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Philosophy books

new books in philosophy

Making sense of it You don’t have to follow a particular God to say a prayer. The words are all that matter

Magus: the art of magic from faustus to agrippa by anthony grafton review – their dark materials, observer book of the week we are free to change the world: hannah arendt’s lessons in love and disobedience – review, the zone of interest invites us to face the holocaust and ask: could we have done this.

new books in philosophy

The big idea The big idea: what if every little thing you do changes history?

new books in philosophy

‘No one should have more than €10m’: the author of Limitarianism on why the super-rich need to level down radically

new books in philosophy

Limitarianism: why we need to put a cap on the super-rich

new books in philosophy

Israelis and Palestinians by Jonathan Glover review – the psychology of conflict

new books in philosophy

Don't bother: an anti-resolutions special The key to keeping new year resolutions? Don’t make them in the first place

new books in philosophy

Why? The Purpose of the Universe by Philip Goff review – a real poser

new books in philosophy

Moments of hope The day my students stopped me in my tracks – and changed how I thought about hope

new books in philosophy

Best books of 2023 Best ideas books of 2023

new books in philosophy

Verdant Inferno/A Scabby Black Brazilian by Alberto Rangel/ Jean-Christophe Goddard review – an Amazonian beauty

new books in philosophy

Book of the day Determined: Life Without Free Will by Robert Sapolsky review – the hard science of decisions

new books in philosophy

I’ve Been Thinking by Daniel C Dennett review – an engaging, vexing memoir with a humility bypass

new books in philosophy

Book of the day The New Leviathans by John Gray review – should we abandon hope and prepare for anarchy?

new books in philosophy

The Handover by David Runciman review – is the future out of our control?

new books in philosophy

The big idea The big idea: how can we live ethically in a world in crisis?

new books in philosophy

Lifescapes by Ann Wroe review – a master biographer chases the essence of life

new books in philosophy

Book of the day Alone by Daniel Schreiber review – me, myself and I

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361 episodes

Interview with Philosophers about their New Books Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

New Books in Philosophy Marshall Poe

  • Society & Culture
  • 3.7 • 17 Ratings
  • 10 FEB 2024

Michael Devitt, "Biological Essentialism" (Oxford UP, 2023)

What makes a species a species? Aristotle answered the species question by positing unchanging essences, properties that all and only members of a species shared. Individuals belonged to a species by possessing this essence. Biologists and philosophers of biology today are either not essentialists at all, or if they are think there are essences they are relational, historical properties.  In his provocative book Biological Essentialism (Oxford UP, 2023), Michael Devitt argues for a new form of biological essentialism in which intrinsic essences, probably largely genetic properties, are part of what tie species together and that the actual explanatory practices of biologists commit them to this view. Devitt, who is distinguished professor of philosophy, emeritus, at CUNY Graduate Center, responds to many philosophers critical of his position, and applies his essentialism to debates about race realism and anti-realism. Carrie Figdor is professor of philosophy at the University of Iowa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

Lisa Herzog, "Citizen Knowledge: Markets, Experts, and the Infrastructure of Democracy" (Oxford UP, 2023)

For better or worse, democracy and epistemology are intertwined. For one thing, politics is partly a matter of gathering, assessing, and applying information. And this can be done responsibly or incompetently. At least since Plato, a leading critique of democracy has focused on the ignorance of ordinary citizens. Historically, this kind of critique has supplied the basis for several nondemocratic proposals. Yet it has also worked in the background of a range of views within democratic theory. Among these are views that have relied on markets as mechanisms for sharing and distributing information. But there are hazards to market-based thinking about democracy. In Citizen Knowledge: Markets, Experts, and the Infrastructure of Democracy (Oxford UP, 2023), Lisa Herzog explores three conceptually distinct sites where democracy interfaces with epistemology: markets, expert communities, and public deliberation. The result is an integrated political epistemology for democracy. Robert Talisse is the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

  • 20 JAN 2024

Jan Westerhoff, "Candrakirti's Introduction to the Middle Way: A Guide" (Oxford UP, 2023)

A proponent of the Madhyamaka tradition of Mahāyāna Buddhism, Candrakīrti wrote several works, one of which, the Madhamakāvatāra, strongly influenced later Tibetan understandings of Madhyamaka.  This work is the subject of Jan Westerhoff’s Candrakīrti’s Introduction to the Middle Way: A Guide (Oxford University Press, 2024), part of the Oxford Guides to Philosophy series. His book situates Candarkīrti and his text within Indian and Tibetan Buddhism and helps philosophical readers appreciate the text’s main arguments and ideas. Chief among these is a commitment to the emptiness of all phenomena, especially but not only selves, which is the subject of the lengthy sixth chapter—analyzing what it means for things to lack any substantial existence and criticizing opposing positions. Candrakīrti also takes up topics in metaphilosophy (do critical arguments commit us to positive claims?), philosophy of mind (do enlightened beings have experience at all?), and semantics and logic (what is the difference between conventional and ultimate truth, and can we express the latter in language?). Westerhoff’s guide aims to help readers unfamiliar with Sanskrit or Tibetan navigate these ideas, pointing them to further scholarly and philosophical resources along the way. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

  • 10 JAN 2024

Krista K. Thomason, "Dancing with the Devil: Why Bad Feelings Make Life Good" (Oxford UP, 2023)

How could a good life include one with anger, or jealousy, or spite? In Dancing with the Devil: Why Bad Feelings Make Life Good (Oxford UP, 2023), Krista Thomason flips the script on popular ways of dealing with our emotions, including neo-Stoicism, mindfulness, and even the prosperity gospel. She makes the case that we should get rid of the double standard we have towards "good" and "bad" emotions, and that we should not aim to be emotional saints. Instead, because "bad" emotions are an essential part of our attachments to our selves, they help us discover what we care about. Thomason, who is an associate professor of philosophy at Swarthmore College, guides the reader through philosophical traditions regarding the relation of emotion to reason and the various approaches thinkers have come up with to deal with our "bad" emotions. Carrie Figdor is professor of philosophy at the University of Iowa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

  • 20 DEC 2023

Tyler Dalton McNabb and Erik Baldwin, "Classical Theism and Buddhism: Connecting Metaphysical and Ethical Systems" (Bloomsbury, 2023)

In addition to denying the existence of a substantial, enduring self, Buddhists are usually understood to deny the existence of a God or gods. However, in Classical Theism and Buddhism: Connecting Metaphysical and Ethical Systems (Bloomsbury, 2022), Tyler Dalton McNabb and Erik Baldwin argue that there is conceptual space to affirm both basic Buddhist metaphysical claims and Classical Theism without contradiction. Their book argues that three fundamental commitments are generally agreed upon by Buddhists: all things are interdependent, impermanent, and empty of "own-being" (svabhāva). However, since Classical Theists like Aquinas deny that God—who is eternal, immutable, impassible, and metaphysically simple—is a thing among other things, accepting the existence of such a God poses no problem for a Buddhist. The book unpacks this thesis, also taking up historical Buddhist and contemporary philosophical objections to a divine being, arguing for a synthesis of Buddhist and theistic ethics and soteriology, and closing with a discussion of the problem of religious pluralism for Christians and Buddhists. Malcolm Keating is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College. His research focuses on Sanskrit works of philosophy in Indian traditions, in the areas of language and epistemology. He is the author of Language, Meaning, and Use in Indian Philosophy (Bloomsbury Press, 2019) and host of the podcast Sutras & Stuff. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

  • 10 DEC 2023

Philip Goff, "Why? The Purpose of the Universe" (Oxford UP, 2023)

Does the universe have a purpose? If it does, how is this connected to the meaningfulness that we seek in our lives? In Why? The Purpose of the Universe (Oxford University Press, 2023), Philip Goff argues for cosmic purposivism, the idea that the universe does have a purpose – although this is not because there is an all-powerful God who provides it with one. Instead, Goff argues, fundamental physics provides us with reason to think it is probable there is a cosmic purpose – and, moreover, the best explanation of these reasons is to posit cosmopsychism: the idea that there are fundamental forms of consciousness such that the universe itself is a conscious mind. Goff, who is professor of philosophy at Durham University, argues that these claims are not as extravagant as they may initially seem, and that his view provides a way for understanding human purposes that lies between secular humanism and religious or spiritual perspectives. Carrie Figdor is professor of philosophy at the University of Iowa. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/philosophy

  • © New Books Network

Customer Reviews

Ummmm, ahhhhh.

These ought to be really good. But they're not, alas. It's not clear whether they are aiming at experts or intelligent non-experts. The presenter Carrie Figdor may know her stuff, but she has no humour or sparkle, and often seems almost unable to complete a sentence - the extended flat ummmms and aaaaahs and youknows can get almost painful to listen to. She also name-drops other supposed academic philosophers without explaining why they might be relevant. It's therefore not surprising that the interviewees themselves sometime seem baffled by what's expected of them and can wander off into annoying jargon or intricacies of meaning that are next to impossible to follow. NB that these directly linked to new books in philosophy rather than wider philosophical themes, and many of these books seem to make angels dancing on the end of a pin seem positively sensible. And as another reviewer has noted, the sound quality is patchy. All of which said, if you want to follow philosophy and hear some smart people talking about smart books, you can still get a lot out of it even though the format is doing its best to stop you! I'll press on...

