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How to List Education on a Resume in 2024 (With Examples & Tips)

Not sure what degree to list? If you should include a GPA? It just so happens that there's a variety of ways to effectively list your eduction.

Ed Moss

The education section of a resume may not always be the star of the document but knowing how to properly list your education can be essential for advancing into the next phase of the hiring process.

In this guide, we will cover all the ins and outs of crafting an education section for your resume. 

We'll cover the following:

  • What to Include in an Education Section?

Tips for Listing Degrees (College, High-School, GED)

Listing incomplete education.

  • Where to Include Education on a Resume?

What Employers Look for in an Education Section

Beautiful resume templates to land your dream job.

Paralegal

What to Include in an Education Section

As we've covered, different formats of resumes may require different information to be included within an education section.

In general, there is some basic information that should be included within the education section of a resume:

  • The name of the school — "e.g. Georgia Institute of Technology"
  • The location of the school
  • Your degree ( high-school diploma, GED, associate’s degree, bachelor’s degree, etc. )
  • Graduation year ( if applicable )
  • Major field or department of study (if applicable )
  • Minor field or department of study (if applicable and relevant )
  • GPA ( If you're a student or graduates who held lower GPAs, this bit of information may be good to omit unless specifically requested by the employer )

Here's what that looks like for and university grad:

Georgia Institute of Technology • Atlanta, GA B.S. in Computer Engineering, 2006 - 2010 GPA: 3.9/4.0

For high-school students, you can do something like the following:

Georgia Institute of Technology • Atlanta, GA High School Diploma, Graduated in 2010 GPA: 3.9/4.0

Remember, including a GPA  is optional. Only add it if it's required by the job listing or it's relatively high. If your GPA is low (under 3.5), it's better to just leave it out.

Listing Education with Limited Work Experience

In resumes that have limited or no work experience , as may be the case with college students or recent graduates, the education section may be a good opportunity to show off educational achievements instead.

Additional information that can be included in longer education sections can include:

  • Internships completed as part of a curriculum 
  • Academic awards or sponsorships
  • Relevant coursework
  • Academic assistantships with professors or other academic professionals

As covered, in documents such as CVs the education section could be fairly lengthy.

However, the education section for most resumes will be one of the shortest sections.

This is mostly because standard resumes will be used for entry-level or mid-level positions, while longer-form resumes like the CV will only come into play for more prestigious or hard to obtain positions. 

It is much more important to show either a robust work history or detail relevant and transferable skills, using your education as support rather than the main point of interest. 

Here are some quick tips for deciding what educational information to include in a resume:

1) When including professional hobbies and extra curricular activities, it is important to keep relevance in mind

Incorrect: Do not include information about sports clubs or other clubs that cannot be connected back to your qualifications for a job.
Correct: If you held leadership positions in clubs or other extra-curricular activities, this can be useful information to include to highlight non-paid leadership or management experience.

Keep your descriptions simple and concise

Incorrect: Including long-winded and wordy paragraphs explaining the relevance of a certain piece of information. If a piece of information is relevant, it should be easily explained in one, simple sentence.
Correct: Use bullet points to separate bits of information to keep your resume easy to read or skim.

The readability of a resume can be the defining factor of whether or not a job recruiter or potential employer moves the candidate into the next phase of the hiring process.

As such, using clear and concise wording and formatting is essential for not just the education section, but for all sections. 

Here are a few tips for different formatting options depending on the level and type of education you have completed.

1) Adding High School and GED on Resume

  • If your highest level of education is a high school diploma or a GED, this should still be included as there are many jobs that are open to high school graduates as well as college graduates.
  • Generally, this type of education section should be kept short and sweet. Listing that you have received either a diploma or a GED should be sufficient.
  • If you have recently graduated high school or received your GED, including additional high school-related achievements may be beneficial (such as leadership positions, honor roll awards, athletics, etc.)

2) Adding Associate’s and Bachelor’s Degrees on Resume

  • When listing an associate’s or bachelor’s degree on a resume, always include the name and location of the institution, as well as the date or expected date of graduation.
  • While the education section should still be kept short, inclusion of any collegiate level academic achievements, such as honor societies or dean’s lists, can be useful to include.
  • Don’t go too crazy including coursework of extracurricular information – stick to including the most relevant information. 

3) Adding Graduate School or Doctoral Programs on Resume

  • Graduate and doctoral students may feel inclined to always include this information; however, it is important to be wary of including too much academic information in scenarios where it may render you overqualified for the position.
  • Graduate and doctoral information is more likely to come into play for candidates seeking higher level positions at the management level. 
  • For candidates seeking jobs in academic or scientific fields, a CV-style resume and longer-form education section providing higher level of details regarding graduate or doctoral programs may be necessary.

4) Adding Certifications on Resume

  • In some cases, a candidate may not have attended college but may have completed a trade school or other program that resulted in various certifications. These certifications should be included when relevant.
  • Certifications such as CPR or First Aid can be useful to include in most resumes, although they should perhaps be saved for a separate certifications section .

5) Listing Incomplete Education on Resume

Incomplete education can be tricky to include in a way that sounds positive — as such, if you have incomplete education, be wary of your wording and avoid words such as “incomplete” or “unfinished.” Instead try to do the following:

  • Include relevant coursework or credits earned during your duration of education before the point of departure from the institution.
  • Omit any wordy or lengthy explanations of why the education is incomplete. 

However, we've seen this be a common problem that many candidates have. Continue reading below to see how to effectively list education that is left incomplete. ‍

In some cases, a job applicant may have a partially-complete or incomplete educational credential they want to list on their resume.

Incomplete education can result from a variety of circumstances, including:

  • A person who is still in the process of earning their diploma, GED, or degree, but has not yet earned the credential or graduated.
  • A person who started a degree and completed relevant coursework, but ultimately did not finish the degree program.
  • A person who chose a different career path than what they studied for, but still has relevant coursework for the new career path.

When listing incomplete education on a resume, it is important to stay highly mindful of how you are wording your limited educational credentials — as words such as “ unfinished ” or “ incomplete ” are not ideal to include within a resume. 

Here are some quick examples on how to properly list incomplete education in the education section of a resume:

For applicants who are in the process of completing a degree, it is important to note the expected timeframe of completion.

Incorrect: ‍ B.S. in Communications University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Not yet complete
Correct: B.S. in Communications University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC Expected graduation May 2021

For applicants who began a degree, but ultimately did not complete the degree, it is key to be mindful of how you frame the education you did receive. 

Incorrect: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC

Why is this incorrect? Sure, this example indicates you, at some point, attended a university.

However, it provides no insight as to what relevant coursework or studies you may have completed.

Here's the correct way to describe your educational experience instead:

Correct: University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, NC Completed 20 credits towards a BS in Communications

Alternatively: This could be a good opportunity to include a bulleted list of relevant coursework.

For applicants who did not complete high school, it is important to note if you either earned a GED or are in the process of earning a GED.

Incorrect: ‍ Watauga County High School Boone, NC Incomplete
Correct: General Educational Development Diploma Earned May 2021 — OR — Expected to earn May 2021

Generally speaking, the majority of jobs will require applicants to have earned at minimum a GED certification in order to qualify.

In some cases, an applicant may lack a degree but may be certified by a trade school.

For instance, a beautician would want to include any beauty and health related certifications or licenses earned under the education section. 

Take a look at this resume example of a college student below to see how to do this.

College Student

Where to Include Education on a Resume

When it comes to placing your educational credentials on a resume, there are many considerations to make.

Resumes can serve a variety of purposes and, as a general rule of thumb, should be tailored for specific jobs . 

It is also important to take into consideration the level of education you have completed, as this will impact how it should be presented as well.

For instance, a job applicant seeking a position in academia would have a much heavier emphasis on education and academic-related achievements — than someone seeking a job in a corporate environment.

Ultimately, not all resumes are the same, so the placement of the education section will differ depending on the type of resume being used and the intention behind its structuring. 

