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Participatory media fandom: a case study of anime fansubbing

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Fansubbing: Latest Trends and Future Prospects

  • First Online: 01 August 2020

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participatory media fandom a case study of anime fansubbing

  • Serenella Massidda 3  

Part of the book series: Palgrave Studies in Translating and Interpreting ((PTTI))

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At the turn of the century, the explosion of over-the-top (OTT) services such as Amazon Prime, HBO Now, Hulu and Netflix, along with the never-ending production of a wide variety of serialised formats, have swiftly raised the demand for audiovisual content localisation across the globe. In the gargantuan void produced by the fast pace of technological and cinematic changes, while Language Service Providers (LSPs) were exploring viable options offered by new technology, amateur subtitlers around the globe were already forging alternative, Internet-based localisation workflows, clockwork, perfect mechanisms able to deliver hundreds of fansubs within unprecedented tight turnaround times. This chapter will provide an account of the state of the art of amateur practices around the globe to date.

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Massidda, S. (2020). Fansubbing: Latest Trends and Future Prospects. In: Bogucki, Ł., Deckert, M. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility. Palgrave Studies in Translating and Interpreting. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-42105-2_10

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COMMENTS

  1. Participatory media fandom: A case study of anime fansubbing

    Anime fansubbing is situated at the disjuncture of the global mediascape, which intensifies with the increasing public access to means to copy and share, the expansion of collective knowledge and the rise of fans' voluntary labour coordinated on a global scale. It exemplifies participatory media fandom whose globalization exceeds that of ...

  2. Participatory media fandom. A case study of anime fansubbing

    It exemplifies participatory media fandom whose globalization exceeds that of cultural industries in terms of extent and velocity. The article argues that fansubbing, pursued as a hobby, can unsettle the global mediascape by allowing multiple mediations of cultural text and presenting a new model of content distribution and its organization ...

  3. Participatory media fandom: A case study of anime fansubbing

    This article explores the nature and implications of fan-translation and distribution of cultural commodities through a case study of English fansubbing of anime (subtitling of Japanese animation in English). Anime fansubbing is situated at the disjuncture of the global mediascape, which intensifies with the increasing public access to means to ...

  4. Participatory media fandom: A case study of anime fansubbing

    Participatory media fandom: A case study of anime fansubbing. November 2011. Media Culture & Society 33 (8):1131-1147. DOI: 10.1177/0163443711418271. Authors: Hye-Kyung Lee. To read the full-text ...

  5. Participatory media fandom: a case study of anime fansubbing

    TY - JOUR. T1 - Participatory media fandom: a case study of anime fansubbing. AU - Lee, H.K. N1 - M1 - 8. PY - 2011/11. Y1 - 2011/11. N2 - Recent years have seen the rise of consumers' voluntary translation and distribution of foreign cultural products on a global scale.

  6. Participatory Media Fandom by Hye-Kyung Lee :: SSRN

    It exemplifies participatory media fandom whose globalization exceeds that of cultural industries in terms of extent and velocity. The paper argues that fansubbing, pursued as a hobby, can unsettle the global mediascape by allowing multiple mediations of cultural text and presenting a new model of content distribution and its organisation based ...

  7. Participatory Media Fandom

    It exemplifies participatory media fandom whose globalization exceeds that of cultural industries in terms of extent and velocity. The paper argues that fansubbing, pursued as a hobby, can ...

  8. PDF King s Research Portal

    Through a case study of English fansubbing of anime (subtitling of Japanese animation in English), this paper provides a snapshot of participatory media fandom, which is operating on and is furthering the disjuncture of the global mediascape. The anime industry - much less globalized than US-based cultural industries but facing significant

  9. Participatory media fandom: a case study of anime fansubbing

    Participatory media fandom: a case study of anime fansubbing. H.K. Lee. Culture, Media & Creative Industries. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article › peer-review. 88 Citations (Scopus) 4925 Downloads (Pure) Overview. Fingerprint.

  10. Fansubbing: Latest Trends and Future Prospects

    2 Fansubbing: Definition, Key Features and Historical Overview. The fansubbing phenomenon, conceived as an alternative AVT (audiovisual translation) mode of transfer, has been described by a variety of scholars within the fields of fan, media, legal and translation studies and from the most diverse angles.

