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80 for Brady parents guide

80 for Brady Parent Guide

Lazy writing and wooden acting create a tedious viewing experience..

Theaters: Four best friends decide to seize life and take a trip to the Super Bowl so they can watch their favorite quarterback, Tom Brady.

Release date February 3, 2023

Run Time: 98 minutes

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The guide to our grades, parent movie review by kirsten hawkes.

It all started with a broken remote control. Luella (known as Lou and played by Lily Tomlin) was recovering from chemotherapy and her TV remote stuck on a channel broadcasting a football game. As Luella and her friends watched, a rookie quarterback named Tom Brady saved the day, winning the game for the New England Patriots and turning all four women into die-hard Brady fans.

Sixteen years have passed but the friends still gather every week to cheer for their favorite team and for each other. Betty (Sally Field) is a math professor with an indecisive academic for a husband, Maura (Rita Moreno) is recently widowed and mourning her loss, and Trish (Jane Fonda) changes men as frequently as she swaps out her wigs. Lou knows that life is both precious and unpredictable and decides that what the women need is a trip to the Super Bowl. The 2017 game will be played in Houston between the New England Patriots and the Atlanta Falcons - and a local TV show is giving away tickets. The women all enter the contest and come game day they’re in Houston, clad in blinged up Patriots jerseys and ready to root for their favorite quarterback. As tightly bonded as these gal pals are, there’s no way they are going to let any roadblocks prevent them from enjoying the game they came to see…

Critical details aside, the overall vibe is bad. 80 for Brady feels less like a movie and more like an advertorial for the NFL, with strong product placements for Microsoft and reality TV personality Guy Fieri. It’s also a vanity project for Tom Brady. Not only does he appear in the film, he’s also the producer, which means he invested money to get this self-congratulatory film made. It’s not a good look.

To be honest, I had low expectations for this film. I assumed it would be another Book Club , replete with sex jokes but I’m glad to be wrong. The sexual content is minimal, focusing mainly on Betty’s innocent use of a term that is also slang for a sex toy. There is some minor social drinking, but more troubling is a scene where three of the women inadvertently consume gummy bears laced with marijuana and get stoned, which is played for laughs over an extended series of scenes. Some viewers will also be unhappy with the movie’s relaxed and often positive attitude towards gambling, which pops up fairly frequently in the storyline.

Any critic’s review is obviously subjective and I noted with surprise that there was some audible laughter in the theater during my showing. There is an off chance that you might find this movie funny, but I wouldn’t gamble the price of a theater ticket on it. Wait until it streams: when the eye rolls start to become physically uncomfortable, you can just watch your favorite football team instead.

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Kirsten hawkes, watch the trailer for 80 for brady.

80 for Brady Rating & Content Info

Why is 80 for Brady rated PG-13? 80 for Brady is rated PG-13 by the MPAA for brief strong language, some drug content and some suggestive references.

Violence: Athletes are tackled on the football field. Sexual Content:   A man and woman are seen kissing. There are repeated jokes about a woman’s innocent use of a term that is slang for a sex toy. A person mentions a “sex room” in a movie. A main character writes erotic novels but no explicit details are shared on screen. Profanity:   The script contains over 60 profanities, including a single sexual expletive, 50 terms of deity, a half dozen scatological curses, and five minor profanities. Alcohol / Drug Use:   Main characters drink alcohol in a social context. Main characters inadvertently consume marijuana edibles and get stoned: this is seen as funny. A character talks about cocaine use and past marijuana use.

Page last updated January 22, 2024

80 for Brady Parents' Guide

The movie is based on five real women, all octogenarian football fans. You can read their story below:

People: The True Story Behind ’80 for Brady

History vs Hollywood: 80 for Brady

Related home video titles:

For movies about the challenges of aging, you can try Quartet , Poms , The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel , A Man Called Otto or Astronaut.

Female friendships are fodder for films and if you want more you can watch Book Club , The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants , Steel Magnolias , Pitch Perfect , Whip It , A League of Their Own, or Women Talking .

Movie Reviews

Tv/streaming, collections, great movies, chaz's journal, contributors, 80 for brady.

plugged in movie review 80 for brady

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Resistance is futile: The ladies of "80 for Brady" have been mesmerizing us with the fascinating, flawed, but always vibrantly human characters they've portrayed for a combined more than two centuries, along with many Oscars, Tonys, and Emmys. They bring everything they've learned to this irresistible film from director Kyle Marvin , inspired by the true story of four octogenarians whose devotion to each other is matched by their devotion to NFL quarterback Tom Brady . It’s a Cinderella story with four fairy godmothers, but instead of ugly step-sisters forcing them to do housework, these women are confronting the indignities of aging and the limits of mortality. Speaking of magical interventions, the film is produced by Tom Brady, who plays himself and has a very engaging screen presence.

When a local radio station promises four Super Bowl tickets to anyone who comes up with the best story, Trish ( Jane Fonda ), Lou ( Lily Tomlin ), Betty ( Sally Field ), and Maura ( Rita Moreno ) decide it's their chance to take a break from the various complications of their lives and go on a wild adventure to see their beloved Tommy in the 2017 Super Bowl. 

Trish, who writes erotic fan fiction about Brady's teammate Rob Gronkowski , falls in love too easily and is recovering from her latest broken heart. Lou is afraid to open the email from the hospital to find out whether her cancer has returned. Betty, a retired MIT professor, loves her husband ( Bob Balaban ), but attending to his neediness is making her feel erased. And Maura is still mourning the loss of her late husband. 

It all began 16 years earlier, when Lou was getting chemo treatments for cancer, and her friends came together to help her. The television got stuck on a 2001 game between the Patriots and the Jets. A then-lesser player named Tom Brady was called off the bench, beginning one of the most storied careers in sports history. Now it's an annual tradition for the women to get together in their team jerseys to watch the game. Like many avid sports fans, they're superstitious and begin watching the first game of each season just as they did the first time, with Betty on a ladder changing a light bulb and Lou knocking over the potato chips.

One can sit back, relax, and enjoy "80 for Brady," understanding that nothing here makes sense in terms like “might happen” or even “should happen.” Just as all fairy tales should, this movie lives in the land of “wouldn’t it be wonderful.” How about a dance number? Yes! And a little romance? Do you have to ask? Harry Hamlin is debonair, and Glynn Turman is utterly charming. For others in the crowd: Are there some colorful guest stars? Yes! Billy Porter ! Guy Fieri ! An update during the end credits? Of course. What about clips from exciting moments in football games? Yep!

Far more important than the questions “Does any of this make sense?” and “Are there any surprises in the storyline?” are the questions, “It is fun to watch?” Yes! “Does it give each of these fabulous actors a chance to shine?” Yes, yes, yes, and yes. With a screenplay by " Booksmart "'s Emily Halpern and  Sarah Haskins , a lot happens and things move fast, so the parts that don’t work well are over quickly.