Choosing the right resume format

There are several different types of resume formats to choose from, but the main ones that are used are as follows:

1) Reverse-Chronological

‍ Emphasis is placed on the most relevant work experience, listing jobs from most recent to oldest. Education can be placed before or after the work experience section. However higher degrees that qualify a candidate for the position may be beneficial to mention sooner rather than later. 

2) Functional

‍ Functional resumes place a much heavier emphasis on skillsets and areas of expertise. This format of resume is typically used by job applicants lacking the relevant work experience or educational credentials. In this format, the education section may lead if the applicant has educational credentials but limited work experience but should follow after the skills section if education is limited. 

‍ Hybrid resumes combine the reverse-chronological work experience ordering with the emphasizing of skills. This can help to supplement resumes of applicants who may have some relevant work experience but still need to beef up their resumes with a skills section . The placement of the education section will depend on how applicable or high level the credentials are and should generally be kept brief. 

4) Curriculum Vitae (CV)

‍ CVs are a type of long-form and multi-page resume used most commonly by applicants seeking positions in either academic or scientific fields. In a CV, the education section will be a prominent component and should appear early in the document. This type of education section should include all credentials, published works, projects, awards, or other academic achievements — no details should be spared. 

The below example of a Physician Assistant's resume is listing education in the bottom-right corner as it's using a reverse-chronological resume format to shine on it's work history.

Data Analyst

Employers can gather a variety of information about a job candidate from an education section, including:

  • A job applicant’s work ethic, reflected through GPAs or other grade-related information
  • Relevant skills or training an applicant has received through their schooling
  • Name recognition of specific universities, such as ivy leagues, that may give a candidate a leg up on the competition
  • Insight into a candidate’s interests or talents based on academic-related extracurricular activities included 

Understanding what employers are looking for in an education section included on a resume is key to understand how much or how little information to include.

What an employer is looking for will vary depending on the nature of the job being offered. 

For instance, an entry-level communications job at a corporation is likely to require a bachelor’s degree in communications or a related field.

Comparatively, a job in the welding industry may require the completion of a trade school program but not require a four-year degree. 

It is of the utmost importance when you are applying to various jobs that you read the job descriptions provided carefully, as this is where you will find the necessary information regarding what educational credentials are required of eligible candidates.

This will also help you to tailor your education section according to what credentials or qualifications you have that meet the requirements of the job. 

In general, what an employer is mostly looking for is simply that an education section exists on a resume.

The majority of employers will want candidates who have shown a commitment to their education, reflected through the inclusion of an education section.

For candidates lacking a completed education, it is still considered best practice to include some information regarding what level of education was reached before the point of incompletion, as well as the inclusion of any relevant coursework and knowledge gained from the time the candidate spent pursuing further education. 

Here is a quick rundown of a few key factors to consider for applicants who may be unsure how much information to provide in an education section for a specific employer or position:

  • The education section should prove that you have the credentials necessary to complete the job at hand.
  • Oversharing of education can be detrimental in some situations, as overqualified candidates may not be considered by employers.
  • Job descriptions will always be the best place to look for indicators regarding how much educational background information an employer is looking for.
  • Never lie or over-exaggerate — while not all employers double-check applicants’ educational histories, many still do, and dishonesty can cost you the position in the long run.

Physician Assistant

Final Thoughts

Unless you are crafting a longer-form resume, such as a CV, the education section will generally be a fairly short summary of your academic credentials and achievements.

Education sections can be longer in some cases where job applicants may have hefty academic backgrounds but limited work experience.

Ultimately, the key to making a strong education section is to include only the most relevant information.

Always avoid deceptive wording, as employers can fairly easily run academic background checks if need be. 

Check out our resume templates to get your creativity flowing and get started on your ideal resume today. 

Browse more resume templates that fit your role

Ed Moss is an author for Easy Resume

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How to List Education on Your Resume (with Examples)

10 min read · Updated on March 27, 2024

Marsha Hebert

Use your education to show you have the knowledge to land the job

Your education is an essential detail to include on your resume, as it indicates that you're trained in your field. Even if your formal education isn't directly related to your current career path (perhaps you made a career change, for instance), it's still worthwhile to show that you succeeded in a high-level learning environment.

As with much of resume writing, the content and format of your resume Education section is fluid and will depend on where you are in your career. Still, it's important that you get it right to prove you're qualified for the job you want.

In this article, you'll learn how to list education on your resume and see examples that you can use for inspiration as you craft your own. 

What to include under Education on a resume

It sounds simple – you list the degrees you've obtained and the schools where you got them. 

But, wait! There's more.

In some instances, it may be appropriate to include your GPA, some relevant coursework, or even give a nod to some major project you worked on. Much of this depends on whether you're fresh out of school or have some experience under your belt. 

Here are some other things to consider when writing the Education section of your resume:

Does your education section go at the top or bottom of your resume?

Do you include a degree if you're still working on it?

Does high school belong on my resume?

Let's start with the basics.

1. Degree earned

When you finally graduated and received your diploma, what did it say? For example, you may have achieved a Bachelor of Arts (BA) or Master of Business Administration (MBA).

Whatever it was, it's the most important education detail you can put on your resume, because it's the official evidence of your education.

One of the most important things to remember is that you should list your degrees in reverse chronological order. That means you start with the most recent one (which is likely to be your highest) and work backward. Also, once you get into college there is no reason to add high school. Employers know that you have to finish high school to get into college, so they'll assume you graduated. 

Remember that one degree type can be applied to a variety of fields of study. For example, a Bachelor of Science degree can be earned for both physics and computer science. Therefore, in addition to the degree itself, you must include the major for which the degree was earned. This way, a hiring manager knows exactly what topics you've studied.

If you completed any minors or concentrations, you can include those too.

3. University, college, or institution

Add some context to your education by listing the university, college, or institution where you went to school. This is especially important if you attended a well-respected program in your field, because it will make you seem all the more impressive.

4. Years attended

The timeframe that you were in school is generally something you don't need to worry about including unless you're still in school or graduated within the last year. Additionally, you might add the dates you were in school if you need to take care of a gap in employment. Outside of these conditions, you should leave off the timeframe you were in school.

Whether or not you include your GPA in the Education section of a resume depends on many factors. If you earned your degree 20 years ago, your GPA is likely a defunct measure of your current abilities. If you earned your degree recently, however, adding your GPA can be a great move – but only if it's 3.5 or higher. You can also indicate any distinctions you earned based on your grades, such as summa cum laude , if applicable.

6. Extracurricular activities

If you were in an honors society, you can list your membership. If you were part of a fraternity or sorority, it's a toss-up. While you might think this is a good inclusion because it demonstrates you were participating in service-related activities or so on, Greek rivalries can extend way past college years and you wouldn't want to accidentally tip off your hiring manager that you belonged to a rival group.

7. Certifications 

Outside of formal education, you may also have taken the initiative to earn supplementary certifications or complete online courses that are relevant to your field. Highlight these in your resume Education section, especially if they are on niche or high-level topics that prove your expertise far beyond a more generalized curriculum.

Here's an example of what all that looks like:

EDUCATION & CREDENTIALS

Bachelor of Business Administration | ABC University | 2021-2024

Dean's list - summa cum laude

President - Marketing Club

Certifications:

Project Management Professional (PMP) | Project Management Institute

Conditions to consider, aside from the basics

Some of those basics may be optional - as we mentioned, you wouldn't include the dates of your degree program if you've been out of school for more than a year. When you begin to craft the Education section of your resume, there are other things to consider as well.

You completed high school

Attending college may not be among the goals you've set for your life. That's okay!

If you decide to graduate high school and go straight to work, your career can still be rich and full. At this point, though, a lot of people ask if they should include high school on their resume. 

A few rules of thumb about adding high school to the Education section of your resume:

Exclude high school altogether if you go to college

Exclude high school if you've attended trade school

Include high school if you have no additional education, professional development, or certifications

Include high school if the job description specifically mentions that you need a high school diploma

Include high school if you're applying for a job while still in high school

This is what the Education section of your resume would look like if all you have to put in it is high school:

Diploma or GED [whichever is appropriate] | DEF High School

Graduated: 2023

Relevant courses: Accounting, Business Law, and Ethics

Just because high school is the highest education you've obtained, doesn't mean you can't take the opportunity to inject some relevant keywords into your resume. 

