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How to List Education on a Resume in 2024 (With Examples & Tips)

Not sure what degree to list? If you should include a GPA? It just so happens that there's a variety of ways to effectively list your eduction.

Ed Moss

The education section of a resume may not always be the star of the document but knowing how to properly list your education can be essential for advancing into the next phase of the hiring process.

In this guide, we will cover all the ins and outs of crafting an education section for your resume. 

We'll cover the following:

  • What to Include in an Education Section?

Tips for Listing Degrees (College, High-School, GED)

Listing incomplete education.

  • Where to Include Education on a Resume?

What Employers Look for in an Education Section

Beautiful resume templates to land your dream job.

Financial Analyst

What to Include in an Education Section

As we've covered, different formats of resumes may require different information to be included within an education section.

In general, there is some basic information that should be included within the education section of a resume:

  • The name of the school — "e.g. Georgia Institute of Technology"
  • The location of the school
  • Your degree ( high-school diploma, GED, associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree, etc. )
  • Graduation year ( if applicable )
  • Major field or department of study (if applicable )
  • Minor field or department of study (if applicable and relevant )
  • GPA ( If you're a student or graduates who held lower GPAs, this bit of information may be good to omit unless specifically requested by the employer )

Here's what that looks like for and university grad:

Georgia Institute of Technology • Atlanta, GA B.S. in Computer Engineering, 2006 - 2010 GPA: 3.9/4.0

For high-school students, you can do something like the following:

Georgia Institute of Technology • Atlanta, GA High School Diploma, Graduated in 2010 GPA: 3.9/4.0

Remember, including a GPA  is optional. Only add it if it's required by the job listing or it's relatively high. If your GPA is low (under 3.5), it's better to just leave it out.

Listing Education with Limited Work Experience

In resumes that have limited or no work experience , as may be the case with college students or recent graduates, the education section may be a good opportunity to show off educational achievements instead.

Additional information that can be included in longer education sections can include:

  • Internships completed as part of a curriculum 
  • Academic awards or sponsorships
  • Relevant coursework
  • Academic assistantships with professors or other academic professionals

As covered, in documents such as CVs the education section could be fairly lengthy.

However, the education section for most resumes will be one of the shortest sections.

This is mostly because standard resumes will be used for entry-level or mid-level positions, while longer-form resumes like the CV will only come into play for more prestigious or hard to obtain positions. 

It is much more important to show either a robust work history or detail relevant and transferable skills, using your education as support rather than the main point of interest. 

Here are some quick tips for deciding what educational information to include in a resume:

1) When including professional hobbies and extra curricular activities, it is important to keep relevance in mind

Incorrect: Do not include information about sports clubs or other clubs that cannot be connected back to your qualifications for a job.
Correct: If you held leadership positions in clubs or other extra-curricular activities, this can be useful information to include to highlight non-paid leadership or management experience.

Keep your descriptions simple and concise

Incorrect: Including long-winded and wordy paragraphs explaining the relevance of a certain piece of information. If a piece of information is relevant, it should be easily explained in one, simple sentence.
Correct: Use bullet points to separate bits of information to keep your resume easy to read or skim.

The readability of a resume can be the defining factor of whether or not a job recruiter or potential employer moves the candidate into the next phase of the hiring process.

As such, using clear and concise wording and formatting is essential for not just the education section, but for all sections. 

Here are a few tips for different formatting options depending on the level and type of education you have completed.

1) Adding High School and GED on Resume

  • If your highest level of education is a high school diploma or a GED, this should still be included as there are many jobs that are open to high school graduates as well as college graduates.
  • Generally, this type of education section should be kept short and sweet. Listing that you have received either a diploma or a GED should be sufficient.
  • If you have recently graduated high school or received your GED, including additional high school-related achievements may be beneficial (such as leadership positions, honor roll awards, athletics, etc.)

2) Adding Associate’s and Bachelor’s Degrees on Resume

  • When listing an associate’s or bachelor’s degree on a resume, always include the name and location of the institution, as well as the date or expected date of graduation.
  • While the education section should still be kept short, inclusion of any collegiate level academic achievements, such as honor societies or dean’s lists, can be useful to include.
  • Don’t go too crazy including coursework of extracurricular information – stick to including the most relevant information. 

3) Adding Graduate School or Doctoral Programs on Resume

  • Graduate and doctoral students may feel inclined to always include this information; however, it is important to be wary of including too much academic information in scenarios where it may render you overqualified for the position.
  • Graduate and doctoral information is more likely to come into play for candidates seeking higher level positions at the management level. 
  • For candidates seeking jobs in academic or scientific fields, a CV-style resume and longer-form education section providing higher level of details regarding graduate or doctoral programs may be necessary.

4) Adding Certifications on Resume

  • In some cases, a candidate may not have attended college but may have completed a trade school or other program that resulted in various certifications. These certifications should be included when relevant.
  • Certifications such as CPR or First Aid can be useful to include in most resumes, although they should perhaps be saved for a separate certifications section .

5) Listing Incomplete Education on Resume

Incomplete education can be tricky to include in a way that sounds positive — as such, if you have incomplete education, be wary of your wording and avoid words such as “incomplete” or “unfinished.” Instead try to do the following:

  • Include relevant coursework or credits earned during your duration of education before the point of departure from the institution.
  • Omit any wordy or lengthy explanations of why the education is incomplete. 

However, we've seen this be a common problem that many candidates have. Continue reading below to see how to effectively list education that is left incomplete. ‍

In some cases, a job applicant may have a partially-complete or incomplete educational credential they want to list on their resume.

Incomplete education can result from a variety of circumstances, including:

  • A person who is still in the process of earning their diploma, GED, or degree, but has not yet earned the credential or graduated.
  • A person who started a degree and completed relevant coursework, but ultimately did not finish the degree program.
  • A person who chose a different career path than what they studied for, but still has relevant coursework for the new career path.

When listing incomplete education on a resume, it is important to stay highly mindful of how you are wording your limited educational credentials — as words such as “ unfinished ” or “ incomplete ” are not ideal to include within a resume. 

Here are some quick examples on how to properly list incomplete education in the education section of a resume:

For applicants who are in the process of completing a degree, it is important to note the expected timeframe of completion.

Incorrect: ‍ B.S. in Communications University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Not yet complete
Correct: B.S. in Communications University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Expected graduation May 2021

For applicants who began a degree, but ultimately did not complete the degree, it is key to be mindful of how you frame the education you did receive. 

Incorrect: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC

Why is this incorrect? Sure, this example indicates you, at some point, attended a university.

However, it provides no insight as to what relevant coursework or studies you may have completed.

Here's the correct way to describe your educational experience instead:

Correct: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC Completed 20 credits towards a BS in Communications

Alternatively: This could be a good opportunity to include a bulleted list of relevant coursework.

For applicants who did not complete high school, it is important to note if you either earned a GED or are in the process of earning a GED.

Incorrect: ‍ Watauga County High School Boone, NC Incomplete
Correct: General Educational Development Diploma Earned May 2021 — OR — Expected to earn May 2021

Generally speaking, the majority of jobs will require applicants to have earned at minimum a GED certification in order to qualify.

In some cases, an applicant may lack a degree but may be certified by a trade school.

For instance, a beautician would want to include any beauty and health related certifications or licenses earned under the education section. 

Take a look at this resume example of a college student below to see how to do this.

College Student

Where to Include Education on a Resume

When it comes to placing your educational credentials on a resume, there are many considerations to make.

Resumes can serve a variety of purposes and, as a general rule of thumb, should be tailored for specific jobs . 

It is also important to take into consideration the level of education you have completed, as this will impact how it should be presented as well.

For instance, a job applicant seeking a position in academia would have a much heavier emphasis on education and academic-related achievements — than someone seeking a job in a corporate environment.

Ultimately, not all resumes are the same, so the placement of the education section will differ depending on the type of resume being used and the intention behind its structuring. 

Choosing the right resume format

There are several different types of resume formats to choose from, but the main ones that are used are as follows:

1) Reverse-Chronological

‍ Emphasis is placed on the most relevant work experience, listing jobs from most recent to oldest. Education can be placed before or after the work experience section. However higher degrees that qualify a candidate for the position may be beneficial to mention sooner rather than later. 

2) Functional

‍ Functional resumes place a much heavier emphasis on skillsets and areas of expertise. This format of resume is typically used by job applicants lacking the relevant work experience or educational credentials. In this format, the education section may lead if the applicant has educational credentials but limited work experience but should follow after the skills section if education is limited. 

‍ Hybrid resumes combine the reverse-chronological work experience ordering with the emphasizing of skills. This can help to supplement resumes of applicants who may have some relevant work experience but still need to beef up their resumes with a skills section . The placement of the education section will depend on how applicable or high level the credentials are and should generally be kept brief. 

4) Curriculum Vitae (CV)

‍ CVs are a type of long-form and multi-page resume used most commonly by applicants seeking positions in either academic or scientific fields. In a CV, the education section will be a prominent component and should appear early in the document. This type of education section should include all credentials, published works, projects, awards, or other academic achievements — no details should be spared. 

The below example of a Physician Assistant's resume is listing education in the bottom-right corner as it's using a reverse-chronological resume format to shine on it's work history.

Data Analyst

Employers can gather a variety of information about a job candidate from an education section, including:

  • A job applicant’s work ethic, reflected through GPAs or other grade-related information
  • Relevant skills or training an applicant has received through their schooling
  • Name recognition of specific universities, such as ivy leagues, that may give a candidate a leg up on the competition
  • Insight into a candidate’s interests or talents based on academic-related extracurricular activities included 

Understanding what employers are looking for in an education section included on a resume is key to understand how much or how little information to include.

What an employer is looking for will vary depending on the nature of the job being offered. 

For instance, an entry-level communications job at a corporation is likely to require a bachelor’s degree in communications or a related field.

Comparatively, a job in the welding industry may require the completion of a trade school program but not require a four-year degree. 

It is of the utmost importance when you are applying to various jobs that you read the job descriptions provided carefully, as this is where you will find the necessary information regarding what educational credentials are required of eligible candidates.

This will also help you to tailor your education section according to what credentials or qualifications you have that meet the requirements of the job. 

In general, what an employer is mostly looking for is simply that an education section exists on a resume.

The majority of employers will want candidates who have shown a commitment to their education, reflected through the inclusion of an education section.

For candidates lacking a completed education, it is still considered best practice to include some information regarding what level of education was reached before the point of incompletion, as well as the inclusion of any relevant coursework and knowledge gained from the time the candidate spent pursuing further education. 

Here is a quick rundown of a few key factors to consider for applicants who may be unsure how much information to provide in an education section for a specific employer or position:

  • The education section should prove that you have the credentials necessary to complete the job at hand.
  • Oversharing of education can be detrimental in some situations, as overqualified candidates may not be considered by employers.
  • Job descriptions will always be the best place to look for indicators regarding how much educational background information an employer is looking for.
  • Never lie or over-exaggerate — while not all employers double-check applicants’ educational histories, many still do, and dishonesty can cost you the position in the long run.

Physician Assistant

Final Thoughts

Unless you are crafting a longer-form resume, such as a CV, the education section will generally be a fairly short summary of your academic credentials and achievements.

Education sections can be longer in some cases where job applicants may have hefty academic backgrounds but limited work experience.

Ultimately, the key to making a strong education section is to include only the most relevant information.

Always avoid deceptive wording, as employers can fairly easily run academic background checks if need be. 

Check out our resume templates to get your creativity flowing and get started on your ideal resume today. 

Browse more resume templates that fit your role

Ed Moss is an author for Easy Resume

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what should i put on my resume for education

What to Include in Your Education Section

The education section on a resume gives hiring managers a glimpse into your academic achievements , interests, and skills.

It can demonstrate your commitment to learning, your ability to succeed in a structured environment, and the relevant knowledge you've acquired.

The information you should include in this section, though, varies based on things like your career level, the exact job you're applying for, and how recent your education is.

This means you don’t always have to be super detailed. Some of the information about your education is optional, and some of it may even be redundant if you have relevant work experience, so you should only use it if you think it can give your resume a boost.

Let’s start with the details most employers expect to see:

Essential Information

  • Degree Name. Include the type of degree and the relevant major. (E.g.: BFA in Graphic Design)
  • University Name. Add the name of the institution you studied at. (E.g.: University of Saint Andrews)
  • Location. If the university isn’t well known or the name doesn’t specify where it is, include the general location. (E.g.: St Andrews, Scotland)
  • Years Attended. Usually, only the years you attend there are enough, but the mm/yyyy format is also popular. (E.g.: 09/2018 - 06/2021)

Optional Information

  • Honors and Awards. If you’ve received any acknowledgments, list them here. (E.g.: Dean's List, Summa Cum Laude, Merit Scholarships, Valedictorian)
  • Relevant Coursework. List three to five courses that directly apply to your target job. (E.g.: Marketing 101, Marketing Strategy, PR Basics)
  • Thesis or Dissertation. We recommend including this for graduate-level degrees in research-heavy fields.
  • Minor. If relevant, include any additional areas of study. (E.g.: BA in Creative Writing, Minor in Journalism)
  • Grade Point Average. Only include your GPA if it's 3.5 or above on a 4.0 scale. Anything lower can undermine your application.
  • Extracurricular Activities. Mention any clubs or organizations that seem relevant. (E.g.: Debate team, Theater Club, School Newspaper)

Here’s an example of an education section that includes information from both categories:

education on resume

Getting ready to find a job? Start by learning how to write a resume with our detailed guide!

How to Format Education on Your Resume

Now that you have an idea of what to include in your education section, let’s explain how you should do it.

In terms of structuring your education section, follow a reverse-chronological order ; this means, list your latest educational entry first and then go backward from there.

And remember – if you have a relevant university degree, there’s no need to waste precious space on your resume by listing your high school education .

As a general rule, if you’re an experienced professional and you have a Master’s degree, you can also omit your undergrad degree. Hiring managers are a lot more interested in your work experience section, so your education section should only focus on the basics.

However, if you’re a recent graduate , you might want to include more details to give your resume an extra kick. It’s always a good idea to leverage your education if you don’t have enough relevant work experience.

Now, regardless of your level of experience, add the name of your degree at the very top of the entry in your education section.

The same degree can be written down differently, for instance:

  • Bachelor of Arts in English Language and Culture with a Minor in Teaching
  • BA in English Language and Culture, Minor in Teaching
  • B.A. English Language and Culture (Major), Teaching (Minor)
  • BA, English Language and Culture

Here’s an example of what the formatting in your education section should look like:

how to list education on a resume

If you graduated from a famous university with a good reputation, you can highlight that first. For example, list “Harvard University” before the name of your degree.

Where to Place Education on Your Resume

Another important thing to consider is where to position the education section on your resume.

This mostly depends on where you are in your career. Do you have a lot of relevant achievements in the field, or are you looking for your first job ?

As a rule of thumb, the top third of your resume should be reserved for your accomplishments , which are most relevant to the job you are applying for.

So before you place this section on your resume, ask yourself: is your education your biggest selling point to the hiring manager?

Most of the time, it won’t be. Work experience is way more important for just about any position above entry level, so it should be listed first.

Let’s look at an example of a resume that puts this into action:

education on resume examples

As you can see, this architect resume starts by listing their relevant work experience and then includes a detailed entry of their most recent degree.

When Does Education Go Before Work Experience?

While your work experience section is generally more important, there are a few cases where you should list your education first.

These include:

  • You have no work experience. When you have absolutely no work experience yet, you should focus on your academic achievements instead.
  • You just graduated college. If you don’t have relevant work experience, you’re often better off not listing it. For example, if you’re applying for an entry-level office job, the part-time teenage jobs you had won’t be anywhere near as relevant as your recently earned BA in Marketing.
  • You are currently studying. If you’re in the process of earning a degree that’s relevant to your targeted field, it’s better to list education before work experience. For example, if you’re making a career change , you would want your new education to be the first thing the hiring manager sees.
  • You recently earned a new degree. Getting a fresh MSc, Ph.D., or MBA in your field is worth showing off. For example, if you’ve been a line manager for years but earned an MBA to qualify for an executive position, your education section should go first.
  • You are applying to academia. Usually, when applying for a research or teaching position in academia, you’ll need an academic CV , not a resume. In that case, your education will always come first.

Not sure if you need a CV or a resume ? Check out our guide to learn what the difference between the two is and when to use which.

cv vs resume example

Use a (Free) Resume Template

Creating a resume can be a hassle.

You have to find a template that works with your favorite text editor, set the page margins, adjust the line spacing, choose a professional font , and all while making sure you never go past page one.