These pros are superb scene partners, and the ensemble scenes are among the highlights. And each makes the most of her solo moments. Moreno lights up the screen in a high-stakes poker game and her masterfully underplayed negotiation with a scalper. Field takes what could be a dreary character and makes us see her vulnerability and integrity; she even makes an extremely dumb joke about calling a fanny pack “a strap-on” work. Her insistence that she’s not an “80” for Brady since she is still in her 70s is not about vanity; it’s about her dedication to mathematic precision. 

Meanwhile, Lou struggles with secrets about her health and how the trip came together but relishes her role as the one who inspires the others, including Brady himself. Fonda brings warmth to the thinnest-written role. While a disrespectful character calls the four women “Golden Girls,” she is not a one-note “isn’t it cute that an old lady likes sex” joke. Rather, she's a tender-hearted but resilient optimist who has been re-inventing herself since she got too old for her job as a spokesmodel for a car dealer. And Fonda’s chemistry with her “Grace and Frankie” co-star and close friend Lily Tomlin continues to sparkle.

"80 for Brady" isn't just about these characters proving to themselves that they value their friendships and are still open to adventure. Indeed, it's the support they give each other, and the idea that they have nothing left to lose that makes them more willing to take risks than those two generations younger. That goes for the people who portray them as well; it's pure joy to see these women we have loved and grown with over the decades. They still give their considerable best to make us laugh, dream of our own adventures, and wish they could be around for another two centuries.

Now playing in theaters. 

Nell Minow

Nell Minow is the Contributing Editor at RogerEbert.com.

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Film Credits

80 for Brady movie poster

80 for Brady (2023)

Rated PG-13 for brief strong language, some drug content and some suggestive references.

Lily Tomlin as Lou

Jane Fonda as Trish

Rita Moreno as Maura

Sally Field as Betty

Tom Brady as Tom Brady

Billy Porter as Gugu

Alex Moffat as Nat

Rob Corddry as Pat

Guy Fieri as Guy Fieri

Harry Hamlin as Dan

Bob Balaban as Mark

Glynn Turman as Mickey

Jimmy O. Yang as Tony

Ron Funches as Chip

Rob Gronkowski as Rob Gronkowski

Julian Edelman as Julian Edelman

  • Kyle Marvin
  • Emily Halpern
  • Sarah Haskins

Cinematographer

  • Colin Patton
  • John Debney

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Rita Moreno, Jane Fonda, Sally Field  and Lily Tomlin in 80 for Brady

80 for Brady review – screen queens go wild in charming but slight comedy

Jane Fonda, Rita Moreno, Sally Field and Lily Tomlin make for soothing company in a silly but good-natured film about NFL fans

D uring the Patriots dynasty of 17 division titles across our century’s first two decades, quarterback Tom Brady held a supernatural sway over the mature women of New England. In this ascended townie-jock, a housewife could see someone that while not literally named Sean, nonetheless presented a more handsome, wealthy and successful image of a man like her husband. (The fantasy worked both ways, too; at the time, having Tommy Touchdown meant a lady got to be Gisele Bündchen.) But mostly they loved him for the same reason anybody loves any athlete, which is to say because he’s a winner. When defeat seems all but assured, he’s the guy you want calling the shots, the unstoppable will that once brought come-from-behind victories now enough to make a wide-release audience temporarily forget how much they detest this ball-deflating ring-hoarder.

His regular fourth-quarter miracles are a testament to the fact that being down isn’t the same as being out, and that can-do resilience forms the flimsy link connecting him to the quartet of greying legends who star in the mild, pleasurable 80 for Brady. New Hollywood icons Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin , Rita Moreno and Sally Field play a real-life group of Massachusetts galpals who found a new structure for their lifelong friendship in the weekly broadcast of Pats games during the Brady-Belichick era, coming together to check in and catch up over an activity more stimulating than bingo. Good company is the name of the game here, both in the nourishing bond between these geriatric besties as well as the chance for us to spend another 100 minutes in the presence of showbiz royalty. But for all its congenial upbeatitude, this salute to blue-hair camaraderie has been molded into the shape of a movie without much finesse. That never-say-die spirit, for instance, is crystallized with a pep talk from Tomlin that sees her resolve to beat cancer inspire Brady to battle the Atlanta Falcons into overtime.

Louella (Tomlin) has been avoiding calls from her oncologist, just one in a handful of crises meant to cover the full gamut of octogenarian struggles: incurable flirt Trish (Fonda) is fresh off the latest in a long series of heartbreaks, recently widowed Maura (Moreno) can’t bring herself to move on, and responsible one Betty (Field) feels unheard by her professor husband (a pantsless Bob Balaban) glued to his dissertation. A radio sweepstakes win and road trip to Houston for 2017’s big game could be just the shot in the arm they each need, though Betty frets that “the Super Bowl is no place for four old women”. How wrong she is! Their PG-13 hijinks include a Guy Fieri-hosted hot-wing-eating contest unblemished by gastrointestinal distress, a woozy THC gummy trip without major incident, and a furtive broom-closet makeout with a past footballer (Harry Hamlin), the comedy pitched to the safe, agreeable register of “uncouth yet dignified”.

The goal-line hasn’t really been set at laughter anyway, a warming wash of affection being the ceiling of the film’s aspirations. The repeated virality of the cast’s press tour reaffirmed the public’s reverent fondness for these well-preserved movie stars, strengthened with time as they’ve grown into the right to speak their mind under the candor of age. Writers Sarah Haskins and Emily Halpert (two of the four credited with the script for Booksmart) do a fair job balancing the softball humor of oldsters behaving in ways unbecoming of their years with a respectful empathy for a neglected demographic. As is law for movies about characters in their twilight years, we’re duly shown that they can still do and feel everything they did in their spring-chicken days, though that support is just one step away from the pity of a back-pat before steering Grandma to bed. Trish authors erotic NFL fan-fiction with titles like A Gronk for All Seasons and We Gronk You a Merry Christmas, at once an earnest expression of a seasoned libido and a pat horny-old-lady joke.

Approaching this bit of fluff as a grand monument to four colossuses of the acting profession, a fan will probably be able to overlook the odd ends weakening it as cinema, like the aggressive product placement for Microsoft-brand tablets or the awkward dance break featuring internet personality Marc Rebillet. Though viewers invested in the legacy of screen queens from the 70s and 80s as they progress through their 70s and 80s might also feel a twinge of melancholy, thinking about how their groundbreaking careers once posed a rejoinder to feelgood pap with daring works of modernism, or just stick-to-your-ribs entertainment in line with Fonda and Tomlin’s 9 to 5. We made movies then; today, the best we can manage is a tribute to their greatness that’s not quite an extension of it.

80 for Brady is in US cinemas on 3 February and in the UK on 24 March with an Australia release to be confirmed

  • Comedy films
  • Sally Field
  • Lily Tomlin

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‘80 for Brady’ Review: Remember These Titans

This stubbornly charming romp starring Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, Sally Field and Rita Moreno is inspired by the story of a real group of female friends with a love for Tom Brady and the New England Patriots.

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Four women decked out in New England Patriots gear gathered together with a look of cheer on their faces.