PRO TIP: Check out our article on tailoring your resume to different jobs to understand how important relevant keywords are when writing your resume.

You have an undergrad degree

Once you graduate from college and start searching for your first entry-level position, it's assumed that you'll remove any information that refers to your high school activities and focus on your new undergrad degree.

Go back to the basics to build your Education section when you earn your Bachelor's degree. 

Include your degree and major

Add the name of the school where you obtained the degree

Throw in some extras, like achievements, coursework, and affiliations

The last point – about adding extras – is extremely important if you have little to no work experience . Adding that you were a Resident Advisor or won first place in a robotics competition could be the thing that puts your resume at the top of the yes pile. 

You have an advanced degree

Once you enter the world of Master's degrees and PhDs the Education section of your resume becomes more robust and might include things like the title of a dissertation, fellowships or internships. 

As before, always start with your highest degree and work backward. Here's an example of an Education section with advanced degrees:

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) – Leadership Studies | CCC University 

International Student Scholar

Dissertation: Exploring the Relationships of Principal Preparation Programs and Leadership Styles on School Accountability Indices

Master of Arts (MA) – Counseling | BBB University 

Bachelor of Science – Psychology (cum laude) | University of AAA

You started college at one place but finished somewhere else

If you attended college at one institution – perhaps a community college – and then completed your education in another place, you only need to list the university where you completed your degree. All the employer wants to know is which college supplied you with your degree at the end of your education; they don't necessarily care or need to know how you arrived at this place. Save that resume space for more important information.

You didn't attend or finish college

If you attended college but didn't graduate, you may want to list the relevant courses you took, especially if you made it to some of the higher-level classes, to demonstrate the skills you built or the disciplines you were exposed to during your coursework.

You're still pursuing a college degree (undergrad or grad program)

If you're still attending college for either your undergraduate or graduate degree, you can simply add an expected graduation year to this information. You can add a list of a few courses you've completed if 

They're higher-level courses that are relevant to your job goals

You don't have a lot of relevant work experience to market on your resume.

You earned your degree more than 5 years ago

If you earned a degree or certification more than 5 years ago, place your Education at the bottom of your resume and remove the graduation date. It's important to demonstrate you've earned the degree, but there's no need to draw attention to how long ago this occurred.

Doing so will allow you to focus your resume on your skills, accomplishments , and professional history. For those who have many years of professional experience, education becomes less important because you should be moving forward in your career.

Where does the Education section of your resume go?

If you're new to the workforce and your new degree is your best selling point, the Education section should appear toward the top of your resume , because 

You most likely have limited professional experience to list on your resume

Your education is the core competency that you wish to highlight for an employer

After you have a few years of relevant experience under your belt, the education section gets shifted to the bottom of your resume, and your work history will get pushed farther up on the page.

Key takeaways

Presenting your education on your resume in a thoughtful way will open a lot of employment doors. Here's what you should keep in mind as you write the Education section of your resume:

You list education on your resume in a certain way based on what stage of your career you're at

The main components of your Education section are degree, major, school, years attended, and certifications

Tailor your Education section based on keywords and qualifications mentioned in the job description

Be honest about ongoing education or degrees you've decided not to complete

Your Education section is fluid

Remember, there isn't one resume format that fits all job seekers. Be strategic when placing your Education information by considering where you are in your career and how it will help you to land the jobs you're after. 

Find out if you are showcasing your education on your resume - get a free resume review from TopResume.

This article was updated in December 2023. It contains work by Amanda Augustine and Lauren Settembrino  and Heather Rothbauer-Wanish .

Recommended reading:

Resources for In-Demand Job Skills You Can Learn Online

How To Speed Up the Resume-Writing Process

The Most Essential Trait You Need to Land Any Job

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How to Create a Resume With No Education

Why You Lose When You Lie on Your Resume: Learning From Mina Chang

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What to Include in Your Education Section

The education section on a resume gives hiring managers a glimpse into your academic achievements , interests, and skills.

It can demonstrate your commitment to learning, your ability to succeed in a structured environment, and the relevant knowledge you've acquired.

The information you should include in this section, though, varies based on things like your career level, the exact job you're applying for, and how recent your education is.

This means you don’t always have to be super detailed. Some of the information about your education is optional, and some of it may even be redundant if you have relevant work experience, so you should only use it if you think it can give your resume a boost.

Let’s start with the details most employers expect to see:

Essential Information

  • Degree Name. Include the type of degree and the relevant major. (E.g.: BFA in Graphic Design)
  • University Name. Add the name of the institution you studied at. (E.g.: University of Saint Andrews)
  • Location. If the university isn’t well known or the name doesn’t specify where it is, include the general location. (E.g.: St Andrews, Scotland)
  • Years Attended. Usually, only the years you attend there are enough, but the mm/yyyy format is also popular. (E.g.: 09/2018 - 06/2021)

Optional Information

  • Honors and Awards. If you’ve received any acknowledgments, list them here. (E.g.: Dean's List, Summa Cum Laude, Merit Scholarships, Valedictorian)
  • Relevant Coursework. List three to five courses that directly apply to your target job. (E.g.: Marketing 101, Marketing Strategy, PR Basics)
  • Thesis or Dissertation. We recommend including this for graduate-level degrees in research-heavy fields.
  • Minor. If relevant, include any additional areas of study. (E.g.: BA in Creative Writing, Minor in Journalism)
  • Grade Point Average. Only include your GPA if it's 3.5 or above on a 4.0 scale. Anything lower can undermine your application.
  • Extracurricular Activities. Mention any clubs or organizations that seem relevant. (E.g.: Debate team, Theater Club, School Newspaper)

Here’s an example of an education section that includes information from both categories:

education on resume

Getting ready to find a job? Start by learning how to write a resume with our detailed guide!

How to Format Education on Your Resume

Now that you have an idea of what to include in your education section, let’s explain how you should do it.

In terms of structuring your education section, follow a reverse-chronological order ; this means, list your latest educational entry first and then go backward from there.

And remember – if you have a relevant university degree, there’s no need to waste precious space on your resume by listing your high school education .

As a general rule, if you’re an experienced professional and you have a Master’s degree, you can also omit your undergrad degree. Hiring managers are a lot more interested in your work experience section, so your education section should only focus on the basics.

However, if you’re a recent graduate , you might want to include more details to give your resume an extra kick. It’s always a good idea to leverage your education if you don’t have enough relevant work experience.

Now, regardless of your level of experience, add the name of your degree at the very top of the entry in your education section.

The same degree can be written down differently, for instance:

  • Bachelor of Arts in English Language and Culture with a Minor in Teaching
  • BA in English Language and Culture, Minor in Teaching
  • B.A. English Language and Culture (Major), Teaching (Minor)
  • BA, English Language and Culture

Here’s an example of what the formatting in your education section should look like:

how to list education on a resume

If you graduated from a famous university with a good reputation, you can highlight that first. For example, list “Harvard University” before the name of your degree.

Where to Place Education on Your Resume

Another important thing to consider is where to position the education section on your resume.

This mostly depends on where you are in your career. Do you have a lot of relevant achievements in the field, or are you looking for your first job ?

As a rule of thumb, the top third of your resume should be reserved for your accomplishments , which are most relevant to the job you are applying for.

So before you place this section on your resume, ask yourself: is your education your biggest selling point to the hiring manager?

Most of the time, it won’t be. Work experience is way more important for just about any position above entry level, so it should be listed first.

Let’s look at an example of a resume that puts this into action:

education on resume examples

As you can see, this architect resume starts by listing their relevant work experience and then includes a detailed entry of their most recent degree.

When Does Education Go Before Work Experience?

While your work experience section is generally more important, there are a few cases where you should list your education first.