  11. Sci-Hub

    Lee, H.-K. (2011). Participatory media fandom: A case study of anime fansubbing. Media, Culture & Society, 33(8), 1131-1147. doi:10.1177/0163443711418271

  12. PDF Cultural consumer and copyright: a case study of anime fansubbing

    Anime fansubbing refers to the participatory consumption in which avid fans copy anime (Japanese animation), translate Japanese to another language, subtitle and release subtitled version on the Internet to share it with other fans, without asking for permission from the copyright holder. The case study of English fansubbing of anime shows

  13. Fansubbing and Abuse: Anime and Beyond

    Fansubbing is examined as an informal translation practice that emerged as a subset of media piracy with its own ethical standards and rules of conduct. Much early anime fansubbing focused on ...

  14. Participatory media fandom working on the disjuncture of global

    This paper explores the nature and implications of fan-translation and distribution of cultural commodities through a case study of English fansubbing of anime (subtitling of Japanese animation in English). ... It exemplifies participatory media fandom whose globalization exceeds that of cultural industries in terms of extent and velocity. The ...

  15. Progress against the law: Anime and fandom, with the key to the

    Participatory media fandom: A case study of anime fansubbing. Go to citation Crossref Google Scholar. Anime fandom and the liminal spaces between fan creativity and piracy. ... Participatory media fandom: A case study of anime fansubbing. Show details Hide details. Hye-Kyung Lee. Media, Culture & Society. Nov 2011.

  16. Participatory media fandom: A case study of anime fansubbing

    Participatory media fandom: A case study of anime fansubbing Participatory media fandom: A case study of anime fansubbing Lee, Hye-Kyung 2011-11-01 00:00:00 Recent years have seen the rise of consumers' voluntary translation and distribution of foreign cultural products on a global scale. Such a practice not only facilitates the grassroots globalization of culture but also questions the ...

  17. Cultural Consumer and Copyright: A Case Study of Anime Fansubbing

    Anime fansubbing refers to the participatory consumption in which avid fans copy anime (Japanese animation), translate Japanese to another language, subtitle and release subtitled version on the Internet to share it with other fans, without asking for permission from the copyright holder. ... The case study of English fansubbing of anime shows ...

  18. Transnational Fandom: Creating Alternative Values and New Identities

    "A New Ethical Code for Digital Fansubbing." Anime News Network, ... "Anime Fandom and the Liminal Spaces between Fan Creativity and Piracy." ... "Participatory Media Fandom: A Case Study of Anime Fansubbing." Media, Culture & Society 33 (8): 1131-47. Crossref.

  19. PDF Understanding Intervention in Fansubbing's Participatory Culture:

    2.1 Participatory media fandom in the digital era As attested by a growing body of literature, professional subtitling practices are widely held to foster social and cultural standardization ...

  20. Cultural consumer and copyright: A case study of anime fansubbing

    ABSTRACT This article aims at discussing copyright and its infringement from the consumers' perspective by examining 'anime fansubbing'. Anime fansubbing refers to the practice in which avid anime (Japanese animation) fans copy anime, translate Japanese to another language, and subtitle and release a subtitled version on the Internet to share it with other fans, without permission from the ...

  21. Author Page for Hye-Kyung Lee :: SSRN

    Lee, H.-K. (2011) Participatory media fandom: a case study of anime fansubbing. Media, Culture & Society. 33(8): 1131-1147. Number of pages: 20 Posted: 26 Jan 2015

  22. Anime: From Cult Following to Pop Culture Phenomenon

    More recent articles containing information on fansubbing have even said that this participatory media fandom has unsettled the global media landscape by providing an alternate form of content distribution. The motivations for English-speaking fansubbers were indicated as the strong desire to perpetuate the anime culture and provide ...

  23. An overview of multimodal fan translation: fansubbing, fandubbing, fan

    Media and fan studies refer to a fan as "a person with a relatively deep positive emotional conviction about someone or something famous, [who is] driven to explore and participate in fannish ...