An invaluable resource

There are so many new books in philosophy, that oftentimes it’s difficult to get around to reading outside your particular area of interest. To have a podcast where philosophers are able to lay out their arguments in their own words and which also directs you to a more thorough work they’ve written is a wonderful idea. Since I found this podcast, philosophers who have appeared on here have led me down so many unexpected and interesting paths - not to mention productive ones! Thank you to the team who make this. It really is appreciated.

Thoughtful, thorough long-form interviews, aimed at an academic audience

New Books in Philosophy is a series of long-form interviews in which philosophers discuss their newly-published books. The interviews are thorough, thoughtful, and deliberative; and if you are listening as a student or researcher in the discipline, you have almost certainly added books to your to-read list as a result of interviews in the series. It is, however, definitely a podcast intended for a specialised academic audience. There are lots of really great podcasts intended to bring philosophy to a general audience (I particularly recommend _The History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps_, _Philosophy Bites_, _The Partially Examined Life_, and _Elucidations_, if that's what you're looking for). These podcasts do commendable work, and can be enjoyed by more advanced listeners as well - but researchers and advanced students will get far more out of a podcast thet meets them at their level than one which takes time to explain stuff they've known for years. It's good that both kinds of podcast exist. I'm labouring this point a bit because the show has had some negative reviews from listeners who appear to be judging it in comparison to philosophy podcasts for a general audience. The 'pauses' and 'ummms' in the interviews are the result of actual *thinking* happening inreal time. The 'wandering off' the reviewer complains of is *digging into the philosophical issues and arguments*. It's true that the interviews often refer to other philosophers' work, and use the jargon of the discipline - but for a specialist audience, that's not an obscurantist bug, it's a time-saving feature. If you are an academic in philosophy or neighbouring disciplines, and you want a podcast that gets you up to speed quickly on the latest philosophical research, you want something that gets straight to the point and goes deep - not something that spends 80% of the runtime explaining Phil101 material. And the former is exactly what New Books in Philosophy does.

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  • The 35 Best Philosophy Books to Live Better and Become a Great Thinker

The 35 Best Philosophy Books to Live Better and Become a Great Thinker Cover

I used to think philosophy meant sitting in a college auditorium, reading boring old texts in languages no one speaks anymore. When I was 23, however, I discovered Ryan Holiday and his work on Stoicism . I read his book The Obstacle Is the Way , and I realized I couldn’t have been more wrong. Philosophy is not about analyzing the thoughts of people who died long ago. It’s about how to live a good life, right here, right now — and that’s exactly what philosophy books are for.

We’ve summarized over 1,000 books here at Four Minute Books. Today, we’ll compile the best philosophy titles for you. Whether you’re a beginner or a philosophy expert, we’re sure you’ll find a book on here that’ll teach you something new. Find a strong set of guiding principles, discover where it came from, and adjust it to your own and modern life.

As usual, we’ve sorted our list into multiple sub-categories. First, we’ll cover the best philosophy books all around. Then, we’ll get into Western philosophy, Eastern philosophy, important philosophers, as well as books talking specifically about ethics and morality. Finally, we’ll show you some “philosophies of productivity” and other books that present a coherent worldview for our modern world.

Besides a picture of the cover of each title, you’ll find our favorite quote from the author, a one-sentence-summary of the book, and some suggestions on when and why to read the book. We’ve also included three key takeaways, as well as some buttons you can click to read the book’s free summary on Four Minute Books or buy a copy for yourself on Amazon (affiliate links).

Use the clickable table of contents below to quickly jump to any book or category, and start discovering the many wonderful, enlightening philosophies we can use to live a better life!

Here are the 35 best philosophy books of all time!

Table of Contents

1. Meditations by Marcus Aurelius

2. man’s search for meaning by viktor frankl, 3. the daily stoic by ryan holiday.

  • 4. The Story of Philosophy by Will Durant 

5. The Republic by Plato

6. discourses by epictetus.

  • 7. The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch 

8. Letters from a Stoic by Seneca

9. meditations on first philosophy by rené descartes, 10. on the shortness of life by seneca, 11. a guide to the good life by william b. irvine, 12. how to be a stoic by massimo pigliucci, 13. how to think like a roman emperor by donald robertson.

  • 14. The Obstacle Is the Way by Ryan Holiday 

15. The Bhagavad Gita by Vyasa

16. the art of war by sun tzu, 17. the tao te ching by lao tzu, 18. the book of joy by dalai lama & desmond tutu, 19. lives of the stoics by ryan holiday, 20. plato at the googleplex by rebecca goldstein, 21. breakfast with socrates by robert rowland smith, 22. the nicomachean ethics by aristotle, 23. the prince by niccolò machiavelli, 24. the ethics of ambiguity by simone de beauvoir, 25. the better angels of our nature by steven pinker, 26. essentialism by greg mckeown, 27. deep work by cal newport, 28. the power of full engagement by jim loehr & tony schwartz, 29. principles by ray dalio, 30. 12 rules for life by jordan peterson, 31. minimalism by joshua fields millburn & ryan nicodemus, 32. digital minimalism by cal newport, 33. kaizen by sarah harvey, 34. the subtle art of not giving a f*ck by mark manson.

  • 35. The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle 

Other Book Lists by Topic

Other book lists by author, best philosophy books overall.

Best Philosophy Books #1: Meditations

Favorite Quote

“You have power over your mind — not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength.” — Marcus Aurelius

The Book in One Sentence

Meditations is a collection of 12 books written by Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, who consistently journaled to remember his education in Stoic philosophy, and whose writings will teach you logic, faith, and self-discipline.

Why should you read it?

If you’re looking for daily comfort, motivation, and wisdom, this is one of the best books you’ll ever pick up. I don’t see why anyone shouldn’t read this. The advice is as sound as when Marcus gave it to himself 2,000 years ago, and the book will benefit you in tough as well as glorious times. Plus, it might even inspire you to start journaling yourself!

Key Takeaways

  • True “logic” doesn’t always make sense, but everything happens for a reason.
  • Life is too short to complain.
  • The only pain you suffer is the pain you create yourself.

If you want to learn more, you can read our free four-minute summary or get a copy for yourself.

Best Philosophy Books #2: Man's Search for Meaning

“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.” — Viktor Frankl

Man’s Search for Meaning details holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl’s horrifying experiences in Nazi concentration camps, along with his psychological approach of logotherapy, which is also what helped him survive and shows how you can – and must – find meaning in your life.

There are few holes this book couldn’t make you crawl back out from. Beyond inspiring you to rethink meaning and find it wherever you go, however, it will also instill tremendous respect in you for those who’ve come before us. This book is enlightening on both a personal and a historical level, and I think almost anyone would benefit from reading it.

  • Sometimes, the only way to survive is to surrender to death.
  • Your life has its own meaning, and it’s up to you to find it.
  • Use paradoxical intention to make your fears go away.

Best Philosophy Books #3: The Daily Stoic

“Control your perceptions. Direct your actions properly. Willingly accept what’s outside your control.” — Ryan Holiday

The Daily Stoic is a year-long compilation of short, daily meditations from ancient Stoic philosophers, like Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius, teaching you equanimity, resilience, and perseverance via the three Stoic disciplines of perception, action, and will.

If you struggle with reading non-fiction at a pace that makes you feel good about your progress, this is the book for you. It’s also one of my all-time favorites. I read it every year for five years in a row. A page a day is so easy to read, you can’t not do it. As a result, you’ll gain a great overview of Stoicism and implement plenty of its tenets in your life.

  • Perception gives purpose to your thoughts, actions, and ultimately everything you do.
  • We can change the course of our life by actively choosing our actions instead of just reacting to our impulses.
  • Will is our internal force of perseverance, ready to give us hope when everything else fails.

4. The Story of Philosophy by Will Durant  

Best Philosophy Books #4: The Story of Philosophy

“Civilization begins with order, grows with liberty, and dies with chaos.” — Will Durant 

The Story of Philosophy profiles the lives of great Western philosophers, such as Plato, Socrates, and Nietzsche, exploring their views on politics, religion, morality, the meaning of life, and plenty of other important concepts.

If you’re curious about the origins of philosophy, this is the definitive title to read. Durant and his wife are some of the greatest historians who ever lived, and they fantastically condensed the world’s story, in this case down to 700 pages. If you want to start with something shorter, grab The Lessons of History first, then go deeper on each of history’s most important philosophers in this masterpiece.

  • Ancient Greek philosophers paved the way for philosophy, science, and new forms of societal governance.
  • Philosopher Spinoza helped decipher the hidden meanings of religion.
  • Voltaire was partially responsible for the French revolution and the improvement of political systems around the world.

Best Philosophy Books #5: The Republic

“The heaviest penalty for declining to rule is to be ruled by someone inferior to yourself.” — Plato

The Republic is one of the most important political and philosophical works in history , written by Plato, the archetypal philosopher and one of Socrates’ students , in the form of a dialogue about justice and political systems.

If you’re in politics, this is a must-read. If not, it’s still a valuable read on what it means to be governed, how to be a good citizen, and why philosophers can be good rulers but don’t necessarily will be . All-around a classic worth picking up.

  • Justice must be looked at on an individual as well as a city level.
  • Both cities and souls can be divided into three distinct parts.
  • Philosophers trying to rule others will face lots of difficulty, and rightfully so.

Best Philosophy Books #6: Discourses

“What else is freedom but the power to live our life the way we want?” — Epictetus

Discourses is a collection of ancient philosopher Epictetus’ lectures, transcribed by one of his students, helping us make sense of the world and teaching us to accept hardship, change, and life events that feel like setbacks at first but will ultimately make us stronger.