These include:

  • You have no work experience. When you have absolutely no work experience yet, you should focus on your academic achievements instead.
  • You just graduated college. If you don’t have relevant work experience, you’re often better off not listing it. For example, if you’re applying for an entry-level office job, the part-time teenage jobs you had won’t be anywhere near as relevant as your recently earned BA in Marketing.
  • You are currently studying. If you’re in the process of earning a degree that’s relevant to your targeted field, it’s better to list education before work experience. For example, if you’re making a career change , you would want your new education to be the first thing the hiring manager sees.
  • You recently earned a new degree. Getting a fresh MSc, Ph.D., or MBA in your field is worth showing off. For example, if you’ve been a line manager for years but earned an MBA to qualify for an executive position, your education section should go first.
  • You are applying to academia. Usually, when applying for a research or teaching position in academia, you’ll need an academic CV , not a resume. In that case, your education will always come first.

Not sure if you need a CV or a resume ? Check out our guide to learn what the difference between the two is and when to use which.

cv vs resume example

Use a (Free) Resume Template

Creating a resume can be a hassle.

You have to find a template that works with your favorite text editor, set the page margins, adjust the line spacing, choose a professional font , and all while making sure you never go past page one.

What if there was an easier way?

This is where our resume builder comes in!

Novoresume lets you choose from 16 professional resume templates , each crafted with feedback from HR professionals around the world, and create the perfect resume in minutes.

Just look at how one of our resume templates compares to a basic text editor resume template:

novoresume vs normal resume

16 Examples of Education on a Resume

Looking for inspiration?

We’ve compiled a list filled with real-life examples of how education can be listed on a resume, with practical examples for different types and levels of education:

#1. High School Education

If you’re a high school student, you might have some volunteer experience or extracurriculars you can show off. In that case, you can start by listing those sections, so long as they’re relevant to the job you’re applying for.

For example, if you volunteered with your local branch of the Red Cross, that’s a good experience to have when you’re applying to work at a shelter.

In most other cases, the education section would take the upper hand, and it would look something like this:

High School Diploma

Chapel Hill High School

2017 - 2021

  • Courses: AP Science, Mathematics, Advanced Chemistry

If you’re still in high school, you can disclose it in your resume by writing down your expected graduation year or otherwise specifying that you’re currently still there.

2021 - Present

#2. General Education Development

If you were homeschooled or haven’t graduated high school, the previous example won’t apply to you.

But if you still received a General Education Development certificate, you can mention that in your resume in the following way:

GED Diploma

Durham Literacy Center

Just like with high school education, you can include the location of your school or GED center, as well as any relevant courses, if you have enough space.

#3. Associate Degree

If you went to a community college or opted for a vocational program, you can list it in your education section the same as any other undergraduate degree.

Associate degrees are typically cheaper and take less time than a bachelor’s degree. They tend to be focused on specific occupations and place more emphasis on daily job functions. Other than that, they follow the same formatting as any other educational entry.

Let’s look at some real-life examples of different types of degrees at this level.

First, an Associate of Arts degree:

AA in Business Designation

Community College of Denver

2015 - 2016

Summa Cum Laude

Next, here’s how you would list an ongoing Associate’s of Applied Science degree:

AAS in Medical Assisting

2018 - Present

Some associate degrees are what’s known as “transfer degrees.” Here, the long-term goal is to transfer into a bachelor’s degree program.

Similarly, if you’ve completed accredited courses at a community college that can go towards a degree, you can list them under your education section, like this:

Medical Assisting Certificate

  • 30 credits completed

#4. Certificates

Certificates can be included on your resume, either as part of the education section or in a dedicated section.

Unlike broad academic degrees, certificates can show specialized expertise and commitment to professional development. They tend to demonstrate more focused, essential skills that are directly applicable to a particular job or industry.

Treat these entries the same as any other: list the name of the certificate, the institution or organization that issued it, and the year you obtained it.

Here’s an example of how to list a professional certificate in an education section:

Certified Public Accountant (CPA)

American Institute of CPAs

And here’s how they would look in a separate section:

CERTIFICATES

  • Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) - National Academy of Sports Medicine, 2020
  • Certified Nutrition Coach - American Nutrition Association, 2023

But there are also other certificates you could list , such as after specialized software courses:

  • Maya Autodesk: Advanced 3D & Animation Udemy, 2022
  • Creation of Pixel Art Scenes for Video Games Domestika, 2023

#5. Undergraduate Degree

There are different ways to list a bachelor’s degree.

Let’s take a look at three different cases for a candidate with an engineering degree.

First, if you’ve graduated from university and received the degree, list it according to the following template:

B.Sc. Mechanical Engine ering

University of California, Berkeley

2002 - 2006

If you obtained a double major, you would write it down as:

B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering and Civil Engineering

If you have two or more majors, keep in mind that you should list the major that’s most relevant to the job you are applying to.

For example, if you majored in Applied Languages and International Relations, you should focus on the languages for a job as a translator.

Lastly, if you’re still attending college, just omit the finishing year when filling in your education section and add “Present” instead, like so:

But there are also different ways you can specify that you’re still studying. Instead of “Present,” you could write:

  • 2021 - Current
  • Expected Graduation: 2024
  • 2021 - 2024 (expected graduation)
  • 2021 - In progress
  • To Be Completed: 2024

#6. Graduate and Postgraduate Degrees

Graduate-level education is, in general, more detailed since it requires participating in a more focused area of research on top of your graduate-level work. 

At this level, you probably contributed to the field with a dissertation of your own, which you should include in your resume.

Here’s an example:

Ph.D. in Brain and Cognitive Sciences

University of Rochester

Dissertation: Imaging, Computational Analysis, & Neural Representations in Young Children

Graduate and postgraduate education often includes scholarships , fellowships, or outside funding involved, which you might want to include in addition to all the general information about your degree.

Here are some real-life examples:

MBA in Business Administration

University of Maine

  • Avangrid Scholarship
  • Magna Cum Laude

When it comes to honors and awards, there are different ways you can list them to save space on your resume. Here’s an example that mentions them but leaves more space for the dissertation title:

MSc. in Information Systems

WU Vienna University of Economics & Business

Salutatorian, Summa Cum Laude

2015 - 2017

Dissertation: Leveraging User-Generated Content for Advertising Purposes Through Information Systems

And if you’re still studying, don’t forget to check out our student resume templates to get started on your job hunt.

#7. Unfinished Education

Even if you didn’t graduate from university, you can still mention it in your education section. Just be strategic about it.

If you have several years of relevant coursework from a degree program that relates to the job you're applying for, it can show that you’re knowledgeable even without the final credential.

B.Sc. in Civil Engineering

34 credits completed

2018 - 2019

However, if you only have basic courses or your degree isn’t relevant to the role, you might be better off skipping it altogether. There’s no need to draw attention to an unfinished degree if it won’t help you impress the hiring manager.

Need more examples? Check out our 90+ resume examples for different professions .

Do you still wonder something about education on a resume? Check out the answers to the most frequently asked questions here:

#1. How Do You Put Your Degree on a CV?

Adding your degree to your CV is pretty much the same as adding it to your resume.

List your degrees in reverse chronological order, with the most recent degree on top. Always include the essential information, such as the degree name, your major, the name of the university, and the years you attended. If relevant, you can include your GPA, thesis title, study abroad experiences, and academic honors.

#2. How Do You Write Down Your Bachelor’s Degree?

There are different ways that a bachelor's degree can be written down on your resume. Usually, there’s no need to spell out the full degree name, so there are ways you can abbreviate it for your resume. These include:

BA (Bachelor of Arts) BS (Bachelor of Science) BBA (Bachelor of Business Administration) BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing)

Just use the specific abbreviation that matches your degree type. (E.g.: BSc Computer Science, BA History, BBA Economics, etc. )

#3. What If I Have an Education Gap or Took Time Off from Studies?

Treat any gaps in your education the same as you would treat an employment gap . Be upfront with the hiring manager and list the start and end dates to account for the time of the gap on your resume.