By Amy Nicholson

Tom Brady, the oldest starting quarterback in N.F.L. history, has said he is retiring “for good” at the age of 45. But at a combined age of 335, Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, Sally Field and Rita Moreno muscle “80 for Brady,” a comedy about a fan club’s frenetic Super Bowl weekend, over the goal line. The setup is that Lou (Tomlin), who is living with cancer, is adamant that she and her besties will attend a Super Bowl before she returns an urgent message from her oncologist. Betty (Field), a math professor, calculates that they have a .0013% chance of winning a call-in contest to see the 2017 showdown between Brady’s New England Patriots and the Atlanta Falcons. But wish fulfillment is in their favor, as is the director Kyle Marvin’s choice to treat obstacles like breakaway paper banners to be torn through by its winning team.

This stubbornly charming romp is, quite literally, fan fiction inspired by a group of female friends from North Attleborough, Mass., one of whom had a grandson with the Hollywood connections to pitch their story to Tom Brady’s film production company. Brady serves as one of the movie’s producers, as well as its motivational mascot. In times of need, he pops up as a talking bobblehead who whispers advice, while flashbacks to the game itself hail that year’s victory as one of football’s most memorable comebacks.

Predictability doesn’t scare the screenwriters Sarah Haskins and Emily Halpern, who collaborated previously as writers of “Booksmart.” Their script is a barrage of quirky one-liners that punch up familiar set pieces like an accidental drug bender, a hot wings-eating contest, and a high-stakes card game. It gambles, correctly, that the veteran cast can convince the audience to play along with outlandish contrivances — including an assurance that four seniors in loudly bedazzled jerseys can, when needed, sneak around like ninjas.

The benefit of leads with decades of personal chemistry, plus the classic studio ingénue training to hoof it through corny material, is that Marvin is freed up to lavish attention on his bit players. Even brief parts like a book store clerk or an underpaid worker at a carnival game earn solid snickers from just a sentence or two of dialogue. The only thankless role goes to Sara Gilbert as the daughter tasked to nag Tomlin’s character about her health; Gilbert’s stuck in reality while everyone else is doing jazz hands with Gugu (Billy Porter), the halftime choreographer.

Instead, the more absurd the gag, the better it works. As Trish, a lovelorn author of Rob Gronkowski erotica (sample title: “Between a Gronk and a Hard Place”), Fonda finds herself selecting the perfect Barbarella blonde wig for a romance with a debonair jock played by Harry Hamlin. Moreno’s Maura, a widow with a flair for bold jackets, stumbles into a room steeling herself for an orgy only to find a poker table of Guy Fieri clones, a mesmerizing image destined to be painted on velvet and mounted over a plate of nachos. We’re so pleasantly pummeled by silliness that the film comes to feel like a massage. As soon as I roused myself to wonder if the friends would wind up on a Jumbotron, there they were, grinning for the camera. I grinned back.

80 for Brady Rated PG-13 for drug use and suggestive references to Rob Gronkowski. Running time: 1 hour 38 minutes. In theaters.

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‘80 for brady’ review: tomlin, fonda, moreno and field outmaneuver screenplay fumbles in a crowd-pleasing sports comedy.

In a feature inspired by a true story, four silver-haired Massachusetts friends head to Houston for Super Bowl LI to see their hero Tom Brady in action.

By Sheri Linden

Sheri Linden

Senior Copy Editor/Film Critic

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From left: Rita Moreno, Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin and Sally Field

If 80 for Brady , the opening-night selection of the Palm Springs Film Festival, lures the 55-plus cohort from its living-room flat-screens to the multiplex, it won’t be for the bromides on friendship. Those are delivered with an almost shocking literalness, but sparingly at least. This movie’s dazzle is all about the chemistry of its powerhouse quartet and the potential for comic sparks, and on that front, the starry huddle of Lily Tomlin , Jane Fonda , Rita Moreno and Sally Field delivers.

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As for the story itself, most of which is not set in the stadium, it’s a variously awkward, sweet and silly amalgam of day-to-day reality, sitcom zaniness and pure worship fantasy — those worshipped being, understandably, its glorious leading ladies. Scripted by Emily Halpern and Sarah Haskins, whose previous teamwork includes Carol’s Second Act and Booksmart , and directed by Kyle Marvin, an indie producer ( The Climb ) at the helm of his first film, 80 for Brady lays out all its plays right on the surface, sometimes ploddingly. It’s when Marvin stands back and lets his stars loose that the film finds traction, delighting in their skill at bringing expert devil-in the-details flourishes to the obvious setups.

The screenplay grasps how superstition takes hold of otherwise rational people in the name of their sports-team devotion. Every time they gather to watch a Patriots game, Lou and company go so far as to re-create what they were doing in her living room on the occasion of a decisive Pats victory. As local sportscasters Nat and Pat, Alex Moffat and Rob Corddry further capture the emotional extremes of fandom (and also give the always problematic Bay State accent a creditable shot; the only other castmember to try is Tomlin, with an understated slant on her vowels here and there).

Through a ticket giveaway contest and a series of events that are muddled for plot purposes but also unnecessarily confusing, the four friends get themselves to Houston to see the Patriots take on the Atlanta Falcons. For reasons that Lou doesn’t reveal to her pals, this Super Bowl has taken on enormous importance to her; hiding her health concerns, she frames the need to go as perhaps their last shot to see the 39-year-old Brady play.

At its sharpest, the screenplay by Halpern and Haskins gives the cast terrifically droll lines — a bit of haggling between Moreno’s Maura and a scalper being a highlight. But even when it doesn’t, these four effortlessly elevate the material with their unforced readings and offhand spins, Tomlin in particular. She manages to withstand the script’s most mawkish passages, involving Lou’s psychic connection with Brady, who addresses her from TV screens and billboards with words of encouragement, a favor that she ultimately repays with her own timely pep talk.

It’s more fun to watch the foursome outwit a Calm Gardens employee (Jimmy O. Yang) and, later, a stadium facilities manager (Ron Funches). Given how deliriously witty the central performances can be, it’s too bad the writers and Marvin didn’t push the absurdity factor more. There’s no need to supplement the comic framework with feel-good affirmations when these actors bring such accomplishment and well-earned affection to their roles; they’re rooting interests from the get-go, which is, above all, the point of this cinematic valentine.

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80 for Brady

2023, Comedy, 1h 38m

What to know

Critics Consensus

The titular QB may have been tough to beat on the gridiron, but on the big screen, it's 80 for Brady 's veteran leading ladies who make this lightweight comedy a fitfully winsome watch. Read critic reviews

Audience Says

80 for Brady 's stars are so talented that they're more than enough to carry the movie's thin story -- even if you aren't a Tom Brady fan. Read audience reviews

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80 for brady videos, 80 for brady   photos.

80 FOR BRADY is inspired by the true story of four best friends living life to the fullest when they take a wild trip to the 2017 Super Bowl LI to see their hero Tom Brady play.