Unlike most of the other ancient philosophers, Epictetus didn’t start from wealth. He was a slave, but thanks to his ideas and behavior, he was set free. He lived frugally till the end of his days, and that’s why his lectures are full of common sense. If you want an original take on Stoicism that didn’t come from a point of privilege, this is your best bet.

  • Without life’s challenges, we wouldn’t feel the need to grow and evolve. 
  • Everything great in life takes time and effort to build.
  • If you can’t control it, don’t stress over it.

7. The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch  

Best Philosophy Books #7: The Last Lecture

“If I only had three words of advice, they would be, ‘tell the truth.’ If I got three more words, I’d add, ‘all the time.’” — Randy Pausch

The Last Lecture is a college professor’s final message to the world before his impending death of cancer at a relatively young age, offering meaningful life advice, significant words of wisdom, and a great deal of optimism and hope for humanity.

Imagine your favorite school teacher or mentor were to give one last lecture before they died. Wouldn’t you attend? Well, Randy Pausch may not be your favorite college professor, but he probably will be if you give his last lecture a chance. The book is full of inspiration, hard-gained wisdom, and memories that will make you smile. Randy also gave the actual lecture , of course, but I recommend reading the book first. It holds more detail and makes the talk feel a lot stronger.

  • If you never give up on your dreams, eventually, some of them will come true.
  • True satisfaction comes from helping others succeed.
  • The simplest advice is often the most valuable.

Best Philosophy Books About Stoicism and Western Philosophy

Best Books About Philosophy #8: Letters from a Stoic

“If you really want to escape the things that harass you, what you need is not to be in a different place but to be a different person.” — Seneca

Letters from a Stoic is a collection of encouraging moral messages sent by Roman Stoic and philosopher Seneca to his friend Lucilius in order to help him become less emotional, more disciplined, and find the good life.

There used to be a thing called “pen pals.” People would commit to writing each other letters on a regular basis. Nowadays, the practice is dwindling. Thanks to this book, however, you can have a pen pal, and not just any pen pal but one of the most famous philosophers in history. If you’d like a friend to send you letters of encouragement, this book is perfect for you.

  • The goal of attaining wisdom is to live in harmony with nature.
  • Your most valuable possession is your mind.
  • A wise man doesn’t need friends, but he chooses to make them anyway.

Best Books About Philosophy #9: Meditations on First Philosophy

“Dubium sapientiae initium — Doubt is the origin of wisdom.” — René Descartes

Meditations on First Philosophy is one of the premier works of Western philosophy, written by  René Descartes in 1641, prompting us to abandon everything that can possibly be doubted and then starting to reason our way forward based only on what we can know with absolute certainty.

Are you a person driven by logic and reason? Then this is the philosophy book for you. Descartes’ approach of starting from what’s 100% true and then going from there is fascinating. If you’d like to test your reasoning skills and aren’t afraid of someone challenging your assumptions, read this book.

  • Your senses don’t always tell the truth.
  • The fact that you think proves that you exist.
  • There are three levels of truth in the world.

Best Books About Philosophy #10: On the Shortness of Life

“People are frugal in guarding their personal property; but as soon as it comes to squandering time they are most wasteful of the one thing in which it is right to be stingy.” — Seneca

On the Shortness of Life is a 2,000 year old, 20-page masterpiece by Seneca, Roman Stoic philosopher and teacher to the emperors, about time and how to best use it to ensure you lead a long and fulfilling life.

There are a million talks, books, and celebrities out there telling us that “life is short.” But, honestly, no one ever said it better than Seneca in this short read. You’ll find yourself making highlight after highlight. It’s amazing and, productivity-wise, probably the only book you’ll ever have to read.

  • Chasing leisure, luxury, and legacy is what makes a long life appear short.
  • You can be busy all your life without ever doing something meaningful, so beware.
  • Your ability to contemplate and appreciate life will never disappear.

Best Books About Philosophy #11: A Guide to the Good Life

“The easiest way for us to gain happiness is to learn how to want the things we already have.” — William B. Irvine

A Guide to the Good Life is a roadmap for aspiring Stoics, revealing why this ancient philosophy is useful today, what Stoicism is truly about, and showing you how to cultivate its powerful principles in your own life.

If you’re looking for a general introduction to Stoicism, get this book. It covers its historical rise and fall, most important concepts, as well as the best pieces of Stoic advice. A great overview of this resurgent philosophy.

  • The two primary values of Stoicism are virtue and tranquility.
  • Learn to want what you already have.
  • Immediately accept things that are outside of your control, and focus on what you can do with what you’ve got.

Best Books About Philosophy #12: How to Be a Stoic

“Better to endure pain in an honorable manner than to seek joy in a shameful one.” — Massimo Pigliucci

How to Be a Stoic is a practical guide for applying ancient philosophy in modern life, covering the principles philosophers like Socrates, Epictetus, and Cato followed to cultivate strength in the three Stoic disciplines of desire, action, and assent.

For a deeper dive into Stoicism and its central areas of application, consider this book. Like many other books on the topic, it divides its ideas into three section mapping to the three Stoic disciplines, so even if you’re just looking for advice on one particular field, you can easily skip around and get right to what’s most relevant to you right now.

  • The concept of “preferred indifferents” can help you act in line with your morals without becoming extremist.
  • In Stoicism, virtue is the highest good, and it’s made up of four values.
  • You can have useful, pleasurable, and good friendships. The good are the most important.

Best Books About Philosophy #13: How to Think Like a Roman Emperor

“What matters, in other words, isn’t what we feel but how we respond to those feelings.” — Donald Robertson

How to Think Like a Roman Emperor combines the story of famous Stoic and Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius with lessons from modern psychology to help you become more emotionally resilient and develop the strength to overcome even the most challenging circumstances.

If you prefer learning from stories, this is a great book for you. Robertson releases the ideas behind Stoicism slowly, rolling them out alongside Marcus’ life story, adding insight into modern psychology along the way. The result is an effortless read that makes for fantastic insights without feeling like a typical non-fiction book.

  • We come from nature, and we’ll return to it eventually, so it’s only logical to live in agreement with it. 
  • Life is about constant improvement, which is why we should all work on our virtues every day.
  • Stoics know there’s no point in worrying over what you can’t control, so best just make your peace with it.

14. The Obstacle Is the Way by Ryan Holiday  

Best Books About Philosophy #14: The Obstacle Is the Way

“There is no good or bad without us, there is only perception. There is the event itself and the story we tell ourselves about what it means.” — Ryan Holiday

The Obstacle Is the Way will help you endure the struggles of life with grace and resilience, thanks to lessons drawn from ancient heroes, former presidents, modern actors, and successful athletes and how they turned adversity into success thanks to the powers of perception, action, and will.

If you think, “Well, all this stuff about Stoicism is great, but what does it look like today ?” then this title, and of course Ryan Holiday’s other books , are a great place to start. Ryan can be largely credited with bringing Stoicism back to life, and he does it with countless examples from modern-world leaders, athletes, and celebrities embodying Stoic ideals. The first of three books in his original trilogy on Stoicism, you’ll want to read  Ego Is the Enemy and Stillness Is the Key next.

  • Imagine you’re advising yourself as a friend to keep an objective perspective.
  • Large obstacles have large weaknesses – identify them and use them against them.
  • Use your will to accept what you cannot change and change the things you can.

Best Philosophy Books About Eastern Philosophy

Best Books On Philosophy #15: The Bhagavad Gita

“It is better to live your own destiny imperfectly than to live an imitation of somebody else’s life with perfection.” — Vyasa

The Bhagavad Gita is the number one spiritual text in Hinduism, packed with wisdom about life and purpose as well as powerful advice on living virtuously but authentically without succumbing to life’s temptations or other people’s dreams.

You don’t have to be Hindu to appreciate Hindu wisdom. Philosophy works best when you balance multiple perspectives, and though, as readers have told me, it’s very hard for outsiders to fully grasp “the Gita,” it still provides valuable counterpoints worth studying.

  • Living life doing what you were destined to do brings peace, while the opposite breeds pain and insecurity.
  • Find meaning in the journey and let go of constant anticipation.
  • Meditation can help you master your thoughts and regain focus.

Best Books On Philosophy #16: The Art of War

“Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win.” — Sun Tzu

The Art of War is considered the definitive text on military strategy and warfare, written in ancient China around 500 BC, inspiring businesses, athletes, and of course generals to beat their opponents and competition the right way.

If you’re looking for a highly action-oriented approach to philosophy, this classic might be for you. It’s a book about war, yes, but it’s also a book about business, work, and life. If you metaphorically apply Sun Tzu’s strategies of warfare to your next big meeting, it might go better than you expect. You’ll also pick up plenty of honorable attitudes along the way, as the soldier’s path is, ideally, supposed to be a virtuous one — and it’s walking that path that this book hopes to teach you.

  • Only enter battles you know you can win.
  • Deceive your competition to make them do what you want.
  • Lead your team as if you were leading a single man by the hand.

Best Books On Philosophy #17: The Tao Te Ching

“If you realize that all things change, there is nothing you will try to hold on to.” ― Lao Tzu

The Tao Te Ching is a collection of 81 short, poignant chapters full of advice on living in harmony with “the Tao,” translated as “the Way,” an ancient Chinese interpretation of the spiritual force underpinning all life, first written around 400 BC but relevant to this day.