What if there was an easier way?

This is where our resume builder comes in!

Novoresume lets you choose from 16 professional resume templates , each crafted with feedback from HR professionals around the world, and create the perfect resume in minutes.

Just look at how one of our resume templates compares to a basic text editor resume template:

novoresume vs normal resume

16 Examples of Education on a Resume

Looking for inspiration?

We’ve compiled a list filled with real-life examples of how education can be listed on a resume, with practical examples for different types and levels of education:

#1. High School Education

If you’re a high school student, you might have some volunteer experience or extracurriculars you can show off. In that case, you can start by listing those sections, so long as they’re relevant to the job you’re applying for.

For example, if you volunteered with your local branch of the Red Cross, that’s a good experience to have when you’re applying to work at a shelter.

In most other cases, the education section would take the upper hand, and it would look something like this:

High School Diploma

Chapel Hill High School

2017 - 2021

  • Courses: AP Science, Mathematics, Advanced Chemistry

If you’re still in high school, you can disclose it in your resume by writing down your expected graduation year or otherwise specifying that you’re currently still there.

2021 - Present

#2. General Education Development

If you were homeschooled or haven’t graduated high school, the previous example won’t apply to you.

But if you still received a General Education Development certificate, you can mention that in your resume in the following way:

GED Diploma

Durham Literacy Center

Just like with high school education, you can include the location of your school or GED center, as well as any relevant courses, if you have enough space.

#3. Associate Degree

If you went to a community college or opted for a vocational program, you can list it in your education section the same as any other undergraduate degree.

Associate degrees are typically cheaper and take less time than a bachelor’s degree. They tend to be focused on specific occupations and place more emphasis on daily job functions. Other than that, they follow the same formatting as any other educational entry.

Let’s look at some real-life examples of different types of degrees at this level.

First, an Associate of Arts degree:

AA in Business Designation

Community College of Denver

2015 - 2016

Summa Cum Laude

Next, here’s how you would list an ongoing Associate’s of Applied Science degree:

AAS in Medical Assisting

2018 - Present

Some associate degrees are what’s known as “transfer degrees.” Here, the long-term goal is to transfer into a bachelor’s degree program.

Similarly, if you’ve completed accredited courses at a community college that can go towards a degree, you can list them under your education section, like this:

Medical Assisting Certificate

  • 30 credits completed

#4. Certificates

Certificates can be included on your resume, either as part of the education section or in a dedicated section.

Unlike broad academic degrees, certificates can show specialized expertise and commitment to professional development. They tend to demonstrate more focused, essential skills that are directly applicable to a particular job or industry.

Treat these entries the same as any other: list the name of the certificate, the institution or organization that issued it, and the year you obtained it.

Here’s an example of how to list a professional certificate in an education section:

Certified Public Accountant (CPA)

American Institute of CPAs

And here’s how they would look in a separate section:

CERTIFICATES

  • Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) - National Academy of Sports Medicine, 2020
  • Certified Nutrition Coach - American Nutrition Association, 2023

But there are also other certificates you could list , such as after specialized software courses:

  • Maya Autodesk: Advanced 3D & Animation Udemy, 2022
  • Creation of Pixel Art Scenes for Video Games Domestika, 2023

#5. Undergraduate Degree

There are different ways to list a bachelor’s degree.

Let’s take a look at three different cases for a candidate with an engineering degree.

First, if you’ve graduated from university and received the degree, list it according to the following template:

B.Sc. Mechanical Engine ering

University of California, Berkeley

2002 - 2006

If you obtained a double major, you would write it down as:

B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering and Civil Engineering

If you have two or more majors, keep in mind that you should list the major that’s most relevant to the job you are applying to.

For example, if you majored in Applied Languages and International Relations, you should focus on the languages for a job as a translator.

Lastly, if you’re still attending college, just omit the finishing year when filling in your education section and add “Present” instead, like so:

But there are also different ways you can specify that you’re still studying. Instead of “Present,” you could write:

  • 2021 - Current
  • Expected Graduation: 2024
  • 2021 - 2024 (expected graduation)
  • 2021 - In progress
  • To Be Completed: 2024

#6. Graduate and Postgraduate Degrees

Graduate-level education is, in general, more detailed since it requires participating in a more focused area of research on top of your graduate-level work. 

At this level, you probably contributed to the field with a dissertation of your own, which you should include in your resume.

Here’s an example:

Ph.D. in Brain and Cognitive Sciences

University of Rochester

Dissertation: Imaging, Computational Analysis, & Neural Representations in Young Children

Graduate and postgraduate education often includes scholarships , fellowships, or outside funding involved, which you might want to include in addition to all the general information about your degree.

Here are some real-life examples:

MBA in Business Administration

University of Maine

  • Avangrid Scholarship
  • Magna Cum Laude

When it comes to honors and awards, there are different ways you can list them to save space on your resume. Here’s an example that mentions them but leaves more space for the dissertation title:

MSc. in Information Systems

WU Vienna University of Economics & Business

Salutatorian, Summa Cum Laude

2015 - 2017

Dissertation: Leveraging User-Generated Content for Advertising Purposes Through Information Systems

And if you’re still studying, don’t forget to check out our student resume templates to get started on your job hunt.

#7. Unfinished Education

Even if you didn’t graduate from university, you can still mention it in your education section. Just be strategic about it.

If you have several years of relevant coursework from a degree program that relates to the job you're applying for, it can show that you’re knowledgeable even without the final credential.

B.Sc. in Civil Engineering

34 credits completed

2018 - 2019

However, if you only have basic courses or your degree isn’t relevant to the role, you might be better off skipping it altogether. There’s no need to draw attention to an unfinished degree if it won’t help you impress the hiring manager.

Need more examples? Check out our 90+ resume examples for different professions .

Do you still wonder something about education on a resume? Check out the answers to the most frequently asked questions here:

#1. How Do You Put Your Degree on a CV?

Adding your degree to your CV is pretty much the same as adding it to your resume.

List your degrees in reverse chronological order, with the most recent degree on top. Always include the essential information, such as the degree name, your major, the name of the university, and the years you attended. If relevant, you can include your GPA, thesis title, study abroad experiences, and academic honors.

#2. How Do You Write Down Your Bachelor’s Degree?

There are different ways that a bachelor's degree can be written down on your resume. Usually, there’s no need to spell out the full degree name, so there are ways you can abbreviate it for your resume. These include:

BA (Bachelor of Arts) BS (Bachelor of Science) BBA (Bachelor of Business Administration) BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing)

Just use the specific abbreviation that matches your degree type. (E.g.: BSc Computer Science, BA History, BBA Economics, etc. )

#3. What If I Have an Education Gap or Took Time Off from Studies?

Treat any gaps in your education the same as you would treat an employment gap . Be upfront with the hiring manager and list the start and end dates to account for the time of the gap on your resume.

Use your cover letter to briefly explain the gap without going into too much detail. Hiring managers are understanding, and reasons like health, family, or professional experience are all common to justify education gaps.

#4. How Far Back Should I Go When Listing My Education History?

Generally, you only need to list basic information about your education if you graduated a long time ago. Your work experience and more recent achievements will have a lot more weight than details about your time in college 14 years ago.

For most professionals, listing just your highest degree is more than enough. However, an academic CV for scientific or research-heavy roles might need a more comprehensive educational background.

Key Takeaways

Congratulations! You’ve made it to the end of our article!

We’re confident you’re an expert on how to list education on a resume by now, but before we part ways, let’s quickly wrap up our main points:

  • Your education section belongs after your work experience section, though there are some exceptions.
  • If you don’t have any work experience, recently earned a relevant degree, or if you’re applying for a research-oriented position or in academia, the education section should be listed first.
  • When listing your educational entries, use a reverse chronological order. Start with the most recent degree you have and go backward from there.
  • If you have some sort of higher education, there’s no need to list your high school education.
  • Unless your GPA is exceptional, don’t list it. It might undermine your resume otherwise.
  • There are different ways to list your education, depending on the type of school you went to and what you want to highlight. Scroll back up if you want to see some examples.

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  • Career Blog

How to List Education on a Resume: 30 Examples & Tips

what should i put on my resume for education

In today’s competitive job market, having a strong education section on your resume can be a game-changer. Highlighting your educational achievements not only demonstrates your knowledge and expertise but also showcases your commitment and dedication towards personal growth and career development.

The ultimate purpose of this article is to guide job seekers in presenting their education credentials effectively on their resumes. Through a comprehensive compilation of 30+ real-life examples and practical tips, this piece aims to help applicants in crafting a compelling education section that will impress hiring managers and land them their dream job.

Whether you’re a recent graduate, a mid-career professional, or a seasoned executive, this article provides valuable insights and actionable advice that are proven to enhance your resume and increase your chances of getting hired. So, stay with us, and be ready to learn how to shine a spotlight on your educational background and leverage it for your next career move!

The Basics of Education on a Resume

When it comes to creating a winning resume, the education section plays a significant role. This section is particularly important for recent graduates or those looking to change careers. Employers want to see that you have the skills and knowledge necessary to perform the job, and education serves as a reliable indicator of this.

Importance of Education Section

The education section is often used as a method of filtering out candidates. Employers want to see a clear progression of your academic qualifications, as this demonstrates a commitment to learning and personal development. Failure to include this section can result in your resume being discarded without further consideration.

How to Format Education Section

The education section should be listed in reverse chronological order with your most recent qualification first. This format makes it easier for employers to see your academic progress and the relevance of your education to the current job position.

what should i put on my resume for education

Format for education section:

What to Include in Education Section

The education section should include the following:

Degree: State the degree you obtained or are currently in the progress of obtaining, for example, Bachelor of Science (BSc), Master of Arts (MA).

Major: Indicate the field of study in which you took most of your academic courses, for example, Business Administration, Mechanical Engineering.

University: Mention the institute or university from which you earned your degree.

Graduation Date: Include the date of your graduation or expected graduation date if you are still pursuing your education.

What Not to Include in Education Section

There are specific details that you should avoid including in the education section that may work against you. Some of them are:

GPA: Unless you have recently graduated and have a high GPA, it is best to leave this information off your resume.

High School Diploma: Unless you have no higher education or in junior level, don’t include high school education.

Coursework: Unless it is directly related to the position you are applying for, it is not relevant to list your coursework.

The education section is your chance to show your credentials and qualifications to your potential employers. Ensure that your education section is properly formatted and reflects your academic achievements clearly. By following the above guidelines, you can present your educational background in a professional and impressive way.

Where to Place Education on a Resume

When it comes to listing your education on a resume, the placement can be just as important as the information itself. Here are some of the best options for where to place your education section:

what should i put on my resume for education

At the top of the resume : If you are a recent graduate or your education is directly related to the job you are applying for, placing your education section at the top of your resume can help to draw attention to your qualifications.

After your work experience : If you have several years of relevant work experience, placing your education section after your work experience section can help to showcase your skills and experience first.

In a separate section : You can also create a separate section for your education, which can be especially helpful if you have multiple degrees or certifications. This can also help to make it easy for recruiters to find your education information quickly.

Tips for selecting placement options:

Consider the job requirements : When deciding where to place your education section, consider the job requirements and whether your education is a significant factor in the hiring decision.

Highlight your strengths : If your education is a strong selling point for you, make sure to highlight it in a prominent position on your resume.

Keep it concise : While it’s important to include your education information, don’t overdo it. Keep your education section concise and relevant to the job you are applying for.

How to make your education section stand out:

Include relevant coursework : If you have coursework that is relevant to the job you are applying for, make sure to include it in your education section.

Highlight any honors or awards : If you received any honors or awards during your education, make sure to showcase them in your education section.

Quantify your accomplishments : If you have any accomplishments from your education, such as publishing a research paper or completing a thesis, try to quantify them with specific numbers or details.

The placement and presentation of your education on your resume can play a significant role in your job search. By carefully selecting the placement and making your education section stand out, you can increase your chances of landing your dream job.

Listing High School Education on a Resume

When it comes to including high school education on a resume, it’s important to understand that it’s typically not necessary for most job positions. However, if you are early in your career or lacking in higher-level education, you may want to include it. Here are some tips for including high school education on your resume:

How to Include High School Education on Resume

  • Start with your most recent education and work backwards. List your high school education at the bottom of your education section, following any college or vocational training you may have completed.
  • Be concise. Simply list your high school name, location, and the year you graduated.
  • Highlight any academic achievements or honors. If you received any academic awards or honors during your high school education, include those on your resume.
  • Limit the amount of detail. Unlike college education, high school education does not require a lot of detail. Keep it brief and to-the-point.

Tricks to Make High School Education More Professional

If you are concerned about how including high school education on your resume may come across, here are some tricks to make it more professional:

  • Use your high school education to show transferable skills. Even if the education itself may not be relevant to the job, there may be skills you learned during that time that are transferable to the job you are applying for. For example, if you were heavily involved in a sport during high school, you may have developed leadership and teamwork skills that are applicable to many job positions. Highlight these skills on your resume.
  • Show continuous learning. If you have not pursued higher education, but have taken classes, workshops, or courses since high school, include them on your resume. This shows that you have a commitment to continuous learning and professional development.
  • Focus on your experiences outside of education. If you are concerned about how your high school education will be perceived, focus on highlighting experiences outside of education. If you participated in clubs, sports teams, or community organizations during your high school years, include them on your resume. These experiences can demonstrate important soft skills such as leadership, communication, and teamwork.

By following these tips for including high school education on your resume, it can help you present yourself in the best possible light to potential employers. Remember, the most important thing is to demonstrate your unique skills, experiences, and qualifications in a way that will make you stand out from other candidates.

How to List Bachelor’s Degree on a Resume

When it comes to listing your Bachelor’s degree on your resume, there are a few techniques that can help you highlight this accomplishment and make it stand out to potential employers.

Techniques to Highlight Bachelor’s Degree on Resume

Use a clear and concise format:  When listing your Bachelor’s degree, make sure it is easy to find and read. Use a straightforward format that includes the name of your degree, the name of the institution where you earned it, and the date of graduation.

Include relevant coursework and honors:  If you completed coursework or received any honors related to your Bachelor’s degree, be sure to include them on your resume. This can help demonstrate your knowledge and expertise in a particular area.

Emphasize relevant skills and experiences:  Instead of simply listing your degree, try to tie it in with your relevant skills and experiences. For example, if you majored in marketing, make sure to highlight any marketing-related projects or experiences you’ve had.

Quantify your achievements:  Whether it’s a high GPA, a specific project you worked on, or an award you received, try to quantify your achievements related to your Bachelor’s degree. This can help make it stand out and demonstrate your accomplishments.

Sample Sections to List Bachelor’s Degree

Education section:  This is the most common section to list your Bachelor’s degree. Simply include the name of your degree, the name of the institution, and the date of graduation.

Skills section:  If your Bachelor’s degree is relevant to your desired job, you can include it in your skills section to emphasize your expertise.

Experience section:  If you completed any related coursework or had relevant experiences while earning your Bachelor’s degree, you can list them under the appropriate job or experience in your experience section.

Example of Listing Bachelor’s Degree in a Different Format

Degree: Bachelor of Science in Computer Science Institution: XYZ University, City, State Graduation: May 2022

  • Proficient in programming languages such as Java, C++, and Python
  • Strong understanding of algorithms and data structures
  • Experience with database management systems

Experience:

Software Development Intern ABC Company, City, State June 2021 – August 2021

  • Developed and tested software modules for a web application using Java and HTML/CSS
  • Collaborated with a team of developers to troubleshoot and debug issues
  • Participated in code reviews and implemented improvements based on feedback

Coursework:

  • Introduction to Computer Science
  • Data Structures and Algorithms
  • Database Management Systems

By presenting your Bachelor’s degree in a different format, you can highlight it as a separate section and provide more details about your skills, relevant experiences, and coursework. This alternative format allows the degree to stand out and provides a comprehensive overview of your educational background and related accomplishments.

How to List Associate’s Degree on a Resume

Strategies to highlight associate’s degree on resume.

Listing your associate’s degree on a resume requires a strategic approach. Here are some strategies you can use to highlight your associate’s degree:

  • Place your associate’s degree prominently: Be sure to mention your associate’s degree in the education section of your resume. You can either add it directly under your high school diploma or create a separate section for your associate’s degree.
  • Highlight your skills: Your skills are a crucial part of your resume, and you can use them to showcase your qualifications. Emphasize the skills that you gained as part of your associate’s degree program, such as critical thinking, problem-solving, and communication.
  • Showcase your GPA: If you excelled in your associate’s degree program, showcase your GPA prominently on your resume. A high GPA can show potential employers that you are a diligent learner and have a strong work ethic.