Rating: PG-13 (Some Suggestive References|Some Drug Content|Brief Strong Language)

Genre: Comedy

Original Language: English

Director: Kyle Marvin

Producer: Donna Gigliotti , Tom Brady

Writer: Sarah Haskins , Emily Halpern

Release Date (Theaters): Feb 3, 2023  wide

Release Date (Streaming): Mar 7, 2023

Box Office (Gross USA): $39.3M

Runtime: 1h 38m

Distributor: Paramount Pictures

Production Co: Watch This Ready, 199 Productions, Paramount Pictures, Fifth Season, Tempesta Films

Sound Mix: Dolby Digital

Aspect Ratio: Flat (1.85:1)

Cast & Crew

Lily Tomlin

Rita Moreno

Sally Field

Billy Porter

Rob Corddry

Alex Moffat

Harry Hamlin

Bob Balaban

Glynn Turman

Sara Gilbert

Jimmy O. Yang

Ron Funches

Matt Lauria

Sally Kirkland

Rob Gronkowski

Kyle Marvin

Sarah Haskins

Screenwriter

Emily Halpern

Donna Gigliotti

Jeffrey Stott

Executive Producer

Michael Angelo Covino

Cinematographer

Colin Patton

Film Editing

John Debney

Original Music

Wynn Thomas

Production Design

Thomas P. Wilkins

Art Director

Jon J. Bush

Set Decoration

Allyson B. Fanger

Costume Design

Matthew Maisto

Victoria Thomas

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80 for Brady review – a over-sentimental and ham-fisted comedy

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We review the film 80 for Brady, which does not contain spoilers.

Bill Belichick would have never allowed Tom Brady  to be involved in such an over-sentimental, bordering on cloying comedy that is as phony as they come. The new comedy film, 80 for Brady , is part of the new genre of films dedicated to the sisterhood of traveling muumuus. Movies like Book Club (I’m still mystified about how this film has a greenlit sequel) and 2019’s Poms . The baby boomers have created an influx of senior-themed films that studios cater to on discount days for the midday show crowd. I’ll admit, 80 for Brady is more enjoyable than those films. However, this is nothing more than a harmless film you watch with your mom on Mother’s Day.

80 for Brady Review and Plot Summary

The film follows the story of four best friends. All of them are older adult women in their 80s. (Well, one of them reminds them she is still a fresh and young 75). They are all devoted New England Patriots fans. Well, more dedicated to what my wife likes to label as “Hot Quarterback Sunday,” as these seasoned women thirst for Tom Brady. I don’t blame them. I mean, every human of any age in the Boston area experiences polydipsia over the man. Why are these ladies such fans of the GOAT? Or, to be more accurate, why should you or I care?

It’s because Lou ( Lily Tomlin ) was going through chemotherapy 16 years ago. At the time, these friends took care of her. You have the former “Mayflower” girl-turned-romance novelist Trish ( Jane Fonda ), her well-off widower, Maura ( Rita Moreno ), and the statistics professor, Betty ( Sally Field ), all over to the house watching Drew Bledsoe almost die from a hit by New York Jets linebacker, Mo Lewis. A young, handsome, unassuming rookie quarterback came in to play for him. That man was Tom Brady (played by you guessed it, Tom Brady). This group of Golden Girls credits the golden boy with giving Lou the inspiration and strength that saved her life.

That’s when the group sees a local public access postgame show of the AFC Championship win over the Pittsburgh Steelers. The duo (played by Michael O’Malley and SNL’s Alex Moffat ) hosting the show is giving away four tickets to the upcoming Super Bowl. The only catch? Whoever calls in with the best story of why they deserve the tickets will win. Not wanting to waste anymore more time they have left to see their beloved Tom, Lou calls and wins the tickets.

Believe it or not, 80 for Brady is based on a true story of four older adult women’s love for everything GOAT and Patriot football. Directed by Kyle Marvin , making his feature directorial debut, working with a script from the writing partners of Sarah Haskins and Emily Halpern . Yes, the same team that brought us Booksmart , one of the great coming-of-age films of recent memory. One would think the way these two wrote such a heart-swelling, factitious, quick-witted, ultra-cool, and savage comedy would have put their own spin on the surge of Golden Girl comedies over the past few years. They didn’t, and it’s head scratching.

For one, the film is an ultra-generic script watered down of anything meaningful. Where Haskins and Halpern excelled before, which is a problem with most films about anyone over 60, has mysteriously left them here. Their script is a much broader comedy. Why is it we can focus on and maximize a young person’s emotions and pains to create a well-rounded, three-dimensional character, but when it comes to a movie of the senior variety, they are cardboard cutouts?

You have Fonda’s Trish, the flirty romantic one. You have Moreno’s Maura, the feisty spitfire one. Let’s not forget the uptight, smart one played by Field. A road trip comedy should take some time to reveal the character’s desires and regrets, which are hardly touched here. There are also a few minor details in the football timeline that the film gets wrong. The most glaring being the Patriots played the Jaguars in the conference championship, not the Steelers. Yet, I will give them credit for at least getting the greatest comeback in NFL history correct.

I will say the film has a few laughs. Field has one of the movie’s funnier scenes, where she rejects Friday Night Light’s Alum Matt Lauria. Moreno gets the film’s most consistent laughs, finding herself in the most absurd situations. Yet, casting Guy Fieri in such an expanded role was a bit of a headscratcher. You will also notice the connection between Lou having cancer and Brady’s personal life. His own mother went through her own treatment in 2017. That wasn’t lost on me and does give the film some much-needed depth.

Is the movie 80 for Brady good?

I have no doubt 80 for Brady will play well with specific groups like older adults, but specifically Brady and Patriot football. While the film does have some laughs, Marvin’s film is too broad to be anything but a bland and generic comedy outing. The combination of lightweight writing and heavy, ham-fisted delivery is too distracting to be truly enjoyable.

What did you think of the film 80 for Brady? Comment below.

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  • Cast & crew
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80 for Brady

Sally Field, Jane Fonda, Rita Moreno, and Lily Tomlin in 80 for Brady (2023)

A group of friends made it their life-long mission to go to the Super Bowl and meet NFL superstar Tom Brady. A group of friends made it their life-long mission to go to the Super Bowl and meet NFL superstar Tom Brady. A group of friends made it their life-long mission to go to the Super Bowl and meet NFL superstar Tom Brady.

  • Kyle Marvin
  • Sarah Haskins
  • Emily Halpern
  • Lily Tomlin
  • Rita Moreno
  • 103 User reviews
  • 78 Critic reviews
  • 52 Metascore
  • 4 wins & 2 nominations

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  • Production, box office & more at IMDbPro

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  • Trivia Of the four female leads, Sally Field is the only one younger than 80 at the time of filming.
  • Goofs The kickoff time for the AFC Championship game was 6:40pm and the game footage the ladies are watching shows the game taking place at night. However, it is clearly daytime at Lou's (Lily Tomlin) house.

Maura : [during poker] Shut it, Brisket.

