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Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter: Sample & Guide [Entry Level + Senior Jobs]

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Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter Example

Are you looking to break into the world of investment banking? Our guide to writing an Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter will help you put your best foot forward and stand out from the competition. Learn how to structure your letter, what to include, and how to make yourself an attractive candidate.

We will cover:

  • How to write a cover letter, no matter your industry or job title.
  • What to put on a cover letter to stand out.
  • The top skills employers from every industry want to see.
  • How to build a cover letter fast with our professional Cover Letter Builder .
  • What a cover letter template is, and why you should use it.

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Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter Sample

Dear [Recruiter],

I am writing to apply for the Investment Banking Analyst position at [Company Name], as advertised on [Job Portal]. I am confident that my strong analytical, financial, and problem-solving skills make me an ideal fit for this role.

I recently graduated from [University] with a degree in Finance and Accounting. During my studies, I gained an in-depth understanding of financial analysis and modeling, and I have applied my knowledge in various roles since then. For the past two years, I have been working as an Investment Banking Analyst at [Company], where I have been responsible for analyzing and presenting financial data to support strategic decision-making. I have also successfully managed numerous projects from start to finish, including the financial restructuring of a major corporation.

I am an excellent communicator and I have extensive experience in managing stakeholder relations. I am comfortable working with clients from diverse backgrounds and I am adept at presenting complex financial concepts in a clear and concise manner. I have a proven track record of providing accurate and timely advice to clients, and I am confident that I can bring the same level of performance to [Company Name].

In addition to my professional qualifications, I am proficient in Microsoft Excel and other financial software. I am also well-versed in various financial analysis techniques, such as discounted cash flow analysis and ratio analysis.

I am excited by the prospect of joining [Company Name], and I am confident that I can be an asset to your team. I have attached my resume for your review. I look forward to hearing from you and discussing my candidacy further.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

[Your Name]

Why Do you Need a Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter?

  • A Investment Banking Analyst cover letter is a great way to introduce yourself to a potential employer and showcase your relevant skills and experience.
  • It is important to highlight your qualifications and what makes you a great candidate for the job.
  • Your cover letter should also provide a brief overview of your background and explain why you are the right person for the role.
  • A cover letter is a great way to make a lasting impression and demonstrate to a potential employer that you are serious about the position.
  • It is also an opportunity to explain why you are a great fit for the company and how you can help the company to reach its goals.

A Few Important Rules To Keep In Mind

  • Start your cover letter with a strong introduction that explains why you are a great fit for the position.
  • Describe your experience with investment banking and how it relates to the job you are applying for.
  • Focus on how you can bring value to the company and position.
  • Highlight any skills or qualifications that are relevant to the role.
  • Include specific examples of how you have used your investment banking skills in the past.
  • Keep your letter concise and to the point, and don’t exceed one page.
  • Proofread your cover letter carefully before submitting it to ensure accuracy.
  • Follow up with the hiring manager after submitting your cover letter.

What's The Best Structure For Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letters?

After creating an impressive Investment Banking Analyst resume , the next step is crafting a compelling cover letter to accompany your job applications. It's essential to remember that your cover letter should maintain a formal tone and follow a recommended structure. But what exactly does this structure entail, and what key elements should be included in a Investment Banking Analyst cover letter? Let's explore the guidelines and components that will make your cover letter stand out.

Key Components For Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letters:

  • Your contact information, including the date of writing
  • The recipient's details, such as the company's name and the name of the addressee
  • A professional greeting or salutation, like "Dear Mr. Levi,"
  • An attention-grabbing opening statement to captivate the reader's interest
  • A concise paragraph explaining why you are an excellent fit for the role
  • Another paragraph highlighting why the position aligns with your career goals and aspirations
  • A closing statement that reinforces your enthusiasm and suitability for the role
  • A complimentary closing, such as "Regards" or "Sincerely," followed by your name
  • An optional postscript (P.S.) to add a brief, impactful note or mention any additional relevant information.

Cover Letter Header

A header in a cover letter should typically include the following information:

  • Your Full Name: Begin with your first and last name, written in a clear and legible format.
  • Contact Information: Include your phone number, email address, and optionally, your mailing address. Providing multiple methods of contact ensures that the hiring manager can reach you easily.
  • Date: Add the date on which you are writing the cover letter. This helps establish the timeline of your application.

It's important to place the header at the top of the cover letter, aligning it to the left or center of the page. This ensures that the reader can quickly identify your contact details and know when the cover letter was written.

Cover Letter Greeting / Salutation

A greeting in a cover letter should contain the following elements:

  • Personalized Salutation: Address the hiring manager or the specific recipient of the cover letter by their name. If the name is not mentioned in the job posting or you are unsure about the recipient's name, it's acceptable to use a general salutation such as "Dear Hiring Manager" or "Dear [Company Name] Recruiting Team."
  • Professional Tone: Maintain a formal and respectful tone throughout the greeting. Avoid using overly casual language or informal expressions.
  • Correct Spelling and Title: Double-check the spelling of the recipient's name and ensure that you use the appropriate title (e.g., Mr., Ms., Dr., or Professor) if applicable. This shows attention to detail and professionalism.

For example, a suitable greeting could be "Dear Ms. Johnson," or "Dear Hiring Manager," depending on the information available. It's important to tailor the greeting to the specific recipient to create a personalized and professional tone for your cover letter.

Cover Letter Introduction

An introduction for a cover letter should capture the reader's attention and provide a brief overview of your background and interest in the position. Here's how an effective introduction should look:

  • Opening Statement: Start with a strong opening sentence that immediately grabs the reader's attention. Consider mentioning your enthusiasm for the job opportunity or any specific aspect of the company or organization that sparked your interest.
  • Brief Introduction: Provide a concise introduction of yourself and mention the specific position you are applying for. Include any relevant background information, such as your current role, educational background, or notable achievements that are directly related to the position.
  • Connection to the Company: Demonstrate your knowledge of the company or organization and establish a connection between your skills and experiences with their mission, values, or industry. Showcasing your understanding and alignment with their goals helps to emphasize your fit for the role.
  • Engaging Hook: Consider including a compelling sentence or two that highlights your unique selling points or key qualifications that make you stand out from other candidates. This can be a specific accomplishment, a relevant skill, or an experience that demonstrates your value as a potential employee.
  • Transition to the Body: Conclude the introduction by smoothly transitioning to the main body of the cover letter, where you will provide more detailed information about your qualifications, experiences, and how they align with the requirements of the position.

By following these guidelines, your cover letter introduction will make a strong first impression and set the stage for the rest of your application.

Cover Letter Body

Dear [Hiring Manager],

I am writing to express my interest in the Investment Banking Analyst position at [Company Name]. I believe my enthusiasm and drive to succeed, combined with my financial analysis and project management skills, make me an ideal candidate for this role.

I have spent the past [number] years working as an Investment Banking Analyst for [Investment Bank], where I have developed a wide range of skills that will be of great benefit to your team. My responsibilities included developing financial models, analyzing financial markets, conducting due diligence, and presenting findings to senior management. I have also gained experience in preparing financial statements, negotiating deals, and managing client relationships.

I have also been successful in leading complex projects from start to finish, with a focus on quality and timely completion. An example of my success is when I led a team that was charged with analyzing and presenting the effects of a new regulation on our company’s business operations. We presented our findings to senior management, which led to a successful implementation of our recommendations.

In addition to my experience, I hold a Bachelor’s degree in [Finance] from [University]. I am also proficient in a variety of financial software applications, such as Microsoft Excel, Access and PowerPoint. I am confident that I am the best candidate for this position and look forward to discussing my qualifications with you in more detail.

Thank you for your time and consideration. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or require any additional information.

Sincerely, [Your Name]

Complimentary Close

The conclusion and signature of a cover letter provide a final opportunity to leave a positive impression and invite further action. Here's how the conclusion and signature of a cover letter should look:

  • Summary of Interest: In the conclusion paragraph, summarize your interest in the position and reiterate your enthusiasm for the opportunity to contribute to the organization or school. Emphasize the value you can bring to the role and briefly mention your key qualifications or unique selling points.
  • Appreciation and Gratitude: Express appreciation for the reader's time and consideration in reviewing your application. Thank them for the opportunity to be considered for the position and acknowledge any additional materials or documents you have included, such as references or a portfolio.
  • Call to Action: Conclude the cover letter with a clear call to action. Indicate your availability for an interview or express your interest in discussing the opportunity further. Encourage the reader to contact you to schedule a meeting or provide any additional information they may require.
  • Complimentary Closing: Choose a professional and appropriate complimentary closing to end your cover letter, such as "Sincerely," "Best Regards," or "Thank you." Ensure the closing reflects the overall tone and formality of the letter.
  • Signature: Below the complimentary closing, leave space for your handwritten signature. Sign your name in ink using a legible and professional style. If you are submitting a digital or typed cover letter, you can simply type your full name.
  • Typed Name: Beneath your signature, type your full name in a clear and readable font. This allows for easy identification and ensures clarity in case the handwritten signature is not clear.

Common Mistakes to Avoid When Writing an Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter

When crafting a cover letter, it's essential to present yourself in the best possible light to potential employers. However, there are common mistakes that can hinder your chances of making a strong impression. By being aware of these pitfalls and avoiding them, you can ensure that your cover letter effectively highlights your qualifications and stands out from the competition. In this article, we will explore some of the most common mistakes to avoid when writing a cover letter, providing you with valuable insights and practical tips to help you create a compelling and impactful introduction that captures the attention of hiring managers. Whether you're a seasoned professional or just starting your career journey, understanding these mistakes will greatly enhance your chances of success in the job application process. So, let's dive in and discover how to steer clear of these common missteps and create a standout cover letter that gets you noticed by potential employers.

  • Not customizing the cover letter for the specific job
  • Not highlighting relevant skills and experiences
  • Including irrelevant information
  • Failing to proofread and edit the cover letter
  • Using overly complex language or jargon
  • Neglecting to include the company’s information
  • Not addressing the cover letter to a specific person
  • Using a generic greeting such as “To whom it may concern”
  • Failing to explain why you are interested in the position
  • Not demonstrating enthusiasm for the job
  • Including typos or grammatical errors

Key Takeaways For an Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter

  • Highlight your relevant experience and knowledge of the industry
  • Emphasize your analytical and problem-solving skills
  • Demonstrate your understanding of the company's financial and strategic objectives
  • Showcase your ability to work with a team and manage multiple projects simultaneously
  • Illustrate your success in using financial models to make sound investment decisions
  • Explain your knowledge of equity and debt markets
  • Highlight your proficiency in financial analysis and financial reporting
  • Communicate your enthusiasm and commitment for working in the investment banking sector

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The Investment Banking Cover Letter Template You’ve Been Waiting For

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entry level investment banking cover letter

A long time ago I said that we would never post a cover letter template here :

“I was tempted to post a Word template, but I don’t want 5,000 daily visitors to copy it and to start using the same exact cover letter.”

But hey, we already have resume templates that everyone is using, so why not go a step further and give you a cover letter template as well?

Plus, “investment banking cover letter” is one of the top 10 search terms visitors use to find this site – so you must be looking for a template.

The Template & Tutorial

Let’s jump right in:

Investment Banking Cover Letter Template [Download]

Download Template – Word

Download Template – PDF

Investment Banking Cover Letter Template

And here’s the video that explains everything:

(For more free training and financial modeling videos, subscribe to our YouTube channel .)

And if you’d rather read, here’s the text version:

Do Cover Letters Actually Matter?

At bulge bracket banks, people barely read cover letters.

Cover letters matter 10x less than resumes and 100x less than networking.

But there are a few special cases where they’re more important:

  • Boutiques and Local Banks – Sometimes they actually read cover letters.
  • Unusual Backgrounds – If you’re NOT in university or business school at the moment, you may need to explain yourself in more detail.
  • Outside the US – In Europe, for example, some banks pay more attention to cover letters, online applications, and so on.

Similar to grades and test scores, a great cover letter won’t set you apart but a poor one will hurt you – so let’s find out how to avoid that.

Keep your cover letter compact and avoid 0.1″ margins and size 8 font.

With resumes you can get away with shrinking the font sizes and margins if you really need to fit in extra information, but this is questionable with cover letters.

Go for 0.75″ or 1″ margins and at least size 10 font.

With resumes there were a couple different templates depending on your level – but with cover letters that’s not necessary and you can use the same template no matter your background.

1 Page Only

Ok, maybe they do things differently in Australia (just like with resumes) but aside from that there is no reason to write a multi-page cover letter.

If you actually have enough experience to warrant multiple pages, do it on your resume instead and keep the cover letter brief.

Contact Information

List your own information – name, address, phone number, and email address – right-aligned up at the top.

Then, below that you list the date and the name and contact information for the person you’re writing to, left-aligned on the page.

If you don’t have this information you can just list the company name and address and use a “Dear Sir or Madam” greeting.

That’s not ideal – especially if you’re applying to smaller firms where cover letters actually get read – but it’s all you can do if you can’t find a person’s name.

If you’re sending the cover letter via email as the body of the email, you can omit all this information and just include the greeting at the top.

Paragraph 1: Introduction

This is where you explain who you are, where you’re currently working or studying, and how you found the bank that you’re applying to.

Name-drop as much as possible:

  • Impressive-sounding university or business school ? Mention it. Even if it’s not well-known, you still need to mention it here.
  • Your company name , especially if it’s recognizable, and the group you’re working in, especially if it’s something relevant to finance like business development.
  • How you found them – specific peoples’ names , specific presentations or information sessions where you met them, and so on.
  • The position you’re applying for (Analyst? Associate?) – especially for smaller places that are not well-organized.

This first paragraph is all about grabbing their attention.

Example 1st Paragraph:

“My name is John Smith and I am currently a 3rd year economics major at UCLA. I recently met Fred Jackson from the M&A group at Goldman Stanley during a presentation at our school last week, and was impressed with what I learned of your culture and recent deal flow. I am interested in pursuing an investment banking summer analyst position at your firm, and have enclosed my resume and background information below.”