Sample Sections to List Associate’s Degree

Here are some sample sections you can use to list your associate’s degree:

  • Associate’s Degree in Business Administration, XYZ College, 2018-2020
  • High School Diploma, ABC High School, 2014-2018

Certifications and Education

  • Associate’s Degree in Accounting, XYZ College, 2018-2020
  • CPA certification, 2021

Example of Listing Associate’s Degree in a Different Format

Here’s an example of how you can list your associate’s degree in a different format:

Professional Summary

As a diligent and detail-oriented professional with a background in business administration, I have gained essential skills in critical thinking, communication, and problem-solving through my associate’s degree program.

By strategically highlighting your associate’s degree, you can impress potential employers and show them that you have the skills and education necessary to succeed in your desired role.

How to List Master’s Degree on a Resume

When listing your master’s degree on your resume, it’s important to do so in a way that highlights your education and makes it easy for potential employers to see your qualifications. Here are some tips for highlighting your master’s degree on your resume:

Tips for highlighting master’s degree on resume

Start with your highest degree: When listing your education, start with your highest degree first. In most cases, this will be your master’s degree.

Be concise: You don’t need to include every detail about your master’s degree on your resume. Keep it concise and relevant to the job you’re applying for.

Use bullet points: Use bullet points to make your education section easy to scan. This will help potential employers quickly see your qualifications.

Include relevant coursework: If you took coursework that is relevant to the job you’re applying for, include it in your education section.

Sample sections to list master’s degree

Here are some sample sections to list your master’s degree on your resume:

  • Master of Science in Computer Science, XYZ University, 2020
  • Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, ABC University, 2018

Academic achievements

  • Graduated with honors
  • Recipient of the Dean’s List award

Professional development

  • Completed coursework in curriculum development and instructional design
  • Facilitated professional development sessions for other educators

Example of listing master’s degree in a different format

Here’s an example of how you could list your master’s degree on your resume in a different format:

Professional experience

Director of Marketing, ABC Corporation

  • Led the development and execution of marketing campaigns for a leading technology company
  • Managed a team of five marketing professionals
  • Increased website traffic by 25% through targeted content marketing strategies

Master of Science in Marketing, XYZ University

  • Coursework included: Marketing Research, Consumer Behavior, Marketing Analytics
  • Recipient of the Outstanding Graduate Student award

By listing your master’s degree in the education section of your resume, you’re able to highlight your academic achievements and qualifications. However, you can also choose to list your degree in other sections of your resume, such as your professional experience section, to show how your education has prepared you for your work.

How to List PhD on a Resume

If you have earned a PhD, it is important to highlight this achievement on your resume. Here are some steps to help you effectively list your PhD:

Include your degree title: Begin by listing your degree title, such as “Doctor of Philosophy” or “PhD” after your name at the top of your resume.

Highlight your field of study: Under the education section of your resume, include the name of your university, the dates of your attendance, and your field of study.

Detail your dissertation: Highlight your dissertation topic and provide a brief summary of your research under your education section.

Emphasize your contributions: If you were actively involved in any research or publications during your PhD program, consider creating a separate section to highlight these achievements.

Here are some sample sections you could use to list your PhD on a resume:

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology, XYZ University, 2016-2022
  • Dissertation: “The Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Anxiety Among Children and Adolescents”

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE

  • Conducted empirical research on the effect of mindfulness-based interventions on stress levels among university students
  • Published several articles in peer-reviewed journals related to social behavior and mental health in adolescence

PUBLICATIONS

  • John Doe, Jane Doe, & Sam Smith. (2021). “Impacts of Social Media on Mental Health in Adolescents.” Journal of Adolescence, 87, 35-41.

If you want to highlight your PhD in a different format, consider these tips:

  • Create a separate section for your education, research experience, and publications.
  • Use bullet points to list your relevant achievements and responsibilities.
  • Keep it concise but specific – employers want to see your accomplishments, but they don’t want to read a thesis.

Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work, XYZ University, 2014-2019

  • Dissertation: “The Role of Social Support in Reducing Depression Among Adults with Chronic Illnesses”
  • Conducted a mixed-methods research project on the experiences of individuals with disabilities in accessing healthcare services
  • Presented research findings at several conferences and published in peer-reviewed journals
  • John Doe & Jane Smith. (2019). “Barriers and facilitators to accessing mental health care among individuals with disabilities.” Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation, 18(1), 30-40.

Listing your PhD on a resume is an essential aspect of showcasing your expertise and qualifications. By following these steps and examples, you can effectively and clearly highlight your achievements and make a positive impact on potential employers.

How to List Certifications and Licenses

When it comes to creating a resume, highlighting your education is a key component. However, it’s not just your degrees that can impress potential employers. Listing certifications and licenses you hold can also make you stand out as a qualified candidate. Here, we’ll discuss what essential certificates and licenses to list on a resume, how to format and list them properly, and provide sample sections to make your resume stand out.

Essential Certificates and Licenses

When it comes to listing certifications and licenses, there are many to choose from. However, certain certifications and licenses are more relevant to specific career paths. Here are the essential certificates and licenses that you should list on your resume based on the industry you’re in:

  • Healthcare: CPR certification, BLS certification, CNA certification, RN license, AHA certification, etc.
  • Education: Teaching license, administrator license, TEFL certification, etc.
  • Information technology: Microsoft certifications, CompTIA certifications, Cisco certifications, etc.
  • Finance: Certified Public Accountant (CPA) license, Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) certification, etc.
  • Law: Bar admission, legal secretary certification, notary public commission, etc.
  • Real estate: Real estate license, certified residential specialist (CRS) certification, etc.

Formatting and Listing Certifications and Licenses

When listing certifications and licenses on your resume, it’s essential to format them properly. Here are some tips to ensure that you list them correctly:

  • Place relevant certifications and licenses in an area of your resume that makes sense. If you’re in healthcare, you may want to include them under a “Certifications” header after your education section. If you’re in finance, you could list your CPA license under your “Professional Development” section.
  • Always list the most recent certification or license first, followed by the less recent ones in descending order.
  • If the certification or license has an expiration date, make sure to list it along with the certificate’s title, followed by the issuing institution and the date it was earned.

Sample Sections for Listing Certifications and Licenses

Now that you know the essential certificates and licenses to list and how to format them, here are some sample sections that you can use on your resume for some inspiration:

Certifications

  • BLS Certification, American Red Cross, Exp. 04/2022
  • Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Certification, State of California, Exp. 12/2023
  • Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Certification, American Heart Association, Exp. 06/2024
  • Teaching License, State of New York, Exp. 06/2027
  • Administrator License, State of Illinois, Exp. 06/2029

Information Technology

  • CompTIA Security+ Certification, CompTIA, Exp.

How to List Relevant Coursework on a Resume

When crafting a resume, it is important to showcase all aspects of your education and relevant experiences. One way to do this is by including relevant coursework on your resume. In this section, we will discuss why including coursework on your resume can be helpful, the importance of relevant coursework, how to format it, and provide examples of sections to list relevant coursework.

Why Include Coursework on Resume

Including relevant coursework on your resume can be helpful in showcasing the skills and knowledge you have gained in your academic career. If you do not have much work experience or are applying for a job in a field that you studied in school, including coursework can show the employer that you have a solid foundation in the industry.

Importance of Relevant Coursework on Resume

Listing relevant coursework on your resume can demonstrate to the employer that you have gained valuable knowledge and experience in a particular subject area. This can be especially important if the job you are applying for requires specific skills or knowledge that you gained through your coursework. Additionally, it can show your dedication and interest in a particular field or subject.

How to Format Relevant Coursework

When formatting relevant coursework on your resume, it is important to keep it concise and relevant. You should only include coursework that is relevant to the job you are applying for, and ensure that the information is easy to read and understand. Consider highlighting the relevant coursework in a separate section, or within the education section of your resume.

Example Sections to List Relevant Coursework

Below are some examples of sections to list relevant coursework on your resume:

Education Section

Bachelor of Science in Marketing

  • Marketing Research Methods
  • Consumer Behavior
  • Marketing Communications

Relevant Coursework Section

  • Web Design and Development
  • Digital Security

Including relevant coursework on your resume can be a valuable addition, especially if you are new to the workforce or transitioning to a new field. Use the tips provided to format your relevant coursework in a clear and concise way, and showcase your skills and knowledge to potential employers.

Listing Education Based on Career Level

When it comes to listing your education on a resume, it’s important to consider your career level and tailor your education section accordingly. Depending on your level of experience and the job you’re applying for, you may need to highlight different aspects of your academic background.

Tailoring Education Section to Fit Career Level

For entry-level positions, your education may be the most important section of your resume, especially if you have limited work experience. In this case, you should list your education and any relevant coursework, certifications or awards related to the job you’re applying for at the top of your resume.

If you’re a more experienced professional, your work experience will likely take center stage on your resume. However, your education can still be valuable to showcase, particularly if you completed advanced degrees or specialized training.

For senior-level positions, it’s common to list your education at the end of your resume, after you’ve highlighted your extensive work experience. At this stage of your career, employers are likely more interested in your professional achievements and leadership experience than your academic background.

Example Sections to List Education Based on Career Level

Entry-level example:.

  • Bachelor of Science in Marketing, XYZ University
  • Relevant Coursework: Marketing Research, Consumer Behavior, Advertising and Promotion, Digital Marketing
  • Dean’s List, Fall 2018 – Spring 2021

Experienced Professional Example:

  • Master of Business Administration, ABC School of Business
  • Bachelor of Science in Management, XYZ University
  • Relevant Coursework: Strategic Management, Operations Management, Corporate Finance, Marketing Analytics
  • Certified Project Management Professional (PMP)
  • Awards: Outstanding Graduate Student, ABC School of Business

Senior-Level Example:

Professional Experience

  • Director of Sales, XYZ Corporation
  • Vice President of Marketing, ABC Company
  • Chief Revenue Officer, DEF Inc.

Education on a Functional Resume: Tips & Samples

When it comes to creating a functional resume, highlighting your education can be incredibly important. Whether you’re a recent graduate or have years of experience under your belt, your educational background can demonstrate your qualifications and expertise in your chosen field.

Importance of Education in a Functional Resume

Including your education on a functional resume can help you stand out from other job seekers. It can demonstrate that you have the necessary knowledge and skills to be successful in your desired position, and it can also show that you value ongoing learning and professional development.

When listing your education on a functional resume, be sure to include any relevant degrees, courses, certifications, or training programs that you’ve completed. This can help demonstrate your expertise and show that you’ve taken the initiative to further your education and skills.

Techniques to Highlight Education in a Functional Resume

One technique for highlighting your education on a functional resume is to create a separate “Education” section. This section should include the name of the school or institution you attended, the degree or certification you earned, and the year of completion.

When listing your education, be sure to include any relevant coursework or honors that demonstrate your expertise in your field. For example, if you’re applying for a position as a software engineer, you might include coursework in programming languages or computer science.

Another technique for highlighting your education on a functional resume is to incorporate it into your work experience section. For example, if you completed an internship or apprenticeship during your education, you might list that experience under a relevant job title.

Sample Sections to List Education in a Functional Resume

Here are a few sample sections that you might use to list your education on a functional resume:

  • Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, University of XYZ, 2014-2018
  • Relevant coursework: Business Law, Financial Accounting, Marketing
  • Marketing Intern, ABC Company, 2017-2018 (completed as part of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration program at the University of XYZ)
  • Certified Nursing Assistant Training Program, Red Cross, 2016
  • Relevant coursework: Patient Care, Infection Control, Anatomy and Physiology
  • Nursing Assistant, XYZ Hospital, 2016-2018 (completed as part of the Certified Nursing Assistant Training Program at the Red Cross)

By including your education in your functional resume, you can demonstrate your qualifications, expertise, and ongoing commitment to learning and professional development. These sample sections can help you highlight your educational background in a clear and effective way.

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The Must-Haves When Writing Your Education On Your Resume [For 2024]

The education section on your resume is more important than you think. Here’s how to structure it, including advice for current students and recent grads.

3 years ago   •   11 min read

The education section is an easily overlooked part of any resume — which doesn’t mean it should be an afterthought. If you’re a current student or recent graduate, or if you’re applying to jobs that require a specific degree, you’ll know you need to put some thought into it, but the same is true even if you’ve been in the workforce for a while.

Here are some of our best tips for how to structure it, including where to put your resume education section and how to make the most impact without letting it take over more space than it needs.

Where to put your education on your resume

Where to put the education section of your resume mostly depends on how recently you graduated:

  • If you've been out of school for a few years and have some relevant work experience, include your education section underneath your professional experience .
  • If you graduated recently and your education is your most relevant experience, put your education section at the top of your resume .

We'll go into more detail on the why's and how's of listing your education vs work experience first on your resume later in the article. First, here's a quick guide on how to write a resume education section.

How to format a resume education section

  • Create a separate section and title it "Education."
  • List the name of the school and the degree you studied.
  • List your graduation date. This is optional, especially if you graduated more than 10 years ago.
  • List any major awards or honors, including cum laude or dean's list.
  • If you're a current student or recent graduate, you can consider including extra details like GPA or relevant coursework (see below for more details).
  • If you have multiple degrees, list them in reverse chronological order, with your most recent degree first.

Here's an infographic of an education section on a resume

Resume education section template

Here are a couple of different templates you can use, depending on how much experience you have.

Education section for mid-level hires

Here's an example of a brief education section, suitable for experienced hires.

what should i put on my resume for education

Use this template to copy this format:

EDUCATION Name of college or university, location Date of graduation Degree, major, and minor

Education section for students and graduates

This is a longer example you can use if you're a current student or recent graduate.

what should i put on my resume for education

Here's the expanded template:

EDUCATION Name of college or university, location Date of graduation Degree, major, and minor Awards and GPA (if above 3.5) Relevant coursework

What to include in your resume education section

As a general rule, you should limit your education section to information that's relevant to the job you're applying for.

Must haves:

  • The university or college you attended
  • The degree you obtained
  • Your major(s)
  • The year you graduated

Awards and honors

Study abroad.

  • Relevant coursework

Extracurricular activities

Other certifications, educational projects, internships and student placements, unfinished degrees, the university or college and degree.

This one's a no-brainer. If nothing else, you must include the name of your degree and where you obtained it.

what should i put on my resume for education

Major and minor

You should pretty much always list your major, unless you completed your degree in a completely unrelated field. Listing your minor is a good idea if it's in any way relevant to the job you're now applying for.

what should i put on my resume for education

More information: How to put a double major on a resume and the minors you need to include on your resume

Any major awards or honors should go in your resume education section. These include cum laude or magna cum laude, dean's list , and fellowships.

An example education section that highlights key achievements during university

More information: How to list honors on your resume

Your GPA is very optional — only include it if you're a current student or recent graduate and it's above 3.5. In all other cases, leave it off.

what should i put on my resume for education

If you’re a current student, it’s fine to list study abroad on your resume. You can list the experience under the host school, making sure to note that it was a study abroad program.

what should i put on my resume for education

More information: Turn study abroad into a job with these resume tips

If you're an experienced hire, skip this step. If you have real work experience, including coursework will look strangely out of touch.

If you're a current student and don't have a lot of relevant work experience, relevant coursework can help demonstrate key skills and get you past Applicant Tracking Systems . You can list a handful of subjects on one line underneath your degree and major.

what should i put on my resume for education

More information: What to put on your resume if you don't have a lot of experience

You can include student activities a subsection of your resume education section (if they only take up a line or two) or in a separate section (if you want to include key accomplishments).

what should i put on my resume for education

More information: How to showcase extracurriculars on your resume

Other certifications and qualifications can go on your resume, but be critical about what you list. This could include certificates, licences, technical qualifications, and other types of continuing education — as long as they’re relevant to the job you’re applying for. You also don’t need to list every conference or seminar you’ve ever attended. Keep it limited to substantial qualifications that help you stand out.

what should i put on my resume for education

More information: The right way to list certifications on a resume

Projects can also be listed in their own section if you choose to elaborate on your accomplishments — if you're a current student or recent graduate, this is a great way to highlight relevant skills. If you'd rather keep it brief, include a 'Projects' subheading in your education section and list them there instead.

what should i put on my resume for education

More information: How to list projects on your resume

Internships — paid or unpaid — are generally a better fit for your work experience section, since they take place in a professional work environment. List these the same way as paid work experience, including the name of the employer, the dates of the internship, and a few key accomplishments in bullet points.