  • Connections Featured in CBS News Sunday Morning with Jane Pauley: Episode #45.17 (2023)
  • Soundtracks Get Down on It Written by George 'Funky' Brown (as George Melvin Brown), Robert 'Kool' Bell (as Robert E. Bell), James 'JT' Taylor (as James Taylor), Robert 'Spike' Mickens , Ronald Bell , Claydes Smith and Eumir Deodato Performed by Kool & The Gang Courtesy of Island Records under license from Universal Music Enterprises

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  • Runtime 1 hour 38 minutes
  • Dolby Digital

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80 for Brady Review

A surprisingly funny and heartfelt comedy with less tom brady than you'd expect..

80 for Brady Review - IGN Image

Despite its trailer hinting at an over-qualified cast selling something slight, 80 for Brady is a surprising (if scattered) romp with a beating heart. It has a deceptively simple conceit: respected actresses Jane Fonda, Sally Field, Rita Moreno, and Lily Tomlin play four aged best friends eager to travel to the 2017 Super Bowl to catch a glimpse of their favorite quarterback, Tom Brady; cue the age-inappropriate shenanigans.

Based somewhat on a true story (which is to say, a group of women in their 80s who gather to watch Brady play each weekend, but without the comedy of road trip errors), 80 for Brady is helmed by first-time feature director Kyle Marvin. His inexperience shows early on, when each joke settles into a rote rhythm as the movie cuts to close-ups for each punchline before immediately cutting back to wider group shots. The effect here is two-fold. First, the constant over-emphasis feels akin to an outdated laugh track, adding the exact same punctuation to every moment, whether or not it needs or deserves it. Second, it robs its leading quartet of the opportunity to sell each joke with their body language and interpersonal dynamics. More focus on the way they interact and play off each other’s energies might have helped things get off to a stronger start,t in a film about friendship, and one that opens with the four lead characters gathering for a 2017 playoff game involving Brady’s team at the time, the New England Patriots, and engaging in superstitions rituals with amusing fervor, while introducing themselves to the audience.

However, these missteps slowly begin to fall by the wayside once its four Bostonian ladies decide to watch the Super Bowl in Houston, no matter what it takes. The adventure yanks them far away from the close quarters of the domestic opening scene, so the movie has little choice but to let its legendary collective of actors dictate the comedic rhythms (it also helps that it was shot by two time Oscar-winning cinematographer John Toll, whose eye for framing characters is on display here). Along the way, the group’s mis-adventures include (among other things) a hot wings contest, an impromptu dance, and a drug-induced trip through a fancy party – all scenarios which become doubly funny when you place older women at their center rather than the traditional frat boy.

These events are all glimpsed in the marketing, but what the trailers don’t fully reveal is how each scene (and the story in totality) works thanks to individual characterizations, and a script – by Sarah Haskins and Emily Halpern – that ultimately centers around trusting and relying on your friends, and finding a second wind in old age. It’s fairly sweet, with a sentimentality born from each character having a rich, complex interiority that clashes wordlessly with their outward behavior.

Sex-symbol Fonda plays Trish, a divorced woman with a string of romantic bad luck. She’s an author of NFL-centric erotic fan fiction, and she puts a ton of effort into still looking her seductive best, though her dedication to the group’s Super Bowl mission is occasionally tested once she’s distracted by a sexual pursuit. Granted, the digital makeover inexplicably applied to her face leaves her looking a little too smooth and unreal — a decision that’s especially strange in a movie explicitly about older women — but it’s a role that could have so easily been flattened into a one-note stereotype. Instead, Fonda imbues it with a touching tense of regret and frequent, silent questions of what living in the present even means when the past has offered up nothing but disappointment.

What's Tom Brady's best movie or TV cameo?

Field plays the flipside to that coin. Her character, retired probability professor Betty, is the youngest of the group (the frequent mentions of their fan club name, “80 for Brady,” are always accompanied by her reminders that she’s only 70) and she’s spent 50 years married to her husband, who is now dependent on her care. She’s seen as the responsible one in the bunch, which Field expertly portrays through both uptight neuroses and quiet acceptance. The group sees Betty as having a picture-perfect life, but perhaps more than the rest of them she’s in need of a new adventure to find parts of herself she left behind.

Moreno’s character, Maura, reflects another aspect of octogenarian life as it pertains to the group’s rejuvenation. She’s a respected and romantically sought-after member of her retirement community, which keeps its residents young through daily activities. But there’s also a sense that her jovial second wind is a way to stave off the grief of losing her husband the previous year. In a film that’s all about having fun in old age, that’s a pretty complicated approach to the subject, but one that Moreno embodies with grace and poise.

And finally, there’s Tomlin’s Lou, the de facto protagonist, and a woman whose encroaching mortality is the entire impetus that kickstarts the old girls’ trip in the first place. However, Lou refuses to let her anxieties about death (and her ensuing denial about facing it) be known, lest they dampen the group’s spirits). The most comically excitable fan in the bunch, she discovered her love for football at a vulnerable time, and her decisions are now guided by words of advice offered by Brady in his many televised interviews. Brady is a producer on the film, so it’s no surprise that his greatness is treated as a given, and he’s often seen through Lou’s eyes (that said you could finish this story knowing as much or little about him, or about American football, as when you began). However, despite the often hilariously broad reverence for Brady, Tomlin approaches Lou’s questionable degree of hero worship with such affection that her performance essentially overpowers his constant background presence, all but reducing him from a sports star to a conceptual stand-in for any motivating reason to keep moving forward in old age.

80 for Brady Stills

plugged in movie review 80 for brady

Tomlin could probably sell the role if her new lease on life depended on eating a really special hot dog. In a just world, she’d join her three co-stars as an Academy Award winner for this movie. The rest of it may not be polished or prestigious enough to land on the Academy’s radar, but Tomlim commands the screen with verve, as a woman wrestling between her fears of death and her desire to have one last big bucket list adventure – which she sells with such a joyful, infectious radiance that she occasionally elevates 80 for Brady into an exuberant experience.

Granted, things often come easy for the women during their hunt for big game tickets — problems that seem dire always have sudden solutions, usually involving celebrity cameos — but where the plot has scant few twists and turns, its story of four women making up for lost time feels fulfilling enough.

While its script is often scattered and convenient, 80 for Brady is also a surprisingly effective movie, in which the “Brady” of it all doesn’t matter nearly as much as the bonds of friendship. Its four legendary actresses embark on the comedy-adventure of a lifetime, proving they’ve still got tricks up their sleeve, as they deliver sentimental performances that also make for a fun watch.

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80 For Brady

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80 for brady review: a surprising combination of charm, chuckles and chutzpah, share this article.

If you want to understand the unbeatable charm of 80 for Brady , watch Sally Field chow down on hot wings in a contest hosted by Guy Fieri.

In a world where we’ve lost touch with how to build consistent studio comedies for theaters, it seems strange to imagine that there aren’t 500 more movies like this. You know, just watching an elderly screen icon doing something silly can bring forth laughter you never know you had in you.

That’s the fun of 80 for Brady , a sports-centric comedy with four undisputed entertainment legends who just want to have a good time watching Tom Brady play football. If you can’t find at least something enjoyable in watching a stoned Rita Moreno walk around a mansion in a Venetian mask to discover a room full of Guy Fieris playing poker, you need to loosen up a bit.