Use your cover letter to briefly explain the gap without going into too much detail. Hiring managers are understanding, and reasons like health, family, or professional experience are all common to justify education gaps.

#4. How Far Back Should I Go When Listing My Education History?

Generally, you only need to list basic information about your education if you graduated a long time ago. Your work experience and more recent achievements will have a lot more weight than details about your time in college 14 years ago.

For most professionals, listing just your highest degree is more than enough. However, an academic CV for scientific or research-heavy roles might need a more comprehensive educational background.

Key Takeaways

Congratulations! You’ve made it to the end of our article!

We’re confident you’re an expert on how to list education on a resume by now, but before we part ways, let’s quickly wrap up our main points:

  • Your education section belongs after your work experience section, though there are some exceptions.
  • If you don’t have any work experience, recently earned a relevant degree, or if you’re applying for a research-oriented position or in academia, the education section should be listed first.
  • When listing your educational entries, use a reverse chronological order. Start with the most recent degree you have and go backward from there.
  • If you have some sort of higher education, there’s no need to list your high school education.
  • Unless your GPA is exceptional, don’t list it. It might undermine your resume otherwise.
  • There are different ways to list your education, depending on the type of school you went to and what you want to highlight. Scroll back up if you want to see some examples.

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Writing the Education Section of a Resume (5 Key Tips)

Where to put education on your resume, how to format education on a resume (with examples), what else to put on your resume if you don't have work experience, sample resumes to highlight your education, faqs: answers to common questions about education on resumes, learn more about resumes, top source for premium resume templates, work on your resume education section today.

Here are the common guidelines to follow when listing education on a resume:

  • Always include the following information: the degree you received, your major, the name of your school, its location, and your graduation year.
  • Start with your highest educational attainment.
  • List all other degrees in reverse-chronological order.
  • Delete high-school education if you already graduated from college.
  • Remove your graduation date if you earned it more than five years ago.

Of course, these guidelines don’t apply to all situations. When adding your education to your resume, you should add any recent education. This shows the hiring manager that you've got a gap because you were working on your skills.

But if your education was more than ten years ago, you don't need an education section on your resume. Also remove your education once you’ve accomplished 10 to 15 years of work experience. ( Remove the education section of your resume--or at least the dates of your education--because this section can make it easier for people to discriminate against you because of your age. )

I’ll discuss all these in more detail in the succeeding sections:

If You're In High School

List your education at the top one third of your resume, just below your skills summary. Let your education do the heavy lifting for now, even if you already have a bit of work experience.

If You're In College or Just Graduated

At this stage, you probably have more credentials related to your target job as a student, than as a working professional.

So, if you haven’t had a job, project, or volunteer work related to the position you’re applying for, put education before work experience on your resume.

You might argue that it’s better to list the odd and part-time jobs you did first. Maybe you think these job entries show that you’re employable and at least know what it’s like to work for a living.

Perhaps some hiring managers might consider that fact.

But what if they don’t read past your job title as “Waitress,” “Cashier,” or “Barista”? All the qualities and achievements you list below the job title will be ignored, too. Even if those skills are related to the job at hand.

For now, list education before your work experience first. Just consider it your first step in convincing employers that you've got the qualifications they need. 

If You're Already a Working Professional

At this stage, employers pay less attention to the GPA and college coursework of experienced applicants than they do with fresh graduates. Because of this, a seasoned professional’s education is either listed after their work history or at the bottom of the resume, just after the skills section.

1. High School

How to add your high school education to your resume

Below are different resume education examples, depending on where you are in your high school education.

Examples for High School 

If high school is your highest level of education, list it like this:

“Western High School, Baltimore, MD
Graduated in 2023”

But if you’re still at school, just change the second line so it looks like this:

Expected to graduate in 2025”

If you didn’t finish high school:

List the name of your school and its location, followed by the years you attended.

“Edmonson-Westside High School, Baltimore, MD
Attended school from 2020 to 2024”

If You Completed a GED

Some people who didn’t finish their high school education took a General Education Development (GED) test instead.

If that’s you, list the institution where you took your GED test followed by your high school information.

“GED High School Equivalency Diploma
Richland One Adult Education Center, 2020
Spring Valley High School, Columbia, SC
Attended 2020 – 2022”

Trade School

If you studied a trade after high school, list it on top of your high school education as long as it’s related to your target job.

Here's an example: 

“Dorsey School, Madison Heights, MI
HVAC Technician, 2023
Portage Central High School, Portage, MI
Graduated 2022”

2. Undergraduate Degree

How to add your undergraduate degree to your resume.

Below are different ways to list college education on your resume.

College Graduate

“BS in Electrical Engineering, 2023
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA”

You can also write the degree type in full instead of abbreviating it:

“Bachelor of Arts in English, 2023
UCLA, Los Angeles, CA”

Still at School

If you’re still at school, just put “in progress” beside the course you’re taking.

“BS in Mathematics in Progress
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA”

You can also write “Expected in” followed by the estimate date of your graduation.

“BS in Economics, Expected in 2024
New York University”

Unfinished Degree

Not everyone who attends college completes it, for whatever reason. There’s no shame in that. So, don’t let your education go to waste by excluding it on your resume.

List your school’s name, followed by your start and end dates, so it’s clear you’re no longer enrolled. Then write how many credits you earned towards your chosen degree. Put your high school education below it.

“Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
2021-2022: Completed 32 credits towards BA in Education”
  J.P Stevens High School, 2023
Edison, New Jersey”

3. Graduate Studies

How to add graduate studies to your resume.

A graduate degree in your field increases your credibility as an applicant. That’s why it should be listed on top of your undergraduate degree.

The example below is impressive for an applicant in the IT sector. 

“MS in Computer Science, 2023
BS in Computer Science,
Michigan State University, 2021”

You can still list an advanced degree not related to your line of work. But it might be better to list it below your undergraduate degree if it’s not related to your current role.

For example, if you work in the IT sector, a master’s degree in political science isn’t relevant except perhaps for the skills you learn while researching for your thesis. To make this information worth including in your resume, highlight any coursework that may be applicable to your job.

“BS in Computer Science,
Michigan State University, 2020”
MS in Political Science, 2023
Coursework: Models and Methods, Security Studies”

This tip isn’t applicable to everyone, as it all depends on your career plan. For example, a master’s in business administration applies to many jobs with a management role.

Incomplete Graduate Studies

The strategy here is like that used in undergraduate degrees. List the anticipated graduation date on resume, if you still have a lot of coursework to finish before graduating. Here's an unfinished degree on resume example:

“Master of Science in Economics, to be completed 2024
Harvard University, Cambridge, MA”

But if you finished everything except the dissertation, write “all but dissertation,” which is sometimes abbreviated as “ ABD ” below your graduate program. Be warned, though, there are mixed opinions about this. 

“MS in Biology
All but dissertation (ABD), 2025”
City College of New York”

Always list your undergraduate degree below your graduate studies.

Discontinued Graduate Study

You can still list a master’s or doctoral degree on your resume, even if you didn’t finish it or ended up dropping out from the program entirely.

To avoid confusion, list this in a separate section called “ Research Work ” or “ Professional Development” instead of listing it together with your other education credentials.

Write the number of units completed in the subject, the name of the institution, and the dates you attended.

“15 credits in Applied Mathematics
University of Maryland, 2023-2024”

This example shows how you could list a MS in Applied Mathematics & Statistics, and Scientific Computation, if you only did part of the coursework (i.e. Applied Mathematics)

You can also list it in this format, so it’s all in one line and it downplays the low number of units finished and the incomplete degree.

“Post-graduate coursework in Applied Mathematics, University of Maryland, USA, 2022-2023”

4. Master’s & Doctoral Studies

How to add masters and doctoral degree to your resume.