Paragraph 2: Your Background

You go through your most relevant experience and how the skills you gained will make you a good banker right here.

Do not list all 12 internships or all 5 full-time jobs you’ve had – focus on the most relevant 1-2, once again name-dropping where appropriate (bulge bracket banks / large PE firms / Fortune 500 companies).

Highlight the usual skills that bankers want to see – teamwork, leadership, analytical ability, financial modeling and so on.

If you worked on a high-impact project / deal / client, you can point that out and list the results as well.

This may be your longest paragraph, but you still don’t want to write War and Peace – keep it to 3-4 sentences.

Example 2nd Paragraph:

“I have previously completed internships in accounting at PricewaterhouseCoopers and in wealth management at UBS. Through this experience working directly with clients, analyzing financial statements, and making investment recommendations, I have developed leadership and analytical skills and honed my knowledge of accounting and finance. I also had the opportunity to work with a $20M net-worth client at UBS and completely revamped his portfolio, resulting in a 20% return last year.”

Paragraph 3: Why You’re a Good Fit

Now you turn around and link your experience and skills to the position more directly and explain that leadership + quantitative skills + accounting/finance knowledge = success.

There is not much to this part – just copy the template and fill in the blanks.

Example 3rd Paragraph:

“Given my background in accounting and wealth management and my leadership and analytical skills, I am a particularly good fit for the investment banking summer analyst position at your firm. I am impressed by your track record of clients and transactions at Goldman Stanley and the significant responsibilities given to analysts, and I look forward to joining and contributing to your firm.”

Paragraph 4: Conclusion

This part’s even easier: remind them that your resume is enclosed (or attached if sent via email), thank them for their time, and give your contact information once again so they don’t have to scroll to the top to get it.

Example 4th Paragraph:

“A copy of my resume is enclosed for your reference. I would welcome an opportunity to discuss my qualifications with you and learn more about Goldman Stanley at your earliest convenience. I can be reached at 310-555-1234 or via email at [email protected]. Thank you very much for your time and consideration.”

Unusual Backgrounds

These examples cover how to apply to a bank if you’re in university, business school, or you’ve been working for several years.

If you have a more unusual background (e.g. you went to med school, graduated, started your residency, but then decided you wanted to be an investment banker), then you might need to add a few sentences to paragraph #2 or #3 explaining yourself.

Resist the urge to write your life story because no one will read it – interviews are a much better venue to prove how committed you are.

Email vs. Attachments

If you’re emailing your cover letter and resume, do you create a separate cover letter attachment?

Or do you make the body of your email the cover letter?

I think it’s redundant to create a separate cover letter and attach it, so don’t bother unless they ask specifically for a separate cover letter.

If you’re making the body of your email the cover letter, make it even shorter (4-5 sentences total) and cut out the address bits at the top.

Optional Cover Letters?

If you’re applying online and it says “Optional Cover Letter” should you still upload one?

You might as well because it takes 2 minutes once you have a good template – it’s not the end of the world if you don’t include one, but you never know what everyone else is doing and it’s not terribly time-consuming.

Cover Letter Mistakes

Remember the role of cover letters: great ones don’t help much, but poor ones get you dinged.

The biggest mistakes with cover letters:

  • Making outrageous claims (“I’m a math genius!”) or trying to be “creative” with colors, pictures, fonts, and so on.
  • Going on for too long – 10 paragraphs or multiple pages.
  • Listing irrelevant information like your favorite ice cream, your favorite quotes from Wall Street or Boiler Room , and so on.

If you think this sounds ridiculous, remember the golden rule: do not overestimate the competition .

For every person reading this site, there are dozens more asking, “What it’s like to be an investment banker?” at information sessions.

Sometimes you hear stories of people who write “impassioned” cover letters, win the attention of a boutique, and get in like that …

…And I’m sure that happens, but you do not want to do that at large banks.

If you do, your cover letter will be forwarded to the entire world and your “career” will be destroyed in 5 minutes .

More Examples

As with resumes, there are hardly any good examples of investment banking cover letters online.

Most of the templates are horribly formatted and are more appropriate for equities in Dallas than real investment banking.

Here’s a slightly different but also good templates you could use:

  • Best Cover Letters – MBA Template

More questions? Ask away.

Still Need More Help?

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We will take your existing resume and transform it into a resume that grabs the attention of finance industry professionals and presents you and your experience in the best possible light.

When we’re done, your resume will grab bankers by the lapels and not let them go until they’ve given you an interview.

Specifically, here’s what you’ll get:

  • Detailed, line-by-line editing of your resume/CV – Everything that needs to be changed will be changed. No detail is ignored.
  • Your experience will be “bankified” regardless of whether you’ve been a student, a researcher, a marketer, a financier, a lawyer, an accountant, or anything else.
  • Optimal structuring – You’ll learn where everything from Education to Work Experience to Activities should go. Regional badminton champion? Stamp collector? You’ll find out where those should go, too.
  • The 3-point structure to use for all your “Work Experience” entries: simple, but highly effective at getting the attention of bankers.
  • How to spin non-finance experience into sounding like you’ve been investing your own portfolio since age 12.
  • How to make business-related experience, such as consulting, law, and accounting, sounds like “deal work.”
  • How to avoid the fatal resume mistake that gets you automatically rejected . Nothing hurts more than making a simple oversight that gets you an immediate “ding”.
  • We only work with a limited number of clients each month. In fact, we purposely turn down potential clients in cases where we cannot add much value. We prefer quality over quantity, and we always want to ensure that we can work well together first.

FIND OUT MORE

Other Options for Personalized Help: Wall Street Mastermind

Finally, if you want to go  beyond your cover letter and also get help with your resume, work experience, networking, and interview prep, check out Wall Street Mastermind .

They’ve worked with over 1,000 students to help them secure high-paying investment banking jobs out of school (and internships while in school), and their coaches include a former Global Head of Recruiting at three different large banks.

They provide personalized, hands-on guidance through the entire networking and interview process – and they have a great track record of results for their clients.

It could be a great fit for you if you’re looking for comprehensive coaching through the entire process rather than just a new version of your resume or cover letter.

You can book a free consultation with them to learn more .

entry level investment banking cover letter

About the Author

Brian DeChesare is the Founder of Mergers & Inquisitions and Breaking Into Wall Street . In his spare time, he enjoys lifting weights, running, traveling, obsessively watching TV shows, and defeating Sauron.

Free Exclusive Report: 57-page guide with the action plan you need to break into investment banking - how to tell your story, network, craft a winning resume, and dominate your interviews

Read below or Add a comment

279 thoughts on “ The Investment Banking Cover Letter Template You’ve Been Waiting For ”

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I love how hand downs and direct this page is. Trying to break into IB come from a (semi-)target school but very bad GPA, love how you are always motivating, but realistic. Keep it up!

entry level investment banking cover letter

I am a sophomore and have a low gpa (2.5) should I include this on my cover letter? how do I stand out and not get dinged, low gpa because had to work full time freshman year because my dad lost his job, and my family had health issues. Am an only child.

All you can really do about a low GPA is network extensively so that people who know you can recommend you, and so you can avoid being filtered out by screening tools. See: https://mergersandinquisitions.com/low-gpa-investment-banking/

Maybe include a brief mention of why your GPA is lower in your cover letter, but focus on how you’ve improved since your first year (mention the higher GPA since then).

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Thanks for the write up!

If i am writing my cover letter in the body of the email, Do i write the name of the recipient instead of dear Madam ?

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I like it not bad

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Hey Brian – thanks for this article. Quick question: is there a certain point in your career (in my case, I’m an associate) when you can stop with the cover letters even if they give you the option?

Cover letters are pretty much always optional unless they ask for one.

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I was wondering for your template, you gave a solid and formal introduction. I also see other career advice sites that recommend making the cover letter “memorable” and straying away from the cookie cutter method with more flashy intros. As an example just from another online source: When I was seven, I wanted to be the GEICO gecko when I grew up. I eventually realized that wasn’t an option, but you can imagine my excitement when I came across the events manager position, which would have me working side by side with my favorite company mascot. So what’s your opinion on this? I’m sure it’s different for every field, so would you say the average investment banker appreciates something like this, or would it just make them roll their eyes and make you seem too keen/tryhard.

Same Andrew again…

Sorry I should’ve watched your video fully before asking. But you mentioned to not get too fancy with fonts, photos, etc. But would the bit of personal information outside the cookie cutter approach separate you in the slightest? To me, cover letters sound like they have the same purpose as GPA. A 4.0 (good but generic cover letter) won’t give you any advantages, but a 2.5 (poorly done letter) will eliminate you from the application process.

Yes, cover letters are basically used to weed out people, not to select them. You can include some personal information such as an interesting student group, study abroad, or experience that led you to IB, but don’t go overboard with trying to appear “interesting.” Save that for actual networking and interviews.

If you are applying to traditional “high finance” roles such as investment banking, private equity, etc., you should not do anything creative with your cover letter. It will only backfire. Firms either do not read cover letters, or if they do, they simply look at them to make sure you didn’t do something silly or inappropriate. You’re taking a very big risk by writing a “creative” cover letter, and one that has very little upside with tons of downside.

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For online applications that request your resume, but do not specify whether a cover letter should be included, should I submit a cover letter? Also since you can only submit one document in these cases, should you compile resume and cover letter into one document?

Thanks so much.

If they just request your resume, just include your resume. I would not even bother with a cover letter or combining them into one document.

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Do we have to leave

“Enclosure: Resume”

At the bottom of the Cover Letter? Many thanks

*In Online Application where they ask you to attach your CV and Cover Letter – if that makes any difference

Brina, many thanks for the quick answer. Just a last question:

Shall we sign between sincerely and our name or under our name?Both options are good?

Alternative A:

(Signature)

Alternative B:

The first one is slightly better.

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I just wanted to thank you for not only this Cover Letter template but also your Resume template. I have used both and I have received great feedback from interviewers and getting my foot in the door for asset management.

Thanks! Glad to hear it. Good luck!

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This question targets the paragraph listing relevant experiences & skills gained through it.

As a University Student with some corporate finance and consulting experience but nothing directly related to investment banking, do you think it would be relevant to list explain skills gained during university classes (e.g. a term project that simulated the entire M&A process based on a real life deal) that involved valuation, simulated investor calls, etc. Or do you believe sticking to actual work experience would be best suited.

Thanks a lot for all the content you post.

Stick to your work experience if you have actual CF and consulting internships. Maybe add a line or brief phrase within a line that mentions your learnings from university classes as well.

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I live in the UK and I’ve been told cover letters carry a lot of weighting in the initial application process. I have written a cover letter which is 8 paragraphs but it’s still 1 page. Do you think this would be ok or should I take some stuff out? Thanks in advance, great website you have.

By the way, it’s still size 10 font but I had to reduce the line spacing between the paragraphs to fit it all in.

Cover letters only matter in the “negative” sense, i.e. if you write something stupid or have typos, you could lose an offer or interview opportunity. Your cover letter should be as short as possible, so 8 paragraphs is too long, especially if you had to reduce the font size to 10, which is too small. So, be more concise and realize that bankers glance at hundreds/thousands of these letters each recruiting season…

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How do one relate a tax internship experience which I acquired In an accounting consulting firm to an investment banking internship I hope to start with with BofA

Talk about how your tax findings/work affected the big picture… did they potentially change the company’s valuation? What was the impact on the company’s financial statements? Did anything you did result in changes to the internal controls at the company? Did you do any tax work related to M&A or equity/debt deals?

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Hi Brian, I have read that the header of a cover letter should match your resume. Is there a reason the header from the M&I resume template was not included in this cover letter template?

??? I think it would be very odd if your cover letter started with your name in a bigger font size at the top… so, no if that is what you are asking about. A cover letter should start with the normal heading of a letter. Your resume is different because it’s intended to present the key points in bullet/highlight format.

I agree. Thanks.

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I’m applying online to banks in the EMEA area and most banks ask for my motivation – they don’t require a cover letter. Could I still use this template? or wouldn’t it make any sense to use this template?

If its the case that this template would not be useful, do you have any tips on what to focus on in such a motivation letter?

I think this template is too long for a simple question about your motivation. Your motivation should basically be the last part of your “story” – assuming 150 words for a competency question and a 300-word story. See:

https://mergersandinquisitions.com/walk-me-through-your-resume/

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How do you travel like a dug dealer? haha…You are funny. Great info. Thanks a lot. I’m trying to break the front door at Piper Jaffray so I can put my little two feet inside that door.

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hey, i am actually studying law in France but i wanted to go on trading/investment banking/hedge fund area. What would you suggest me ? Which arguments should I point out ?

Thanks a lot !

??? I’m not sure I understand your question.

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The links for Workbloom – Investment Banking Intern Template and Vanderbilt – Cover Letter Template are not valid anymore. Is it possible to fix that? Thank you very much!

Sincerely, Frank

We don’t have alternate links, sorry. But the template there wasn’t much different anyway.

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Hi Brian, I had a question in mind. I have been working with a Big four Audit firm in India for the past 10 months now, and have a Bachelors in Commerce degree from a non-target University here. The role here is Back-end, as in we do not have client interaction, and rather coordinate with the US/EMEA teams – which deal with the clients directly – for the work. Recently, I got a call from GS for an Analyst position under the Data Resource Group for its IB Division in India. How do you suggest I pitch my auditing experience to get an offer for this position? Also, considering the work I do here is back-end and basically, formatting files around and punching in numbers! Thanks in advance for your help!

I would just point out how your audit work led directly to results with clients and how you were a part of the client-interaction process, even if you didn’t speak with them directly. As a result, you have a good understanding of what they’re looking for and how to get them results most efficiently.

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Thanks for the template. Is it correct to include in the cover letter an entreprise which I am auditing or not?

Sure, you could, but you have to be able to tie that to whatever role(s) you’re applying for.

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Hi there, thanks for the cover letter template you provided. It’s a great help. Just wondering does the same template work for UK application? As you mentioned they tend to pay attention to cover letters.

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Yes this template works for UK applications.

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Thank you for sharing your blog, it helped a lot cos I am also having a hard time in writing a cover letter and I suck! Hope you can help more. Keep it up!