Whereas Western philosophy is focused more on the self and dealing with the outside world, Eastern philosophy promotes harmony and being part of the world. Few books encapsulate this Eastern approach more appropriately than this book. Plus, at 81 short chapters, it’s an easy and quick read full of great life advice. Definitely another one for your must-read shelf!

  • Fully accept whatever the current moment brings. Give yourself fully to reality.
  • Admit your own faults and mistakes, because ultimately, they might be your greatest source of strength.
  • Always compete in a spirit of play to stay in harmony with the Tao.

Best Books On Philosophy #18: The Book of Joy

“The more time you spend thinking about yourself, the more suffering you will experience.” — Dalai Lama & Desmond Tutu

The Book of Joy  is the result of a 7-day meeting between the Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu, two of the world’s most influential spiritual leaders, during which they discussed one of life’s most important questions: how do we find joy despite suffering?

When two globally revered spiritual leaders talk, it’s worth paying attention. When they discuss handling suffering as an essential life skill (because suffering is inevitable), you might want to drop everything else and listen for a while. This one probably works really well as an audiobook too. If you’re looking for more joy in your life, get this one.

  • A life without suffering does not exist.
  • Since we can’t control suffering, we must practice our response to it.
  • Compassion and sadness help us alleviate our troublesome responses to suffering.

Best Books About Important Philosophers

Best Books On Philosophy #19: Lives of the Stoics

“There is no better definition of a Stoic: to have but not want, to enjoy without needing.” — Ryan Holiday

Lives of the Stoics takes a deep dive into the experiences and beliefs of some of the earliest philosophers practicing the four Stoic virtues of courage, temperance, justice, and wisdom.

If you’re already on the Stoicism-train but want to know more about the most important Stoic philosophers’ lives, this book is for you. Beyond just the most important Stoic ideas, you’ll also find plenty of anecdotes and details about the lives of Epicurus, Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, and others. If you like biographies, you’ll enjoy this book.

  • Stoicism came about as a result of extreme hardship. 
  • Not everyone who initially followed Stoicism fully lived up to its standards. 
  • Marcus Aurelius was a Roman emperor whose practice of Stoicism helped him lead with compassion and humility.

Best Books On Philosophy #20: Plato at the Googleplex

“If we don’t understand our tools, then there is a danger we will become the tool of our tools.” — Rebecca Goldstein

Plato at the Googleplex asks what would happen if ancient philosopher Plato were alive today and came in contact with the modern world, for example by touring Google’s headquarters, and what the implications of his encounters are for the relevance of philosophy in our civilized, hyper-technological world.

Are you skeptical that philosophy still has a place in the modern world? Then this book provides the perfect thought experiment. If Plato were on a speaking tour today, what would he tell us? This book combines the fun of a novel with the insight of a history book, and the result is a trip you’ll never forget! Perhaps, it might even change your mind.

  • Google can answer most questions but not all of them.
  • No two people are the same, and neither should education treat them that way.
  • Plato came up with a definition of love that encompasses all human relationships.

Best Books On Philosophy #21: Breakfast With Socrates

“You can’t be free to be right unless you can free to be wrong.” — Robert Rowland Smith

Breakfast With Socrates takes you through an ordinary day in the company of extraordinary minds, linking each hour of the day and its activity to the core ideas of one of history’s great philosophers, such as  Descartes, Nietzsche, or Socrates.

If you’re looking for an easy, extremely practical introduction to philosophy, look no further. From breakfast to going to work to falling asleep at night, this book will paint a philosophical backdrop for plenty of familiar everyday situations. Then, it will fill said backdrop with the wisdom of one of history’s great philosophers. What a wonderful concept for a book!

  • Philosophy isn’t about spinning your head all day; it’s about making wise decisions.
  • Your morning routine is a battle of the egos.
  • A good way of assessing your happiness is to ask yourself if you’d like to live the same life again.

Best Philosophy Books About Ethics & Morality

Best Philosopher Books #22: The Nicomachean Ethics

“Whosoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god.” — Aristotle

The Nicomachean Ethics is a historically important text compiling Aristotle’s extensive discussion of existential questions concerning happiness, ethics, friendship, knowledge, pleasure, virtue, and even society at large.

This one’s for nerds and philosophy geeks like me. Even modern translations still aren’t always super easy to understand, and you’ll have to reread sentences all the time. That said, there is something about reading an original text that makes it feel more special than even the best second-hand reporting. If you want to be able to claim you’ve actually read Aristotle, get yourself a copy of this book.

  • Aim to achieve a state of eudaimonia instead of conventional happiness.
  • Arete, or virtue, is accomplished through a lifetime of work.
  • Strive to be magnanimous — someone who does great and honorable things.

Best Philosopher Books #23: The Prince

“Everyone sees what you appear to be, few experience what you really are.” — Niccolò Machiavelli

The Prince is a 16th century political treatise famous for condoning, even encouraging, evil behavior amongst political rulers in order for them to stay in power.

In my mind, this book is something akin to a big “BEWARE” sign. You read it. You understand how people in power can easily abuse it. And you’ll be much less likely to become the victim of power schemes in the future. Don’t think of this as an instruction manual, for it’ll only lead you down a dark path. Treat it with care, however, and it will be enlightening.

  • Countries can be easy to conquer but hard to rule or vice versa – and markets are the same.
  • If a country truly wants to protect itself, it needs its own army, not mercenaries. The same holds true for businesses.
  • If you want to run a business, you have to assemble your advisors and know when to listen to them.

Best Philosopher Books #24: The Ethics of Ambiguity

“We are having a hard time living because we are so bent on outwitting death.” — Simone de Beauvoir

The Ethics of Ambiguity explains existentialist philosophy in a post–World War II setting, showing us how we can accept the absurdity of life and use its randomness to create rather than despair.

Philosophy, like many other fields and book-writing in general, has historically been dominated by men. How refreshing to get a woman’s perspective. On existentialism, one of the most relevant and, arguably, useful philosophies, no less. If you’re looking for an introduction into existentialism and/or some background on one of history’s best female philosophers, pick this one.

  • You’re freer than you think, and you should take advantage of it.
  • There is no such thing as a completely neutral perspective.
  • Abstract ideals aren’t as important as real people, but our governments mess this up all the time.

Best Philosopher Books #25: The Better Angels of Our Nature

“As one becomes aware of the decline of violence, the world begins to look different. The past seems less innocent; the present less sinister.” — Steven Pinker

The Better Angels of Our Nature proves that we live in the most peaceful time in history, taking us through several major shifts that led to a global reduction in crime, explaining what motivates us to behave violently, and showing that these motivators are far outweighed by our naturally peaceful tendencies.

It’s easy to feel depressed. All you have to do is turn on the news. But despite all the bad reporting, when you zoom out on the timeline, the world is doing better than it ever has. If you’re looking for hope, optimism, and more faith in humanity, this is the one to read.

  • Ideologies always start out with good intentions, but they can quickly deteriorate into promoting violence.
  • The Flynn effect increases humanity’s ability to reason over time, thus making us less violent.
  • Thanks to the invention of the printing press, humanitarian philosophy could spread, which decreased violence across the board.

Best Philosophy Books for Productivity

Best Philosopher Books #26: Essentialism

“Remember that if you don’t prioritize your life someone else will.” — Greg McKeown

Essentialism will show you a new, better way of looking at productivity  by giving you permission to be extremely selective about what’s truly essential in your life and then ruthlessly cutting out everything else.

Most productivity books are just collections of common-sense tips. This one offers a fully fledged out philosophy for how to get things done, both in work and in life. That’s what makes this book so refreshing. It also shows you what philosophy looks like when we extend it beyond its usual, often academically influenced confines. All around a fantastic book!

  • Doing nothing and doing everything are both signs of learned helplessness.
  • Become the editor of your own life with the 90% rule.
  • Always give yourself a time buffer of 50%.

Best Philosopher Books #27: Deep Work

“If you don’t produce, you won’t thrive — no matter how skilled or talented you are.” — Cal Newport

Deep Work   proposes that we have lost our ability to focus deeply and immerse ourselves in a complex task, showing us how to cultivate this skill again and manage our attention better than ever before thanks to  four simple rules.

If you struggle to focus and feel like you can barely hold your attention together, read this book. It’s one of few productivity books presenting a coherent worldview, and that’s what makes it one of the best.

  • There are four strategies for deep work, all of which require intention.
  • Productive meditation can help you work more deeply, even while you’re taking a break.
  • Stop working at the same time each day. 

Best Philosopher Books #28: The Power of Full Engagement

“We grow the aspects of our lives that we feed — with energy and engagement — and choke off those we deprive of fuel. Your life is what you agree to attend to.” — Jim Loehr & Tony Schwartz

The Power of Full Engagement will show you how to manage the only thing worth managing – your energy – by teaching you how to properly maintain the four kinds of energy, accept your limitations, and live a life of purpose.

Are you struggling to balance the various areas of life demanding your time and energy? Then this book is for you. It’s also not a philosophy book per se, but it presents a model you can use to navigate all of life. Plus, the energy management concept is just fascinating. Worth checking out!

  • Manage your energy, not your time.
  • Keep track of all four sources of energy in your life.
  • Accept your limitations. 