What’s refreshing about 80 for Brady is the commitment to the concept. It’s easy to get a bunch of hyper-talented comedic actors like Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda together and let them just do their thing. Tomlin and Fonda have been doing that together for decades, going all the way back to 1980’s 9 to 5 . It’d have been easy to just throw these four ladies in any sort of situational comedy and let it all just work itself out. However, the feisty screenplay from Sarah Haskins and Emily Halpern helps the broader humor all blend in together with the Super Bowl-related shenanigans.

They do have a real-life story to kinda-sorta consider, even though there are clear fantastical licenses the writers had to take with what inspired this. You can’t really make that much of a movie just about four seniors heading to Houston to watch Brady and the New England Patriots take on the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl 51 . You can, however, delightfully embellish just how that might’ve gone down.

There isn’t a nuanced bone in this movie’s body, and it’s all the better for it. Playing it as broad as possible allows 80 for Brady to maximize its loonier plot developments, and it gives the primary quartet plenty of room to just let their organic comedic chops take over whatever scene is going on. Moreno has been doing this since the 1950s, and she’s still as spry as ever. You could argue, even though Tomlin and Fonda are the comedic titans here, that Moreno and Field get the biggest laughs.

While any Falcons fan attending might want to excuse themselves for a bathroom break during the film’s actual Super Bowl sequences, there’s enough for even the most begrudged Dirty Bird fan to find something pleasant in a lighthearted comedy that’s very sure of itself.

How is Brady, you might wonder? While he’s certainly not going to have an acting career like the one former NFL cornerback Nnamdi Asomugha has built for himself, he holds his own with what he’s asked to do. He and Tomlin share one sweet moment toward the end of the movie that does make you wonder if Brady does have something in him for acting , but more than likely, he won’t grace the screen with any movie that doesn’t have his name in the title.

Watching 80 for Brady is a bit like joining in for a game night at your grandma’s retirement village. There’s just something nice about watching an entire room of elderly people crack jokes and sip the bubbly on a Saturday afternoon. If you have a grandma, take her to see this one. The smile on her face will undoubtedly make the one on yours grow even bigger.

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Movie Review: 80 for Brady

Four longtime friends go on an adventure of a lifetime to see their beloved football star Tom Brady play in a Super Bowl. But while these ladies have a blast, some may want to skip this trip

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80 FOR BRADY – Review by Susan Kamyab

80 For Brady plays out about as well as Tom Brady did in his last game against the Cowboys. It’s a major fumble in almost every aspect.

80 for Brady is loosely based on the true story of a group of best friends who are Tom Brady superfans. In the film, they take a life-changing trip to the Superbowl to see their hero play. The journey to get to the game has a few of bumps along the way, including lost tickets, health scares, and an accidental drugging. And through all that, you might chuckle a few times, but a lot of the comedy is forced and rushed.

The beauty of this story is the bond that these four women have had for so long. There is a sweet reason why Brady and the Patriots mean so much to them. Particularly, Lily Tomlin’s character who, while going through chemo, found joy and an escape by watching the Patriots play with her girlfriends. I just wish there was more about their history and friendship, instead of cheap jokes and random romances. The “connection” between Tomlin and Brady can be cringe-worthy at times and it doesn’t help that he’s not the strongest actor – even playing a version of himself.

The saving grace of 80 for Brady comers from the four legends starring in the film. Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, Rita Moreno, and Sally Field are joys to watch on screen, especially together. If their relationships were scripted with a little more depth, the corny subplots could have been forgiven.

But, if you’re fan of these talented women or of Tom Brady, it’s possible you might find the film to be entertaining. And hey, no better time to watch this movie then during this Superbowl season.

  • ← ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT – Review by Susan Granger
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plugged in movie review 80 for brady

Susan Kamyab

Susan Kamyab is a Dallas-based television and online film critic, producer, reporter, and writer. Since 2010 she's been reviewing for Irving Television (ICTN) and online at thischixflix.com.

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plugged in movie review 80 for brady

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In Theaters

  • Millie Bobby Brown as Elodie; Ray Winstone as Lord Bayford; Angela Bassett as Lady Bayford; Brooke Carter as Floria; Nick Robinson as Prince Henry; Robin Wright as Queen Isabelle; Milo Twomey as King Roderick; Nicole Joseph as Princess Victoria

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  • March 8, 2024
  • Juan Carlos Fresnadillo

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Movie review.

It was a storybook wedding, to be sure.

Granted, it was a storybook Elodie never asked to open. She wasn’t ready to be married—and certainly not to a guy she had never even met.

But in the book of fantasy-kingdom politics, sometimes you don’t really have a choice. Elodie’s kingdom—ruled and run by her father, Lord Bayford—was cold and barren, and his people were starving. The land of Aurea was warm and rich. But they were apparently poor in eligible princesses, and Aurea’s Prince Henry was in need of one.

So a deal was struck: Aurea would shower Lord Bayford’s kingdom with gold—enough to buy food and keep his people fed through yet another unimaginably hard winter—and Aurea would gain another member for its royal family. Everyone’s happy, right?

Well, at least for a couple of days.

The palace was magnificent. The land was beautiful. The prince was, well, charming . Elodie’s stepmother was impressed. Elodie’s younger sister, Floria, was enchanted. Henry and Elodie spent an afternoon together, chatting and riding some (naturally exquisite) horses. The next morning, Elodie was dressed in the finest, most complicated gown, and she and Henry were married posthaste.

But that wasn’t the end of the nuptial ceremony.

Elodie and Henry rode a (naturally elegant) carriage up the side of a huge mountain—to pay homage to Henry’s ancestors, he said. And there, Aurea’s glamorous Queen Isabelle told a rather disturbing story.

Hundreds of years ago, when Isabelle’s ancestors first settled this land, they discovered they were not alone. A dragon lived in the mountain. Aurea’s first king tried to conquer the beast, but to no avail. So, after all his own henchmen were slaughtered, the king cut a deal: He sacrificed his three daughters to the dragon. “And a kingdom was born,” Isabelle said.

Well. You’d think that Elodie might’ve been having second thoughts about the wedding right about then. The kingdom she would one day be the queen of had some pretty dark skeletons hiding in its closet, am I right?

But what family doesn’t have its grim chapters? So she smiled and nodded. And when Isabelle cut open her hand, and Henry’s hand, and then pressed their bleeding palms together, Elodie surely thought, “Wow, Aurea has some intense ceremonies, but at least we can get back to the castle now.”

But alas. When Henry picked her up and told her to close her eyes—yet another inexplicable family tradition, Elodie thought—he whispered his apologies and then threw his hours-old bride into a gaping chasm.

Several dozen feet and a few thousand tree branches later, Elodie found herself at the bottom of a deep, dank cave.

But that wasn’t the worst of it. No siree.

Family traditions live on in Aurea, it seems. And the dragon wants its latest sacrifice.

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Positive Elements

If Henry wasn’t so determined to throw his bride to the dragon, he would have realized that Elodie was quite the catch. She was near perfect, in fact.