You can include student placements if they were a) significant, b) recent, and c) relevant. In other words, a six-month hospital placement belongs on your resume if you're a recent nursing graduate, but a two-week observation probably doesn't.

what should i put on my resume for education

More information: How to write effective resume bullet points

It's fine to list an unfinished degree on your resume. Do list an unfinished degree if it's relevant to the job you're applying for, demonstrates key skills, or explains a long career gap. Don't list an unfinished degree if it's much older or  in a different industry than the one you now work in — only include it if it strengthens your candidacy.

It’s also okay to include your degree if you haven’t officially graduated yet — simply list it as “expected May 2024” (or whatever date applies).

Boston University (2020-2021) Boston, MA Bachelor of Arts in Communication — Completed 20 credit hours

More information: Listing an unfinished degree on your resume

I’d recommend uploading your resume to the tool below to find out if your education section is structured the right way. It’ll scan your education section and let you know if you’ve listed your degrees, majors & minors, GPA, honors, coursework and projects the right way. It’ll also let you know which of these belong on your resume and which ones to leave off entirely.

Do's and don'ts for structuring your education section

Here are some general do's and don'ts for formatting the education section of your resume:

  • Keep it brief. In most cases, your education section only needs to be a line or two underneath your work experience.
  • Highlight any particularly impressive accomplishments, like graduating summa cum laude or receiving a prestigious fellowship.
  • Include unfinished degrees if you're still in school or they're relevant to the job you're applying for.
  • List all your degrees, not just the most recent. You may think your bachelor’s degree in art history doesn’t matter if you have a master’s in engineering and are applying for jobs as an engineer, but it’ll look weird if you leave it off altogether.
  • Leave a degree off your resume only if it isn’t relevant and it could make you appear overqualified — for example, if you have PhD in mathematics and are applying for jobs as an entry-level salesperson.
  • Always include an education section, even if it's very short.
  • Include more information than is necessary. Stick to details that strengthen your candidacy — if it's not relevant, leave it off.
  • Include your GPA unless it's very high (above 3.5) . Listing a 2.0 GPA isn't going to impress any recruiters — but the good news is, once you've graduated, it isn't relevant anyway.
  • List high school information (unless you're a current high school student).

Tips for writing a resume education section

Wondering how these rules apply to your specific circumstances? Here's some more targeted advice for different situations.

If you’re a recent graduate

As a recent graduate, always include your graduation date on your resume. If you don’t have a lot of work experience, a recent graduation date makes it obvious why.

Example: Listing study abroad in your resume's education section

Unlike more experienced hires , recent graduates can use your education section to highlight your achievements. This includes awards, student initiatives, study abroad programs, language proficiency , key leadership skills, and any major accomplishments.

If you’re a current student

If you’re still studying, your education section can be a lot bigger, since you’re unlikely to have a lot of relevant work experience. You should include any major accomplishments, including awards and involvement in extracurricular activities. If you know when you’ll be graduating, go ahead and list the expected date .

Students should prioritize their education section on their resumes, since it's the most recent

Any part-time work experience or internships can go in the work history section of your resume.

If you graduated a while ago

Try to keep your education section as short as possible.  The longer you’ve been in the workforce, the shorter it should be. If you graduated some time ago (e.g. 8+ years), it’s common practice to omit the date (and a good idea for those who want to avoid any potential age discrimination) .

Leave off your graduation date from your education section of your resume if its 15+ years old

If you transferred schools

If you started and finished your degree at different institutions — including transferring between four-year schools or from a community college — it's fine to just list the name of the school you graduated from. If you're a recent graduate and have achievements on your resume from your previous institution (like involvement in student organizations), you can consider listing both schools for clarification.

If you have multiple degrees

If you have multiple degrees, list them in reverse chronological order with the most recent first.

Use the reverse chronological ordering for your Education section on your resume

Key takeaways

Remember that your resume is about presenting you as a strong applicant for a position rather than about adding as much information as possible. Normal resume rules apply — if it strengthens your candidacy, leave it in. If it takes the spotlight off more impressive work experience, take it off.

Everything on your resume should have a single purpose: Demonstrating that you’re a good fit for the position you’re applying to. This means:

  • Tailor your resume : Add or remove experiences and qualifications from your experience section as necessary to fit each specific role.
  • If you don't have much work experience: Expand your education section when you don’t have a lot of work experience, or if the experience you do have isn’t particularly relevant. On the other side, if your work experience is extensive or impressive on its own, anything else you add risks taking focus away from the parts you want to highlight.
  • If you’re a career changer: Fresh qualifications can help bridge the gap between your old industry and the new role you want.

Should you lead with work experience or education on your resume?

The convention is for your education section to be after your work experience, but there are some situations where that doesn’t apply.

You can put your education section at the top of your resume if:

  • You're still a student
  • You graduated recently
  • You're changing careers
  • Your education is the most relevant part of your resume

Recent or current students can lead with your education section

If you’re a current student and don’t have a lot of work experience , it’s fine to lead with your education section. It’s the most recent (and likely most relevant) experience you have. Leading with your education also prevents anyone who’s skimming over your resume from assuming that you’re simply inexperienced or unemployed, when the reality is that you’re in full-time education.

The same applies if you’re a recent graduate. If your education is still the most relevant or most impressive experience you have, list it first.

Career changers can start their resumes with an education section, if it's relevant

The last exception is career changers . If you’ve gone back to school as part of the career change process, you can list your education first. A new qualification is more relevant than your experience in a different industry. It also provides important context for your application, as a resume that solely focuses on your past experience in a different sector might otherwise be confusing to a hiring manager.

If you’re a career changer looking for new qualifications to include in your education section but aren’t sure what skills you need, use the tool below to find a list of skills and keywords required for the job you want.

Otherwise, your work experience should come before your education section

If the situations above don’t apply to you, and you don’t have another good reason to list your education first, stick to the standard convention as lead with your work experience. Employers primarily want to know about your work history and achievements, so unless your education is very recent, you’re better of focusing on your professional accomplishments.

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what should i put on my resume for education

Thank you for the checklist! I realized I was making so many mistakes on my resume that I've now fixed. I'm much more confident in my resume now.

what should i put on my resume for education

How to (and How Not to) List Education on Your Resume

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About a week ago, I received a resume from a job seeker interested in a technical sales position one of my recruiting clients has available. All was going well—until I reached the education section of his resume.

Here’s what it said:

Graduate, and Ongoing Student

School of Life, Multiple Locations

I wanted to admire his creativity , I really did. But instead, I just felt sort of annoyed and duped. I wondered why this job seeker, who had tons of great work experience and plenty of continuing education coursework under his belt, felt like he had to invent something to put into this section of his resume.

The more I pondered, the more I realized: Resumes are just damned hard for most people to craft, even under the most straightforward of circumstances. This challenge becomes even more daunting when you have to strategize on something sensitive or complex, like having no degree or a non-completed degree.

And then there’s the whole, “Where do I put my education on the resume, top or bottom?” thing. And how about dates? Do you list them, or not? Do you cite GPA, courses completed? Committee memberships?

The education section is tough. And truthfully, there aren’t unbendable laws on it. But to avoid this job seeker’s mistake (and others), here are a few bits of advice on how to best manage this piece of your resume:

Don’t Be Overly Cutesy (or Lie)

Most of us have stuff in our past that we’d like to disguise on our resumes. If it happens that your Achilles heel falls in the education section, be strategic, of course, but not cheesy (see above) or dishonest. It probably won’t end well. If you feel your education section is a little light, load this section with continuing education and professional coursework .

Put Advanced Degrees First (Usually)

Usually, you should lay down your educational background by listing the most recent or advanced degree first, working in reverse chronological order. But there are exceptions. Say you earned a degree in geography, but are now working in the field of online marketing. If you more recently completed coursework specific to social media or digital marketing, list that first to grab the reviewer’s attention.

Lose the Dates, Unless You’re a Recent Grad

Unless you’re a recent graduate (one to three years out of school), you really don’t need to list the graduation dates . The reviewer cares more about whether or not you have the degree than when you earned it. And, as you progress in your career (that’s code for “as that gray hair starts springing out”), listing dates can work against you.

Don’t List Everywhere You Ever Attended

If you attended one or two colleges before landing at the one from which you graduated, it’s not necessary to list them all out. Again, the degree is what the reviewer is looking for, not an autobiographical account of the four colleges you hopped to and from before finally graduating.

Didn’t Quite Earn the Degree? Mention It Anyway

Last week, I counseled a woman who had completed her master’s program, but not the thesis. She wondered if it was OK to list that she’d completed the coursework, or if would it appear deceptive. Um, mention it . Absolutely mention it. I’d frame it something like this:

Master of Business Administration Degree Candidate, Marylhurst University, Marylhurst, OR

Thesis under development; anticipated completion June 2013

List Honors, Not GPA

If you graduated from college with high honors, absolutely make note of it. While you don’t need to list your GPA (especially if it’s under 3.5 or if you’ve been out of school for more than three years), don’t be afraid to showcase that summa cum laude status or the fact that you were in the honors college at your university.

Position It Strategically

Most people list educational background at the end of the resume, which is perfectly fine. However, if you have a degree from a prestigious university or one that may serve as an advantage for the types of positions you’re pursuing, consider listing your education at the beginning of your resume instead.

Above all, be strategic about anything you put in your education section. Like anything else on your resume, it should be working for you, not against.

what should i put on my resume for education

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Resume Examples & Samples

How to list education on a resume [examples].

Dayana Aleksandrova

Create a Resume in Minutes & Get More Job Interviews

Table of Contents

First things first, basic formatting, how to list high school education, mention awards.

Education is tough. You spend four years in college, stressing about exams and living off of gummy bears and ramen, often curled up on the library floor. That’s the best case scenario. Reward your efforts by expertly putting your education on a resume.

It’s crucial to know how to list your education on a resume at every stage. Applicants get confused by all the possible scenarios. What if you never finished high school? What if you only completed high school? What if you dropped out of college? Don't worry.

We will teach you how to:

  • List your high school experience even if you never graduated
  • Include your education if you’re still in college
  • Present your education on a resume if you never graduated college
  • Mention your college education once it’s completed
  • Leverage skills and extracurriculars to complement your education

VelvetJobs Expert Tip

Need help? Check out our resume builder .

#first-things-first

Have you ever wondered what goes first, education or experience? They are both important and should be easy to spot on your resume.

You can have your education positioned:

  • At the top of your resume, before experience
  • After your experience but before your interests and hobbies

Both alternatives work.

If you have recently graduated, list education before experience on your resume. This is because, at this point, education is most likely the most relevant and extensive experience you’ve had.

If you’ve decided to go back to school after a few years in the workforce, you should put your work experience before your education. It's better to see that you can, say, generate $20,000 in sales over six months than a theoretical finance course you took.

Make sure to make education a priority on your resume. While you may choose not to put it at the top, don’t bury it at the very bottom. The bottom part of your resume should be for hobbies and interests, certifications and volunteer work.

Learn How and Why Put Hobbies on a Resume (20+ Real Examples) !

When should you put education after your work experience?

If you’ve been working for a few years and have a few solid positions to show, put your education after your experience. After all, companies want to hire you for what you can do , not what you’ve learned in theory.

Of course, a degree can be a very helpful asset, but the experience here has a higher value. If you’ve been working for 5-10 years, your experience has become more relevant and recent than your degree so you can put your education in the second part of the resume.

#basic-formatting

We will go over the basic formatting requirements of listing your education on your resume.

  • List your highest degree first (Ph.D-MA - BA - Associate)
  • If you put your college degree, you don’t need to list high school

It makes sense to list your highest degree first. It will be the one you obtained most recently and the most valuable of all. If you’ve got a Ph.D, it would be at the top of your resume. You can leave off the rest of your degrees in that case, especially if they are in the same discipline.

For example, if you have a Ph.D in Neuroscience and a Master's in the same sphere, just list your Ph.D. Besides the doctorate, Master’s degrees go next, followed by Bachelor’s and finally, Associate’s degree.

Additional details to include:

  • School you graduated from
  • Major/ minor
  • Year of graduation
  • Location of school

These are the four additional pieces of information you should mention when listing your education on your resume.

The name of your school is important. The area of study matters as well. If you had both a major and a minor, list the major first . The year of graduation is important as the recruiter will be judging your progress based on it.

Finally, the location of the school is a good piece of information to have, but it isn’t crucial. It’s important in case the name of your college is popular. For example, when you say you graduated from “Trinity College,” the recruiter would ask which one - the one in Ireland or Connecticut.

Here is an example of what this format looks like:

for example

2015 MA in Psychology

Boston University, Boston, MA

3.8 GPA Followed by:

2013 BA in Psychology

  • Trinity College, Hartford, CT

As you can see, this candidate has listed their HIGHEST and MOST RECENT degree first, followed by their previous education.

Need some extra help? Check out these resume templates .

bonus tips:

  • Every space on your resume counts. Shorten “Master’s” to MA, “Bachelor’s” to BA, etc.
  • It’s good to put your GPA on your resume as long as it’s higher than 3.2.

If you attended an Ivy League school (Harvard, Princeton, Yale), you could lead with the name of the school instead of the major.

#how-to-list-high-school-education

We will follow the same format as above. If you didn’t graduate high school, simply say:

  • Name of High School, Town, State
  • Attended school from YEAR - YEAR

For example:

  • Union High School, Gilford, NH
  • Attended school from 2003 - 2005

Since your education is not the strongest suit on your resume if you didn’t finish high school, go ahead and emphasize your relevant work experience and qualifications instead.

If you are still in high school, list the following:

  • Expected to graduate YEAR

It would look like:

  • Expected to graduate 2010

Finally, if you didn’t finish high school, but later completed a GED, say this: GED High School Equivalency Diploma

  • Institution, State, YEAR
  • Attended High School From YEAR - YEAR
  • GED High School Equivalency Diploma
  • Greenville Center, Gilford, 2010
  • Attended High School From 2003- 2005

Why do we list both institutions? This is because you began your education in high school and finished elsewhere. Together, the two add up to what the recruiter needs to know. You'll see this information in all good resume templates .

what should i put on my resume for education

If you finished high school

Listing your completed education is very simple. Just say the following:

  • Graduated in YEAR

It would look like this:

  • Graduated in 2013

Looks simple? That’s because it really is, no catch. While your high school experience can be quickly summed up in a few lines, you should put more effort into discussing your skills and experience in case this is your highest level of education.

We know you're a rockstar. Check out these 50+ Essential Skills to Put on a Resume (And Get the Job) !

Now let’s talk about college education on your resume. We will look at how to list it in case:

  • You never finished college
  • You are still in college
  • You completed a college degree

what should i put on my resume for education

Simply list it like this:

  • University of New Hampshire, Manchester, NH
  • 2012-2014 Completed 70 credits towards BA in Economics
  • Graduated in 2012

Here, we list your high school along with the college courses you’ve taken in order to demonstrate a more wholesome educational experience. If you did the work and completed a certain number of courses, definitely mention it.

Here is the best way to list your education on your resume if you are still in college :

  • BA in Economics in Progress

Simply mention when you will have your degree. You can use the phrase “in progress,” or “anticipated,” or “expected.” These terms are interchangeable.

Listing a completed college degree on your resume is very straightforward. Simply say:

  • YEAR Degree Type in Discipline
  • University, City, State
  • 2015 BA in Economics
  • University of Boston, Boston, MA

#mention-awards

Let's have a look at how to list degrees higher than BA on your resume. Feel free to include additional details such as:

  • Honors and awards
  • Relevant courses taken
  • Extracurricular activities and volunteer work
  • Published work

It is always a good idea to mention any honors you’ve received with your degree or whether you’ve been a part of any societies such as Phi Beta Kappa.

This is what an example looks like:

  • Honors BA in Economics, Summa Cum Laude
  • Graduated in 2015

Other honors can include any scholarships you’ve received on Dean's List .

It’s a good idea to mention details about the courses you’ve taken if they are relevant. For example, if you are applying for a position in politics and you’ve taken courses in international political economy, politics of developing countries and international relations, do mention those courses.

Your resume should be one page long, so only mention these details if you have space left.

You can spend more time on your education section in case you have little to no work experience. That way, you will demonstrate that this is where the majority of your efforts have been focused.

What if you graduated with a degree that isn’t relevant to the position you are applying for? Then simply list the courses you’ve taken that can be helpful in the industry.

For example, if you’d like to work as a Human Resources Specialist, but you studied Economics, that’s fine. List courses that may be relevant, such as Psychology 101, Behavioral Psychology and Social Psychology.