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Thank you for sharing the template and guide! I am a recent college grad and just started working in an economic consulting firm (last month). I want to make the career transfer to IB and I am trying my best networking everywhere. I am applying for an IB analyst position and editing my cover letter. Should I still mention in the cover letter my leadership roles in college or it does not matter much?

Many thanks!

You can mention them briefly, but you should focus on your current role.

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Thanks for the template! After working as an ER associate for 2 years in my hometown, I am moving from North America to Europe in the next few weeks. Should I mention in my cover letter something to the effect of “After visiting [country] several times over the past few years, I applied for and received my Work Visa” or will the recruiter assume I have a visa and do not require sponsorship? I just do not want to be passed over if they are assuming I will be a headache for them!

Furthermore, I am also hoping to move from ER to corporate. Besides tailoring the letter to reflect skills mentioned in the posting, are there any other changes that need to be made when moving out of capmarkets?

Thank you for your time!

Sure you can include this. Yes, I’d talk about why you want to move from ER to corporate and talk about why you prefer corporate over ER (perhaps you prefer the type of work in corporate better and you see yourself in a corporate vs. in a bank) and you want to move over to XX industry [the industry the corporate you’re applying for is in] given XX reason [ideally you’ve covered that industry in ER before]

Thank you Nicole. Should I be putting this explanation in paragraph 2? Or later on in the letter?

I’d probably list this later in the letter.

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Hi, I’m studying in the US and applying to summer IBD internship in 3 different locations (New York, London, HK), so who should I address to in my cover letter since there is only one cover letter for three different recruiters? Thanks!

I’d say Dear Sir/Madam or To Whom It May Concern

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when you express abbreviations, let’s say M&A, how do you put it in a cover letter? i.e., (“M&A”) or (M&A) without punctuations mark?

M&A is fine I believe

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Hi! You mentioned that putting the name of the recruiter is always better than just a “Dear Sir/Madam”. When applying in London, do you think it is appropriate to address the cover letter to a recruiter I haven’t personally met that I just found his name via an internet search, specifically from Linkedin. Also, there are dozens recruiters for the same company on Linkedin, should I still address the letter to a specific person? What about if it is the director of HR? Should I address it to him/her directly?

Yes, I’d address the email to Director of HR. If you don’t know the person’s name, I’d say “To Whom It May Concern” or “Dear Sir/Madam”

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Hey, I have a question concerning applying for an internship at G&S in Europe. Instead of a cover letter they want you to submit a motivational statement with 300 words when applying, which is according to them similar to the cover letter. But I am a bit unsure that I express my motivation for applying for an investment banking postion with this cover letter because it focuses more on previous internships. Should I outline my internships and then explain that I want to pursue an career in IB because of them? and should I mention my extra curriculare activities which involve leadership experience and exotic interests?

I’d briefly touch on your previous experience and focus on why IB, and why GS. If the previous experience can serve as your IB spark, use them. So yes you can mention that you want to pursue a career in IB because of your previous internships, but don’t dive too deep given word limit and you can address that in interviews. No, the latter part should be demonstrated on your resume, unless you have space in the statement

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What should you do in [Signature]?

I’m not sure I understand your question. I’d just insert your signature there.

Upload an image of your handwritten signature?

Yes you can do that. Copy and paste it below “Yours sincerely/Best Regards”

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I resigned from my previous role in April this year as we were planning a family move to another country However, it did not materialize due to some unexpected changes and I have to start looking for a job again. This has left an employment gap of about 3 months in my resume. During this period, I have taken the BIWS course to enhance my knowledge. Shall I mention my current status and address that in my cover letter? or leave it out and talk about it when asked during interview?

Xavier, you can list that on your resume and cover letter. You may also want to talk about other activities you’ve done during those 3 months.

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I am a first year associate working at a boutique bank on the trading floor and trying to switch into equity research/banking side. How is the cover letter different from the cover letter template above. Do I need to specifically state why I am switching?

Yes you need to address why you’re switching

Do you have any suggestions as to how I can gracefully address this? The reason why I am switching is because I don’t feel like I am learning much out of my positions – not being given much responsibilities, etc…

I’d focus on the positives on why you prefer the other division versus your current one; not what you’re lacking.

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Hi, I am wondering when introducing my skill sets and experience in the second paragraph of the cover letter, is it appropriate to use bullet points? e.g. my key skills/experience include: bullet point: A bullet point: B

Yes you can do that, though a lot of times we find that its best to follow our template, unless you’re a very experienced candidate

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I worked at a boutique investment bank for an internship and I was wondering how I may explain my low gpa on my cover letter. I would focus on my strengths and what I learned from the position but sooner or later the question of gpa will be addressed either during an interview or sent through email. How would I approach this?

This may come up in interviews and I’d address it then. I am not sure why you had a low GPA. If you had family/personal reasons you can list that. Otherwise if you were taking more advanced courses because you were too ambitious and got a lower GPA as a result of that you can list that too.

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I’m applying to various finance and IB positions and my documents will be seen as a package sent through my school. I created my resume in a very similar format to the template on your website, only using .5″ margins. I have the same header layout (with name and personal info) on both my resume and cover letter. My question is regarding holding these .5″ margins on both of my documents to keep a consistent look. I’m just curious as to whether this would be a good or bad idea, or as to whether you think it would even matter.

I haven’t seen the format of your resume so I am not 100% sure. 0.5 margins maybe a bit crowded but depending on your content it can be doable. If you have lots of solid content, yes this is applicable. Otherwise, I’d shorten your content and go for the standard margins

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Hey, this template isn’t just for investment banking right, it can be used for targeting internships in accounting as well? Same with the resume template?

If you change the paragraph from why IB to why accounting, you can use this template. The resume template is tailored to IB though you can use it for Accounting roles too

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I graduated from a top school 1.5 years ago, but unfortunately ended up at a not so impressive bank. What’s the best way to name drop the school in the cover letter? Thanks.

First paragraph – you can just say that you are working at XX bank and have recently graduated from XX school

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I am applying to three different divisions in the same investment bank that are different in nature (2 back office and one front) and there is only one cover letter for all three that asks you to describe your motivation for each. Since they are different positions, how do I go about this?

I’d be generic and focus on why finance and how you can make an impact to the firm

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How about adding the recommendations from the previous job? Is it worth? Should we add it even if they do not menton about that?

You can provide recommendations upon request

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Hi, I am wondering whether I need to include a signature in my cover letter for online application. If so, should I just insert it in the pdf document or scan a paper copy of the cover letter? Thanks!

Yes you can include it. Both works.

Yo’re welcome.

Just a follow-up question: I am applying for summer analyst position at CS, and they only allow one application per applicant. Should I use the same cover letter during campus recruiting (addressed to an alumnus) for my online application? Since I am applying to CS HK as well, I am wondering whether I should use a slightly different cover letter.

Sure I think this shouldn’t be a problem. Yes the HK one should be slightly different – i.e. why HK, why Chinese market

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Dear M&I staff,

I’m a master student in Europe. I’m currently attending a Master of Science in Finance after completing a bachelor in business administration. Do you have any specific suggestion about my first paragraph? Also, if I can’t find the name of the recruiter, how can I start the letter? I was thinking about expressions such as “To whom it may concern…”; does this work?

Thanks in advance

Yes it does, or Dear Sir/Madam.

First paragraph – I’d follow the template on the post

Dear Sir or Madam,

My name is [Insert Name] and I am currently pursuing a Master of Science in Finance at [Insert University Name] where I have also been awarded a Bachelor of Science with honors. How would this sound?

Sounds good, though I’d probably just use My name is [Insert Name] and I am currently pursuing a Master of Science in Finance at [Insert University].

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Hey Brian/Nicole, Thank you guys so much for this website. I spend days on it reading your articles! lol I’m just wondering when I do the name-dropping on the cover letter, is it alright to put the company names in bold? or is that too much? What do you guys think?

Thank you for your kind comment. You should credit Brian for his hard work! I don’t think its necessary to bold company names. I think its probably better to leave it “unbolded.”

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i a lil older i was originally an engineering major, left school (didnt graduate), started working as a stock broker, then mortgage broker, and then more sales background. I then re entered school and graduated with a degree with finance, gpa not so high bc of past screw ups, but now looking to break into finance. I love finance, and cant figure out how to convey that in a cover letter. can you help?

Focus on the impact you’ve made in your previous roles. Then say while you’ve enjoyed and learn a lot from your previous experience, you realize [Talk about your IB spark here], and that you realize you wanted to pursue IB because [XYZ]. Then say that you’re confident that your [XX] skills can be an invaluable asset to the firm (something around those lines)

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If I’m applying for a job based on an online job posting (LinkedIn / other job board), then in my 1st paragraph, ho would you address the section about how you learnt about the job / company ?

(I find it awkward to say that “I recently learnt about your company through your online ad on abc.com”)

ThankX Guys!

I recently learned about your company from [a contact/an event/an online job posting] and was impressed with what I learned of [List what you’re impressed with here]

Hey Nicole,

Thanks for your reply.

I’m finding it awkward to write “I learnt about your company from an online job posting” bcoz I feel it sounds like I did not know them before seeing the posting (which, in turn, sounds insulting for the company).

Instead, can I just say “I recently found out about the XYZ position at ABC Capital & want to apply for this position”?

Sure, this sounds good. No, this isn’t insulting – this is why companies post on job postings! It is best if you have already spoken to people at the company and use that as an intro. line.

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please i am an undergraduate in my final year with just one internship experience and one teaching experience, that was before i gained admission. i want to know if it is appropriate to include my date of birth and list of referees; i will also like to know the maximum length of resume ideal for some one in my category. Thanks.

Please see https://mergersandinquisitions.com/free-investment-banking-resume-template/

No, I don’t think you need to include your DOB and list of referees. Maximum length of your resume would be 1 page.

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Hi Brian, thanks so much for creating this awesome website.

I’m a year one student in a non-target uni in HK who’s interested in IBD. My first semester GPA wasn’t stellar because I had a hard time balancing family issues and adapting to a new country.

I’m currently applying for several pre-internship programs, and am afraid my less-than-3 GPA will cause my immediate disqualification. What can I do?

I’ve had several leadership positions in high school, am great at networking/socializing, and speak a few languages. But my first semester GPA is lackluster. Please advice, should I explain in my cover letter?

Best Regards, Sara

Yes, your GPA is likely to be alarming to interviewers. Sure, you can explain the above on your cover letter, though I would focus on your strengths and what you have achieved first. You want to draw people to your strengths. I’d also try as hard as you can to boost your GPA next semester and craft a very good explanation when you land interviews.

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Hey there M&I,

Firstly, I’d just like to thank you for this template – it truly is priceless.

I’m from Melbourne, Australia and I’d like to break into Investment Banking for a long-term career.

I’m starting a Bachelor of Commerce degree at The University of Melbourne and I was thinking of double majoring in Accounting and Finance.

I feel as though this will put me in a good position for Investment Banking and will also provide me with a few alternatives should I be unable to make it to Investment Banking or decide that it’s not for me.

Sorry about the long-winded explanation, I guess what I want to know is whether or not the double major sequence I have suggested is desirable in Investment Banking or there is a better sequence you could suggest to me.

Also, what do you have to say about people getting summer internships after first year? I haven’t heard of anyone doing this before, but have you? How should I go about trying to increase my chances?

Thanks very much!

Thanks. Yes, that sequence is fine but I don’t know if it would give you an advantage. From what I understand about Australia, I believe most people who get into banking there actually have dual Commerce and Law degrees.

Summer internships after year 1: very tough. You’d have to aim for small local firms. And probably not common in Australia.

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I’m applying to a Private Equity internship and I completed the BIWS fundamental and advanced modeling courses. Should I talk about this in my cover letter? Right now I just have a general statement about it and that I worked on some case studies.I was wondering whether I should go more in depth and mention a specific case? Leave it as a general statement? Or take it out completely

Yes, definitely mention the specific case studies as that makes it sound much better than just saying you completed the courses.

Document for listing them on your resume (you may be able to apply parts of this):

http://biws-support.s3.amazonaws.com/BIWS-Courses-Resume-Instructions.docx

Thanks Brian,

I took your advice and mentioned specific case studies.

One other thing, currently in the second paragraph of my cover letter I talk a lot about my internship experience, but this internship doesn’t have to do with IB, its accounting and sales for a hotel. I did spin it in away that says that I picked up skills from this internship that I can apply to IB, PE, etc. Should I focus less about this and more on the BIWS courses, and projects in school I worked on since it doesn’t directly relate?

I would probably do an even split in that case.

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I found this guide and template very useful. I was wondering, though, if I were to apply online to bb investment banks that didn’t make any meeting at my university and require a cover letter, what should I write in: “I was recently introduced to your firm via [Friend / Contact at Firm / Presentation] and was impressed with what I learned of [Your Culture / Working Environment / Bank-Specific Info.].”

I know about these banks just because of their fame, so should I just skip this part?

Sure though having this line may be more convincing.

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I am now applying to Société Générale M&A summer internship in Power, Utilities and Infrastructure department. I tried to find some alumni working there. I could manage to find one via linkedin; however, i cannot contact him because he sets a permission. I wonder what should i write on cover letter if i can’t find a contact in SG?

Dear Sir or Madam / [Name of Recruiter if you have it]

Dear Nicole,

I feel sorry not to explain it clearly.

Quoted from the IB template: ” I was recently introduced to your firm via [Friend / Contact at Firm / Presentation] and was impressed with what I learned of [Your Culture / Working Environment / Bank-Specific Info.] ”

I searched SG career website but they mention the work environment and culture very vague. I tried to find an alumni working there; however,the alumni office hasn’t replied me yet.Even worse, SG hasn’t held any campaign event at our uni. At present moment,I can’t manage to get a contact at firm. I did search they have an aggressive expansion plan for the department 2 years ago. Should I mention this instead?

Much thanks

It would help if you have spoken to a contact who is working/worked there or attending one of their info sessions. Otherwise, yes it may be useful to mention of their department’s aggressive expansion plan.