Best Philosophy Books for Modern Life

Books of Philosophy #29: Principles

“The happiest people discover their own nature and match their life to it.” — Ray Dalio

Principles outlines and breaks down the set of rules for work and life that billionaire investor Ray Dalio, CEO of the world’s largest hedge fund, has acquired throughout his 40-year career in finance.

This book is part biography, part career advice, and part philosophical manual. Dalio put everything he had into it, and it shows. It has a lot to offer, and even if you’re not the biggest philosophy nut yet, you’ll gain a lot from Dalio’s vast life experience. The book is also quite moving, so there’s a strong emotional component as well. Check out Ray Dalio’s other books when you’re done!

  • Principles are powerful weapons in the fight against flawed thinking.
  • Radical truthfulness and transparency are two of Ray’s most important ideas.
  • Great businesses use principles to create environments where the best ideas win.

Books of Philosophy #30: 12 Rules for Life

“It’s all very well to think the meaning of life is happiness, but what happens when you’re unhappy? Happiness is a great side effect. When it comes, accept it gratefully. But it’s fleeting and unpredictable.” — Jordan Peterson

12 Rules for Life is a story-based, stern yet entertaining self-help manual for young people laying out a set of simple rules to help us become more disciplined , behave better, act with integrity, and balance our lives while enjoying them as much as we can.

Love or hate Jordan Peterson , the man has a way with words. In this case, he uses his calm yet convincing voice to provide essential life advice to young people. The advice makes sense, and the stories are inspiring. All around, this is a book worth peeking into.

  • Sweep in front of your own door before pointing out that the street is dirty.
  • Treat yourself like a child you’re responsible for.
  • Aim to do what is meaningful, not convenient.

Books of Philosophy #31: Minimalism

“You needn’t settle for a mediocre life just because the people around you did.” — Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus

Minimalism   is an instructive introduction to the philosophy of less, and how it helped two guys who had achieved the American dream let go of their possessions and the depressions that came with them.

Minimalism is one of few modern-day, standalone philosophies. That alone makes this book worth reading. More so, however, it has a chance at making you happier. Caring less about possessions is a wonderful way of making room for what’s truly important in your life, and this book explains this life approach extremely well.

  • Debt goes first. Get rid of your financial crutches to finally feel free.
  • Use the TARA method to become more accepting of other people in your life.
  • You are not your job. Don’t let your work define you.

Books of Philosophy #32: Digital Minimalism

“Focus your online time on a small number of carefully selected and optimized activities that strongly support things you value, and then happily miss out on everything else.” — Cal Newport

Digital Minimalism shows us where to draw the line with technology, how to properly take time off our digital devices, and why doing so is the key to living a happy, focused life in a noisy world.

We have so much more technology than we did even 20 years ago, and yet, no one has updated philosophy to help us acknowledge this fact. Well, no one except Cal Newport. If you struggle to find the line between your screen and reality, this book will provide plenty of tips and tactics but also some powerful arguments as to why spending less time online matters.

  • Digital minimalism centers on 3 principles: clutter is costly, optimization is vital, and intentionality is satisfying.
  • Plan downtime events as a source of inward joy and deep contemplation.
  • Quick fixes and “life hacks” might prompt a healthy new habit, but they don’t promote sustainable change.

Books of Philosophy #33: Kaizen

“Change is infectious and when success is achieved in one area, you are encouraged to apply the same techniques to another area of your life.” — Sarah Harvey

Kaizen is the Japanese philosophy of “continuous improvement,” which is often used in business but can also be applied to personal growth, offering us a path to self-improvement that’s less plagued by pressure and anxiety and more marked by small, daily steps adding up to incremental but meaningful progress.

If you feel overwhelmed by all the positive changes you’re hoping to make in your life, stop and read this book. This refreshing philosophy gives us permission to take it slowly, to live our lives one day at a time and yet still feel good about them. Everything is going well when you improve a little every day — what a comforting philosophy to live by!

  • Kaizen is a Japanese philosophy centered around incremental growth, and it begins with evaluating your habits.
  • The best way to reach a big goal is to start with a step so small, you’ll barely notice the difference.
  • Review your habits regularly to track your progress.

Books of Philosophy #34: The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

“Who you are is defined by what you’re willing to struggle for.” — Mark Manson

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck does away with the positive psychology craze to instead give you a Stoic, no-BS approach to living a life that might not always be happy, but that will be meaningful and centered only around what’s important to you.

Are you tired of the constant prompts to be positive and put on a smile? Then this is the book for you. Manson has managed to evolve nihilism — a philosophy in which nothing matters and that commonly makes people depressed — into something meaningful: a world in which very few things matter, but the ones that do are really, really important. An absolute mega-bestseller of a book, full of humor and sound advice. Definitely a recommended read.

  • Values you can’t control are bad values to follow.
  • Don’t believe you know anything with certainty; it keeps you from improving.
  • Trying to leave a legacy might ruin your life.

35. The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle  

Books of Philosophy #35: The Power of Now

“Time isn’t precious at all, because it is an illusion. What you perceive as precious is not time but the one point that is out of time: the Now. That is precious indeed. The more you are focused on time — past and future — the more you miss the Now, the most precious thing there is.” — Eckhart Tolle

The Power of Now shows you that every minute you spend worrying about the future or regretting the past is a minute lost, because the only place you can truly live in is the present, the now, which is why the book offers actionable strategies to start living every minute as it occurs and becoming 100% present in and for your life.

If you feel like reality keeps letting you down, perhaps you’re not spending enough time in it. Of course we get sad when we constantly think about the past or the future! This book will remedy that problem. If you’re a mindfulness skeptic or feel burned out, this book might provide just the new perspective you need.

  • Life is just a series of present moments.
  • All pain is a result of resistance to the things you cannot change.
  • You can free yourself from pain by constantly observing your mind yet not judging your thoughts.

Tim Ferriss once came close to committing suicide. The thing he credits for successfully climbing out of the hole, not returning, and managing his depression a lot better since then? Philosophy! Stoicism, in his case. Tim calls it “an operating system for thriving in high-stress environments; for making better decisions.” 

Thanks to people like him, Ryan Holiday , and others, this set of ancient ideas from a few good thinkers is seeing a resurgence. Whichever particular philosophy you find most helpful in living your life, however, only you can find out. At the end of the day, it doesn’t matter whether we connect more with Stoicism, existentialism, or even the ideals promoted in Star Wars . What matters is that we find a set of life rules that works for us .

I hope our list of the best philosophy books will help you do just that. Pick a title, start learning, and remember what William James said: “Philosophy is at once the most sublime and the most trivial of human pursuits.”

Looking for more of the best books on various topics? Here are all the book lists we’ve made for you so far:

  • The 60 Best Business Books of All Time (Will Forever Change How You Think About Organizations)
  • The 20 Best Entrepreneurship Books to Start, Grow & Run a Successful Business
  • The 14 Best Finance Books of All Time
  • The 21 Best Habit Books of All Time to Change Any Behavior
  • The 33 Best Happiness Books of All Time That Everyone Should Read
  • The 60 Best History Books of All Time (to Read at Any Age)
  • The 7 Best Inspirational Books That Will Light Your Inner Fire
  • The 40 Best Leadership Books of All Time to Help You Become a Truly Inspiring Person
  • The 31 Best Motivational Books Ever Written
  • The 12 Best Nonfiction Books Most People Have Never Heard Of
  • The 34 Best Psychology Books That Will Make You Smarter and Happier
  • The 25 Best Sales Books of All Time to Help You Close Any Deal
  • The 33 Best Self-Help Books of All Time to Read at Any Age
  • The 22 Best Books About Sex & Sexuality to Improve Your Love Life & Relationships
  • The 30 Most Life-Changing Books That Will Shift Your Perspective & Stay With You Forever

Looking for more books by the world’s most celebrated authors? Here are all of the book lists by the author we’ve curated for you:

  • All Brené Brown Books, Sorted Chronologically (and by Popularity)
  • Jordan Peterson Books: All Titles in Order of Publication + The 5 Top Books He Recommends
  • All Malcolm Gladwell Books, Sorted Chronologically (and by Popularity)
  • All Michael Pollan Books, Sorted Chronologically (and by Popularity)
  • Peter Thiel Books: A Comprehensive List of Books By, About & Recommended by Peter Thiel
  • All Rachel Hollis Books: The Full List of Non-Fiction, Fiction & Cookbooks, Sorted by Popularity & the Best Reading Order
  • All Ray Dalio Books, Sorted Chronologically (and by Popularity)
  • All Robert Greene Books, Sorted Chronologically (and by Popularity)
  • All Ryan Holiday Books, Sorted Chronologically (and by Popularity)
  • All Simon Sinek Books, Sorted Chronologically (and by Popularity)
  • All Tim Ferriss Books, Sorted Chronologically (and by Popularity)
  • All Walter Isaacson Books, Sorted Chronologically (and by Popularity)

Last Updated on February 20, 2023

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new books in philosophy

  • June 16, 2011

The New Books Network has launched a new channel focusing on philosophy. “New Books in Philosophy features peer-to-peer discussions with philosophers about their new ideas as expressed in their newly published books. The program is co-hosted by Carrie Figdor (University of Iowa) and Robert Talisse (Vanderbilt University). Between the two of us, we will be exploring new books in ethics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, metaphysics, philosophy of science, social and political philosophy, history of philosophy, philosophy of language, and many other subfields.”

Info here .

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Paul Katsafanas

Philosophy of devotion, the longing for invulnerable ideals, oxford university press 2022.