  • Bachelor of Arts in Economics
  • Relevant Coursework: Psychology 101, Behavioral Psychology, Social Psychology

You can back your resume up with relevant extracurricular and volunteer experiences as well, such as:

  • Mentor programs
  • Debate team
  • Sports teams
  • Creative writing
  • Student government

These extracurricular activities demonstrate that you’ve closely worked with people in a team and as a leader, as well as have imagination and creativity.

Don't be shy, it's fine to show off. Here's How to Mention Accomplishments on Your Resume (10+ Examples)

Here are the things to remember when discussing education on your resume.

It’s important to talk about your studies when you apply for a job. Though your experience will be more important if you’ve got ten years of experience under your belt, if you are just starting out or are still in school, your education matters.

You can list any sort of education - both high school and college, regardless of whether you completed a degree or not. There are different ways to speak about your education, depending on whether you have completed your studies, have dropped them or are still in progress.

You should leverage your extracurricular activities , honors and rewards and mention details about your coursework in order to position your candidacy best for the job.

Make sure to be concise in your education description, as your resume should be a neat one page. It’s easy to choose whether to put your education at the top or bottom of your resume, depending on how much professional experience you’ve accumulated.

If you have years of solid work experience behind you, place your education after your experience. In case you have recently graduated from school or don’t have much professional experience to show, put your education second.

what should i put on my resume for education

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How to List Education in Progress on Your Resume (+ Examples)

Marsha Hebert, professional resume writer

10 min read

A man sitting outside in front of some windows using his Apple laptop.

Are you unsure about how to list your in-progress education on your resume? Many people are, including current students, students taking online classes, and people taking a break from their degree programs.

Is it acceptable to include unfinished degrees on a resume?

ZipJob’s career experts agree that education in progress should usually be included on a resume. A degree in progress is still important to employers, as well as a degree that was started and holds relevance to a position. However, it needs to be included in an honest way so it’s an accurate reflection of your learning and accomplishments.

If you’re currently pursuing a degree, here is how you can list education in progress on your resume – plus some examples for you to use as templates on your own resume.

Key Takeaway

KEY TAKEAWAY: Are you working on a degree and want to tell prospective employers about your efforts? These tips can help you to list your in-progress education on your resume.

How to list education in progress on a resume

There are two things you need to learn if you want to know how to list education in progress on your resume. The first is how to provide that information in a way that clearly conveys your education status to an employer. The second is where to place that information in the body of your resume. With respect to the how, there are a few different ways to convey these details. There are only a couple of basic rules to follow when you list these education details:

Be as clear as possible. You don’t want to give the employer the wrong impression, after all. If you have completed one degree and are pursuing advanced education, be sure to clearly state that fact. If your degree is not yet complete, be clear about that as well.

Be honest. If you are in the process of withdrawing from school, don’t list that educational program. Don’t try to enhance your education section in any way. Just state the facts in an honest way.

Feel free to include in-progress university degrees , as well as online degrees that you may be pursuing. Both are popular in 2023/2024.

Resume degree in progress examples

When you include details indicating that you’re currently pursuing a degree on your resume, it’s important to provide clarity. The last thing you want is to inadvertently leave the impression that you’re trying to pretend like you’ve completed the degree. And while it might be tempting to just note that the degree is still a work-in-progress, we believe that you should be even more specific. The best way to do that is to include the anticipated graduation date.

Now, if you’re like many students, you may not be entirely sure that you’ll complete your degree by a set date. However, that shouldn’t stop you from providing an anticipated date of completion. In fact, it’s essential that you provide this information so that employers know that you’re serious about your studies. This is especially true in cases where the job you’re seeking requires that degree. Fortunately, it’s a relatively easy task to accomplish.

We wrote a good post here on how to include an MBA on a resume.

For example, check out this listing from a sample resume with a master’s degree in progress:

Master of Business Administration (MBA), Human Resources Program

Dynamic University, Anytown, AnyState. Expected completion 2025

If you’re closer to graduation and are more certain about the date, you can use something like this:

Graduate Studies, Computer Engineering

XYZ University, MyCity, MyState, Graduation Date: Spring, 2024

What if I don't expect to finish the degree?

If you are taking a break from your education (or a permanent hiatus) you need to consider whether or not the coursework you did complete is relevant. Ask yourself:

Is this degree related to the job I'm applying for?

Is this degree more relevant to the job than my other relevant experience including jobs, volunteer work, or certifications?

Is this in-progress degree recent enough? (Can I still remember what I learned? Has a lot changed in the industry since I learned it?)

Is having a degree required for this job?

While you should never lie about having a degree you don't have, including any progress made toward a required degree may help you reach the interview stage. The trick is you have to be qualified for the job in every other aspect. If you don't have an MBA, but you do have 10+ years in the business field, you may still have a shot at landing the interview.

To accurately represent this on your resume, don't include a prospective graduation date. Instead, try including the number of credits and the years you attended.

University of California, Riverside (2019 to 2021) | Riverside, CA

36 units toward a Bachelor of Arts in Media and Cultural Studies

EXPERT TIP: View 200+ more professional resume samples for all industries, along with a guide to writing resumes from our career experts.

Should I include other information about my degree?

You may want to consider whether you should list relevant coursework and major projects on your resume. In general, work experience is more compelling than education, but either way, adding classes that you’ve taken or capstone-type projects can elevate your resume with more relevant keywords.

Relevant coursework

Adding relevant coursework to the education section of your resume can be a great idea, especially if you lack the professional experience needed to set you apart from other job seekers. The great thing about adding coursework is that you can include it whether you’ve finished your degree or not. Here’s what it would look like:

Bachelor of Arts in Media and Cultural Studies | University of Chicago (GPA: 3.89) 

Relevant Coursework: Media Technology, Games Culture, Intercultural Communication, Web Design, Advanced Video Production, Multimedia Performance, and Strategic Social Media

Adding coursework isn’t a place to dump every class you took pursuing your degree. Rather, it’s a place to inject relevant keywords into your resume. So, if the job description calls for someone with experience in video production and you haven’t had a job that allowed you access to that but you did take a class in college, then you can add it to your Education section. 

Related read: Relevant Coursework on a Resume: Good or Bad?

Capstone or other major projects

Similar to adding coursework, you can talk about projects you’ve worked on. Remember that relevancy is critical. You should always be thinking about how your experience and education relate to what the prospective employer is looking for in a new hire. If you need to add something else on your resume that helps you demonstrate skills or knowledge, a project from school can be just the ticket. Write the project details in your Education section in the same way you’d write a job role – meaning, use bullet points to call attention to things you achieved as you worked on the project. Here’s what that looks like:

Notable project: Project title

Describe the project and goals along with how many team members were involved

Talk about what you did – your role – to achieve the project goals

Mention the skills you gained – “Honed skills in [skill 1], [skill 2], and [skill 3]

If you won an award or earned some recognition for a project well done, write about it

Where to place education in progress on your resume

The second issue you need to address is placement. Where should you place these details when you’re trying to figure out how to list education in progress on a resume? There are two main possibilities, depending upon whether the degree is needed for the job you’re seeking.

If the job requirements include the degree that you’re pursuing, then you should try to emphasize that information in your resume. Position it near the beginning of your resume, after the summary section. That way, the employer will see that you’re close to completing that requirement before he or she delves any further into the document. This placement helps showcase your interest and suitability right away.

On the other hand, you should place this detail later in the resume if the degree isn’t needed for the position. In that instance, you can put your work history and skills higher up in the resume and leave your education for the end.

Tie it all together in your cover letter

Don’t forget about the power of your cover letter . Since your cover letter is meant to complement your resume, a degree in progress could give you another opportunity to sell the point that you are qualified for the role. Talking about education in progress or unfinished education in your cover letter can also allow you to explain any gaps on your resume that are related to pursuing education. 

Gaps can happen if you decide to go to school, and then change your mind. If you didn’t work while you were in school, then you’ll have a gap. It’s not something to fret about, gaps happen all the time. You just have to be ready to explain why it exists and being able to tell a story about how you were actively working to improve your qualifications and skills can go a long way in showing future employers your dedication to continuous improvement. 

As always, whether you bring up unfinished education in your cover letter depends on whether it’s relevant to the job you’re applying to. If it doesn’t add value to your job application, then leave it off. 

Here are some example statements you can use when mentioning a resume degree in progress on your cover letter:

I am currently pursuing a degree in [field or industry] to enhance my skills in [skill 1], [skill 2], and [skill 3].

While my education journey is still ongoing, I’m excited to apply the knowledge I’ve gained to the [position name] role.

I am actively working toward completing my [degree name] to meet the educational requirements for this position.

A final note: grade point average

We should also address another common question that we encounter: do you need to include your grade point average ? There are different schools of thought on this, so it’s really up to you. As a rule, however, most experts agree that it’s generally unwise to include anything less than the best GPAs. That typically means leaving it out unless it’s at least 3.5. In most instances, however, you won’t need to include that detail unless the job description requires a certain grade point average or you’re seeking a job at a major firm.

For your resume, a degree in progress is one more tool for success!

As you can see, it is not difficult to enhance your resume with a degree in progress. Yes, you need to know the right format to use, and where to list that information. Still, it is a relatively simple thing to handle if you stick to the basic principles we’ve outlined here. So, be sure to include those educational details, to showcase your developing skills and help you stand out from the crowd!

Recommended reading:

7 Free Certifications To Enhance Your Resume

How to List Online Courses on a Resume (Examples and Tips)

200+ Resume Examples for Every Job & Industry

Marsha Hebert, Professional Resume Writer

Marsha is a resume writer with a strong background in marketing and writing. After completing a Business Marketing degree, she discovered that she could combine her passion for writing with a natural talent for marketing. For more than 10 years, Marsha has helped companies and individuals market themselves. Read more advice from Marsha on ZipJob's blog .

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How to List Education on a Resume in 2024 (With Examples)

Adding Education on a Resume

When you set out to write your resume , listing your education is a major component.

Depending on the industry you work in or the job you are applying for, you may need to alter the content or position of your education section.

This article includes:

Within this ResumeGiants article we’ll show you how to list education on your resume , how to detail high school diplomas and higher education, as well as how to list education in process if you haven’t yet graduated.

We’ll make all of this easy to understand by providing many examples. Let’s start!

How to List Education on a Resume

Listing education on a resume requires a specific format . To begin, you’ll need to start with the most recent item first under the heading of “Education,” and then work back in time.

So, if you have an advanced degree , you’d list that first, followed by your bachelor’s degree and/or your high school diploma. If you have a few degrees , then you may also choose to not list your high school diploma, especially if you are short on space.

Take a look at the examples below and note that you can decide what level of detail to include.

You can add bullet points of your accomplishments academically, or you can keep things to the point and simply state the degree, school, location, and the year you obtained your certificate or diploma.

Here are a few examples of how to list education on resume .

1. Multiple Degrees on a Resume

M.Sc. Biology, University of California, California, 2019 BS, Life Sciences, University of Florida, Florida, 2017

2. Highlighting One Degree on your Resume

B.A. Psychology, Georgia College, Georgia, 2002

  • Graduated with a 4.0 GPA
  • Awarded the Entrance Scholarship

3. Highlighting a GED or High School Diploma

High School Diploma, Mackenzie High School, Richmond, Virginia, 2002

Where to Position Education on your Resume

There are 2 possible positions for your education on your resume, and you need to consider the type of job you are applying for and your current level of experience.

The first section, beneath your name and contact information, is the objective statement or summary section of your resume. Next, will be either your education section or your experience section.

Let’s discuss 2 scenarios to illustrate when you should have your education positioned front and center, and when you should have your experience before your education.

When to Position your Education Before Experience on your Resume

If you are applying for a job that requires specific education , then you might want to have your education section before your experience.

Education could also be positioned first if you have limited experience.

This way you are highlighting the qualities that make you a good candidate without drawing too much attention to some skills or qualifications that you don’t have yet.

For example, if you just graduated from school with a degree in business, but you don’t have much work experience in the same field, you likely want to put your education first.

If you apply for positions in finance, the hiring manager will want to know you have a business degree. If you are changing professions, and this is your first job in finance, you’ll want to highlight your education before your experience in another field.

When to Position your Experience Before Education on your Resume

On the other hand, if you have extensive experience in the profession already, you may want to have your experience lead, with your education listed next on your resume.

For example, if you are applying for a job as a manager in a restaurant, and you’ve worked for the last ten years managing wait staff in restaurants, then your experience shows how qualified you are.

Even if you have a certificate in hospitality, your specific experience shows you are right for the job.

As you can see, you’ll have to use your best judgement about the placement of your education on your resume, but it should still be highlighted, even if it does come after your experience section.

Whether you have a high school diploma, a GED, or a higher education degree or certificate, you worked hard for that and should state it on your resume.

We’ll show you exactly how to list your education on your resume in the following sections.

How to List your High School Education and GED on your Resume

Within the education section of your resume, you can list your GED or High School Diploma, just like you would any other degree or certificate.

Like the examples we shared above, you can also put a couple of bullet points beneath your diploma to showcase any academic achievements that are relevant to the job you are pursuing or that you are proud of.

Keep in mind that if you have a Higher Education Degree (or more than one post-secondary degree), you may want to leave your GED or high school diploma out of the education section.

It will save you some space on the page, and the hiring manager will assume you have your high school equivalency if you have a university or college degree.

To get you started, here are a few examples of how to put High School Education on a resume :

  • GED, Detroit, Michigan, 1995
  • High School Diploma, Alex May High School, Middleton, 2002, Honor Roll
  • High School Diploma, Mercy Tech School, Georgina, 2020
  • GED, Online Academy, Wisconsin, 2016

Depending on the resume template you choose, you may have the date first, or even on the next line. Use the template for guidance to keep things looking consistent throughout.

How to Put Graduate Level Education on your Resume

The same guidance applies if you have graduate level education to list on your resume. If your GPA was amazing, or you won a scholarship, you can certainly list those accolades.

You may want those additional details when your experience section is short, which may be the case if you are just graduating and looking for your first job.

Begin with the highest degree you’ve earned, and then work your way back to your bachelor’s degree or your first college diploma. With advanced or multiple degrees, you can leave your high school education off the list.

Here are 3 different examples to give you an idea of how to populate the education section on your resume.

1. Single Degree/Diploma Focus

Let’s start with a single degree, while highlighting a few points:

BA Art History, 2021 Northeastern College, NY

  • Graduated Magnum Cum Laude
  • President of the Art Society

Next, let’s look at listing a single degree without adding any bullets :

Bachelor of Science, Nursing, 2000 Grand Bend College, New Jersey

2. Multiple Degrees

Finally, let’s look at how you’d list multiple graduate level degrees on your resume:

PhD Aerospace Engineering, 2021 University of Toronto, Ontario

M.Sc. Mechanical Engineering, 2017 University of Waterloo, Ontario

B.Eng. Mechanical Engineering, 2015 Western University, Ontario

If it’s important to the job you are hoping to land, you could add bullets explaining what your thesis topic was or what courses you focused on during your degree.

How to List Education in Progress on a Resume

If you are still in university or college, then you might be wondering how to list your current education ongoing on your resume.

When you chronologically list items on your resume, you start from the most recent and work your way backwards.

For a degree in progress or certificate that you haven’t completed yet, you can state the date range as the start date to the present. Or if you are certain that you’ll graduate in a particular year, you can state that year in the future.

Here are a few examples of how to list education if you’re still in college :

  • Bachelor of Education, XYZ University, CT, 2019 – Present
  • Master of Science, H University, NY, 2022
  • Electrical Technician, ABC College, Georgetown, 2021 – 2023
  • Hospitality and Tourism Management, BComm, XYZ University, Netherlands, 2022

Still Looking for Help with How to List Education on a Resume?

If you’d like more help with your resume, look no further than our online resume builder .

You can build your own custom resume to see where exactly to list your education, or you can download our free resume templates for inspiration.

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What to Include in the Education Section of a Resume

what should i put on my resume for education

  • What to Include in the Education Section
  • Where to Put the Education Section
  • Tips for the Education Section

Resume Education Section Template

Education section examples.

What's the best way to include your education on your resume? In the education section of your resume, list the schools you attended, the degrees you attained, your GPA if you're a student or a recent graduate, and any special awards and honors you earned.

You should tailor the education section of your resume to fit your circumstances, including whether or not you're still a student, and the nature of any academic achievements you've accrued. By including the right information, you can impress your employer and secure an interview.

What to Include in the Education Section of Your Resume

Here's an overview of what to include when you're adding education to your resume.

School and degree.  The essential information to include in the education section are your degree(s) and the schools you attended.