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Hi! What if I have not attended any presentation and I do not know nobody that work in a specific bank? Can I still apply online? I am applying to investment banks in London and I know that they recruit using the online application process.

Yes you can still apply online.

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Hi Nicole/Brian,

Adding to what Paolo has mentioned, what about the cover letter? Since we do not know anybody that work in that specific bank (nor attend any presentations), who do we address the cover letter to? (Or is it better not to submit one if the cover letter is optional?)

Secondly, is it alright to say that we found out about the job/vacancy by browsing through their website?

Again, thanks for your continuous kind support.

Regards, Rifki

Quoting from the article:

“If you don’t have this information you can just list the company name and address and use a ‘Dear Sir or Madam” greeting.’ ”

If it’s optional, I wouldn’t even bother submitting it especially if you don’t know anyone there. Yes saying you saw it through a website is OK.

Thanks Brian!

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I’ve just graduated in Finance and Accounting but wasn’t able to get summer internships in my 2nd year. What else can I write in section 2+3? I’ve got work experience in wholesale, an accounting firm and an insight day at a Merrill Lynch which were just before I started uni, i.e. 2009 can I still use these in this section or would it look bad since they are old?

I’ve taken part in many trading simulation games in teams etc which show all the skills you have mentioned in the paragraph, would it be acceptable to use this as an example even though it was a simulation?

They wouldn’t look bad but not exactly current. Ideal if you have recent experiences to list. Otherwise you can list them

Yes – show the returns you generated

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Thanks for the useful resources.

Last year, I hadn’t as much insight and experience with IB (I was coming from law and bearely started to study a MSc-Finance in a good school). I still got two interviews with a nice boutique and a bb. I got reject at the final round.

This year I’m applying again (I’m currently doing an off cycle M&A internship)

1. Shall I mention I applied last year, and why I like the firm so much? or shall I just make a regular cover letter and avoid to mention I applied a year ago?

2. How many interviews should I go through to secure an offer, or what is the average? I’d like to know whether I am doing something bad or just if it is because you need to go through several interviews to finally get something?

3. What would shall I do with the current market if I secure another off cycle internship or a full time M&A position in a leading law firm? (I prefer finance than law, but I m getting old and need to start working as oppose to “intern”)

Sorry for this long thread, thanks for your help.

1. you can mention it if you want though I don’t think its necessary 2. hard to say – depends on you. people generally go through more than several rounds of interviews to land an offer 3. network a lot

Last year, I hadn’t as much insight and experience in IB profiles (I am coming from law and bearely started to study a MSc-Finance in a good school). I still got two interviews with a nice boutique and a bb. I got reject at the final round.

— Shall I mention I applied last year, and why I like the firm so much

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Hi, I have an upcoming interview with a bulge bracket bank in Capital Markets. I submitted my resume about 1 month ago and got selected recently. My resume was updated recently and is much much more in depth than before. Should I reach out to the recruiters and ask if I can have them replace the resume on the website with my new one? Or would this be frowned upon? Thanks!

Yes, please do that!

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Thank you for your tips, they are great!I have two questions:

1. All templates I find are about experienced people. If you are a person with no experience (or with a very short experience in a different area), how can you turn this fact around and convince someone to hire you? Should you really emphasize your academic background?

2. I started a PhD but early on I realized that it was not the right fit for me. How and where should I mention this? Should I explain why? I am afraid that no one will be considering me for a job position because I am quitting the PhD…

Thank you so much!

1. There are templates for inexperienced hires – pls look for the one for undergraduates. If you have NO work experience at all, I’d suggest you to emphasize your academic background and extracurricular activities. 2. Explain this on your cover letter & interviews. No, it shouldn’t be a problem if you know how to spin your story. Most jobs don’t require a PhD these days anyway.

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Hi, Thank you very much for uploading the template.

But what if I don’t have background info or experiences specific to the investment banking industry even though I have banking experience in a different field such as Loan Officer? Will that matter?

I will be considered as a fresher in that case how can I convince anybody about changing my profession to investment banker or wealth management analyst from this profession?

And can you also please help me with a sample C.V for freshers in Invest and Wealth Management.

I do have an MBA in finance.

You’ll have to figure out why IB and pitch your story well.

You can use the same template for Wealth Management – just focus on your research and investment experience

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I’m planning to use this short cover letter as my email body. My question : “Should I opt for a longer version with more elaborate details?”

— Dear Sir/ Madam [or the recruiter’s name],

I would like to express my interest in a position as [position] for [company].

As you may perceive from my summary, I’ve been leveraging my consulting and technical skills from my previous career as an IT Consultant to break into the finance industry. Thus, I’m adapt at translating clients’ problems into a satisfying, concrete solution. I also possess good leadership skill and can work well with others. [ + other skills the company valued / demanded for this specific job]

I would love to expand my career with your company, and am confident that I would be a beneficial addition to your company. I have enclosed my resume and I would welcome a personal interview at your earliest convenience.

[Name and contact address] —

Any input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

I’d keep your email short, sweet and succinct. Anything longer than that is too much.

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Hello, my question is regarding the introduction —

“Paragraph 1: Introduction This is where you explain who you are, where you’re currently working or studying, and how you found the bank that you’re applying to.”

I have nearly 2 years of consulting experience, but have recently been laid off. Since I’m no longer working or studying, how would I approach this as far as introduction?

Just introduce yourself and tell interviewer you’ve been laid off due to the lackluster economy – they should understand. Tell them what you’ve been doing with your free time i.e. traveling, studying, picking up a new hobby, etc. As long as you sound like you are doing something productive/interesting with your life, you should be fine

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Errors – If there are minor typos that most people don’t see at a glance, are you in the clear? I’m not sure if people read cover letters that closely especially during OCR when hundreds of people apply at the same time from one school.

It depends on whether your reviewer is attentive to details or not!

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I don’t exactly have a stellar GPA, so I was wondering if the cover letter is where I would explain myself? Or is it better to just not mention it? Thanks! And love this website!

It depends why you don’t have a stellar GPA – if you have a legit reason i.e. you had sick parents you needed to take care of etc I think it would help

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Thanks for the article. I just had a quick question. I was originally interested in marketing and completed two internships my freshman year undergraduate (currently a junior applying for summer analyst positions). Since then I have had several research internships. Would it be a good idea what lead my decision to go from marketing to banking in my cover letter?

Any input would be awesome. Thanks!

Yes I would explain why you changed your mind in your cover letter and point to a specific person/incident

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I am studying at a “frontier market” university and am currently an exchange student at a highly ranked (Top 100) universities.

Should I use an exchange studies university in a cover letter instead of a university where I’ll be graduating and mention it accordingly (I am currently an exchange student at…)?

No, I think you should still use the university where you’ll be graduating

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ha frontier market. I am putting where I am an exchange student with the frontier school I attend.

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I’m applying for an internship in the US, but I’m studying in Germany. Should I mention that my University/Business School, is one of the best business schools in Germany?

Thank you for your answer!

I don’t think it makes a difference. You could try but reviewers might not necessarily care too much re that

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Hi, thanks so much for this article. I am writing a cover letter to J.P. Morgan, but I cannot find the office address in HK, shall I omit it at the top?

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But what if I don’t have background info or experiences specific to the investment banking industry? does that automatically rule me out as a candidate even though they specify that finance background is not necessary?

Could I simply emphasize my skills and abilities that I have gained through other experiences such as working for an NGO?

Not necessarily.

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just one other quick question. At Goldman Sachs, one could apply for internship in several divisions and they have asked motivation for applying to different divisions. Would it make this impression that you yourself do not know what division is right for you when you make applications for several divisions? Thanks a lot.

With Goldman, yes. However, in a way you still need to hedge your bets because one division’s MD might like you and the other’s MD might not.

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I’ve shown my CL to the Head of HR in my firm and he adviced me to write something “catching” as a title between the date and “Dear Sir or Madam,..”. So do you think it would be okay to write there: “Why I am a good fit for taking part in your spring programme”? Or does this sound too arrogant?

Thanks a lot! Jevira

This sounds generic.

Have you got another idea or just put there: Spring Programme at XYZ. :D Thanks, and sorry for the time you lose with all my questions..

Come up w something original he said right? I don’t know if the above is original. You should just ask him what his suggestions are. I’d love to help but I need to think through it and have to look at your CL; wouldn’t be fair to other customers who are paying for our CL editing service.

Thanks very much for your helps. I have a few questions and I would greatly appreciate if you could help me. I am doing a double degree master in Complex Systems Science (A multidisciplinary field), so I have studied one year at Warwick, UK and now I am studying the second year at Ecole Polytechnique, France. 1) Should I mention anywhere that I have had a multidisciplinary approach since in my field I have to interact with people with completely diverse backgrounds, from Physics and math to economics and Philosophy? 2)I have got a full scholarship from European commission for my studies. How should I mention it? 3)I think many people are not very acquainted with the structure of such joint programs between two universities in two different countries. In my CV, shall I mention it as two masters and not saying that they are in fact joint? 4)My master thesis has been about financial contagion and I do not have ant job or internship opportunity, so how should I write the second paragraph?

Thanks in advance and sorry it becomes too long. Mostafa

1. Not sure how you will be wording this one. Difficult to use this to stand out 2. Yes 3. No, put joint but you can separate the two in diff lines 4. Can’t help you on this one.

Hi, it’s me again. Does this template also apply for online applications where you have to upload the cover letter? Or can my personal adress, the banks adress and the date can be removed withous replacement?

Yes these templates apply to online apps too

No, I don’t think you should remove the details you mentioned

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I’m a first year university student in the UK, and looking to apply to a spring division internship at Goldman Sachs (and probably many others in the near future).

I have litte actual experience in terms of working for firms, but have competed in many stock market challenges/competitions, and I have come to university a year early, having been moved up a year.

Clearly with my lack of experience, I will need to slightly change the template you have provided above; how would you recommend I do this?

Many thanks.

I nearly asked the same thing – but my question didn’t even appear.

You should elaborate on your stock market challenges/competitions

Is it okay to write under my asset mgmnt firm that I “increased producivity of checking several entries by about 60%”? It was an excelsheet with about 120 rows in which I had to find the entries which were more than once in these rows. (it was an excel formula I made for that).

Or does it sound ridiculous?

Oh, its in the CV, not the cover letter.

yes it does sounds a bit ridiculous and monotonous. Sorry.

So I’ll delete :) Thanks. Its very difficult to boost your CV.

btw: may I send you, Nicole, my CV that you could look over that? You see my email adress, i guess. I’d really appreciate it! Thinking, that it sounds “too” ridiculous…

We’re not offering resume editing at the moment but will be introducing it shortly, so you can watch for that announcement.

What does “shortly” mean? Within this month? And will it be free? If not, how much would it cost? If you’re launching in the very near future, please reserve one place for me :-).

Haha yes but not free. Sure.

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Thanks for your work!

My question is that if I apply for some regions where original language is not English i.e. China, Japan, will it be ok I send a 2-page resume/cl with one in English and another Chinese/Japanese/whatever? or seperately in 2 .pdfs?

Thanks again

No. Not necessary. Just send a one-page resume in English

If bilingual required?

No still submit one pager unless they ask

Thanks Nicole.

Another not-related question, do you think that a 4-month full time internship in PE department of commercial banks, say, standard chartered, strong enough to pass the summer/FT online selection? prior to that i had internship in big-4. a senior in university and will pursue a finance master degree right after. thanks

Should do but again it depends on what position you are interviewing for and which division you are looking at. Also depends on who is screening you..However, I believe your experience should suffice

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Do you think sending a cover letter with a CV directly to the Head of investment banking dpt is inappropriate? The bank is hiring (according to website). Sent my CV to HR a month ago, no responce.

Sure, just send him a brief email and your resume. No point in sending a cover letter – address what you need to say briefly on the email

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What is your opinion about listing client names. Obviously working in a deal situation it would not be acceptable to mention a client name and the transaction itself if this is not public but in my case I have done a lot of work which didn’t result in deals however I am quite keen on mentionning the clients as I have worked with many PE and large Corporate clients. Is it fine to write: “selected list of clients: A,B,C,D,E…

Why would you want to use names there? Just for more credibility when you discuss deals? I would still avoid using names if possible for dead deals. You can still mention that you’ve worked with some big PE names such as X but I wouldn’t go into details; pretend deal is still ongoing even if it died, and leave out the names.

https://mergersandinquisitions.com/why-investment-banking-deals-fail/

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You do such a great service for idiots like me!Keep it up.

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Hi! For my motivation letter, which the company requires on their application website, shouldn’t I just say I like money and that I want to work for their company because I would like to earn a lot? Or should I go with the “It’s my passion… I like to be challenged… I’d like to contribute innovations for the growth of the business…” bits? Thank you!

applications for bulge brackets. thanks!

Um #2, always

Okay, thanks!

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I am beginning to write my cover letter for a number of boutique banks in the fall to apply for analyst positions. What do I if I don’t know anyone at the firm and can’t namedrop a presentation I attended (1st paragraph)? Can I just say

“My name is John Smith, and I am a recent graduate of Fordham University (Class of 2011). I am interested in applying for an analyst position at XYZ firm”

Is there anything else I can add to the first paragraph to flesh out my cover letter a bit? Thank you very much and keep up the good work!

That’s fine

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Hi, I recently switched to a major in economics from engineering. The engineering curriculum at my school is very challenging and had a negative impact on my GPA over my freshman/sophomore year (3.4 currently). Would it be appropriate to list that I was previously an engineering major on my resume to reflect the challenging curriculum I was previously engaged in?

Yes that’s a good idea or at least reflect coursework on there

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Thanks for the cover letter and resume templates, they’re really helpful. A friend of mine used your templates to score a summer internship in corporate finance advisory at a big four company in london and I was able to score a SA offer in the IBD of a BB firm in frankfurt, germany. we’re both germans btw.

depending on how fulltime recruiting develops we should set something up for a “breaking into IB in europe”-feature if you see the demand for this. So long, Nick

Congrats, interesting to hear that it works in other countries. There are a few articles on Europe (UK, Germany, Italy) already but could use more if you have a unique angle.