Why do some of our identity-defining commitments resist reason and critical reflection, and why do we persist in them even when they threaten our happiness, safety, and comfort?

Paul Katsafanas argues in his book Philosophy of Devotion:The Longing for Invulnerable Ideals (Oxford UP, 2023) that these commitments involve an ethical stance that he calls devotion to sacred ideas. 

A sacred value is one that we cannot trade with ordinary values, or even consider trading off. When a value is sacred, no rational considerations will disrupt commitment to it. Philosophy of Devotion offers a detailed philosophical account and defense of these features both reasonable and unreasonable, beneficial and detrimental. Katsafanas explains that a life with meaningful commitments is richer and more meaningful than a life without deep, sustained commitments. 

At the same time, that same devotion can deform into forms of individual and group fanaticism that can be alienating, extremist, and violent. This fanaticism is driven by feelings of persecution and threat to a fragile self, and exacerbated by feelings of ressentiment, a growing anger and resentment of opposition that becomes self-perpetuating.   

In this book Katsafanas also provides an alternative to fanaticism, a way to express non-pathological forms of devotion. With this approach, individuals can avoid the dangers of fanaticism on the one hand and an empty lack of meaning on the other. This perpetual quest requires maintaining a form of existential flexibility, which may include oscillation between affirming these sacred values and deepening understanding through consideration of challenging questions. 

Recommended reading:  The True Believe r by Eric Hoffer

Meghan Cochran studies belief and action as a technologist working in customer experience and as a student of religion, business, and literature.

Listen to more episodes on:

Meghan cochran, also hosted by meghan cochran, economics, religion and happiness, vani kant borooah, the nature of the religious right, neall w. pogue.

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If you love crime fiction, this is a good week for you: Our recommended books include an F.B.I. procedural set in Iowa, a novel about kidnappers seeking revenge for hate crimes, a spy novel set in Malaya during World War II and a collection of four classic detective novels by the great Chester Himes. There’s more fiction, too, including Venita Blackburn’s quirky look at grief and impersonation, “Dead in Long Beach, California,” and novels by Shubnum Khan and Temim Fruchter. In nonfiction, we recommend a history of women in the C.I.A. and an exploration of the intellectual thickets that can arise from copyright law. Happy reading. — Gregory Cowles

THE ESSENTIAL HARLEM DETECTIVES Chester Himes

Himes (1909-84) was one of the last century’s great novelists, who happened to work in the crime genre; this volume contains four of the nine books from his “Harlem Detectives” series, featuring the investigators Coffin Ed Johnson and Grave Digger Jones.

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“Himes is the songwriter of the downtrodden. His stories sing with a fire and light that comes from a simmering sense of loss. A loss of respect, of humanity, of honor.”

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SMOKE KINGS Jahmal Mayfield

Can there ever be restitution for the harm done to generations of Black people in America? Mayfield takes this question to a provocative extreme in this thriller, which follows a group of four friends as they kidnap descendants of people who long ago committed racially motivated hate crimes.

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“As everything goes up in flames, Mayfield leans all the way into the discomfort zone.”

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Melville House | Paperback, $19.99

ORIGINAL SINS Erin Young

In this nimble, assured thriller — the second in a series — an F.B.I. rookie dealing with her complicated family has been assigned to investigate threats against Iowa’s newly elected female governor, just as a serial rapist and killer known as the Sin Eater emerges in Des Moines after a long hiatus.

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“A strong sense of the Midwest and a nimble familiarity with American police investigations — all the more impressive since Young, who previously wrote historical fiction as Robyn Young, is British.”

Flatiron | $28.99

THE STORM WE MADE Vanessa Chan

This ambitious and sweeping debut novel explores the fallout of a Malayan woman’s decision to become a spy for Japanese forces in World War II, unwittingly helping to usher in a brutal occupation with devastating costs for her family.

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From Janika Oza’s review

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DEAD IN LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA Venita Blackburn

Blackburn’s first novel (after two inventive short story collections) is an experimental and disarmingly funny look at death and loss. Narrated by dystopian artificial intelligence machines, the story follows a woman who impersonates her brother by texting from his phone after his suicide.

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“Her sentences zing with lively precision. ... Blackburn’s idiosyncratic grief novel is as freshly devastating as they come.”

From Megan Milks’s review

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THE DJINN WAITS A HUNDRED YEARS Shubnum Khan

A decaying mansion with a once-glamorous history is the setting for this rich and swoony novel about a grand love story, which features a bookish girl, her ghost twin, a lost diary and haunted generations of Indian immigrants in coastal South Africa.

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“An ambitious delight, with rich characters and some exceptionally lovely writing. ... This is the start of a major career.”

From Lauren Beukes’s review

Viking | $28

WHO OWNS THIS SENTENCE? A History of Copyrights and Wrongs David Bellos and Alexandre Montagu

In short, punchy chapters and witty prose, a lawyer and a literature professor untangle the history of how intellectual property has come to be protected — and who wins and loses in the bargain.

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“Bellos and Montagu champion the little guy, the writer — who seems to be getting smaller and smaller — against the massive entertainment Goliaths.”

From Alexandra Jacobs’s review

Norton | $28.99

THE SISTERHOOD: The Secret History of Women at the CIA Liza Mundy

Women have long been key players in some of the country’s most famous (and infamous) intelligence-gathering operations. With vivid detail and historic sweep, Mundy focuses on a range of figures over the course of more than six decades.

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“Covert action, moral and tactical failures, moments of heart-stopping vindication and several hostage situations. ... The rare thriller that makes its readers wish for an org chart.”

From Mattie Kahn’s review

Crown | $32.50

CITY OF LAUGHTER Temim Fruchter

Fruchter’s debut explores ideas of family, queerness, loss, heritage and self-discovery. The novel follows generations of women in one Jewish family, each reckoning with her own secrets and identity.

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“In this book, a new generation accepts the complicated lacunae of history; what they can’t abide is silence and obstruction.”

From Lauren LeBlanc’s review

Grove | $27

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For people of all ages in Pasadena, Calif., Vroman’s Bookstore, founded in 1894, has been a mainstay in a world of rapid change. Now, its longtime owner says he’s ready to turn over the reins .

The graphic novel series “Aya” explores the pains and pleasures of everyday life in a working-class neighborhood  in West Africa with a modern African woman hero.

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Each week, top authors and critics join the Book Review’s podcast to talk about the latest news in the literary world. Listen here .

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Alan Love's new open access Cambridge Elements book

 Four turtle species: Red-bellied short-necked turtle, Indian flapshell turtle, Galápagos tortoise, and Hawksbill sea turtle.

MCPS director, Alan Love , has a new open source Elements in the Philosophy of Biology volume entitled Evolution and Development Conceptual Issues published by Cambridge University Press.

The intersection of development and evolution has always harbored conceptual issues, but many of these are on display in contemporary evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo). These issues include: (1) the precise constitution of evo-devo, with its focus on both the evolution of development and the developmental basis of evolution, and how it fits within evolutionary theory; (2) the nature of evo-devo model systems that comprise the material of comparative and experimental research; (3) the puzzle of how to understand the widely used notion of 'conserved mechanisms'; (4) the definition of evolutionary novelties and expectations for how to explain them; and (5) the demand of interdisciplinary collaboration that derives from investigating complex phenomena at key moments in the history of life, such as the fin-limb transition. This Element treats these conceptual issues with close attention to both empirical detail and scientific practice to offer new perspectives on evolution and development. This title is also available as Open Access on Cambridge Core .

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Corey Dethier is joining the MCPS for a two-year postdoctoral position in August 2023 as part of Samuel Fletcher's NSF-sponsored project, A Modern Philosophy for Classical

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Books, socks and a parable

By merrill ogden - | feb 14, 2024.

I often get a new book or two or three for Christmas each year. Books are great gifts, “in my book.” Socks are also a great gift, in my “you can’t have too many socks” philosophy of life. This past Christmas, I received two small books of poetry. I don’t remember receiving socks.

But I do remember buying four pair of socks a week or two ago on a half-price sale. This was after having taken a couple of dozen pair to the thrift store.

When my wife saw me holding socks in the store, I simply answered her non-verbal, quizzical look with the reply, “I’m running low.” She understands that my “low” is many people’s “overflow” when it comes to socks. And she accepts that. She, herself, likes a good pair of Nordic socks as well as anyone.

So, books and socks. These months after Christmas and before Spring is the season for settling into a snug and warm spot with a good book while wearing good socks.

There’s only so much time you can spend outside in the sub-freezing temperatures. That is, unless you’re a dedicated outdoorsy, love the winter, get into the snow and ice type of person.

Many years ago, Norm Fullenbach, was the publisher of “The Richfield Reaper” (1946 – 1977). He wrote a popular, unique column for the weekly newspaper called “Reaper-Cussions” or sometimes “The Reaper Rat Race.”

He was known as “The Rat.” That was because much of the column material dealt with “ratting out” people, by name, relative to embarrassing things that happened around town. When people got the paper, that was often the first thing they read.

The reason I bring him up here and now, is that I’m remembering him making fun of snowmobilers – speaking of outdoorsy, winter lovers.

Norm wrote that if he wanted to have the same fun that snowmobilers were having, he’d drive in his car on a snowy road with the windows down. And, he’d arrange for a pickup truck to drive alongside him. And, someone could throw a bucket of snow through the window on him every minute or so. That’s what he thought of snowmobiling.