When we first meet her and her sister, Floria, Elodie’s chopping wood and instructing Floria to sell the family drapes—using the proceeds to help feed their starving subjects. Though she offers mild resistance to her father’s plan to marry her off, she decides to sacrifice herself for the kingdom. “My happiness is a small price to pay for the future of my people.”

But sacrifice her very life for another kingdom? And under false pretenses, no less? Well, that’s another thing. It takes her a bit of time to adjust to her new circumstances when she lands in the dragon’s lair. But once she does, Elodie proves to be brave, resourceful and awfully pain resistant.

Members of Elodie’s family all have their merits, too. Lord Bayford makes some bad mistakes, but it’s clear that he loves his daughter—even as he tries to do what’s best for his people, too. And he shows a willingness to sacrifice for both.

Lady Bayford—Elodie’s stepmother—proves to be far better than most fairy tale stepmothers. She, in fact, is the only one who seems to have an inkling that something’s off about the Aurean royal family, and she begs Elodie to break off the wedding. And Floria has a few moments where she flashes her own courage, too.

Spiritual Elements

Really, the first sign that something was off about Aurea should’ve been the creepy, red-bedecked priestess who comes as an ambassador to Lord Bayford’s realm. (We know that she’s some sort of cleric, as the lord calls her “your holiness”.) During the sacrificial ceremony on the mountain, Queen Isabelle is dressed in the same blood-red clothes, suggesting that she serves as the head of this particular order.

It seems that religion is an important part of Aurea’s nobility. When Elodie and her family first arrive, they’re told that the royal family is in the middle of prayer (and thus can’t be disturbed). Weddings are presided over by a Catholic-looking cleric dressed in white. Whether this stream of faith is separate from that of the red-cloaked women is unknown.

Lady Bayford’s favorite exclamation is “oh my heavens!”

Sexual Content

Elodie undergoes a complicated gown assembly before her wedding. After she’s thrown into the pit, the gown … suffers. By the end of the movie, she’s essentially running around in her Medieval undergarments—petticoat above the knee, shoulder-less top, etc. We occasionally see a bit of cleavage, but nothing more risqué than that.

While Elodie does get hitched, there’s clearly no opportunity for her and Henry to engage in post-ceremonial nuptial pastimes. Nor does anyone make even a veiled reference to matrimonial bliss.

Violent Content

If we were somehow able to strike all the violent content in Damsel, the movie might well earn a PG rating. As it is … well, some moments might make its actual PG-13 rating feel a wee bit light.

Elodie isn’t the only woman to be tossed to the dragon. It’s a regular occurrence, it seems, and Elodie finds plenty of evidence of previous victims. She sees the body of one very fresh fatality—part of her face and body burned something awful from the dragon’s fiery breath. The bones, clothes and jewelry of others are found throughout.

And Elodie certainly doesn’t come away (literally) unscathed. When she falls down the chasm, she’s scratched heavily by tree roots and branches (though they simultaneously break her fall enough to keep her alive). She lands with a thud and is knocked out for a bit. And that’s before she even meets the dragon—who promptly scorches her leg with his fiery breath. (The wound looks pretty serious, but it does heal.) Elodie is burned and otherwise injured elsewhere, too. She has several close calls involving some significant heights—nearly falling off cliffs or slipping to her death while climbing a crystal wall.

The dragon clearly enjoys playing with its prey. It snatches people up in its claws and dashes them against cave walls and stalagmites—after which they bounce lifelessly to the ground. He squashes others like grapes in its taloned claws. The dragon immolates dozens of people, it seems. In one flashback, he torches several armored soldiers, whom we see engulfed in flames, writhing and screaming. One man dies after having a talon shoved through his armored chest, and we see blood trickle out of his mouth.

Some of the movie’s most jarring scenes, though, don’t involve people at all. Elodie discovers a tiny bird that’s been set on fire, and she tries to save the creature by smothering the flames with dirt. But then thousands of birds fly out of a nearby cave chamber—all on fire, all in pain and most slamming into walls or cave formations or fluttering to the ground. We hear their chirps and cries for several seconds thereafter as they slowly expire. A horse also meets its demise via the dragon’s flames, though off camera.

But the dragon suffers, too. It’s stabbed through the throat and claw. A knife finds its eye, and its face is covered with gold-looking blood. Fire nearly consumes it. And, as we learn, the beast suffered a tragic loss much earlier in its story.

The palms of people’s hands are sliced open as part of the ceremony. Someone is stabbed in the gut.

Crude or Profane Language

One use of the word “d—n.”

Drug and Alcohol Content

Other negative elements.

We see an act or two of betrayal.

You can’t really make a stereotypical fairy tale these days. You know, one where a really good prince kills a really evil dragon and rescues a really imperiled princess. We’re all a little too cynical to swallow such stories now, apparently. And society is way too enlightened to suggest that any princess needs saving.

The irony is, of course, that revisionist fairy tales—the ones where the princess kicks some villainous keester and rescues a rascal in distress—have themselves become a bit stereotypical.

Damsel joins the ever-growing ranks of the revisionist fairy tale. Even its title—playing on the idea of a damsel in distress—paired with star Millie Bobby Brown brandishing a sword, makes that clear. This ain’t Snow White .

But Damsel flips the script in a more organic way than some. We don’t get the sense that Elodie hates frilly clothes or flowers: She likes them just fine, and her sister just loves ‘em. But when you’re alone in a maze-like cavern with a person-eating dragon, a girl’s gotta do what a girl’s gotta do. That makes this story feel both traditional and empowering—a nice combination, really.

Indeed, Damsel can be, at times, a nice movie. Sometimes, it feels delightfully old fashioned, what with its gleaming castle and glittering costumes. The fact that Queen Isabelle is played by Robin Wright—who found fame as Princess Buttercup in the The Princess Bride —adds a nice wink to this fantasy.

But, alas, that’s about the only wink this too-serious story makes to better its fantasy forebears. While Damsel minds its manners in many respects, it still feels grim and heavy. And where it doesn’t rein in its content—in its violence—the film can be surprisingly gruesome. The carnage here is a notch or two heavier than your average superhero film or bloodless actioner: People are burned, melted and occasionally squashed into jelly.

And while all those fatalities are still kept at a PG-13 remove, plenty of folks here do not live happily ever after.

The Plugged In Show logo

Paul Asay has been part of the Plugged In staff since 2007, watching and reviewing roughly 15 quintillion movies and television shows. He’s written for a number of other publications, too, including Time, The Washington Post and Christianity Today. The author of several books, Paul loves to find spirituality in unexpected places, including popular entertainment, and he loves all things superhero. His vices include James Bond films, Mountain Dew and terrible B-grade movies. He’s married, has two children and a neurotic dog, runs marathons on occasion and hopes to someday own his own tuxedo. Feel free to follow him on Twitter @AsayPaul.

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COMMENTS

  1. 80 for Brady

    Conclusion. 80 for Brady is an on-again, off-again kinda pic. In a way, it's like a rental bouncy house with a faulty air blower. Sometimes it's buoyant and fun, other times a little flat. Sometimes it's warm and playful, other times a little uncomfortable. On a positive note, I will say that Sally Field, in particular, is a delight.