When adding your master’s degree, use the abbreviations or spell it out. Whichever you decide, be consistent throughout your resume. Here are some of the master’s degree abbreviations:

  • A.M., M.A., MA (Master of Arts)
  • M.B.A., MBA (Master of Business Administration)
  • M.E., ME, Meng, M.Eng. (Master of Engineering)
  • M.S., MS, M.Sc. MSc (Master of Science)

Here's a completed master’s degree example:

Dates you attended the program College, City of College, State of College Master of Arts in English

Here's how to show a master’s degree that hasn’t been completed:

College, City of College, State of College Master of Arts in Psychology Expected Graduation Date: (put date here)

 Doctoral Degree 

Add your doctoral degree in the resume education section. Your doctoral degree is formatted similarly to other degrees. Here's an example of adding your doctoral degree to your resume:

Name of university Doctorate degree years in university

Here's another example of how to add a doctoral degree to your resume:

University of Chicago Ph.D. in Education 2020-2026

5. Certifications

How to add certifications to your resume.

Some applicants may not have the formal education required for the job. But they made up for it through certifications, courses, seminars, and training events. Professional training and ongoing education can be listed in the education section of a resume, or under a separate section for “ Professional Development.”

Format to Follow : 

“Name of Training, Training Provider or Certification Body, Date Obtained, Location”

Here's an example:

“Oracle SBC Troubleshooting Certification, Pearson Vue Testing Center, 2023, Hong Kong”

Including the training location is optional, except for state-specific licensure and certifications.

If you haven’t completed the training, list it as “In progress” or write the estimated completion date.

“Oracle SBC Implementation by Oracle, Toronto, (To be completed, Sept 2024)

These templates can give your resume a better format:

what do i put on my resume for education

Fresh graduates with no work experience sometimes have trouble filling out a one-page resume. It doesn’t have to be this way if you get creative in how you present your qualifications. No big fonts necessary.

Below is some good information you can add to beef up your resume:

List the GPA for coursework related to the job you’re applying for. Only do this if your GPA isn’t below 3.0.

 “BS in Economics, 2023
Ohio University, Cleveland, OH

Relevant Coursework

You can also list the subjects or units relevant to the job you’re applying for. Not sure which subjects are relevant? Compile job ads for five similar positions in your field, and then list the most common skills or educational requirements listed. Compare this keyword list with your college transcript to find the relevant coursework.

Here’s an example for a fresh graduate applying for an entry-level job as a Clinical Specialist

“BS in Biomedical Engineering, 2023
Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Relevant coursework: Quantitative Experimentation and Design, Systems Physiology, Biomedical Systems Analysis, Biostatistics”

Check out this guide to get more information on how to use keywords in your resume: 

what do i put on my resume for education

List honors, scholarships, and awards you received while studying. List these items after your education, if you've got less than three items to list.

If you've received more than three distinctions, it’s better to list them in a separate section called “Honors and Awards.”

Include the name of the institution that granted the award, and the date it was awarded to you. Here's an example format to follow: 

what do i put on my resume for education

Here are some sample resumes to highlight your education:

1. If You've Got Minimal Education and Experience

If You Have Minimal Education and Experience

If you don’t have a lot of education, it’s best to focus on any professional skills you’ve learned or any certifications you've got. If you've got a lot of credentials and training, try adding a section for that. Leaving the education section off your resume is best if you only have a high school diploma.

Here are the changes made to a resume for someone who has some training and only a high school diploma. As you can see, the education section was deleted, as well as the work experience section. The skills sections were kept and showcase relevant skills to the job that's being applied to. The certifications section was kept and added the relevant certifications. Also, a profile picture was added, and a positive summary to help convince the hiring manager.

3. If You've Got a Lot of Education and No Experience

If You Have A lot of Education and No Experience

In the resume education section, include any classes you took that would be relevant to the job you're applying to.

In the example above, the courses and the thesis that were added were relevant to the job that’s being applied to. When adding your GPA, only add it if it’s 3.0 or higher. If it’s lower, don’t add it to the resume.

In the experience section, add any volunteer work and unpaid internships. Also, add any achievements that you achieved during your volunteer experience or internships. Adding achievements shows the employers what you can do. Fill out the sections for the rest of the resume while remembering what job you’re applying for.

Here are some frequently asked questions about adding education to a resume:

1. What if You Went Back to School to Get a New Degree?

Are you changing careers? If you got a new degree because you want to pursue another type of work, then it’s vital that you include your new degree on your resume. Put it on top of your previous college degree.

When you switch roles, most of your previous work experience will be considered irrelevant. Let’s say you want to switch from nursing to selling life insurance or IT to managing a restaurant. In those cases, most of your previous qualifications—education, skills, achievements—are inapplicable.

That’s where your new degree comes in. You’re like a fresh graduate in your new field, but a tad better. Your formal education satisfies the job requirements of most employers, and your transferrable skills will boost your qualifications a bit more, so you’re not seen as a total newbie.

2. What if Your Degree Isn't Related to Your Job?

I know someone who graduated with a degree in design that's now working as a life insurance agent. I also know a nursing graduate who worked in IT for years, before becoming a real estate agent. This happens more than you know. So, don’t let this stop you from chasing after your dream job.

Below are two ways to downplay the lack of formal education in your target job:

  • List the relevant coursework in your degree. Let’s say you've got a Psychology degree but want a job in marketing. If you took units in social psychology, communications, grammar, and business, those subjects show you've got the knowledge required for the job.
  • List professional courses or ongoing training you took to compensate for your lack of formal schooling on the subject.

what do i put on my resume for education

3. What if You Attended Multiple Schools to Finish One Degree?

Only list the school where you graduated or finished your degree. Educational institutions require transferring students to submit their transcript, along with a detailed list of the subjects they completed with their previous school.

Your school records are consolidated where you graduate, so that’s what you should list on your resume. If you put the wrong school, you may get a negative result from an employer’s pre-employment background check.

Having a college degree doesn’t guarantee you a job, not anymore. Still, a college education is one of the job requirements for high-paying work. So, you should learn how to list your education on a resume in a way that paints you as a skilled and knowledgeable professional, not just a student who only did the minimum work to pass.

Now that you're done listing your education on a resume, why not improve the other parts of your resume too?

what do i put on my resume for education

Browse our professional resume templates on Envato Elements for a great resume design.

what do i put on my resume for education

Envato Elements is the best source for any kind of resume template . They've got templates for people with no experience and for people with a lot of experience. Also, they've got themed resumes that you can use to match the job that you're applying to.

So, what's Envato Elements? It’s a premium subscription service where you pay a low monthly fee to gain unlimited access to premium digital assets . These assets include resume templates, fonts, stock images, audio, etc.

Professionals make every template to look stylish and impressive. This means that you're getting a high-quality product. When you use a template, you save time because it's already designed. All you need to do is add text in the designated sections. You still can if you like adding your personal touch to your resume. A good template is easily customizable.

In this article, you learned how to fill out the education section of your resume in several different circumstances. So, put those skills to use and download a premium template from Envato Elements. Also, learn more about making a great resume in our comprehensive series. There are several resume strategies to master that'll help you land the job you want.

Editorial Note: This content was originally published on August 17th, 2017. We're sharing it again because our editors have determined that this information is still accurate and relevant. It's been updated for relevancy and accuracy by Sarah Joy .

Charley Mendoza

How to List Education on a Resume With Examples

Quick Navigation:

What to include in the education section of a resume

Where to list your education in a resume, what interviewers want to see in your resume’s education section, how to format education on a resume.

  • Examples at different life stages for listing education on a resume
  • Education FAQs

The education section of your resume provides hiring managers with a detailed insight into your background and how it relates to the role. When written to reflect the job requirements, your education section can give you an advantage over other candidates. The best way to list your education depends on your work and academic achievements.

There are several ways to list education on your resume. Reading and understanding the job description can help identify the perfect location and level of qualification to include when applying to a position. Not all jobs need your full credentials, so you can check the job listing to see what the hiring managers are looking for. In this article, you can learn about how to list your education on a resume.

The information to include in your education section depends on your academic qualifications. 