Anyway, back to books and socks. My daughter gave me the poetry books for Christmas. One of them is a collection of poems by the famous American poet, Robert Frost.

On my recent, late night walks with Archer, the wonder Sheltie, I’ve been attempting to memorize the poem, “The Road Not Taken.” It’s quite short, but not easy to commit to memory (for me) because of the irregular arrangement of words, which I guess we’d call syntax.

The poem seems to be a parable for life and has deeper meaning than I thought at first. More about parables in moment.

I’m remembering now a couple of books that I received for Christmas some years ago — “Jane Austen’s Little Advice Book” and “The Book of Totally Useless Information.”

It may or may not surprise you to know that out of the many books I’ve received over the years, one of the books which I was highly drawn to was the “useless information” one. I wonder what that says about me. Let’s not explore that now.

From that book, I learned about the history of kilts. I also learned why the score of zero in tennis is called “love.” (“Love” is a distortion of the French word oeuf, which means egg – as in goose egg. Most of us are familiar with zero sometimes being referred to as a goose egg in sports.)

Here’s a couple of bits of advice from the Jane Austen advice book. 1) On why surprise parties never work: “Surprises are foolish things. The pleasure is not enhanced, and the inconvenience is often considerable.” 2) On the Necessity of Complaining: “Those who do not complain are never pitied.”

Let me get back to parables now. Yes, I know this column is probably reminding you of the movie, which I never saw, titled “Everything Everywhere All at Once.” Some experts call this writing style “Stream of Consciousness.” I call it rambling.

Some years ago, my sister-in-law, who passed away a year and a half ago, told me the story of an experience which she called a parable. This experience was evidently a significant event that she was attempting to draw meaning from.

Here’s the short version. Judi and her grandson were working under a tree. They were suddenly aware that they were invading the personal space of a hummingbird nest. The father and mother hummingbird showed their unhappiness that their privacy and security was being compromised.

Some days later, it seemed that the birds had gone and the nest was seemingly abandoned. The grandson was sent up the tree to cut the small branch off, so the nest could be used – presumably, for a decoration. Lo and behold, when the branch was handed down, there were a couple of withered, ugly, seemingly dead birdies in the nest. But they weren’t dead. When touched, they opened their mouths and were expecting dinner.

For lack of a better idea, the little branch was duct taped back up in the tree. The outcome was good. The baby birds ultimately lived.

So at the end of the story, I wanted to know what the moral or lesson was – since it was advertised as a “parable.” Judi said she didn’t know. She wanted me to tell her.

Here are some of the possible lessons to be learned that I came up with: 1) Be careful when you deal with the withered, ugly, and seemingly dead; 2) Duct tape is, in fact, all it’s cracked up to be; 3) If hummingbirds want their nests to be part of an arts and crafts project, they will build them on top of your mailbox 4) Good deeds aren’t always punished 5) Count your chickens and hummingbirds after they’ve hatched — and before you saw any limbs off.

If you have any unsolved parables in your life, feel free to send them to me. As you can see, I have rare interpretive powers.

In the meantime, find a book and a pair of comfortable socks. Spring, and the outdoor work that comes with it, will be here before you know it. — Merrill

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Philosophy is about asking the big questions: Why are we here? How should I live my life? What is reality? A good book for beginners is A Little History of Philosophy by Nigel Warburton . The book starts with Socrates, who lived in the 5th century BC in Athens, and asked such probing questions he was sentenced to death by his fellow citizens. Socrates himself never wrote a word, but his pupil Plato wrote about him. Plato's book, The Republic (c. 375BC) , is one the earliest and most important philosophical texts ever written.

Today, good philosophy books continue to deal with the challenges we face as a society and how to better understand the world around us, whether it's problems thrown up by the latest scientific advances or the age-old question of how to live a good life. Philosophy—which in ancient Greek means 'love of wisdom'—also focuses on how to think, emphasizing critical thinking skills and logic.

Philosophers (from the 5th century BCE onwards) | Ancient Philosophy | Contemporary Philosophy | Ethics and Moral Philosophy | Atheism | Beliefs | Epistemology | How to Live | Biographies of Philosophers | Best New Philosophy Books

The Best Philosophy Books of All Time , recommended by Nigel Warburton

The Best Philosophy Books of All Time - Republic by Plato

Republic by Plato

The Best Philosophy Books of All Time - Dialogues and Natural History of Religion by David Hume

Dialogues and Natural History of Religion by David Hume

The Best Philosophy Books of All Time - On Liberty by John Stuart Mill

On Liberty by John Stuart Mill

The Best Philosophy Books of All Time - Mengzi: With Selections from Traditional Commentaries by Mengzi

Mengzi: With Selections from Traditional Commentaries by Mengzi

The Best Philosophy Books of All Time - Middlemarch by George Eliot

Middlemarch by George Eliot

Over the past decade our philosophy editor, Nigel Warburton , has been interviewing philosophers asking them to recommend the best philosophy books. After hundreds of interviews, this is our list of the books that have come up again and again. It reveals if not the best philosophy books ever written, at least a collection of very important and influential books.

Over the past decade our philosophy editor, Nigel Warburton, has been interviewing philosophers asking them to recommend the best philosophy books. After hundreds of interviews, this is our list of the books that have come up again and again. It reveals if not the best philosophy books ever written, at least a collection of very important and influential books.

The Best Philosophy Books of 2023 , recommended by Nigel Warburton

The Best Philosophy Books of 2023 - Humanly Possible: Seven Hundred Years of Humanist Freethinking, Inquiry, and Hope by Sarah Bakewell

Humanly Possible: Seven Hundred Years of Humanist Freethinking, Inquiry, and Hope by Sarah Bakewell

The Best Philosophy Books of 2023 - The Dangerous Life and Ideas of Diogenes the Cynic by Jean-Manuel Roubineau, Malcolm DeBevoise & Phillip Mitsis

The Dangerous Life and Ideas of Diogenes the Cynic by Jean-Manuel Roubineau, Malcolm DeBevoise & Phillip Mitsis

The Best Philosophy Books of 2023 - Parfit: A Philosopher and His Mission to Save Morality by David Edmonds

Parfit: A Philosopher and His Mission to Save Morality by David Edmonds

The Best Philosophy Books of 2023 - The Experience Machine: How Our Minds Predict and Shape Reality by Andy Clark

The Experience Machine: How Our Minds Predict and Shape Reality by Andy Clark

The Best Philosophy Books of 2023 - For F*ck's Sake: Why Swearing is Shocking, Rude, and Fun by Rebecca Roache

For F*ck's Sake: Why Swearing is Shocking, Rude, and Fun by Rebecca Roache

The genre of philosophical biography is flourishing, as we pay attention not only to what philosophers said and wrote but also to how they lived and the intellectual context in which they developed their ideas. Nigel Warburton , our philosophy editor, picks out some of the best philosophy books of the year, from the man who lived in a storage jar in 5th century Athens to the latest contributions of cognitive science to our understanding of how we experience the world. Read more philosophy book recommendations on  Five Books

The genre of philosophical biography is flourishing, as we pay attention not only to what philosophers said and wrote but also to how they lived and the intellectual context in which they developed their ideas. Nigel Warburton, our philosophy editor, picks out some of the best philosophy books of the year, from the man who lived in a storage jar in 5th century Athens to the latest contributions of cognitive science to our understanding of how we experience the world. Read more philosophy book recommendations on  Five Books

The Best Introductions to Philosophy , recommended by Nigel Warburton

The Best Introductions to Philosophy - What Does It All Mean? by Thomas Nagel

What Does It All Mean? by Thomas Nagel

The Best Introductions to Philosophy - The Life You Can Save by Peter Singer

The Life You Can Save by Peter Singer

The Best Introductions to Philosophy - Justice by Michael Sandel

Justice by Michael Sandel

The Best Introductions to Philosophy - Causing Death and Saving Lives by Jonathan Glover

Causing Death and Saving Lives by Jonathan Glover

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The Grasshopper by Bernard Suits

How should we live? What is the nature of reality? Should pro golfers be allowed to use carts? British philosopher Nigel Warburton sets us off down the road of philosophical enquiry with an intriguing list of introductory philosophy books.

The best books on World Philosophy , recommended by Bryan Van Norden

The best books on World Philosophy - Republic by Plato

A Treatise Of Human Nature by David Hume

The best books on World Philosophy - Mengzi: With Selections from Traditional Commentaries by Mengzi

Zhuangzi by Zhuangzi (aka Chuang Tzu)

The best books on World Philosophy - The Bodhicaryāvatāra by Śāntideva

The Bodhicaryāvatāra by Śāntideva

The study of philosophy in the Western world is often parochial, and limited to the study of the Anglo-European tradition. It's time to widen our focus, advises the author and philosopher Bryan Van Norden . Here he selects five foundational texts of philosophical traditions worldwide.

The study of philosophy in the Western world is often parochial, and limited to the study of the Anglo-European tradition. It’s time to widen our focus, advises the author and philosopher Bryan Van Norden. Here he selects five foundational texts of philosophical traditions worldwide.