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A company was recruiting at my college, and all they asked for was for us to send them a 1-page motivational letter? Any idea what I can include in the letter? Eg, why me? Why should I get the offer? Why should I get the bursary? My strengths and weaknesses?

They don’t want a cv, they just want a motivational letter. I’m not too sure what to include in it. Any help would be appreciated.

I would just follow the cover letter template here and expand on it a bit… don’t go into strengths/weaknesses, just follow the outline above.

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Thanks Brian for putting up such a nice website and sharing valuable stuff with us aspirers. I might be using a wrong space to look for your suggestions anyways here I go. My challenge here is to make a successful transition from a business development/ strategy side (prior 3 yrs of exp. with a commercial bank) to IB. Being done an MBA recently from a decent B school in UK where I gained the required skill sets for IB, I was targeting at BB which doesnot seems to be working out my way so I m considering the small boutiques as well to start with. I thought a good cover letter can win recruiters attention in my case. Any advice on the approach I should carry to enter into IB & put my prior experience into use to encash it is highly appreciated.

If you do a search for “Networking” and “Cold-calling” you’ll see the most helpful advice – cover letters do not make a difference, focus on your cold-calling and networking skills and do not give up until you try hundreds of places.

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is it okay to put stuff on your resume you don’t mention in your cover letter? or should your resume ONLY include stuff from your cover letter?

It’s fine, you can’t even mention everything in the cover letter anyway

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In the 3rd paragraph you explained that we should say something along the lines of “I am impressed by your track record of clients and transactions at Goldman Stanley…”

This is obviously a great way to tailor your cover letter, but I was wondering where you find out information of transactions. I’ve found some doing a simple Google search, but is there an independent authority that tracks all of these? As well, how do you know which transactions to mention? The ones that the firm is particularly proud of or ground-breaking?

Use the WSJ Deal Journal or NYT Dealbook to find recent deals they’ve done, anything sizable or significant e.g. the Goldman / Facebook deal

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I realized I made a grammatical error in the last paragraph of my cover letter today. I never noticed it before and I’ve sent it to three places already, one BB and two boutiques. Big deal?

No, no one reads cover letters anyway

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Firstly thanks for the website, it’s great.

My question is: in most summer IB internships, they ask several cover letter-like questions like “In 250 words max, describe your career aspirations” etc., however there’s usually an option to upload a cover letter as well. Would you advise keeping it concise or would you include examples of IB-related things, adapted to the question, despite the fact you’re effectively rewriting the cover letter?

This is in UK by the way.

Thanks in advance.

Just keep it concise – competency questions are not a big factor vs. CV/interviews.

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Thank you for the template.

Quick questions:

Should we use the email format for a doostang message as well?

No keep it way shorter like 2-3 sentences maybe

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Dear M&I,

I guess I’m the most complicated case here. I’m currently doing BA in Art History and Italian at UCL, London, now doing my Erasmus in Italy. However, last summer I worked as a M&A Summer Analyst in a small boutique bank specializing in cross-border M&As. There, I started from scratch, with no finance experience/knowledge, but learnt a lot and had lots of hands-on experience, since the company was really small and I was involved in literally everything.

I’m applying for summer internships in large investment banks and about to start writing my cover letters. I assume I must explain myself for studying Art History & Italian and my out-of-the-blue interest in I-Banking, plus use my last summer experience as a selling point. Any other specific hints?

Thanks in advance for your help!

Well, why did you work there? What made you interested in doing that? Reference a specific person or if nothing comes to mind use something from the news or your background e.g. I was always really interested in Italy and the UK and got interested in finance as a result of [xx] so I wanted to explore cross-border M&A and leverage my skills/interests like that.

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Hi, I have completed my masters in Drug Discovery and Translational Biology. But currently I am planning to apply for any investment banking positions. As I don’t have any background or experience in the given field, i don’t what to write in the 2nd and 3rd paragraph.

Can you please help me,

Talk about the analytical skills you gained and how they apply, or the leadership / project management skills or anything else like that from previous internships or school.

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Hey guys, this letter just repeats what is inside the Resume anyway. What is the additional value for the potential employer to read this kind of resume? There are no additional information. Wouldnt it be better to wite about your motiviation, your personal (not work) background, and reasons to chose this department/bank ? Or would it harm to do this?

Furthermore, the letter includes the information about resume enclosure 3(!) times. I like this site but this template really does not look too promising for me!

So don’t use it? The point is that no one reads cover letters, but in case they do, you don’t want to screw up by saying anything controversial or anything that could be misinterpreted.

If you start writing your personal story, bankers might mistake it for a soap opera script rather than cover letter.

Cover letters have no value at all, but just like grades if you screw one up it could hurt you. This template is intentionally boring and gives very little information because otherwise people would download this and insert pictures of unicorns, write about their past relationships, and other nonsense.

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Great comment, made me laugh

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Do you recommend being creative in cover letters, ie varying sentence structure, using big/expressive words ?

No, creativity is for marketing or poetry – this is finance.

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I’m a US student currently at Oxford for my junior year. All the applications for the UK offices are online. I know you have already answered the question before, but I don’t want to make any mistakes. So just to clarify:

1. Omit the physical addresses, mine as well as theirs. 2. Omit the recruiters name leaving only the name of the bank 3. Omit the signature 4. Do not enclose resume since that is a separate attachment

Thanks so much in advance.

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Hie ,i realy luv ur advice!.,Im doing a Bsc in Financial modelling with UNISA.is this a good start for a career in investment banking?.i finish next year, could u tell wat i can do to make myself marketable after graduation.

Honestly, I’m not sure on that one because I’m not familiar with the school. If a lot of banks recruit there, it’s fine; otherwise you should transfer elsewhere.

Its University of SouthAfrica ,im also staying in Africa.is there something i could do 2 giv me an added advantage over my coleagues?.

This article has some tips on South Africa: https://mergersandinquisitions.com/investment-banking-south-africa/

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Hey M&I,

What’s your take on headlines (i.e.Application for IB Analyst) and postscripts? I’ve heard from many friends to add them on because they will grab attention. But then again, they aren’t going into banking.

Thanks, Mack

Not applicable for banking

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i will be applying to merrill lynch. In the template, you stated many of the internship and job roles that provide the skills required to be a great investment analyst. However, i was just wondering, if i have a perfect gpa, perfect sats score, how can i use these to my advantage in my cover letter?

You can’t really, just list them and be done with it – no point in trying to emphasize those because there’s not much to say and they speak for themselves.

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Hi, If the firm’s online application says “you can only attach one file: this should contain your CV, cover letter and any other materials relevant for the position”, does it mean in the word document file I upload, the 1st page is resume, the 2nd page is cover letter and the 3rd is transcript? It looks pretty strange because the document is gonna be 4-5 pages. But since they only allow me to upload one file, I’m not sure what to do with the cover letter and the transcript. Or can I just omit them and attach the resume document only? Thanks a ton.

I would not send the transcript unless they specifically ask for it, otherwise just create a 2-page file with your cover letter and CV

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First of all, great website! It’s really helpful and I think you guys are doing a great job.

I am visually impaired, however I have always followed regular education and have performed like anybody else (also in jobs, at associations, etc). Many banks stress their emphasis on diversity and now I am wondering if I should include this fact in my cover letter / online application? On the one hand I feel it would fit great into the whole “what are you most proud of”-question, but I am also scared it might work against me?

Please note I’m applying London, not NY. (I think European regulations might differ from US-ones). I go to a European target school.

Personally I would not list it on your CV / cover letter / online application, but maybe bring it up in an interview if it fits in naturally.

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Hi Brian, I was beginning to start writing coverletters–atleast get them going, but I’m confused on where to find the unique strength of each BB, which makes it diff from its competitions. One of the things which makes a good cover letter is that its specific to a firm, but I dont know how to find such information. For instance, I was looking at MS, Barclays website in the section ,’Why MS’ or ‘Why Barclays’, and it seems every firm had the same agenda. We are committed to diversity , team player etc. Obv I need to go into more depth than this. Brian where I can find information specific to each BB on their website? I would really appreciate it. Thanks a lot.

You should read the WSJ Deal Journal blog and look for recent mentions of the bank and what deals they have been advising on – then reference those in the cover letter.

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Hi Brian, I’m in a similar position as the above poster. For companies without a personal contact I want to talk about a specific deal they’ve advised on.

I’m just unsure how to formulate such a sentence without encouraging diffcult to answer questions.

E.g. I was thinking of something along the lines of “I was impressed with your company’s role as target advisor in the $X bn acquisition of companyX”

I’m afraid this would result in the question of ‘why were you impressed?’.

Any chance you could give a sample sentence of how you would talk about a deal in a cover letter?

P.S.: Keep up the good work with BIWS, love the constant updates. Highly recommended, well worth the money!

You can say something like “I recently saw news of your role as an advisor in the $X bn acquisition of company X and was immediately interested, since I’ve followed the [X] industry for awhile.”

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Hi, I graduated from a target, went to medical school after graduation, but left after two years to pursue a career in investment banking. I now work at a small investment research firm, and I am applying for 2011 analyst class.

How much “explanation” do I need to do in cover letter? Or should I just focus on my job experience and modeling skills?

I don’t think you need much explanation since you quit medicine after 2 years, so just focus on other aspects

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Is the physical address at the top still necessary if you’re attaching the cover letter as a .PDF in an online form?

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I can’t thank you enough for all these info Brian,

In all honesty, I did have a sudden family death last year for which I had to leave school in the middle of the semester and come back after about two weeks. I got in a lot of psychological stress and uncertainty and I ended up messing up my grades significantly for two semesters. However, I did improve last semester with a full workload (maximum number of credit hours allowed at my school + advanced level classes) and got near 4.0.

How should I mention this on my cover letter? Also, how would I do that on an electronic cover letter which should only be about 4-5 sentences?

Thanks again in advance.

I would just say you had a health issue and had trouble balancing everything, but quickly learned your lesson and received perfect grades right after that. Giving a family excuse sounds fake so I would probably not write that even if it’s true.

Thanks but the thing is that wasn’t my freshman year. It was my sophomore year. So I did well my freshman year than poorly as a sophomore and improved as a junior.

Also, what about the electronic cover letter? Would it be ok to take up some sentences to explain my situation?

Just say you did poorly “at first” and then improved and have perfect grades this past year. I would still keep your cover letter short as no one has time to read a lot.

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I would appreciate your advice on this.

I’m a senior at a target school in Far East Asia. It’s really tough to get into a BB here and I’m thinking of visiting each BB and handing them my resume and cover letter to ask for a junior equity research position. I doubt I’d be able to personally meet the head of research or a senior analyst without prior arrangement, so I’d be probably handing my resume and cover letter to HR. I need to stand out but I have no equity research internship experience. What I do have, is a equity S&T internship at a BB and a RA (intern) at a top-tier mgmt. consulting firm. Plus experience managing a personal portfolio and trading derivatives in notable amounts.

Now, my problem is this. I made it to the final round for a junior ER position at GS but unfortunately was not given the offer (the offer ended up going to someone with some full-time experience in ER; had I been competing against fresh-out-of-college candidates would the result have been different?). I would like to mention this in my resume or cover letter hoping that it would serve as evidence that I’m really interested in ER and that I have the potential. But I’m worried that this might send the wrong signal. Who would like to accept a candidate knowing that he was unsuccessful elsewhere? I’m worried that I might appear arrogant in their eyes. I’m thinking of visiting CS, UBS, Citi, MS, ML, JPM, etc. In ER here in Asia, they’re at least at par with GS if not better…

I realize that answer to this may depend on the culture here. Please advise. Thanks.

I would not mention an unsuccessful interview with GS for the reasons you mentioned.

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Hi Brian! Long time reader, first time poster. I’m currently a rising senior at a target school on the tale end of my internship at a strong boutique bank in New York. I only have one week left, and I’ve been given zero modeling opportunities. I’m very disappointed. I figure that I should ask for some modeling work. But I have some questions.

1) Does it reflect poorly in interviews for full-time that I didn’t do any modeling? Should I “stretch” the truth?

2) Do you have any other relevant comments about doing a junior year internship and not getting any modeling experience? I’m concerned with how this hurts my full-time credentials, how this might affect my resume, and how overall my standing will decrease relative to my peers because I didn’t get modeling experience.

It’s quite common not to have modeling experience… just say you did research and assisted with potential clients / potential buy-side deals but don’t say anything about modeling. Most people do no modeling in their internships so it doesn’t matter much anyway.

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What’s a better part-time fall internship, BB PWM or no-name boutique (I mean no name.. say 3-7 employees)?

Both are about the same, but the boutique is better for your resume because you can write “Investment Banking Analyst”

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off-topic question:

I often read though it’s June interviews are still taking place.

When do banks in America/Europe begin accepting applications for: 1) summer interns (analyst) 2) full-time (analyst/associate)

Is the end of a summer intern equivalent to the end of the full-time offer application period? Because ppl. might are offered a full-time offer after their summer intern.

To put it in a nutshell: When is recruting/application time generally?

Summer interns are December/January, full-time is August-September.

And when do you start as summer intern, when u successfully applied in dec/jan or successfully applied for aug/sep?

Summer interns usually start in June

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This post reminded me of the classic cover letter to Lehman that was on Leveraged Sellout. I tried to see it, but it appears LSO has shutdown. Is this the case? Are the days of re-reading the same, hilarious stories over?

I don’t know because it’s not my site, but yes it appears to be down. Maybe check the google cache.

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Thanks for the release of this article, much appreciated.

Curious on an unrelated question though, when you try to develop relationships with bankers and do the initial outreach to set up an information interview, how far ahead should you plan? I mean should you give them dates within the week you email, 2 weeks ahead, etc?

Also, for specific time slots you ask for, what time is it usually best for a banker to talk to someone about that? Like early morning, late night, right after lunch, etc?