Here are popular educational, academic and professional development credentials to include in the education section of a resume:

  • Secondary diploma, high school diploma, or GED
  • College diploma
  • Bachelor’s degree, Master’s degree, PhD or Doctorate degree
  • Professional degree or certification
  • Trade school diploma, certificate, or apprenticeship
  • Professional licenses or memberships
  • Online class or course
  • Name of schools and location
  • Discipline (including major and minor where applicable)
  • Year of graduation (optional)
  • GPA (include only if you are a current or a recent graduate with a strong GPA of at least 3.5)
  • Awards and honors including Latin honors, Dean’s List and others
  • Relevant coursework, research and other academic activities
  • Professional development courses and certification
  • Licenses (if you aren’t listing them in a separate section on your resume)
  • Membership of extracurricular clubs and organizations

The ideal location of the education section depends on your academic achievements and experience. If you are in college or graduated one or two years ago, it’s better to highlight your education at the top of the resume. This will show the interviewer your academic achievements relevant to the role, even if you have limited work experience. 

If you have enough work experience to impress the employer, consider putting the education section at the lower part of your resume.

The information each hiring manager looks for in your resume education section depends on the job requirements. Recruiters hiring for an entry-level position might look for the course you studied in college or type of degree. An employer interviewing for a managerial role in a finance company might want to see a business school degree or industry-specific certifications.

The requirements or education section of a job description will provide the academic qualifications for the role. Read the section carefully to ensure your credentials are a good fit for the job.

Be honest with the academic qualifications you include on your resume. It is easy for interviewers to confirm the information you provide. You can leave off information that does not support your chances of getting an interview. 

While people have different education backgrounds, employers expect that education on a resume be formatted in a readable way.

Follow these steps to format education on a resume:

  • First, list school or education provider’s name, type of school (if unclear) and location
  • Second, list the time period that you attended or date that you graduated, making sure it is clear whether this education is completed, ongoing or unfinished
  • Third, include the specialization, degree, certification or diploma, if applicable
  • Fourth, list the field of study, major and/or minor, if applicable
  • Lastly, list your GPA if this would be helpful and relevant to include on your resume

Education examples on a resume

Here are examples of how to list education sections on resumes for people at different points in their career:

Education for a working professional

If you are a working professional with up to 5 years of experience, place your education section below your professional experience section. In your case, the function of the education section is to show employers you meet the academic requirements for the role.

Recruiters are more interested in your recent achievements at work, not educational accomplishments. If you gained higher academic qualifications recently, place the education section at the top of your resume if it applies to the role. Rank advanced degrees from the most recent.

Example of the education section for a working professional:

Georgetown University Graduate School of Physics | Washington DC

Master of Science in Fluid Dynamics

University of Baltimore | Baltimore, Maryland

Bachelor of Science in Geophysics Studies

Education for a recent graduate

If you graduated less than five years ago, put your education section below or in line with work experience. Give your work experience a prominent position on the resume to show your readiness for the demands of a professional environment. Include your schools, attendance dates, awards and honors, and your GPA (3.5 and above), but keep it short.

Example of the education section for a recent graduate:

Michigan State University, Michigan 2012-2017

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics

Statistical Analysis Certificate

Sloane Scholar

Education for a college student with some work experience

If you are a college student with work experience, place your education section above work. Include the name of the institution, degree type and the expected year of graduation. You can also mention coursework, extracurricular activities, organizations and other academic achievements relevant to the role. Don’t include your GPA if it is below 3.5.

Example of the education section for a college student with work experience:

California State University, California

Bachelor of Science in Banking and Finance, September 2017

Minored in Accounting

Relevant Coursework: Accounting Systems, Actuarial Sciences, Anti Money Laundering Protocols

Extracurricular activities: Treasurer for the Association of Accounting Students

GPA: 3.95/4.0

Education for a college student with no work experience

If you are a college student with no work experience, build your education section with your best academic achievements. Include relevant coursework, extracurricular activities, degree, awards and honors, expected graduation date and GPA where applicable.

You can also mention any college experience that applies to the role. Mention the experiences and skills you gained from your coursework or research and how they apply to the role.

Example of the education section for a college student with no work experience:

Bachelor of Science in Psychology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

GPA: 3.65/4.0

Relevant Coursework: Experimental Psychology, Cognitive Psychology, Social Psychology

Expected Graduation: September 2019

Awards: Dean’s List, Autumn 2017

Extracurricular Activities: Assistant Editor of the Purdue Psychology Digest

The best way to make your education section stand out is to keep it honest and relevant. Mention only academic achievements that boost your chances of getting hired. Be strategic and put your credentials where they will attract the hiring manager’s attention.

Education Section FAQ

What order should i list education in.

Education is usually listed in reverse chronological order. For example, list a graduate degree first, and then your undergraduate degree.

Most people list the highest level of education first. Start with the highest level of education first, and then the second-highest, and then third highest (onwards).

Should I list all my education on my resume?

Not necessarily. Only list education if it is relevant for the job posting. For example, if you are a college graduate, you don’t need to put high school education on a resume.

What takes priority – education or work experience?

Whether education or work experience is more important is determined by the job posting and your qualifications.

Generally, experienced candidates should list their previous work experience first, if the experience is relevant for the job.

However, teens, students, recent grads, and candidates with less work experience could list education and relevant qualifications first.

When should I leave education off a resume?

Most people list the highest level of education relevant for the job, even if they are experienced candidates. But the more relevant work experience you have, the less important the education section becomes.

Always read the job description carefully to identify whether the employer requires specific education qualifications. Add that education to your resume if you have completed it.

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Resume Examples & Samples

How to list education on a resume [examples].

Dayana Aleksandrova

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Table of Contents

First things first, basic formatting, how to list high school education, mention awards.

Education is tough. You spend four years in college, stressing about exams and living off of gummy bears and ramen, often curled up on the library floor. That’s the best case scenario. Reward your efforts by expertly putting your education on a resume.

It’s crucial to know how to list your education on a resume at every stage. Applicants get confused by all the possible scenarios. What if you never finished high school? What if you only completed high school? What if you dropped out of college? Don't worry.

We will teach you how to:

  • List your high school experience even if you never graduated
  • Include your education if you’re still in college
  • Present your education on a resume if you never graduated college
  • Mention your college education once it’s completed
  • Leverage skills and extracurriculars to complement your education

VelvetJobs Expert Tip

Need help? Check out our resume builder .

#first-things-first

Have you ever wondered what goes first, education or experience? They are both important and should be easy to spot on your resume.

You can have your education positioned:

  • At the top of your resume, before experience
  • After your experience but before your interests and hobbies

Both alternatives work.

If you have recently graduated, list education before experience on your resume. This is because, at this point, education is most likely the most relevant and extensive experience you’ve had.

If you’ve decided to go back to school after a few years in the workforce, you should put your work experience before your education. It's better to see that you can, say, generate $20,000 in sales over six months than a theoretical finance course you took.

Make sure to make education a priority on your resume. While you may choose not to put it at the top, don’t bury it at the very bottom. The bottom part of your resume should be for hobbies and interests, certifications and volunteer work.

Learn How and Why Put Hobbies on a Resume (20+ Real Examples) !

When should you put education after your work experience?

If you’ve been working for a few years and have a few solid positions to show, put your education after your experience. After all, companies want to hire you for what you can do , not what you’ve learned in theory.

Of course, a degree can be a very helpful asset, but the experience here has a higher value. If you’ve been working for 5-10 years, your experience has become more relevant and recent than your degree so you can put your education in the second part of the resume.

#basic-formatting

We will go over the basic formatting requirements of listing your education on your resume.

  • List your highest degree first (Ph.D-MA - BA - Associate)
  • If you put your college degree, you don’t need to list high school

It makes sense to list your highest degree first. It will be the one you obtained most recently and the most valuable of all. If you’ve got a Ph.D, it would be at the top of your resume. You can leave off the rest of your degrees in that case, especially if they are in the same discipline.

For example, if you have a Ph.D in Neuroscience and a Master's in the same sphere, just list your Ph.D. Besides the doctorate, Master’s degrees go next, followed by Bachelor’s and finally, Associate’s degree.