Life-Changing Philosophy Books , recommended by Eric Weiner

Life-Changing Philosophy Books - The Discourses of Epictetus by Epictetus

The Discourses of Epictetus by Epictetus

Life-Changing Philosophy Books - Philosophy as a Way of Life by Pierre Hadot

Philosophy as a Way of Life by Pierre Hadot

Life-Changing Philosophy Books - Waiting for God by Simone Weil

Waiting for God by Simone Weil

Life-Changing Philosophy Books - The Heart of Philosophy by Jacob Needleman

The Heart of Philosophy by Jacob Needleman

Life-Changing Philosophy Books - Ultimate Questions by Bryan Magee

Ultimate Questions by Bryan Magee

Can philosophy change your life? Yes, says bestselling author Eric Weiner , though partly by making it more complicated. Here, he picks five works of life-changing philosophy, from Epictetus to Jacob Needleman, a professor (emeritus) at San Francisco State University.

Can philosophy change your life? Yes, says bestselling author Eric Weiner, though partly by making it more complicated. Here, he picks five works of life-changing philosophy, from Epictetus to Jacob Needleman, a professor (emeritus) at San Francisco State University.

Key Philosophical Texts in the Western Canon , recommended by Nigel Warburton

Key Philosophical Texts in the Western Canon - Republic by Plato

Meditations on First Philosophy by René Descartes

Key Philosophical Texts in the Western Canon - An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding by David Hume

An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding by David Hume

Key Philosophical Texts in the Western Canon - On Liberty by John Stuart Mill

Philosophical Investigations by Ludwig Wittgenstein

Even if you've never studied philosophy, it's nice to be able to read a few books and get a sense of what it's all about. Here, we asked our philosophy editor, Nigel Warburton , to talk us through five key works of Western philosophy—many of them in the public domain and available for free as ebooks—and explain why, despite one or two odd conclusions or quirky writing styles, they've played such an important role in expanding our understanding of the world.

Even if you’ve never studied philosophy, it’s nice to be able to read a few books and get a sense of what it’s all about. Here, we asked our philosophy editor, Nigel Warburton, to talk us through five key works of Western philosophy—many of them in the public domain and available for free as ebooks—and explain why, despite one or two odd conclusions or quirky writing styles, they’ve played such an important role in expanding our understanding of the world.

The Best Philosophical Novels , recommended by Rebecca Goldstein

The Best Philosophical Novels - Middlemarch by George Eliot

Moby-Dick by Herman Melville

The Best Philosophical Novels - Death in Venice by Thomas Mann

Death in Venice by Thomas Mann

The Best Philosophical Novels - The Black Prince by Iris Murdoch

The Black Prince by Iris Murdoch

The Best Philosophical Novels - Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace

Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace

The skills of a philosopher and those of a novelist are often in tension, but they have much to learn from each other, says novelist and philosopher Rebecca Newberger Goldstein. She chooses her favourite philosophical novels.

The best books on The History of Philosophy , recommended by Justin E. H. Smith

The best books on The History of Philosophy - The Veil of Isis: An Essay on the History of the Idea of Nature by Pierre Hadot

The Veil of Isis: An Essay on the History of the Idea of Nature by Pierre Hadot

The best books on The History of Philosophy - The Way and the Word: Science and Medicine in Early China and Greece by Geoffrey Lloyd & Nathan Sivin

The Way and the Word: Science and Medicine in Early China and Greece by Geoffrey Lloyd & Nathan Sivin

The best books on The History of Philosophy - The Lost Age of Reason: Philosophy in Early Modern India, 1450–1700 by Jonardon Ganeri

The Lost Age of Reason: Philosophy in Early Modern India, 1450–1700 by Jonardon Ganeri

The best books on The History of Philosophy - Atoms and Alchemy: Chymistry and the Experimental Origins of the Scientific Revolution by William Newman

Atoms and Alchemy: Chymistry and the Experimental Origins of the Scientific Revolution by William Newman

The best books on The History of Philosophy - Native Pragmatism: Rethinking the Roots of American Philosophy by Scott L. Pratt

Native Pragmatism: Rethinking the Roots of American Philosophy by Scott L. Pratt

Today, we think of scientists and philosophers as distinct, but it wasn't always this way. Back when the Royal Society was founded in the 1660s, figures like Newton, Descartes and Boyle all thought of themselves as ‘natural philosophers’. Justin E. H. Smith , professor of philosophy at the Université de Paris, introduces us to what he sees as the real history of philosophy.

Today, we think of scientists and philosophers as distinct, but it wasn’t always this way. Back when the Royal Society was founded in the 1660s, figures like Newton, Descartes and Boyle all thought of themselves as ‘natural philosophers’. Justin E. H. Smith, professor of philosophy at the Université de Paris, introduces us to what he sees as the real history of philosophy.

The best books on Moral Philosophy , recommended by Jonathan Glover

The best books on Moral Philosophy - Republic by Plato

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy and translated by Rosamund Bartlett

The best books on Moral Philosophy - The Drowned and the Saved by Primo Levi

The Drowned and the Saved by Primo Levi

The best books on Moral Philosophy - The Kennedy Tapes by E.May

The Kennedy Tapes by E.May

The best books on Moral Philosophy - An Unquiet Mind by Kay Jamison

An Unquiet Mind by Kay Jamison

The questions of moral philosophy are not always best answered by philosophy books, says leading moral philosopher, Jonathan Glover . He explores questions of how we should live and by what values in books spanning across multiple genres.

The questions of moral philosophy are not always best answered by philosophy books, says leading moral philosopher, Jonathan Glover. He explores questions of how we should live and by what values in books spanning across multiple genres.

Favorite Books , recommended by Daniel Dennett

Favorite Books - Word and Object by Willard Van Orman Quine

Word and Object by Willard Van Orman Quine

Favorite Books - The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins

The Selfish Gene by Richard Dawkins

Favorite Books - I Am a Strange Loop by Douglas Hofstadter

I Am a Strange Loop by Douglas Hofstadter

Favorite Books - Beyond Concepts by Ruth Millikan

Beyond Concepts by Ruth Millikan

Favorite Books - From Darwin to Derrida by David Haig

From Darwin to Derrida by David Haig

Daniel Dennett is not only one of the most distinguished philosophers of mind working today, he also writes great books . As he publishes his memoir, I’ve Been Thinking , he talks us through some of the books that most influenced him, including two by evolutionary biologists.

We ask experts to recommend the five best books in their subject and explain their selection in an interview.

This site has an archive of more than one thousand seven hundred interviews, or eight thousand book recommendations. We publish at least two new interviews per week.

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COMMENTS

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    18 Best New Philosophy Books To Read In 2024 Discover the best and latest philosophy books, and pick the right one for you. As featured on CNN, Forbes, and Inc, BookAuthority searches the web for book recommendations by experts. We may earn a commission for purchases made through this page. learn more

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    Every year a slew of new philosophy books are published, works by or about everyone from Aristotle to Žižek, and covering subjects from aesthetics to Zen. But which ones are actually worth reading? Below we keep track of new philosophy books coming out, and try to pick out ones that we like the look of.

  4. The Best Philosophy Books of 2023

    Nigel Warburton, our philosophy editor, picks out some of the best philosophy books of the year, from the man who lived in a storage jar in 5th century Athens to the latest contributions of cognitive science to our understanding of how we experience the world. Read more philosophy book recommendations on Five Books

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    In 2022, his philosophy book recommendations include David Chalmers' latest examination of consciousness, a memoir of teaching philosophy in prison, and a biography of the ancient provocateur and original cynic Diogenes. Interview by Cal Flyn, Deputy Editor A Little History of Philosophy by Nigel Warburton 5

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    New Books in Philosophy Marshall Poe Society & Culture 4.2 • 106 Ratings JAN 20, 2024 Jan Westerhoff, "Candrakirti's Introduction to the Middle Way: A Guide" (Oxford UP, 2023)

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    3 Feb 2024 January 2024 The big idea The big idea: what if every little thing you do changes history? 29 Jan 2024 'No one should have more than €10m': the author of Limitarianism on why the...

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    New Books in Philosophy is a series of long-form interviews in which philosophers discuss their newly-published books. The interviews are thorough, thoughtful, and deliberative; and if you are listening as a student or researcher in the discipline, you have almost certainly added books to your to-read list as a result of interviews in the ...

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  16. The Best Philosophy Books of 2021

    Nigel Warburton —the philosopher, broadcaster and creator of the popular Philosophy Bites podcast—selects five of the best public philosophy books published in 2021, including a defence of righteous rage, an examination of the concept of 'time management,' and an intellectual biography of the political philosopher and Holocaust survivor Hannah A...

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  18. The 35 Best Philosophy Books of All Time

    1. Meditations by Marcus Aurelius 2. Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl 3. The Daily Stoic by Ryan Holiday 4. The Story of Philosophy by Will Durant 5. The Republic by Plato 6. Discourses by Epictetus 7. The Last Lecture by Randy Pausch Best Philosophy Books About Stoicism and Western Philosophy 8. Letters from a Stoic by Seneca 9.

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  21. Podcast

    Paul Katsafanas argues in his book Philosophy of Devotion:The Longing for Invulnerable Ideals (Oxford UP, 2023) that these commitments involve an ethical stance that he calls devotion to sacred ideas. A sacred value is one that we cannot trade with ordinary values, or even consider trading off.

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  28. Philosophy Books

    A good book for beginners is A Little History of Philosophy by Nigel Warburton. The book starts with Socrates, who lived in the 5th century BC in Athens, and asked such probing questions he was sentenced to death by his fellow citizens. Socrates himself never wrote a word, but his pupil Plato wrote about him.