Thanks again, H

Give dates within the next 1.5 weeks so they have a few days to respond. Usually right after lunch is best for bankers, for traders you have to call after market hours are over

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Hi Brian, Thanks for the website, I have a quick question for you. I am in one of the new Masters in Finance/Management programs. I am at a target school for undergrad/MBA (think UNC/Duke/UVA). However, since the program is very new, banks don’t know much about it. Aditionally, although I have had some Wealth Management internship experience, I don’t have an I-Banking internship.

Given my situation, do you think it is better for me (in terms of B-school and exit opportunities) to go into a top ten consulting firm (excluding MBB) or try for mid-market/boutique investment banks (My school is very good in placing people in consulting), assuming I don’t get into a BB. I ultimately want to end up in PE or HF (preferably PE).

Thanks for your help.

I would still say banking because consulting –> PE is very tough unless you go for firms like Golden Gate Capital that hire a lot of ex-consultants… and even there they’re mostly from MBB. Much easier to go from smaller bank –> PE than to go from smaller consulting firm –> PE.

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Should I mention the fact that my company is in F500? It’s know in Europe, but I doubt it is known in North America.

You can add it in, yes

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I don’t have any inside experience about the recruiting process, but a friend/colleague of mine (BB) mentioned that while recruiting for regional european branches/off-cycle internships often look at the cover letter, they almost never do it for summer positions in London.

Everyone seems to have different stories re: cover letters, but they are certainly less important than resumes, networking, or interviews

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What about for laterals?

Same template applies but talk about how your previous banking experience applies to the new position you’re applying for

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I appreciate your template for its compactness, I understand I shouldnt overestimate the competition, but Im trying to sell myself to the recruiter, so simply mentioning my skills and experience will not differentiate me from the “competitor”…?

I personally dont have so much experience in the finance realm (although Im genuinely interested in it and have managed to get a ten day insight into a BB) so do you encourage mentioning transferable skills I acquired through extra curricular activities, ie football = teamwork, etc, etc…

Cover letters are not really the place to “sell” yourself, which is why this is short… much safer to keep it boring and then do the selling via networking / interviews.

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I know this is supposed to be basic, but the first paragraph is pretty useless. Your name, university/job position and contact details will already be on your resume so what’s the point in wasting time and space repeating the details on your cover letter. Also, saying “I am interested in pursuing an [Investment Banking Analyst / Associate] position at your firm” is also somewhat redundant, since the recruiter knows what position you’re applying for.

The template is good as a starting point, but on the off chance someone actually does read your cover letter, I would try to do a lot more than just make redundant statements.

This template is for both email and traditional letters… and in email it’s certainly not redundant. Even with traditional letters you are introducing new information by giving the name of the person you met at their firm as well as your major / where you’re working more specifically.

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so do you expect the same stats as what you have written for the resume template? A given population, and a limited percentage will download it, and even a limited percentage will copy it word for word?

Cheers, thanks for all the great info!

In the grand scheme of things, yes – online a lot of people use these templates but most people who apply to banks do not use them.

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I’m currently a rising junior at a semi target looking to be a SA next summer. This past summer I interned at a discount brokerage firm but had significant responsibilities (they didn’t have to hire an additional broker because of me) and got a lot of experience and face time with clients.

I have an opportunity to apply for a PWM internship for the fall with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney. Should I continue with my current internship through the fall or would it look better to move to the more distinguished name? I imagine the work would be similar. thanks

Go to the better name

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nice template, it sure will be easier for internationals like me to write one now. thanks.

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Thank you for the cover letter template.

“If you’re making the body of your email the cover letter, make it even shorter (4-5 sentences total) and cut out the address bits at the top.”

Do you mean we should drastically cut down the entire 4 paragraph cover letter into 4-5 sentences?

Yes, make it so they don’t have to scroll much (if at all) when reading on a Blackberry. 1-2 sentence intro, 2 sentences on your work experience and how it makes you fit for the job and then 1 sentence conclusion.

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A nicely put article! Anyway, I like the new template for the website too!

A question that is unrelated to the article:

How far does an interviewer expect you to know in a previous live deal that you were previously involved in as an INTERN? I mean really, to be fair, often times, even if interns are being put into live deals, they are only doing menial works (including me), such as researching, data mining, presentation slides building, etc.

How far of financial analysis would the interviewer expect you to know?

Also, in terms of financial modeling, you’ve said it before that it is the kind of work that everyone should want to be exposed to. But what if the financial modeling is not for a live deal, but for a potential deal? Would it still look better than the menial works in live deals?

Thank you! You have no idea how helpful you have been.

They expect you to know what you indicate you know… so don’t set expectations very high. And yes any type of modeling work is better than menial tasks

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Win Investment Banking Interviews Like a Pro

Master the networking process, including email templates, call scripts, informational interviews, LinkedIn, and step-by-step examples of networking success stories.

StandOut CV

Investment Banking cover letter examples

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Investment banking is a competitive industry, and your cover letter is your chance to give context to your CV and stand out from the crowd.

But if you want to get noticed, you need to focus on showcasing your biggest achievements in the field, and we can help.

For top tips and writing advice you can bank on, check out our comprehensive guide and investment banking cover letter examples below.

CV templates 

Investment Banking cover letter example 1

Investment Banking cover letter 1

Investment Banking cover letter example 2

Investment Banking cover letter 2

Investment Banking cover letter example 3

Investment Banking cover letter 3

These Investment Banking cover letter examples provide you with some guidance and inspiration for writing a cover letter that gets noticed and ensures your CV will get opened.

But if you really want to master the art of writing a winning cover letter , then follow our step-by-step cove letter writing guide below.

How to write an Investment Banking cover letter

A simple step-by-step guide to writing your very own winning cover letter.

How to write a cover letter

Write your cover letter in the body of an email/message

You should write your cover letter in the body of the email (or messaging system if sending via a job board) and never attach it as a document.

The reason for this?

You want your cover letter to start connecting with the recruiter from the moment they open your application.

If they have to open a document to read it, it will slow things down and they may not even bother to open it.

Write cover letter in body of email

Start with a friendly greeting

Cover letter address

To start building rapport with the recruiter or hiring manager right away, lead with a friendly greeting.

Try to strike a balance between professional and personable.

Go with something like…

  • Hi [insert recruiter name]
  • Hi [insert department/team name]

Stay away from old-fashioned greetings like “Dear sir/madam ” unless applying to very formal companies – they can come across as cold and robotic.

How to find the contact’s name?

Addressing the recruitment contact by name is an excellent way to start building a strong relationship. If it is not listed in the job advert, try to uncover it via these methods.

  • Check out the company website and look at their  About page. If you see a hiring manager, HR person or internal recruiter, use their name. You could also try to figure out who would be your manager in the role and use their name.
  • Head to LinkedIn , search for the company and scan through the list of employees. Most professionals are on LinkedIn these days, so this is a good bet.

Identify the role you are applying for

Once you have opened the cover letter with a warm greeting, you need to explain which role you are interested in.

Sometimes a recruitment consultant could be managing over 10 vacancies, so it’s crucial to pinpoint exactly which one you are interested in.

Highlight the department/area if possible and look for any reference numbers you can quote.

These are some examples you can add..

  • I am interested in applying for the role of *Investment Banking position* with your company.
  • I would like to apply for the role of Sales assistant (Ref: 40f57393)
  • I would like to express my interest in the customer service vacancy within your retail department
  • I saw your advert for an IT project manager on Reed and would like to apply for the role.

See also: CV examples – how to write a CV – CV profiles

Highlight your suitability

The main purpose of your cover letter is to excite recruiters and make them eager to open your CV. And you achieve this by quickly demonstrating your suitability to the job you are applying for.

Take a look at the job adverts you are applying for, and make note of the most important skills being asked for.

Then, when you write your cover letter, make your suitability the focal point.

Explain how you meet the candidate requirements fully, and why you are so well suited to carry out the job.

This will give recruiters all the encouragement they need to open your CV and consider your application.

Cover letter tips

Keep it short and sharp

It is best to keep your cover letter brief if you want to ensure you hold the attention of busy recruiters and hiring managers. A lengthy cover letter will probably not get read in full, so keep yours to around 3-6 sentences and save the real detail for your CV.

Remember the purpose of your cover letter is to quickly get recruiters to notice you and encourage them to open your CV, so it only needs to include the highlights of your experience.

Sign off professionally

To round of your CV, you should sign off with a professional signature.

This will give your cover letter a slick appearance and also give the recruiter all of the necessary contact information they need to get in touch with you.

The information to add should include:

  • A friendly sign off – e.g. “Kindest regards”
  • Your full name
  • Phone number (one you can answer quickly)
  • Email address
  • Profession title
  • Professional social network –  e.g. LinkedIn

Here is an example signature;

Warm regards,

Jill North IT Project Manager 078837437373 [email protected] LinkedIn

Quick tip: To save yourself from having to write your signature every time you send a job application, you can save it within your email drafts, or on a separate documents that you could copy in.

Email signatures

What to include in your Investment Banking cover letter

Here’s what kind of content you should include in your Investment Banking cover letter…

The exact info will obviously depend on your industry and experience level, but these are the essentials.

  • Your relevant experience – Where have you worked and what type of jobs have you held?
  • Your qualifications – Let recruiters know about your highest level of qualification to show them you have the credentials for the job.
  • The impact you have made – Show how your actions have made a positive impact on previous employers; perhaps you’ve saved them money or helped them to acquire new customers?
  • Your reasons for moving – Hiring managers will want to know why you are leaving your current or previous role, so give them a brief explanation.
  • Your availability – When can you start a new job ? Recruiters will want to know how soon they can get you on board.

Don’t forget to tailor these points to the requirements of the job advert for best results.

Investment Banking cover letter templates

Copy and paste these Investment Banking cover letter templates to get a head start on your own.

I am writing to apply for the Investment Analyst position at CitiBank. With over 5 years of experience in financial analysis, valuation, and M&A transactions at Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan, I have honed my skills in creating financial models and conducting market research to deliver strategic advice and financial solutions to clients.

In my current role at Goldman Sachs, I manage a portfolio of over 50 clients with a total transactional asset value of £800million per annum. My in-depth understanding of the financial services industry has optimised business growth, resulting in a 30% client retention rate, surpassing company KPIs by 10%.

During my time at JPMorgan, I achieved investment returns of over 25% for clients by identifying undervalued commercial companies. Moreover, I improved productivity by 11% through the adaptation of the combined asset management database.

I am eager to bring my expertise in investment strategy, market research, and portfolio optimisation to CitiBank. I am available for an interview at your convenience and look forward to discussing how my skills can add value to your team.

Kind Regards,

Charlotte Froissant

I am writing to apply for the Asset Management Advisor role at JPMorgan. With a successful 20-year career as a Chartered Asset Management Advisor at leading UK banks like Morgan Stanley and Trex Bank, I possess the strategic acumen to manage a client portfolio worth over £40million.

Demonstrating my proficiency in client acquisition and revenue growth, I have grown my client portfolio by 15% in my first year at Trex Bank, generating £750K in profit for the company. In my current position, I have secured referral agreements with three third-party financial services companies, resulting in a remarkable 12% increase in local client interest. My ability to liaise with third-party organisations, combined with extensive professional networks in Madrid and New York, allows me to deliver personalised financial management plans effectively.

I am eager to discuss how my skills and achievements align with the requirements of JPMorgan. I am available for an interview at your convenience.

Stanley Dixon

I am delighted to apply for the Risk Manager position at Deutsche Bank. As a seasoned Risk Officer with 30 years of experience in the financial services sector, I have a proven track record of developing and implementing risk management strategies for leading UK commercial banks.

At Nationwide Building Society, I led the development of a liquidity risk management framework with a 92% success rate during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, I successfully implemented a stress testing program at HSBC, enhancing the organisation’s ability to assess and manage credit risks during economic downturns. My expertise in enterprise risk management, regulatory compliance, and stakeholder engagement aligns well with the requirements of the role. Moreover, my MBA from LSE and Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) qualification further strengthen my ability to effectively navigate complex financial landscapes.

I am enthusiastic about the opportunity to contribute my versatile set of skills to the risk management team at Deutsche Bank. I am available for an interview from next week and look forward to discussing how my experience can add value to your organisation.

Helena Sidmore

Writing an impressive cover letter is a crucial step in landing a job in Investment Banking, so taking the time to perfect it is well worth while.

By following the tips and examples above you will be able to create an eye-catching cover letter that will wow recruiters and ensure your CV gets read – leading to more job interviews for you.

Good luck with your job search!

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Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter

15 investment banking analyst cover letter templates.

Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter Sample

How to Write the Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter

In response to your job posting for investment banking analyst, I am including this letter and my resume for your review.

In the previous role, I was responsible for front line support for multiple business units including Human Resources, Finance & Accounting, Legal, Compliance, Corporate Services and PMO.

Please consider my qualifications and experience:

  • Significant prior Business Analysis experience
  • A working knowledge of Excel, Word and PowerPoint
  • Strong communication skills with fluency in German and English
  • Basic accounting knowledge and some knowledge of financial modelling would be advantageous
  • Demonstrated interest in business, whether through formal education or summer employment
  • Extensive extracurricular activities
  • An interest in the infrastructure, energy, urban development, or other related sectors, along with a strong interest in and knowledge of financial markets
  • Professional maturity and experience to interact with senior bankers

Thank you in advance for taking the time to read my cover letter and to review my resume.

Finley Weimann

  • Microsoft Word (.docx) .DOCX
  • PDF Document (.pdf) .PDF
  • Image File (.png) .PNG

Responsibilities for Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter

Investment banking analyst responsible for technical accounting guidance and recommendations to country accounting teams and stakeholders in close collaboration with Corporate Finance team.

Investment Banking Analyst Examples

Example of investment banking analyst cover letter.

Please consider me for the investment banking analyst opportunity. I am including my resume that lists my qualifications and experience.

In my previous role, I was responsible for operational support to corporate administrative functions: Accounting/Finance, Human Resources, Legal, Information Technology, etc.