  2. 80 for Brady Movie Review for Parents

    80 for Brady Rating & Content Info . Why is 80 for Brady rated PG-13? 80 for Brady is rated PG-13 by the MPAA for brief strong language, some drug content and some suggestive references.. Violence: Athletes are tackled on the football field. Sexual Content: A man and woman are seen kissing.There are repeated jokes about a woman's innocent use of a term that is slang for a sex toy.

  3. 80 for Brady movie review & film summary (2023)

    80 for Brady. Resistance is futile: The ladies of "80 for Brady" have been mesmerizing us with the fascinating, flawed, but always vibrantly human characters they've portrayed for a combined more than two centuries, along with many Oscars, Tonys, and Emmys. They bring everything they've learned to this irresistible film from director Kyle ...

  4. Movie Review: 80 for Brady

    Movie Review: 80 for Brady ... —Jane Fonda, Sally Field, Rita Moreno and Lilly Tomlin—team up for a fictional fan foray to the Super Bowl. Read the Plugged In Review. If you've listened to any of our podcasts, please give ... Take a minute to hear a family-friendly review of the hottest movie, YouTube video, streaming series, video game, or ...

  5. '80 for Brady' Review: Four Iconic Femmes Stalk Tom Brady

    '80 for Brady' Review: Four Iconic Leading Ladies Chase Their Super Bowl Fantasies in Soft 'Ball Comedy Reviewed at Palm Springs Film Festival (opener), Jan. 6, 2023. MPA Rating: PG-13.

  6. 80 for Brady review

    D uring the Patriots dynasty of 17 division titles across our century's first two decades, quarterback Tom Brady held a supernatural sway over the mature women of New England. In this ascended ...

  7. '80 for Brady' Review: Remember These Titans (Published 2023)

    Tom Brady, the oldest starting quarterback in N.F.L. history, has said he is retiring "for good" at the age of 45. But at a combined age of 335, Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, Sally Field and Rita ...

  8. Movie Review: 80 for Brady

    Plugged In Entertainment Reviews Parents Guide to "13 Reasons Why" No Porn Marriage

  9. '80 for Brady' Review: Tomlin, Fonda and Moreno in a Crowd-Pleaser

    Cast: Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, Rita Moreno, Sally Field, Tom Brady, Billy Porter, Rob Corddry, Alex Moffat, Guy Fieri, Harry Hamlin, Bob Balaban, Glynn Turman, Sara Gilbert, Ron Funches. Director ...

  10. Movie Review: 80 for Brady

    Movie Review: 80 for Brady. View description Share. Description; Four Hollywood icons—Jane Fonda, Sally Field, Rita Moreno and Lilly Tomlin—team up for a fictional fan foray to the Super Bowl. Read the Plugged In Review. ... Plugged In Entertainment Reviews

  11. 80 for Brady

    Movie Info. 80 FOR BRADY is inspired by the true story of four best friends living life to the fullest when they take a wild trip to the 2017 Super Bowl LI to see their hero Tom Brady play. Rating ...

  12. 80 for Brady review

    Bill Belichick would have never allowed Tom Brady to be involved in such an over-sentimental, bordering on cloying comedy that is as phony as they come. The new comedy film, 80 for Brady, is part of the new genre of films dedicated to the sisterhood of traveling muumuus. Movies like Book Club (I'm still mystified about how this film has a ...

  13. 80 for Brady (2023)

    80 for Brady: Directed by Kyle Marvin. With Lily Tomlin, Jane Fonda, Rita Moreno, Sally Field. A group of friends made it their life-long mission to go to the Super Bowl and meet NFL superstar Tom Brady.

  14. 80 for Brady Review

    A surprisingly funny and heartfelt comedy with less Tom Brady than you'd expect. Despite its trailer hinting at an over-qualified cast selling something slight, 80 for Brady is a surprising (if ...

  15. Movie Review: 80 for Brady

    00:02:00 - Four longtime friends go on an adventure of a lifetime to see their beloved football star Tom Brady play in a Super Bowl. But while these ladies hav… Movie Review: 80 for Brady - Plugged In Entertainment Reviews (podcast) | Listen Notes

  16. 80 for Brady review: Tom Brady movie is surprisingly fun

    80 for Brady review: A surprising combination of charm, chuckles and chutzpah. The media could not be loaded, either because the server or network failed or because the format is not supported. If ...

  17. Movie Review: 80 for Brady

    Plugged In Entertainment Reviews Parents Guide to "13 Reasons Why" ... Movie Review: 80 for Brady Show Notes Four Hollywood icons—Jane Fonda, Sally Field, Rita Moreno and Lilly Tomlin—team up for a fictional fan foray to the Super Bowl. Read the Plugged In Review ...

  18. Movie Review: 80 For Brady Plugged In Entertainment Reviews podcast

    Listen to Movie Review: 80 For Brady and ninety-nine more episodes by Plugged In Entertainment Reviews, free! No signup or install needed. Movie Review: 80 for Brady. TV Review: The Last of Us.

  19. Movie Review: 80 For Brady Plugged In Entertainment Reviews podcast

    Listen to Movie Review: 80 For Brady and ninety-nine more episodes by Plugged In Entertainment Reviews, free! No signup or install needed. Movie Review: Spider-Man: Across the Spider-Verse. ... Sally Field, Rita Moreno and Lilly Tomlin—team up for a fictional fan foray to the Super Bowl.Read the Plugged In ReviewIf you've listened to any of ...

  20. Movie Review: 80 for Brady

    Adam Holz, Paul Asay and Johnathan McKee. TV Review: All Creatures Great and Small. The Screen in Your Pocket: Say, Yes! Four Hollywood icons—Jane Fonda, Sally Field, Rita Moreno and Lilly Tomlin—team up for a fictional fan foray to the Super Bowl. Read the Plugged In Review If you've listened to any of our podcasts, please give us your ...

  21. Movie Review: 80 for Brady

    Movie Review: 80 for Brady. View description Share. Description; Four longtime friends go on an adventure of a lifetime to see their beloved football star Tom Brady play in a Super Bowl. But while these ladies have a blast, some may want to skip this trip. ... Plugged In Entertainment Reviews

  22. Movie Review: 80 for Brady

    However, you might want to check out these other episodes from Plugged In Entertainment Reviews. Plugged In Entertainment Reviews Adam Holz, Paul Asay and Johnathan McKee

  23. 80 FOR BRADY

    It's a major fumble in almost every aspect. 80 for Brady is loosely based on the true story of a group of best friends who are Tom Brady superfans. In the film, they take a life-changing trip to the Superbowl to see their hero play. The journey to get to the game has a few of bumps along the way, including lost tickets, health scares, and an ...

  24. Damsel

    Movie Review. It was a storybook wedding, to be sure. Granted, it was a storybook Elodie never asked to open. ... Paul Asay has been part of the Plugged In staff since 2007, watching and reviewing roughly 15 quintillion movies and television shows. He's written for a number of other publications, too, including Time, The Washington Post and ...