Major and minor.  You can also give more specific information, including your major and minor, as well as the year you graduated, although the latter is not required.

Your GPA.  Include your grade-point average (GPA) if you're currently a student or are 1-2 years out of school and your GPA is strong (about 3.0-3.5 or higher, depending on your major). You may also want to consider including your in-major GPA if it's higher than your overall GPA.

Honors and awards.  Include any honors or awards you have received in school. These can range from Latin honors (such as  cum laude  or  magna cum laude ) to dean’s list and other awards.

You can also include extracurricular clubs, charitable groups, or Greek organizations where you were active and/or held a leadership role.

Certifications, continuing education, and professional development.  Include any professional development courses and certifications. You can list any licenses you have unless you have a separate section of your resume where you include this information.

Where to Put the Education Section of Your Resume

Current students, recent college graduates, or career changers may want to put the education section towards the top of their resume. This is because students typically have limited work experience and want to highlight academic success.

If you have been out of school for at least a couple of years, you can move this section to the bottom of your resume. By this time, you have enough work experience to highlight that you don’t need to rely on your education.

Tips for the Education Section of Your Resume

Consider subsections.  If you have a lot of information to include in the education section of your resume, consider breaking this section into subsections. The main section might include your schools and degrees, and then you can have other sections such as “Awards and Honors,” “Certifications,” and “Professional Development.” If you held a leadership role in a school-affiliated organization (such as a club, sport, or Greek organization), you could list that below the "Awards and Honors" line.

Provide specifics (if useful).  If the sub-college of your university is well known and relevant (e.g., say you graduated from the hospitality school of your university and are applying for a job in hospitality), you can include that before you include your university name. For example, you could write, “School of Hospitality, XYZ College.”

When you can leave out your GPA.  If you're a student or recent graduate and your GPA wasn’t great, but you have other accolades, you can leave the GPA out and put something else, like “XYZ Award Recipient” unless the employer requires a minimum GPA. Once you've been out of school for few years, you can take your GPA out of your resume altogether.

You can leave out high school (after a while). Once you've been in college for a year or so (or once you're in some other sort of continuing education), you can leave your high school degree and GPA out of your resume. However, you should mention your high school diploma (or GED ) if it is your highest degree.

When you can leave out your graduation date. You aren't required to list your graduation date on your resume—but if your degree was earned over 10 - 15 years ago or you're an older job seeker, it's a good idea to omit the date you graduated.

Tell the truth. It's very easy for an employer to confirm whether or not the education information in your resume is true or not. If they have requested a copy, they can simply check your transcript . If you're not happy with your GPA, leave it out, but don’t make it up. Be honest.

If you're a college student or graduate and unsure about what details to include in your resume, check with your career services office for guidance.

You can use the following template to help structure the education section of your resume. Keep in mind that you can change and remove any of this information to fit your own circumstances and the job for which you're applying.

EDUCATION SECTION

College Name Year of graduation Degree, major, and minor GPA

Awards and Honors Include any academic achievements here, including Latin honors, honors within your major, and more.

Certifications Include any professional or educational certifications you've received.

Professional Development Include any professional development experiences, including courses (both online and in person) and seminars. You might also mention here if you're a member of any relevant professional organizations. If you hold a position within the organization, mention that as well.

Resume Education Section Example #1

Huntown College May 2021 Bachelor of Arts in English, department honors 3.8 GPA

Resume Education Section Example #2

EDUCATION XYZ College Bachelor of Arts in Journalism

Awards and Honors Summa cum laude ABC Award for outstanding journalism major

Certifications Level 1 Strategic Communication Certification

Professional Development Conference Coordinator, XYZ Journalism Association of America

Virginia Tech. " Should I Include My GPA on My Resume? " Accessed Sept. 15, 2021.

CareerOneStop. " Education ." Accessed Sept. 15, 2021.

CollegeGrad. " Should You Include Your GPA on Your Entry Level Resume? " Accessed Sept. 15, 2021.

CNBC. " This is the Age When You Should Remove Your Graduation Year From Your Resume ." Accessed Sept. 15, 2021.

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Education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world.

Mandela has left us with a compelling line that no one in the 21st century can ignore.

Currently, every student is concerned about getting a higher-level education to get a pleasant job and live a prosperous life.

Every year nearly 2 million students get a bachelor’s degree in the United States . So, how can you present yourself better than others in this competitive market?

You must showcase your education on resume elegantly to beat your competitors during the recruitment process.

We are helping you make that happen by answering these below-given queries:

  • Should I put my GPA on my resume?
  • How to list education on resume?
  • How to list minors on a resume?
  • When to include coursework on resume?
  • Should you include high school on a resume?
  • How to list education in progress on a resume?

How to List Education on a Resume?

Crafting your resume education section can be tricky. However, you can follow the tips below to frame an impressive education section on your resume.

The two possible places for your resume education section can be:

  • Before your work experience section
  • After your work experience section

Education on a Resume Before Your Work Experience Section

You should put your resume education section before your work experience section in the following cases:

Just graduated :

  • You can consider putting your resume education section before your work experience if you just graduated from high school or college.
  • It helps you build a good resume because you will have more educational background than work experience.

Starting a new education :

  • If you were a professional and recently planned to get a new degree, it is advisable to put your resume education section first.
  • Your new degree should be relevant to the job description.

An academic resume :

  • Your resume education section should be positioned above the work experience for a fresher or academic resume.
  • For academic posts/ fellowships, education matters more than the outside work experience.

Education on a Resume After Your Work Experience Section

You should put your resume education section after your work experience section in the following cases:

Seasoned professional :

  • As a seasoned professional, you should put your resume education before your work experience section.
  • Employers find your educational experience more relevant throughout your career.

High school graduate/fresher :

  • If you are a fresher or high school graduate, you can place your resume education before your work experience section. Employers will look for your educational experience in your career.

How to List Education on a Resume: Educational Information

Choosing the correct resume education template is the first step you must take while building your resume.

You can follow the tips below to write an effective resume education section:

  • Put your highest degree first.
  • Follow reverse-chronological order for other degrees.

If you are a distinguished professional with tons of experience, it is not recommended to add your high school information.

The information that must add to your resume education section is:

  • Degree you received
  • Major/minor
  • Institution Name
  • Location of your institution (Area, Country)
  • Graduation Year

Following are the resume education examples:

  • BA in English LiteratureCambridge University | Cambridge, US | 20173.8 CGPA
  • Stanford University | Chicago, US | 2013Masters in Computer Science4.0 GPA

In case you're lost, here is a quick resume education checklist:

  • Spell out your degree as “Master of Science” or use the initials “MSc.”
  • Use periods to separate the initials "B.A." or leave them like "BA."
  • Write the name of your major as “MA in Business Administration” or separate your degree with a comma from your major as “MA, Business Administration.”
  • Arrange the information based on importance. If your degree is not directly related to the job description, focus on the university rather than the course.
  • Make sure your format remains consistent for all your resume education section entries.

How to List Education on Resume for High School Students

High school students should place the resume education section at the beginning of their resume.

No Work Experience

For a high school resume with no work experience, you can list the following parameters:

  • GPA (if above 3.0)
  • Relevant Courses (Courses that are related to the job profile)
  • Honors/Academic Achievements
  • Clubs/Organizations (Extracurricular activities)
  • Positions of Responsibility

You can highlight the essential steps in your academic career by creating a “Major Achievements” section. It gives a detailed look at your skills and abilities.

You can include volunteer work also. It presents you as an active person. You appear as someone who learns quickly and manages a job efficiently.

Also Read: How to create a resume for your first job?

Some Work Experience

If you have actual work experience, you can keep the education section concise.

Having work experience means you have hands-on experience in your working area, which keeps more importance than any other theoretical knowledge.

Hence, if you have work experience, you can focus on detailing that in your resume rather than the education section.

How to List Education on Resume for College Students

  • As a college student or recent graduate, place your resume education section at the beginning of your resume.

The length of your resume section depends on the amount of work experience you have

For the lack of work experience, make your resume education stand out, follow the following steps:

  • Convey your organization skills, charisma, interpersonal ability, and active lifestyle
  • Include your activities like clubs, major group projects, or your participation outside of academic life

If you already have work experience, focus on it more than the resume education section. It shows that you are familiar with the pressures and expectations of the professional world.

  • Keep your resume education section to a minimum
  • Feel free to list your activities, but emphasize your work experience

How to List Education on Resume for Working Professionals

If you are a working professional, your resume education section is just evidence of your degrees.

  • You should place your resume education section below the Professional Experience section
  • Be straightforward, do not include unnecessary details
  • State your educational degree with your field of study and best achievements
  • Try to avoid positions of responsibility, awards, recognitions
  • Try to include a vast skill set, list your training, certifications

How to List Education on a Resume: Special Cases

What if you fall into the category of professionals who bore the brunt of misfortune for reasons beyond their control?

You don't have to worry. Here's a list of what you can do:

How to List Education on Resume for a Degree in Progress

If you are still in high school/or pursuing a degree, write:

Expected to graduate in 2022

You can use the following phrases to describe your education in high school resume:

  • In progress
  • Expected + year
  • Expected Graduation + year
  • To be completed + year

How to List Education on a Resume for an Unfinished Degree

  • If you did not graduate high school, write the name of your school and the years you attended as Attended school from 2013-15
  • If you did not finish a college or university level degree, write the credits you managed to get as Completed 63 credits toward MA in Physics

Awards, publications, and training

  • If you want to show off your skills and achievements, add honors, awards, training, certifications, licenses, extracurricular activities you did during high school.
  • Pick activities that illustrate the keyword skills listed
  • Mention all the honors programs like graduated with Spanish honors (summa cum laude or magna cum laude), if any
  • Acceptance into campus, national, or international honors societies
  • List your publications under your degree
  • Include a coursework description and add relevant classes to the job profile.
  • A course of study that has a particular skillset
  • List your recent extracurricular roles/ positions of responsibility
  • Avoid adding controversial activities (political or religious)

Highlighting Soft Skills

If you have specific soft skills, you can add them to your resume education section.

Mention your participation in any activity that highlights these skills.

Following is the list of skills employers prefer on a high school resume:

  • Ability to Work on a Team
  • Communication Skills (Written + Verbal)
  • Problem-solving Skills

Optimizing Resume Education for an ATS

Many companies have started using the Applicant Tracking Systems. This software helps an organization filter out undesirable applicants. This program goes through resumes and looks for keywords specific to the job profile.

If you want your resume to make it past an ATS, you need to keep in mind the following things:

  • Use a clean format
  • Ensure that this program can read your full resume
  • Minimize the use of tables, graphs, or pictures
  • Use keywords relevant to your job profile
Also Read: What are resume action words and power verbs?

Education Resume Template

A well-written education should follow this order:

education-resume-template

Let's say that this is your educational background:

  • Degree: Bachelor of Science in Electrical Science
  • University: Harvard University
  • Location of University: Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Graduation year: 2022

In addition to this information, you can also put this add-on information to make your education section more meaningful:

  • Relevant Coursework : Business Communication, Systems, and Circuits Designing, English Language Studies, Analog, and Digital Designing, Embedded Systems
  • Extracurricular Activities : Captain of the Tennis Team

When you incorporate all that information in your resume, it looks something like this:

optimized-resume-education-section

Dos and Don’ts while listing Education on Resume

You can practice and avoid the below-given points while listing education on resume for your next job search:

my-visual_53399800

Resume Education FAQ

1. Should I put my GPA on my resume?

You should put the GPA in your resume if it is >3.5 or if the hiring organization asks for it.

2. How to list education on a resume?

The necessary educational details are:

  • Institution
  • Contribution

3. How to list minors on a resume?

The education on a resume often includes minors if it's relevant to the target job. In that case, you may include it under a sub-header of "Coursework.”

4. When to include coursework on resume?

Include coursework as a part of education on a resume only when:

  • The candidate is a fresher
  • It is required in the target job description
  • It is relevant to the target job

5. Should you include high school on a resume?

Your resume education section can only include high school data when:

  • High-school qualification is relevant
  • To state high-school extracurricular activities/achievements

6. How to list education in progress on the resume?

To list continuing education on a resume, you should:

  • List your education section at the top
  • Write your dates in "Date - Present" format

Key Takeaways

You can keep these points in mind while framing your resume to make it impressive and technically stronger than your competitors:

  • If you already have work experience, focus on it more than the resume education section
  • Put your highest degree first . Follow reverse-chronological order for other degrees.
  • If you are a working professional, your education on a resume is just evidence of your degrees.

Go to Hiration’s 360-Degree Career Platform , which has 24/7 chat support, and get professional assistance with all your job & career-related queries.

You can also write to us at [email protected] .

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A resume is a concise, informative summary of your abilities, education, and experience. It should highlight your strongest assets and skills, and differentiate you from other candidates seeking similar positions. Although it alone won’t get you a job or internship, a good resume is an important factor in obtaining an interview. Tailor your resume to the type of position you’re seeking. This doesn’t mean that all of your experiences must relate directly, but your resume should reflect the types of skills the employer would value.

  • Draft a resume using one of the MCS templates .
  • Attend a Resume Workshop to learn the nuts and bolts of getting started. See the MCS events calendar for dates.
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Resume language should be:.

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  • Written for people who scan quickly

TOP SIX RESUME MISTAKES:

  • Spelling and grammar errors
  • Missing email and phone information
  • Using passive language instead of “action” words
  • Not well organized, concise, or easy to skim
  • Not demonstrating results

DON’T:

  • Use personal pronouns (such as I)
  • Use a narrative style
  • Use slang or colloquialisms
  • Include a picture
  • Include age or gender
  • List references
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  • Be consistent in format and content
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  • List headings (such as Experience) in order of importance
  • Within headings, list information in reverse chronological order (most recent first)
  • Avoid information gaps such as a missing summer
  • Be sure that your formatting will translate properly if converted to a .pdf

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Resume guidelines can vary from country to country. See our international resources.

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AdministeredAllocatedAnalyzedAppraisedAuditedBalancedBudgetedCalculated
ComputedDevelopedForecastedManagedMarketedMaximizedMinimizedPlanned
ProjectedResearched
ActedComposedConceivedConceptualizedCreatedCustomizedDesignedDeveloped
DirectedEstablishedFashionedFoundedIllustratedInitiatedInstitutedIntegrated
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AssessedAssistedClarifiedCoachedCounseledDemonstratedDiagnosedEducated
EnhancedExpeditedFacilitatedFamiliarizedGuidedMotivatedParticipatedProposed
ProvidedReferredRehabilitatedRepresentedServedSupported
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ClassifiedCollectedCompiledCompletedControlledDefinedDispatchedExecuted
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(click on sample for pdf)

The document is a detailed resume sample for a student named Firstname Lastname. It includes contact information and various sections such as Education, Experience, Leadership, Skills & Interests. The Education section lists degrees from Harvard University and the University of London, including GPAs, relevant coursework, and extracurricular activities. The Experience section details roles such as Marketing Analyst Intern at Pepsi-Cola North America Beverages, Assistant Account Executive at Thomas Wilck Associates, and Technology Intern at Tech Hills, describing specific tasks and achievements. Leadership experience is demonstrated through roles in Harvard Undergraduate Women in Business and the Harvard College Marathon Challenge. The resume also lists technical skills in software like Stata and SQL, language proficiencies in French and Spanish, and personal interests such as ultimate frisbee and French films. The format includes clear headings, bullet points for easy reading, and consistent presentation of data.

RESUME TEMPLATE 1 (WITH BULLET POINTS)

The document is a resume template designed for a student from Harvard University. It includes sections for personal contact information, education details, experience, leadership and activities, and skills and interests. The education section allows for listing degrees, GPA, thesis, relevant coursework, study abroad experiences, and high school information. The experience section is structured to include job titles, organization names, locations, and dates, with bullet points to describe responsibilities and achievements using action verbs and quantifiable results. Leadership and activities follow a similar format, emphasizing roles and contributions. The skills and interests section is divided into technical skills, language proficiency, laboratory techniques, and personal interests. The template is formatted for clarity with headings, subheadings, and optional notes to guide customization.