  • Strong teamwork skills in a small local setting, across different geographic locations
  • Cumulative GPA of 3.5 or above preferred
  • First Class communications and presentation skills
  • Investment Banking experience at a top-tier firm
  • Interest/experience in Media and Communications
  • Previous experience including financial or credit analysis is preferred
  • Fluency (written and spoken) in an Asian language (Mandarin preferred) and English
  • Proficiency in Microsoft Suite (Excel, PowerPoint, Word)

Riley Abbott

In the previous role, I was responsible for ad-hoc reporting requests to Auditors, US Accounting or Corporate Finance or other internal or external partners.

Please consider my experience and qualifications for this position:

  • Experience in credit underwriting
  • Financial modeling, financial statement analysis, and accounting skills / knowledge
  • Prior experience in investment banking, or corporate banking, preferred
  • Superior technical financial and analytical abilities
  • MBA from top Tier school/ or professional qualification in Accountancy/Finance
  • Experience working in an agile team, producing user stories, and wireframes
  • A good understanding of Equity or Fixed Income Middle Office or Settlement Operations would be helpful but is not essential
  • A broad understanding of operational functions and their influence on the lifecycle of a trade would be beneficial

I really appreciate you taking the time to review my application for the position of investment banking analyst.

River Rogahn

I would like to submit my application for the investment banking analyst opening. Please accept this letter and the attached resume.

In the previous role, I was responsible for financial information by preparing special reports/projects for both Corporate Accounting and/or Client Finance.

  • Previous internship experience in investment banking or other relevant industries is preferred
  • Fluency (written and spoken) in Mandarin and English
  • Current sophomore or junior undergraduate student
  • Interest in developing a career in technology investment banking
  • Experience reviewing large amounts of transaction data and electronic communications
  • Strong interest and understanding of the Healthcare industry
  • Prior investment banking experience is preferred
  • Experience in a financial analysis environment or related experience in finance, accounting, and/or commercial real estate

Thank you for taking your time to review my application.

Story Langosh

I submit this application to express my sincere interest in the investment banking analyst position.

In my previous role, I was responsible for support to other departments such as Finance, Treasury, Corporate Accounting, Marketing, Environmental, and internal and external auditors.

My experience is an excellent fit for the list of requirements in this job:

  • Cumulative GPA of 3.5 or above preferred but, open to all applicants
  • A mix of financial and technical background in engineering and/or geology will be viewed favorably
  • Strong data modelling and analytical skills
  • High proficiency in Microsoft Excel and other Microsoft Office products
  • Knowledge of the oil & gas industry (E&P, oilfield services, midstream, downstream)
  • Energetic and decisive, with a high level of integrity
  • Experience in systems development life cycle, authorizations/Tandem applications
  • Analyze business requirements and data across diverse sub-systems, create functional and technical requirements in an effort to effectively integrate proposed functionality throughout the platform

Bellamy Hickle

In my previous role, I was responsible for technical guidance and interpretation on the Global Accounting Manual to the divisions (finance and business) and Corporate functions.

  • Strong interest in and knowledge of financial markets and the energy or energy infrastructure sectors
  • A diligent approach to documenting and representing discovered situations
  • Selection of a suitable tool or process that supports updating and enhancement with new discoveries, or as architectural change alters the original output
  • Consider the temporal aspects of a global organisation
  • Sell-side M&A experience is preferred
  • Prior Consumer/ Retail sector experience is preferred
  • Detail oriented with strong analytical / financial modeling abilities
  • Internship or prior work experience in healthcare or financial services industry preferred

Baylor Bartell

Related Cover Letters

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entry level investment banking cover letter

Resume Worded   |  Career Strategy

5 investment analyst cover letters.

Approved by real hiring managers, these Investment Analyst cover letters have been proven to get people hired in 2024. A hiring manager explains why.

Hiring Manager for Investment Analyst Roles

Table of contents

  • Investment Analyst
  • Senior Investment Analyst
  • Alternative introductions for your cover letter
  • Investment Analyst resume examples

Investment Analyst Cover Letter Example

Why this cover letter works in 2024, personal connection to the company.

This cover letter starts with a personal anecdote that connects the applicant to the company. It shows genuine interest and passion for the role and the company, which is a great way to start.

Quantifiable Achievements

Highlighting specific, quantifiable accomplishments is a powerful way to demonstrate your skills and expertise. In this example, mentioning the successful management of assets and reduction of portfolio volatility provides concrete evidence of the candidate's abilities.

Enthusiasm for the Role

Expressing excitement about the position shows that the candidate is genuinely interested in the role and company, which makes them more appealing to the hiring manager. This sentence does a good job at conveying that enthusiasm.

Polite and Professional Closing

The closing paragraph is brief and expresses gratitude, while maintaining a professional tone. It leaves a positive impression on the reader and invites further discussion about the applicant's qualifications.

Expressing Company Admiration

Directly stating your admiration for the company's business approach demonstrates that you've done your research and that you resonate with the company's values. It's an effective way to show you're not just looking for any job but specifically this one.

Demonstrating Leadership

Sharing about a time you led a team to achieve a significant result is a great way to show your leadership skills. It's not just about the outcome, which is impressive, it's about showing you can guide a team towards a goal.

Relating Past Experience

Linking your past experiences directly to the role you're applying for is a smart move. It shows you understand the role and that you possess relevant, valuable skills. Plus, this shows you're already thinking about how you can contribute.

Showing Enthusiasm

Talking about your excitement for the role is a great way to show your genuine interest. It's more than just wanting a job, it's about being thrilled at the thought of contributing to the company's mission and client's success.

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Highlighting Specific Achievements

When you mention a specific project you spearheaded that led to a significant portfolio increase, you're giving me a clear picture of your ability to deliver results. This makes it easier for me to picture how you could fit into our team and what you could potentially achieve.

Relevance to Company Mission

Stating your unique blend of skills and how it aligns with our mission is such a smart move! It shows me that you're not just looking for any job, but rather, you're interested in this specific job because it aligns with your career goals and personal values.

Aligning Personal Aspirations with Company Values

When you talk about our company's emphasis on empowering investors and how it speaks to your core values, it's clear to me that you've done your homework. It also suggests you'd be a good cultural fit, which is just as important as having the right skill set.

Expressing Eagerness for Further Discussion

Your eagerness to discuss this opportunity further tells me that you're truly excited about potentially joining our team. It's a small detail, but it can make a big difference in showing your genuine interest in the position.

Senior Investment Analyst Cover Letter Example

Aligning with company values.

Expressing alignment with the company's approach and ideology is crucial. It suggests a cultural fit and shows that you appreciate the company's distinct approach to investment strategies.

Illustrating Initiative

Highlighting your initiative to redesign an important process, and its successful outcome, is a smart way to present your problem-solving abilities and leadership skills. It also shows your ability to make positive changes with lasting impact.

Blending Technical and Financial Skills

Showing your ability to blend technical know-how with financial expertise is a powerful way to display your unique skill set. It's not just about having the skills, but about showing how you've applied them to achieve results.

Enthusiasm for Contribution

Expressing excitement about the opportunity to contribute to an already successful company shows your confidence and ambition. It's about demonstrating your eagerness to add value and be part of the company's continued success.

Demonstrating Impact through Leadership

Describing how you led a team to shift a substantial amount into sustainable assets and improved performance, specifically quantifies your impact in a way that's easy to understand. It's a great way to highlight your leadership skills and your ability to make a positive, tangible impact.

Showcasing a Blend of Skills

By communicating how your experiences have honed your analytical skills, leadership capabilities, and commitment to purposeful investment, you're effectively putting a spotlight on your multifaceted skill set. It's a good reminder that a great professional isn't just about one standout skill, but a combination of many.

Expressing Excitement for Company Vision

When you express excitement about our dedication to innovative strategies that prioritize long-term value and sustainability, it assures me that our company's vision aligns with your personal and professional philosophy. This makes me more confident that you would be committed to our cause.

Identifying Specific Initiatives for Contribution

Identifying specific initiatives within our company that you're drawn to and seeing yourself contributing to, not only shows your interest but also indicates that you've spent time understanding our work and where you could add value. This kind of proactive thinking is a great quality to have.

Expressing Gratitude and Openness to Further Conversations

Your gratitude for the consideration and openness to further discussions leaves a positive impression and helps keep the door open for future conversations. It's a polite and professional way to wrap up your letter.

Alternative Introductions

If you're struggling to start your cover letter, here are 6 different variations that have worked for others, along with why they worked. Use them as inspiration for your introductory paragraph.

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entry level investment banking cover letter

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entry level investment banking cover letter

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Investment Analyst Cover Letter Examples

Use these Investment Analyst cover letter examples to help you write a powerful cover letter that will separate you from the competition.

entry level investment banking cover letter

Investment analysts are responsible for researching and analyzing potential investments. They make recommendations to their clients based on their findings.

To get a job as an investment analyst, you need to have a strong understanding of the financial market and be able to communicate complex information in a clear and concise way.

Use these examples to write a cover letter that will help you stand out from the competition.

Formal/Professional Writing Style Example

With a strong academic background in finance and economics, and a proven track record of exceptional analytical and problem-solving skills, I am confident that I would be an excellent fit for this role and make significant contributions to your team’s success.

During my time at XYZ University, I honed my financial modeling and valuation techniques, enabling me to excel in my investment-related coursework. As a result, I graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Finance and a minor in Economics, earning a 3.8 GPA. Furthermore, I have passed Level I of the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exam.

My professional experience includes a one-year internship as a Financial Analyst at ABC Capital, where I performed fundamental and technical analysis on various equities and prepared investment recommendations for the portfolio manager. This experience has enabled me to gain in-depth knowledge of the investment industry, as well as develop strong analytical, research, Excel, and presentation skills.

Given the opportunity to join your organization as an Investment Analyst, I am confident that my skills and passion for the investment industry would make me a valuable asset to the firm. I have a strong desire to help businesses grow and succeed and believe that my experience aligns well with the requirements and objectives of this role.

I appreciate your time and consideration of my application and look forward to the opportunity to further discuss how my financial analysis skills and proactive attitude can contribute to the continued growth and success of your organization.

[Your Name]

Entry-Level Writing Style Example

As a recent graduate from XYZ University with a Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance, I am eager to begin my career in the investment industry with a firm that emphasizes integrity, innovation, and growth, such as yours.

During my time at XYZ University, I gained valuable experience as an intern in the finance department of ABC Corp. During this internship, I developed strong analytical skills by assisting with the company’s financial reports and making investment recommendations based on in-depth industry research. Additionally, I gained foundational knowledge of financial modeling and valuation techniques, which I am eager to apply to real-world investment scenarios. I am also proficient in widely-used software tools, such as Excel and Bloomberg, which would enable me to make an immediate impact within your team.

I believe my passion for finance, coupled with my strong work ethic and analytical skills, would make me a valuable addition to your team. I am excited about the possibility of working with an innovative and globally recognized firm like yours that provides ample opportunities to learn and grow as an investment analyst.

I have attached my resume highlighting my academic and professional achievements and look forward to the opportunity to discuss my qualifications further. Thank you for taking the time to review my application, and I hope to speak with you soon.

Sincerely, [Your Name]

Networking/Referral Writing Style Example

I was referred to this opportunity by John Smith, who currently serves as a Senior Investment Analyst at your firm. John and I worked together at XYZ Investments, where we collaborated on various projects and realized our mutual passion and dedication towards creating successful investment strategies. He speaks highly of your team and the work culture at your organization, which has further motivated me to apply for this role.

As a highly motivated professional with a strong academic background in finance and over three years of experience in investment analysis, I am confident in my ability to make a significant contribution. My experience includes financial modeling, valuation, risk assessment, and working on diverse investment opportunities in stocks, bonds, and alternative investments. I have a proven ability to effectively communicate financial insights and recommendations to various stakeholders, which I believe will make me an asset in contributing to informed investment decisions.

John has confirmed to me that your organization values analytical skills, attention to detail, and a strong work ethic – all qualities that I possess and have showcased throughout my career. I am excited about the opportunity to become a part of your dynamic team and contribute to its growth and success.

Please find my resume attached for your review. I welcome the opportunity to discuss how I can contribute to your team and further expand on my qualifications. Thank you for considering my application.

[Your name]

Enthusiastic/Passionate Writing Style Example

Having closely followed your company’s impressive accomplishments and growth in the competitive financial sector, I have been constantly inspired by your innovative strategies and commitment to excellence. Your remarkable investment decisions have not only made a lasting impact on the industry but also have driven me towards pursuing a career as an Investment Analyst with your exceptional team.

As a recent finance graduate from XYZ University, I have consistently demonstrated my strong analytical and quantitative skills over the course of my academic career. My diligence and dedication have earned me several accolades, including top marks in subjects such as Financial Markets, Portfolio Management, and Corporate Finance. I am confident that my extensive knowledge in these areas will add significant value to your team and contribute to the success of your organization.

I have successfully completed internships where my ability to analyze complex financial data, identify risks, and propose sound investment recommendations made me a valuable member of the team. My natural curiosity and enthusiasm for financial markets motivated me to go above and beyond in conducting in-depth research on various industries and investment opportunities.

Beyond my academic and professional qualifications, it is my unquenchable passion for finance and investment that I believe truly sets me apart. I am eager to contribute my knowledge, energy, and unwavering enthusiasm to your already outstanding team of professionals. I am confident that my passion for delivering successful investment strategies will be well-harnessed by your esteemed organization.

Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to the opportunity to discuss how my enthusiasm and passion can contribute to the continued growth and success of your organization.

Problem-Solving Writing Style Example

Having conducted thorough research on your company, I have identified that you are currently looking to expand your investment portfolio and strengthen your presence in emerging markets. With my educational background in finance and work experience as an investment analyst, I am uniquely positioned to contribute towards achieving these goals and providing innovative solutions to the challenges faced by your organization.

During my tenure at [Previous Company], I played a key role in analyzing and identifying lucrative investment opportunities in emerging markets such as Asia and Africa. By employing cutting-edge tools and methodologies, along with a keen understanding of geopolitical factors and market trends, I successfully helped the company diversify its investments, leading to an impressive 20% annual return on its emerging market portfolio.

My strong analytical skills and ability to leverage data-driven insights have driven my success in identifying lucrative investment opportunities. I believe that my experience in conducting comprehensive due diligence, along with my proficiency in Excel and financial modeling software, make me an excellent fit for your organization’s needs.

Serving as an Investment Analyst at your organization will allow me to tackle the unique challenge of expanding your company’s portfolio while managing risk in the dynamic landscape of emerging markets. As a highly motivated individual with a creative approach to problem-solving and a strong analytical mindset, I am confident that my skills and experience will contribute to the continued growth and success of your esteemed organization.

Thank you for considering my application for the Investment Analyst position. I am enthusiastic about the prospect of joining your team and am eager to provide innovative solutions to the challenges your organization faces. I look forward to the opportunity to discuss my qualifications further.

Storytelling/Narrative Writing Style Example

As a child, I would often accompany my father to the local farmers’ market, where he would teach me the art of negotiation and the importance of understanding the value of goods. Little did I know that these early lessons would spark a lifelong passion for analyzing investments and uncovering hidden opportunities in the financial world.

During my college years, I pursued a degree in finance and economics, where I excelled in my coursework and developed a strong foundation in financial analysis. I fondly recall staying up late into the night, pouring over financial statements and market data, as I tried to identify the next “big winner” for my mock investment portfolio. This passion for financial analysis eventually led me to my first internship at a leading investment firm, where I had the opportunity to work closely with seasoned professionals and witness firsthand the impact of sound investment decisions on a company’s long-term success.

As I embark on the next phase of my career, I am excited about the prospect of joining your organization as an Investment Analyst. I am confident that my strong analytical skills, coupled with my passion for uncovering hidden value in the financial markets, will make me a valuable asset to your team. I am eager to contribute my insights and collaborate with my colleagues in order to maximize the returns for your clients.

Thank you for considering my application. I am looking forward to the opportunity to discuss my qualifications further and demonstrate my commitment to becoming a successful Investment Analyst at your organization.

Inventory Manager Cover Letter Examples

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entry level investment banking cover letter

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3 Entry-Level Bank Teller Resume Examples for 2024

Stephen Greet

Entry-Level Bank Teller Resume

Elegant entry-level bank teller resume, clean entry-level bank teller resume.

  • Entry-Level Bank Teller Resume Writing 101

You’ve learned how to maintain a perfect balance between handling transactions and serving the needs of every customer. Your attention to detail and stellar organizational skills let you juggle multiple tasks daily, while effortlessly maintaining top-notch customer service.

Ensuring the cash drawer is balanced each day comes naturally to you, but building a resume that effectively shows off your skills and achievements requires a slightly different approach.

Not to worry—our entry-level bank teller resume templates are here to help. With our resume tips , you’ll be well on your way to jumpstarting your career.

or download as PDF

Entry level bank teller resume example with no experience

Related resume examples

  • TD bank teller
  • Senior bank teller
  • Call center representative
  • Security officer
  • Bank teller

What Matters Most: Your Knowledge of Banking & Customer Service

Your resume skills and work experience

You’ve developed an intimate understanding of the ins and outs of assisting customers with their banking needs. When push comes to shove, you know how to leverage banking software like Jack Henry Banking to efficiently get the job done.

Your job-specific skills and proficiencies will speak for themselves, so prioritize listing those that you’re most confident in. For example, you could talk about your sharp eye for fraud detection and your strong numeracy.

Don’t neglect your soft skills , though—they play a huge part in your ability to thrive as an entry-level bank teller. Mention your strong communication skills, customer service, or ability to speak multiple languages.

9 best entry-level bank teller skills

  • Cash Handling
  • Fraud Detection
  • Customer Service
  • Banking Software
  • Basic Maths
  • Microsoft Office
  • Sales Techniques
  • Financial Services
  • Problem-Solving

Sample entry-level bank teller work experience bullet points

As an entry-level bank teller, you may be a little short on professional experience. Don’t worry—recruiters understand that you’re just starting out and will instead seek evidence of relevant transferable skills like your attention to detail and problem-solving.

Reinforce your abilities with examples of how you used them in your past roles, and back them up with metrics where you can in order to make them even more impactful.

For instance, talk about how you put your strong communication skills to work at your previous employment as an administrative assistant, or how your strong collaboration helped you lead the math club while you were in college.

Of course, if you have any past experience in banking, finances, or customer service, put those front and center and leave the past in the past.

Here are a few examples of using metrics in your resume:

  • Utilized Fiserv software to expedite an average of $20,000 daily customer transactions, improving efficiency by 29%
  • Improved customer satisfaction by 41% by offering personalized banking advice and upselling relevant products
  • Assisted 100+ customers daily, including deposits, withdrawals, opening bank accounts, and solving problems
  • Coordinated with a team of 5 tellers to maintain optimum customer service during peak hours, decreasing customer wait time by 3 minutes

Top 5 Tips for Your Entry-Level Bank Teller Resume

  • If you’re familiar with banking software like Fiserv or FIS Global, showcase how you used it to make an impact. For instance, you could say that you “leveraged FIS Global to streamline daily transactions, reducing customer wait times by 15%.”
  • Highlight your sales experience, whether or not it’s within the realm of banking, quantifying your achievements if possible. You can talk about your stellar sales record at a past retail job or the upselling techniques you used.
  • Handling sensitive customer information is a key part of being a bank teller, so highlight any experience you have with confidential information. As an example, talk about maintaining customer confidentiality during your time as a bank teller intern.
  • As a bank teller, a keen eye for detail can help you spot unusual patterns in fraudulent transactions more easily. Provide examples of your attention to detail throughout your career; for instance, you could say, “utilized Microsoft Excel to track and reconcile transactions, reducing errors by 20%.”
  • A strong grasp of maths is key to any great bank teller. Highlight examples where your eye for numbers helped you achieve your goals, such as by describing the number of transactions you handled per day or the amount of money they involved.

Since you’re just starting out in the industry, including a brief career objective can be a good idea. Use it to show your enthusiasm for the role and take the opportunity to tailor your resume to each application by including the bank name and position title.

It’s best to keep it short and sweet, so make sure it fits onto a single page. If you’re transitioning from a different industry, prioritize listing only the roles that showcase your most relevant skills , such as customer service or your knowledge of mathematics.

Use an AI cover letter generator to elaborate on your education, experience, and your motivation to start a career as a bank teller. Dive into your experience dealing with customers or finances, detailing challenges you faced along the way and how you resolved them.

Create my free resume now

IMAGES

  1. Investment Banking Associate Cover Letter

    entry level investment banking cover letter

  2. Investment Banking Cover Letter Example & Writing Tips

    entry level investment banking cover letter

  3. Investment Banking Cover Letter: Examples & Templates (2023)

    entry level investment banking cover letter

  4. Investment Banking Cover Letter

    entry level investment banking cover letter

  5. Banking Cover Letter

    entry level investment banking cover letter

  6. Investment Banking Cover Letter—Sample & Templates

    entry level investment banking cover letter

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COMMENTS

  1. Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter: Sample & Guide [Entry Level

    A Few Important Rules To Keep In Mind. Start your cover letter with a strong introduction that explains why you are a great fit for the position. Describe your experience with investment banking and how it relates to the job you are applying for. Focus on how you can bring value to the company and position.

  2. Investment Banking Cover Letter: Examples & Templates (2024)

    Two sample investment banking cover letters: one for experienced and one for entry-level investment banking jobs. Steps to write a Goldman Sachs-level cover letter for investment banking. A template for investment banking cover letters with massive ROI. Save hours of work and get a cover letter like this. Pick a template, fill it in. Quick and ...

  3. Investment Banking Cover Letter Template & Tutorial

    Overall. Keep your cover letter compact and avoid 0.1″ margins and size 8 font. With resumes you can get away with shrinking the font sizes and margins if you really need to fit in extra information, but this is questionable with cover letters. Go for 0.75″ or 1″ margins and at least size 10 font.

  4. Investment Banking Cover Letter

    Investment banking cover letters are fairly formulaic. The sections below give a breakdown of each of the areas of information that should be included and what information to put in each. There are three main components to a standard investment banking cover letter: Introduction. Experience & Fit.

  5. How To Write an Investment Banking Cover Letter

    An investment baking cover letter needs to make you stand out from other applicants and land you an interview. It should include: 1. The Greeting. The greeting should always include the hiring manager's name. Address it using the person's first and last name, including "Mr." or "Ms.".

  6. How To Write an Investment Banking Cover Letter (With Tips)

    Keep your cover letter to a maximum of one page in length or around 200 to 300 words. Use standard formatting. Keep your margins between three-fourths to 1 inch and your font size between 10 and 12 points. Provide contact info. Ensure you include your name, email address and phone number at the top of the cover letter.

  7. Investment Banking Cover Letter Template, Example, & Tips

    Here's how to write a perfect cover letter for investment banking jobs: Follow the right cover letter format. Address the bank hiring manager directly. Start with a compelling intro statement. Explain why you are the best candidate. Give some key achievements to stand out. Show them why you want to work at this bank.

  8. Investment Banking Cover Letter [Examples, Template & Tips]

    The 6 sections that need to be included in a cover letter format for investment banking positions are: Letter header - Provide the personal and contact info of the sender (you), date, and the recipient (recruiter, employer, or hiring manager). Salutation - Start with Dear, Hi, or Hello, and address the receiver directly.

  9. Sample Investment Banking Cover Letter

    Investment Banking Cover Letter Jonathan Green. Chicago, IL 55555 | (555) 555-5555 | [email protected] ... As a recent graduate of University One with a BS in finance, I am eager to launch my career in investment banking. Your entry-level analyst opening provides an excellent fit to my qualifications and aspirations, and I hope to have ...

  10. 3 Investment Banking Cover Letter Examples Made in 2024

    These investment banking cover letter examples will help. Resumes. Resume builder Build a better resume in minutes Resume examples 2,000+ examples that work in 2024 Resume templates 184 free templates for all levels ... Level up your cover letter game. Relax! We'll do the heavy lifiting to write your cover letter in seconds. Get started.

  11. Investment Banking Cover Letter—Sample & Templates

    Two sample investment banking cover letters: one for experienced and one for entry-level investment banking jobs. Steps to write a Goldman Sachs-level cover letter for investment banking. A template for investment banking cover letters with massive ROI. Save hours of work and get a cover letter like this. Pick a template, fill it in. Quick and ...

  12. Investment Banking Cover Letter Example & Writing Tips

    Dear [Mr./Ms.] [Manager's Name], My name is Jamie Hass, and I'm writing in support of my application for the Investment Banking Associate position at David Blair & Company. While a Bachelor's Degree in Finance and a Master's Degree in Business Administration have given me the fundamental knowledge necessary to be a successful investment ...

  13. 3 Investment Banking cover letter examples [Get the job]

    This will give your cover letter a slick appearance and also give the recruiter all of the necessary contact information they need to get in touch with you. The information to add should include: A friendly sign off - e.g. "Kindest regards". Your full name. Phone number (one you can answer quickly)

  14. Investment Banking Cover Letter

    Here's another example of how to quantify your experience in your investment banking cover letter: For the past two years in my current role, I have successfully coordinated multiple multi-billion pound deals, including a private equity firm's £3.5 billion acquisition of a public organisation.

  15. Investment Banking Cover Letter: Full Guide w/ Tips

    Crafting an investment banking cover letter is the first transaction with a potential employer. ... Add a postscript to spotlight a standout skill or achievement, especially if you're writing an entry-level investment banking cover letter. Hiring managers in the investment banking sector get a lot of cover letters, which is why most of them ...

  16. Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter Examples

    Free Investment Banking Analyst cover letter example. Dear Ms. Cross: As a highly accomplished investment and financial analyst and advisor with extensive experience conducting in-depth research, analyzing market trends, and managing client account activities, I am well prepared to surpass your expectations. With this in mind, I invite Toledo ...

  17. Top Investment Banking Cover Letter Examples for 2024

    Here's a great example that you can start with. Dear Mr. Smith, When I completed my investment banking internship, I was ranked No. 2 in a group of 50, placing me in the perfect position to immediately move into an investment banking analyst position at Goldman Sachs. Through that time, I worked mainly in valuation for various companies ...

  18. Investment Banking Cover letter: Template & Guide

    Investment banking cover letter main paragraph example During my 4+ years working as an investment banking associate with Goldberg Zacks, I worked closely with the mergers and acquisitions (M&As) team to help overcome modelling and projection issues, ultimately co-creating a new and mutually beneficial roadmap to a merger that is set to net £ ...

  19. Investment Banking Analyst Cover Letter

    90520 George Radial. Lake Marinda, SD 77951. Dear Blake Goodwin, In response to your job posting for investment banking analyst, I am including this letter and my resume for your review. In the previous role, I was responsible for ad-hoc reporting requests to Auditors, US Accounting or Corporate Finance or other internal or external partners.

  20. 5 Investment Analyst Cover Letters

    Investment Analyst Cover Letter Example. Dear Hiring Manager, I am writing to apply for the Investment Analyst position at JPMorgan Chase & Co. As a long-time admirer of the company's history and commitment to the financial industry, I couldn't be more excited to pursue this opportunity.

  21. Investment Analyst Cover Letter Examples

    Use these Investment Analyst cover letter examples to help you write a powerful cover letter that will separate you from the competition. ... Entry-Level Writing Style Example. As a recent graduate from XYZ University with a Bachelor of Business Administration in Finance, I am eager to begin my career in the investment industry with a firm that ...

  22. Cover Letter for an Entry-Level Banking Job

    Sample Cover Letter for an Entry-Level Banking Job. Jemima Smith. (000) 658-3201. jemima@email,com. March 2, 2023. Mr. Gregory Utah. Manager HR. Montecito Bank and Trust. 202 Rio Rojo Road.

  23. 3 Entry-Level Bank Teller Resume Examples for 2024

    Start editing one of our updated Entry-Level Bank Teller resume templates and land your dream job in 2024. Resumes. Resume builder ... Use an AI cover letter generator to elaborate on your education, experience, and your motivation to start a career as a bank teller. Dive into your experience dealing with customers or finances, detailing ...