RESUME TEMPLATE 2 (PARAGRAPH FORMAT)

what should i put on my resume for education

WRITE AN EFFECTIVE COVER LETTER

Your cover letter is a writing sample and a part of the screening process. By putting your best foot forward, you can increase your chances of being interviewed. A good way to create a response-producing cover letter is to highlight your skills or experiences that are most applicable to the job or industry and to tailor the letter to the specific organization to which you’re applying.

what should i put on my resume for education

Some general rules about letters:

  • Address your letters to a specific person if you can.
  • Tailor your letters to specific situations or organizations by doing research before writing your letters.
  • Keep letters concise and factual, no more than a single page. Avoid flowery language.
  • Give examples that support your skills and qualifications.
  • Put yourself in the reader’s shoes. What can you write that will convince the reader that you are ready and able to do the job?
  • Don’t overuse the pronoun “I”.
  • Remember that this is a marketing tool. Use plenty of action words.
  • Have an MCS advisor provide feedback on your letter.
  • If converting to a .pdf, check that your formatting translates correctly.
  • Reference skills or experiences from the job description and draw connections to your credentials.
  • Make sure your resume and cover letter are prepared with the same font type and size.

SAMPLE COVER LETTER

September 1, 2024

Morgan Smith  Director of Communications Jumpstart  308 Congress Street, 6 th Floor Boston, MA 02110 

Dear Morgan Smith: 

I am a senior at Harvard College studying History and Literature. I am writing to apply for the Marketing and Communications position at Jumpstart posted in Harvard’s Crimson Careers database. I’m very excited about the field of education, and would welcome the opportunity to bring my strong communication skills, creativity, and marketing experience to your growing team. 

Jumpstart’s commitment to early education for every child is of particular interest to me because of my passion for youth development. This past summer, I worked as a senior counselor in the Summer Urban Program, which is dedicated to preventing summer learning loss for children in the Boston and Cambridge area. I designed and taught fun, interactive classes to a group of 10 fifth graders, and planned and led local field trips and workshops daily with a junior counselor. Throughout the summer, I consistently strived to create math, science, and reading lessons and activities that were engaging and tailored to my students’ needs. 

Additionally, in my role as the Director of Marketing for the Social Innovation Collaborative, I led our team in creating a social media strategy to drive our member recruitment efforts and promote our programs and events on platforms including Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. With so many competing events on campus each day, I had to continually be creative in my approach to developing and delivering content that would be compelling and effective. As a result of my efforts, our group experienced a 20% increase in our membership base and a 15% increase in our social media engagement. I’m excited at the prospect of bringing the skills I developed through this experience to the Marketing and Communications role at Jumpstart. 

Thank you for your consideration. I very much look forward to the opportunity to speak with you in person about my interest in this position. 

Sincerely, 

Alex Crimson 

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16 Good Skills to Put on a Resume With No Experience

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what should i put on my resume for education

16 Good Skills to Put on a Resume With No Experience was originally published on The Muse , a great place to research companies and careers. Click here to search for great jobs and companies near you.

Looking for a list of good skills to put on a resume with no experience? Yes, it exists. When writing a resume for your first job , finding the best tools to show employers what you have to offer can make all the difference, whether or not you have work experience to back it up.

Today’s job market is highly competitive, with companies seeking versatile candidates who possess a wide range of skills and the ability to adapt to challenging situations. The good news? You can check all those boxes, even without formal job experience.

Your entry-level resume should demonstrate your strengths and qualifications, while also being an accurate reflection of who you are—which means, not turning it into a compilation of buzzwords. Here’s a list of the best skills to put on a resume when you have no experience. (Keep these in handy for your job hunt, and get ready to stand out!)

Once you perfect your resume, check out open jobs on The Muse and maximize your chances of getting hired »

What are entry-level resume skills ?

When it comes to what skills to put on a resume, there’s no one-size-fits-all answer. Yes, there are a couple of general skills that hiring managers typically look for. But specific roles may demand specific abilities.

For example, if you’re an entry-level candidate applying to a sales associate position, your communication and customer service skills are going to be way more important than your Photoshop knowledge.

“When candidates have no experience in a position, recruiters look for skills that align directly with the role,” says Prestina Yarrington , Growth & Development Coach and former Global Talent Acquisition Senior Manager at Microsoft. “They’re looking for a skillset match between the candidate’s resume and the job description.”

The key is to identify past experiences that have helped you develop skills relevant to the job you’re applying for. “These can be exhibited through your education, internships, or volunteer work, which may have allowed you to become familiar with the skills needed for the role. It can also include work you may have done as a member of a club or organization,” Yarrington says.

Examples of skills to put on a resume with no experience

OK, you understand now that your resume should be tailored to each job. But to get you started, here are 16 great skills to put on a resume with no experience—from soft to hard skills .

General and behavioral skills

Need some key skills to put on a resume for an entry-level position? General and behavioral skills—also known as soft skills —are a good place to start. Why? Because they are essential and highly valued in nearly every job out there.

By showcasing these skills on your resume, you’ll be giving the hiring manager a glimpse into who you are and how you might act in the work environment.

1. Creativity

Most employers really value creative candidates because they’re the ones who bring fresh ideas and innovation to the company. Even though this skill is often linked with traditional creative jobs like writing or design, it’s actually useful in any work setting. You can leverage creativity to solve problems and handle tricky situations with ease.

Read more: 16 High-Paying Jobs for Creative People

2. Leadership

Companies crave employees who can motivate, engage, and manage others. That’s why leadership skills can be a surprising asset on a resume with no experience. To demonstrate this quality, reflect on situations or relevant experiences from your past where you had the chance to effectively lead others. This could include team projects or involvement in extracurricular activities, for example.

4. Attention to detail

Another skill that can catch the recruiter’s eye is attention to detail. People with this skill are typically meticulous, organized, and dedicated to high-quality work. However, it’s important to find a balance. While a keen eye for detail is valuable, it shouldn’t become an obsession to the point that slows you down.

With that in mind, to showcase this strength on your resume, highlight how your attention to detail helped you excel in a project or solve a problem. Focus on the positive impact it has on you.

3. Organizational skills

Are you an organized person? Have you ever had to multitask and handled it like a pro? If so, think about adding organizational skills to your resume. Employers really value this ability—especially in roles where you’ll be dealing with a lot of tasks every day.

5. Communication skills

Whether you’re working directly with the public or not, communication skills are a must on an entry-level resume. Regardless of your position, you’ll likely need to communicate with your team, boss, and colleagues daily—be it in person or via email. So, make sure to highlight your ability to convey information clearly and express yourself effectively.

6. Ability to learn quickly

As an entry-level employee, you’ll be constantly learning a lot of things. That’s why you should highlight your ability to be a quick learner on your resume—it shows you’re ready to soak up new knowledge and contribute effectively to any team, even without formal experience.

Mention a previous project where you started with minimal expertise and quickly absorbed new information. Even better if you provide examples illustrating what you learned and how it improved your performance.

7. Adaptability

The job market is constantly evolving. New technology, tools, and apps pop up all the time. Not only that—companies themselves are always changing, requiring employees to take on new responsibilities and adjust to new scenarios. By demonstrating your flexibility and willingness to embrace change, you can make your resume stand out.

Read more: 3 Ways You Can Deal With Change at Work

8. Public speaking

Even if the job you’re applying for doesn’t involve much public interaction, public speaking is a great skill to put on a resume with no experience. It signals you’re a confident person who can communicate effectively. Plus, it’s a useful skill to have in many work situations, such as presenting projects or leading discussions and meetings.

Transferable skills

Transferable skills are those you can apply to any job, regardless of the title or field—which makes them highly prized by hiring managers. “For entry-level positions, recruiters are looking for transferable skills the candidate may have demonstrated in another role. For instance, problem-solving, teamwork, or critical thinking skills,” says Yarrington.

However, it doesn’t mean you should copy and paste the list onto your resume. Your choices should be tailored to the specific role you’re seeking. “This can be taken directly from the job description. Try to stay away from general broad terms. Recruiters are looking to find a match for the position,” she says.

Read more: How to Read a Job Description the Right Way

9. Problem-solving

Problem-solving is one of the best skills to put on a resume with no experience because it shows your ability to tackle challenges and find solutions. Since most professions involve facing certain challenges sooner or later, employers highly value candidates with this capability.

Be sure to provide an example of a situation where you were faced with a problem and successfully find a solution to overcome it.

10. Teamwork

Being a team player is key. Employers seek candidates who can collaborate well with others and offer support, rather than competing with them. Most work environments rely on teams to achieve common goals. This includes everything from group discussions and brainstorming meetings to depending on your colleague to get your job done. Think about a chef who depends on the waiter to deliver the food to customers—that’s teamwork in action.

Read more: 4 Tips to Help Control Freaks Be Team Players

11. Critical thinking

Another highly demanded skill is critical thinking . It involves analyzing complex situations and making informed, intelligent decisions to solve problems or improve processes.

Similar to problem-solving, this skill demonstrates that you’re able to handle obstacles effectively. When crafting your resume, look for situations where you used your critical thinking skills to overcome challenges.

12. Time management

Time management is also a key skill to add to your resume, especially if you’re new to the workforce, given how fast-paced many workplaces are today. It requires the ability to prioritize projects and handle multiple tasks simultaneously while meeting deadlines. Employees lacking time management skills are less likely to thrive in such environments, which could lead to delayed deliveries and low productivity.

Technical skills

Who says entry-level resume skills can’t be technical? Also known as hard skills , they can be self-taught or acquired through certifications, work experience, and college education. Unlike behavioral and transferable skills, technical knowledge is typically more specialized, only applicable in specific fields.

14. Software programs

Are you a Photoshop expert? Can you edit videos using Final Cut or Adobe Premiere? These are good skills to put on a resume, particularly if you’re applying for roles in social media, content creation, or marketing.

Do you have experience working with Excel or Google Presentations? Many office jobs require knowledge in one of these software programs. While more experienced professionals may omit them from their resumes, entry-level candidates should do the exact opposite and highlight this kind of skill.

15. Writing

Writing is one of the best examples of technical skills to put on a resume for first job, as many professions rely heavily on it. For example, roles in social media management and content marketing require strong writing abilities.

Read more: 9 High-Paying Writing Jobs for Word People: Editors, Writers, and Beyond

Even seemingly non-technical roles like receptionist or secretary often require strong writing skills. While graduates from journalism or literature may have an advantage, those from different backgrounds can still get online certifications in creative writing, technical writing, and more.

16. Social media management

If you think about it, almost every business—big or small—has a social media presence nowadays. That’s why social media management is a skill worth considering for your resume, especially if you’re interested in job opportunities related to content marketing or creation.

Like the others skills on this list, social media management is something you can develop through personal projects or certifications.

How do I list my skills on a resume with no experience?

You’ve learned what are some skills to put on a resume as an entry-level candidate. But how do you list them effectively? Ideally, each skill should be linked to a specific experience you’ve had. No worries though—even without formal work experience, there are some creative ways to showcase them and grab the attention of recruiters.

Use a minimalist template

You might have some amazing design skills (put that on your list!), but your resume isn’t the place to show them off just yet. Focus on keeping your resume minimalistic and clear.

“Although most candidates put a lot of effort into the specific template used or the formatting of their resume, which is often aesthetically pleasing, the overall content of the resume is what we pay attention to more,” says Yarrington.

Read more: 40 Best Free Resume Templates to Use and Customize

Leverage the resume summary

The resume summary is the very first section of the document. It’s used to highlight your main goal and your most important qualifications. As an entry-level applicant, you can take advantage of this section to tell a bit about yourself and list some of your best skills.

“It’s a great idea to start with a summary briefly stating the intended career goals and highlighting key strengths that are relevant to the position,” says Yarrington. “For an entry-level position, it may be beneficial to include the desired next step in the career journey—this shows a desire to commit to learning the necessary knowledge and skills to progress.”

Here’s an example:

Creative and detail-oriented computer science graduate with internship experience in web development. Proficient in HTML, Java Script, and CSS, with a solid understanding of software maintenance for engineering applications. Seeking an entry-level position to expand my knowledge and further develop my skills.

Create sections related to your skills

If you’ve never had a formal job before, you can create sections to include relevant experiences related to the skills you want to emphasize. For instance, “education and academic success, notable achievements or awards, and volunteer work,” says Yarrington.

It could be something like:

Volunteer Experience

Food bank of West Virginia

Volunteer Shift Manager, January 2023 — December 2023

  • Managed the food pantry operations, developing a new organization system that resulted in a 35% decrease in waste
  • Trained over 15 new volunteers, guiding them through all our internal processes and systems
  • Created and implemented a new shift calendar to better accommodate the needs of both new and existing volunteers, resulting in a 10% reduction in absenteeism

Literally create a skills section

This skills section can be added at the very end of the document, below your experiences and education. There are two different ways to do it: vertically or horizontally.

Example #1:

Relevant skills

  • Creative writing
  • Critical thinking
  • Adaptability

Example #2:

Creative content writing, SEO, editing, critical thinking, adaptability, attention to detail

Prioritize quality over quantity

Don’t go listing every skill under the sun to fill up a page. Be truthful, and most importantly, focus on the quality of your resume.

“Is it geared towards the role you’re seeking? Have you highlighted skills from the position that can be found in either your education, volunteer, or organizational work? Is the resume spell/grammar checked?” Yarrington asks.

Imagine claiming to be detail-oriented and then submitting a resume that doesn’t align with the job description or, worse, is full of grammar mistakes. That’s definitely not the impression you want to make.

“Many people miss small things when it comes to this,” she says. “It can convey whether or not the candidate pays attention to detail or reviews their work before submitting it. These are soft skills that are vital in an entry-level position .”

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  • Resume and Cover Letter
  • Resume Profile Explained...

Resume Profile Explained (with Examples)

13 min read · Updated on January 17, 2024

Ken Chase

Make an impact with a knock-out profile

When it comes to job search success, nothing is more important than ensuring that your resume captures an employer's attention. After all, even the best resumes are useless if no one reads them. Of course, that raises an important question: is there anything you can do to make your resume get the attention it deserves?

In this post, we'll explain how a great resume profile can help you to solve that challenge. We'll explain how a resume profile works, when you should use it in your resume, and how to create a profile that immediately commands interest. Finally, we'll provide several resume profile examples that you can customize and use in your own resume.

What is a resume profile?

If you're already familiar with the resume objective statement or resume summary, then the concept of a resume profile should be easy to understand. Put simply, the resume profile is an introductory paragraph that quickly summarizes your skills and experiences in a way that motivates hiring managers to continue reading your resume.

As you'll discover in our resume profile examples later in the post, a great profile focuses attention on your best skills, experience, and achievements. You can think of it as an elevator pitch for your resume - a quick snapshot that provides just enough information to make the reader want to learn more about you.

Related: Make the Perfect First Impression With Your Resume

What types of resume profiles can you use?

To better understand the resume profile, it may help to look at some of the different types of resume profiles that job seekers can use. There are three different types of common profiles, including the objective statement, summary, and summary of qualifications.

Objective statement

The resume objective statement is often considered obsolete, since it tends to focus more on your career goals than the employer's needs. It's often used by entry level workers with little experience or career-changers who need to explain why their skill set makes them a good candidate for the job. To use it effectively, job candidates need to ensure that they include some language that explains how they can benefit the employer if they're hired. For example:

“Creative social media professional with 3 years of experience and proven results. Skilled in cross-platform engagement enhancement and brand development. Looking for an opportunity to work with a company that prioritizes customer experience and brand loyalty. Experience includes increasing customer engagement by 130% over a six-month period.”

Related : Resume Objective Examples: A Career Objective Guide

Summary paragraph

The resume summary has replaced the objective statement in most modern resumes - and for good reason. This brief paragraph may also mention one or two key skills, but its primary focus is on detailing your important work experience and measurable achievements. As a result, the summary is a preferred option for job seekers with significant experience, since it's designed to demonstrate your value as an employee. Below, is an example of this type of profile statement:

“Accomplished Project Manager with more than ten years of successful team building and project execution expertise. Skilled in process development, workflow management, and collaboration with stakeholders. Received Agile Leader award in 2018. While at ABC Corporation, developed personnel resource allocation program that increased project efficiency by 48% in the first year of use.”

Summary of qualifications

The third option is the summary of qualifications. The main difference between this type of summary and the summary paragraph involves the format choice. Instead of being one block of text, it combines a brief paragraph with several bullet point examples of notable achievements. For example:

Dynamic Team Leader with 7 years of experience in customer management, problem-solving, and team building. Proven to increase team productivity, enhance the customer service experience, and provide real value to an employer.

  • Led 30-person team of technical professionals, with 95% customer satisfaction
  • Reorganized project workflow for ABC Corporation, increasing efficiency by 45%
  • Developed training program that reduced employee onboarding costs by 17%

What elements should you include in your resume profile?

Before you create a resume profile, it's important to think about the types of information you want to include for your reader. What types of qualification is the employer evaluating as part of its hiring decision? Does the job description focus primarily on core skills ? Do you have achievements that are likely to make a positive impression on the hiring manager?

There are many different profile elements that you can include, so you'll need to prioritize based on the employers' needs. The fact is that you won't have room in your profile to cover all these different types of information, so choose wisely:

Skills that are relevant to the position you're seeking

Your length of experience

Notable achievements, preferably ones that you can quantify with real numbers

Core personal characteristics that make you a good fit for the role

Your career aspirations - preferably noted in a way that shows how they align with the company's vision

Related : Top 15 Professional Goals and How to Achieve Them

Again, make sure that you focus attention on the job posting, taking note of every key skill and experience that the employer cites as required qualifications. You'll want to tailor your profile - and the rest of your resume - to align with those stated employer needs.

Pro tip: Make special note of those job requirements, since you will want to use the same language in your resume. Those keywords are essential for ensuring that your resume can satisfy any applicant tracking system screening the employer might be using.

You should also do some research to learn more about the company's culture. That will enable you to further tailor your resume profile to include personal traits that highlight how well you'll fit into that environment. Sometimes, those little details can make the difference between you and another similarly qualified candidate.

How to write your own resume profile: tips

When you're ready to create your resume profile, it's important to know how to do it the right way. Since it's the first thing employers will see after they're done reading your contact details, you need to make sure that it's as compelling as possible. The following tips can help.

Write this part of your resume last

Even though your profile section will be near the top of your resume, you should still create this important section last. Why? Well, it's simple: since the resume profile serves as a summary of your qualifications, it's helpful to get the rest of the resume done before you start on that summary.

Make it brief

Be as concise as you can. Again, think of this profile section as a salesperson's elevator pitch. It doesn't need to tell your entire employment story, but should instead serve as a brief highlight of your greatest hits. As a rule, try to restrict this paragraph to no more than four sentences. If you use a summary of qualifications, include just one or two brief sentences and three or four bullet points.

Choose the best profile type for your job search needs

Which type of profile should you create? If you're an entry-level employee, you may want to focus on a modified objective statement - one that focuses on your career goals, while highlighting the ways in which your skills can benefit the employer. If you have more experience, you may want to rely on the summary paragraph. Just be sure to include at least one measurable achievement to highlight your value.

If you're switching careers and need to focus attention on transferable skills, you may even want to rely on a summary of qualifications. Those bullet points can be a great way to emphasize specific skills and highlight the value that you've provided for previous employers.

Tailor the profile to your desired position

Make sure that your profile aligns with the job you're seeking. You can do this by including some core keywords from the job posting, detailing your qualifications. However, make sure that your profile ultimately aligns with who you are as an employee. If you take the tailoring to extremes, you may end up with a profile that fails to accurately represent your personality and character.

Don't be afraid to add personality

Speaking of personality, this is the place to add that personal touch. Your skills, work experience, and education sections are not appropriate for adding personality, but a few well-chosen words in your profile can help the employer to better understand you as a person.

Of course, make sure that your personal flourishes fit with the type of job you're seeking. For example, a few words about your fun work style will be appreciated if you're applying for a customer service or similar position. That same language may not be as useful if you're seeking a role in a law firm. Use your best judgment as you determine how much personality to put into any profile.

Use measurable achievements

We've already mentioned measurable achievements several times, but it's important to highlight them once again. Your resume profile should include at least one quantifiable accomplishment, backed by real numbers that demonstrate the value you've provided. For example:

  • Implemented new networking system that reduced downtime by 33%, improving both efficiency and productivity and providing 12% cost savings for the company
  • Led sales team effort that increased new customer acquisition by 13% while generating $12 million in new revenues in the first six months of the fiscal year
  • Created an online customer engagement program that increased website visits by 45%, enhanced new sales activities by 13%, and boosted revenues by 10% within one quarter of implementation

Resume profile examples you can use

As you might expect, your approach to creating a resume profile can also differ based on the type of job you're seeking. That's because different job roles require different skill sets, experiences, and personal qualities.

To get you started, we've compiled resume profile examples covering a wide variety of professions. You can use these professional profile examples as templates for your profile, or simply refer to them for guidance as you create your own unique resume opening.

Resume profile examples for students

Recent Information Technology graduate focused on operating and security software management. Seeking employment with a dynamic software firm in need of advanced networking and troubleshooting expertise. Experience includes a one-year internship with DynacorpX, providing testing and problem-resolution that helped increase company productivity by 14%.

Resume profile example for entry-level applicants

Friendly, detail-oriented, and organized customer service professional looking to be part of an energetic, mission-focused team.

  • Skilled at developing organizational processes, managing records, and engaging customers
  • Successfully resolved customer complaints, with 90% satisfaction rate while volunteering with FreshStart
  • Broad computer systems expertise, including database and presentation platforms

Resume profile example for career-changers

Personnel-focused Sales Team Leader with 10+ years of experience in team building, training, and sales program development. Looking to transition to a project management role to better use organizational and project implementation skills. While at ABC Corporation, successfully created and executed a sales process reorganization that cut waste by 45%, saving the company more than $40,000 per year.

Related : 21 Project Management Skills Every Project Manager Needs to Succeed

Resume profile example for a Graphic Designer

Dynamic and innovative Graphic Designer with 4 years of experience in the gaming and entertainment industry. Skilled in developing storyboards, character animation, typography, and general layouts. Creative successes include development work on more than 200 unique graphic design projects that helped to generate more than $300 million in revenue.

Resume profile example for a Marketing Manager

Creative Marketing Manager focused on data-driven solutions. More than 8 years of experience in building collaborative teams capable of overcoming any challenge. While at XYZ Inc., led a 10-person team responsible for broadening target audience by 200%, increasing company revenues by 120% over a three-year period. Expertise includes digital marketing campaigns focused on driving new customer acquisition and target audience engagement.

Resume profile example for an Accountant

Detail-oriented finance professional with 7 years of accounting expertise. Proficient in accounting best practices, including creation and management of financial reports, regulatory compliance, tax issues, and budget management and forecasting. Reorganized DEF Corporation's accounting department, reducing inefficiencies by 28%, cutting costs by 19%, and improving productivity by 33%.

Resume profile example for an Administrative Assistant

Reliable Administrative Assistant with 8 years of experience in office management and personal assistance. Comprehensive expertise in presentation development, scheduling management, reporting, and confidentiality. Reorganized filing and reporting systems at Beagle Law, improving client response times by 40%, reducing redundancies, and cutting labor costs by 12%.

Resume profile example for a Data Scientist

Fact-driven Data Scientist with 8 years of experience in data analysis, predictive modeling, and data mining. Proficient with SQL, Python, Tableau, and other common data visualization systems. While at DataCore, took the lead on development of new processes that increased decision-making efficiency by improving the company's ability to use data to gain useful insights. Project resulted in an 18% increase in overall departmental productivity.

Resume profile example for an HR Manager

Personnel-focused HR Manager with 7 years of experience managing human resources functions. Expertise in recruitment, onboarding processes, employee training and relations, and performance reviews. Designed AmAm's new HR policies to align with new firm policies, emphasizing progressive discipline and promotion of a positive work environment. Effort resulted in a 33% reduction in turnover and 43% increase in employee satisfaction.

Resume profile example for a Teacher

Results-oriented educator with 6 years of experience as a middle school Teacher. Expertise in crafting challenging but engaging lesson plans designed to encourage critical thinking and classroom participation in an inclusive way. Dedicated to professional development to stay abreast of current educational best practices and focused on enhancing each student's ability to achieve success. Specific competencies include English, US History, and Basic Civics.

Resume profile example for a Construction Manager

Task-oriented construction professional with more than 10 years of experience in both commercial and residential project management. Led teams responsible for completing more than 60 construction projects valued at more than $40 million dollars, with a 99% on-time and under-budget record of success. Bilingual (English and Spanish) manager with expertise in budget allocation, resource management, project estimates and implementation.

Craft the best possible intro for your resume!

No matter what type of resume profile you decide to use to introduce yourself to prospective employers, your goal should always be the same: to create a powerful and compelling message that inspires employers to read the rest of your resume. The tips and resume profile examples we've provided should ensure that you have everything you need to craft your own profile narrative.

Still not sure if your resume profile has what it takes to capture your reader's interest? Get a free resume review from our team of top experts today!

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COMMENTS

  1. How To List Education on a Resume (With Examples)

    You can identify the best place to put your education on your resume by carefully reading job descriptions. This will often help you understand whether certain levels of education are essential, nice-to-have or unnecessary for each role. Read more: 6 Universal Rules for Resume Writing.

  2. How to List Education on a Resume in 2024 (With Examples & Tips)

    5) Listing Incomplete Education on Resume. Incomplete education can be tricky to include in a way that sounds positive — as such, if you have incomplete education, be wary of your wording and avoid words such as "incomplete" or "unfinished." Instead try to do the following:

  3. How to List Education on Your Resume (with Examples)

    Here's what you should keep in mind as you write the Education section of your resume: You list education on your resume in a certain way based on what stage of your career you're at. The main components of your Education section are degree, major, school, years attended, and certifications

  4. How to List Education on a Resume in 2024 + Examples

    However, there are instances where education takes precedence. Education should lead if you've recently graduated from college and lack relevant work experience.. Additionally, prioritize education over work experience if you've recently returned to school to pursue a degree relevant to your desired job via a functional resume format.. In the case that you're a student preparing for ...

  5. How to List Education on Your Resume (2024 Examples)

    Customize your education section to reflect the requirements of the position. Ensure that your education section is truthful and accurate, as employers who complete background checks may also confirm your schooling. Related: Resume Format Guide (With Tips and Examples) Should I Put My GPA on a Resume to Become More Employable?

  6. How to List Education on Your Resume [Examples 2024]

    When contemplating how to list education on a resume, you need to realize that it is an essential component of your job search story. In today's knowledge-hungry world, it's common to have diverse educational experiences that could include things like high school, college, graduate school, online certificates, bootcamps, licenses, and beyond.. If you are curious and ambitious, education ...

  7. How to List Education on a Resume [13+ Real-Life Examples]

    Where to Place Education on Your Resume. Another important thing to consider is where to position the education section on your resume.. This mostly depends on where you are in your career. Do you have a lot of relevant achievements in the field, or are you looking for your first job?. As a rule of thumb, the top third of your resume should be reserved for your accomplishments, which are most ...

  8. Resume Education Section Writing Guide and Examples

    What should I put under education on my resume? You should put the following information under education on your resume: Your highest level of education achieved, including the degree, major, institution and location, and years of attendance and graduation.

  9. How to List Education on Resume in 2024 [Tips & Examples]

    2. Where to Put Education on Resume? Like a hotel in Monopoly, you've got to locate it strategically. In the vast majority of cases, put the education resume section just below your work experience section. But— Place it after your resume profile (resume summary, resume objective, or summary of qualifications) when: You've just graduated.

  10. How to List Education on a Resume With Examples

    The education section of your resume provides hiring managers with a detailed insight into your background and how it relates to the role. When written to reflect the job requirements, your education section can give you an advantage over other candidates.

  11. How to List Education on a Resume: 30 Examples & Tips

    Consider highlighting the relevant coursework in a separate section, or within the education section of your resume. Example Sections to List Relevant Coursework. Below are some examples of sections to list relevant coursework on your resume: Education Section. Bachelor of Science in Marketing. Marketing Research Methods; Consumer Behavior

  12. The Must-Haves When Writing Your Education On Your Resume [For 2024]

    The education section is an easily overlooked part of any resume — which doesn't mean it should be an afterthought. If you're a current student or recent graduate, or if you're applying to jobs that require a specific degree, you'll know you need to put some thought into it, but the same is true even if you've been in the workforce for a while.

  13. How to List Education on a Resume

    Resume Templates Find the perfect resume template.; Resume Examples See perfect resume samples that get jobs.; Resume Format Pick the right resume format for your situation.; How to Write a Resume Learn how to make a resume that gets interviews.; Resume Checker Get your resume checked and scored with one click.; Resume Help Improve your resume with help from expert guides.

  14. How to List Education on Your Resume

    However, if you have a degree from a prestigious university or one that may serve as an advantage for the types of positions you're pursuing, consider listing your education at the beginning of your resume instead. Above all, be strategic about anything you put in your education section.

  15. How to List Education on a Resume in 2024 [+ Examples & Tips]

    Your education section should have a supplementary role in your resume. For this reason, you should put it after your work experience or to the side of the document. When listing multiple degrees, use the reverse-chronological order and emphasize the highest one. There are several key elements to include in this section, such as the name of your degree, the name and location of the institution ...

  16. How to List Education on a Resume [Examples]

    If you've decided to go back to school after a few years in the workforce, you should put your work experience before your education. It's better to see that you can, say, generate $20,000 in sales over six months than a theoretical finance course you took. Make sure to make education a priority on your resume. While you may choose not to put ...

  17. How to List a Degree on a Resume

    To learn more about listing degrees on your resume, check out our video below to see our career expert Eva detail exactly how to add your education and what to include: Build My Resume Our free-to-use resume builder can make you a resume in as little as 5 minutes.

  18. How to List Education in Progress on Your Resume (+ Examples)

    Since your cover letter is meant to complement your resume, a degree in progress could give you another opportunity to sell the point that you are qualified for the role. Talking about education in progress or unfinished education in your cover letter can also allow you to explain any gaps on your resume that are related to pursuing education.

  19. How to List Education on a Resume in 2024 (With Examples)

    As you can see, you'll have to use your best judgement about the placement of your education on your resume, but it should still be highlighted, even if it does come after your experience section. Whether you have a high school diploma, a GED, or a higher education degree or certificate, you worked hard for that and should state it on your ...

  20. What to Include in the Education Section of a Resume

    Tips for the Education Section of Your Resume . Consider subsections. If you have a lot of information to include in the education section of your resume, consider breaking this section into subsections.The main section might include your schools and degrees, and then you can have other sections such as "Awards and Honors," "Certifications," and "Professional Development."

  21. How to List Education on Resume: 2022 Guide with 10+ Tips

    You should put your resume education section after your work experience section in the following cases: Seasoned professional: As a seasoned professional, you should put your resume education before your work experience section. Employers find your educational experience more relevant throughout your career. High school graduate/fresher:

  22. How to list education on a resumé

    Should I put education first on my resumé? Your personal details and career objective or summary should always be listed first on your resumé. You should then include whatever is most recent from your work experience or education. If you've recently graduated, chances are you haven't gained much work experience, so place the emphasis on ...

  23. How to Put an Unfinished Degree on a Resume (with Examples)

    At this point in your career, the Education section of your resume will look a bit like a Work History section, because you'll put more details about your degree and where you're getting it. At this point, because of your need to emphasize how your skills, knowledge, and coursework align with what's required in the job, you'll need to include ...

  24. CREATE A STRONG RESUME

    A resume is a concise, informative summary of your abilities, education, and experience. It should highlight your strongest assets and skills, and differentiate you from other candidates seeking similar positions. Although it alone won't get you a job or internship, a good resume is an important factor in obtaining an interview. Tailor your ...

  25. 11 Key Things to Put on Your Resume

    Related: How to List Education on Your Resume (with Examples) Thus far, we've identified seven key things to put on your resume - and each of them is considered an essential element of any great resume document. Our last four details for a resume can all be considered optional. Their inclusion will depend on the type of job you're seeking and ...

  26. How to Write a Resume With No Experience

    When writing a resume with no experience, you'll want to put more effort into your education section. You want employers to know that even though you don't have that real-world savviness just yet, you have all the necessary knowledge and education to excel at your job. Your education section should, at the very least, include:

  27. The 12 Best Skills to Put on Your Resume (Plus Examples)

    5. Critical Thinking. Critical thinking is your ability to find solutions beyond the obvious. Good critical thinkers can get to the "why" behind a problem, anticipate future problems and elevate ...

  28. Student loan payments will be paused for 8 million borrowers ...

    The Department of Education will pause student loan payments for 8 million borrowers after a federal appeals court temporarily blocked a repayment plan that the Biden administration launched last ...

  29. 16 Good Skills to Put on a Resume With No Experience

    Examples of skills to put on a resume with no experience. OK, you understand now that your resume should be tailored to each job. But to get you started, here are 16 great skills to put on a resume with no experience—from soft to hard skills. General and behavioral skills. Need some key skills to put on a resume for an entry-level position?

  30. Resume Profile Explained (with Examples)

    Put simply, the resume profile is an introductory paragraph that quickly summarizes your skills and experiences in a way that motivates hiring managers to continue reading your resume. ... this is the place to add that personal touch. Your skills, work experience, and education sections are not appropriate for adding personality, but a few well ...