Additional details to include:

  • School you graduated from
  • Major/ minor
  • Year of graduation
  • Location of school

These are the four additional pieces of information you should mention when listing your education on your resume.

The name of your school is important. The area of study matters as well. If you had both a major and a minor, list the major first . The year of graduation is important as the recruiter will be judging your progress based on it.

Finally, the location of the school is a good piece of information to have, but it isn’t crucial. It’s important in case the name of your college is popular. For example, when you say you graduated from “Trinity College,” the recruiter would ask which one - the one in Ireland or Connecticut.

Here is an example of what this format looks like:

for example

2015 MA in Psychology

Boston University, Boston, MA

3.8 GPA Followed by:

2013 BA in Psychology

  • Trinity College, Hartford, CT

As you can see, this candidate has listed their HIGHEST and MOST RECENT degree first, followed by their previous education.

Need some extra help? Check out these resume templates .

bonus tips:

  • Every space on your resume counts. Shorten “Master’s” to MA, “Bachelor’s” to BA, etc.
  • It’s good to put your GPA on your resume as long as it’s higher than 3.2.

If you attended an Ivy League school (Harvard, Princeton, Yale), you could lead with the name of the school instead of the major.

#how-to-list-high-school-education

We will follow the same format as above. If you didn’t graduate high school, simply say:

  • Name of High School, Town, State
  • Attended school from YEAR - YEAR

For example:

  • Union High School, Gilford, NH
  • Attended school from 2003 - 2005

Since your education is not the strongest suit on your resume if you didn’t finish high school, go ahead and emphasize your relevant work experience and qualifications instead.

If you are still in high school, list the following:

  • Expected to graduate YEAR

It would look like:

  • Expected to graduate 2010

Finally, if you didn’t finish high school, but later completed a GED, say this: GED High School Equivalency Diploma

  • Institution, State, YEAR
  • Attended High School From YEAR - YEAR
  • GED High School Equivalency Diploma
  • Greenville Center, Gilford, 2010
  • Attended High School From 2003- 2005

Why do we list both institutions? This is because you began your education in high school and finished elsewhere. Together, the two add up to what the recruiter needs to know. You'll see this information in all good resume templates .

what do i put on my resume for education

If you finished high school

Listing your completed education is very simple. Just say the following:

  • Graduated in YEAR

It would look like this:

  • Graduated in 2013

Looks simple? That’s because it really is, no catch. While your high school experience can be quickly summed up in a few lines, you should put more effort into discussing your skills and experience in case this is your highest level of education.

We know you're a rockstar. Check out these 50+ Essential Skills to Put on a Resume (And Get the Job) !

Now let’s talk about college education on your resume. We will look at how to list it in case:

  • You never finished college
  • You are still in college
  • You completed a college degree

what do i put on my resume for education

Simply list it like this:

  • University of New Hampshire, Manchester, NH
  • 2012-2014 Completed 70 credits towards BA in Economics
  • Graduated in 2012

Here, we list your high school along with the college courses you’ve taken in order to demonstrate a more wholesome educational experience. If you did the work and completed a certain number of courses, definitely mention it.

Here is the best way to list your education on your resume if you are still in college :

  • BA in Economics in Progress

Simply mention when you will have your degree. You can use the phrase “in progress,” or “anticipated,” or “expected.” These terms are interchangeable.

Listing a completed college degree on your resume is very straightforward. Simply say:

  • YEAR Degree Type in Discipline
  • University, City, State
  • 2015 BA in Economics
  • University of Boston, Boston, MA

#mention-awards

Let's have a look at how to list degrees higher than BA on your resume. Feel free to include additional details such as:

  • Honors and awards
  • Relevant courses taken
  • Extracurricular activities and volunteer work
  • Published work

It is always a good idea to mention any honors you’ve received with your degree or whether you’ve been a part of any societies such as Phi Beta Kappa.

This is what an example looks like:

  • Honors BA in Economics, Summa Cum Laude
  • Graduated in 2015

Other honors can include any scholarships you’ve received on Dean's List .

It’s a good idea to mention details about the courses you’ve taken if they are relevant. For example, if you are applying for a position in politics and you’ve taken courses in international political economy, politics of developing countries and international relations, do mention those courses.

Your resume should be one page long, so only mention these details if you have space left.

You can spend more time on your education section in case you have little to no work experience. That way, you will demonstrate that this is where the majority of your efforts have been focused.

What if you graduated with a degree that isn’t relevant to the position you are applying for? Then simply list the courses you’ve taken that can be helpful in the industry.

For example, if you’d like to work as a Human Resources Specialist, but you studied Economics, that’s fine. List courses that may be relevant, such as Psychology 101, Behavioral Psychology and Social Psychology.

  • Bachelor of Arts in Economics
  • Relevant Coursework: Psychology 101, Behavioral Psychology, Social Psychology

You can back your resume up with relevant extracurricular and volunteer experiences as well, such as:

  • Mentor programs
  • Debate team
  • Sports teams
  • Creative writing
  • Student government

These extracurricular activities demonstrate that you’ve closely worked with people in a team and as a leader, as well as have imagination and creativity.

Don't be shy, it's fine to show off. Here's How to Mention Accomplishments on Your Resume (10+ Examples)

Here are the things to remember when discussing education on your resume.

It’s important to talk about your studies when you apply for a job. Though your experience will be more important if you’ve got ten years of experience under your belt, if you are just starting out or are still in school, your education matters.

You can list any sort of education - both high school and college, regardless of whether you completed a degree or not. There are different ways to speak about your education, depending on whether you have completed your studies, have dropped them or are still in progress.

You should leverage your extracurricular activities , honors and rewards and mention details about your coursework in order to position your candidacy best for the job.

Make sure to be concise in your education description, as your resume should be a neat one page. It’s easy to choose whether to put your education at the top or bottom of your resume, depending on how much professional experience you’ve accumulated.

If you have years of solid work experience behind you, place your education after your experience. In case you have recently graduated from school or don’t have much professional experience to show, put your education second.

what do i put on my resume for education

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what do i put on my resume for education

How to list education on a resumé

You’ve spent years of your life studying and now’s the time to show off all that hard work. Educational achievements of all kinds are worth listing on your resumé . Depending on your career paththey can even be the most important details to highlight.

Listing your education on your resumé is important as it lets employers see at a glance what knowledge and skills you bring to a role. Read on to learn more about how to list your education on your resumé and position yourself as a prime candidate for the job you want.

Information to include in the education section of a resumé

When it comes to listing your education, there are a few important factors that hiring managers are looking for when they’re reviewing your resumé. Depending on how in-depth you want to make your education section, here are some details you might want to include:

  • Your school’s name
  • Location of your school 
  • Any degrees, diplomas or certificates you obtained 
  • Your field of study 
  • The year you graduated or the years you studied
  • Any academic recognition, coursework, activities or other achievements 

How to list completed education on a resumé (with examples)

The way you approach listing your education on your resumé depends on how long you’ve been in the workforce. Whether you’re a fresh graduate or a seasoned academic professional will change the level of detail you include. Here are some guidelines on how you should list your education for your circumstances.

Recent graduates (1–5 years)

If you graduated in the last five years, you should place your education section before your work experience. Chances are you haven’t gained much professional experience yet, so use your education to demonstrate your skills and knowledge instead. Be sure to include any extracurricular activities and if you received any special recognition. The exact formatting will depend on the style of your resumé, but remember to make sure it’s easily legible. For example:

Bachelor of Business Management, The University of Queensland 2016–2020 Achievements: Dean’s Commendation for Academic Excellence in Semester 2 President of University of Queensland Chess Club (UQCC), 2019

Experienced professionals (5 or more years)

If you’ve been in the workforce for more than five years, you should put your education section below your professional experience section. At this stage, most employers are more interested in your professional achievements , so you can remove any specific details, like attendance dates, extracurriculars and academic achievements. Here’s an example:

Bachelor of Business Management  The University of Queensland

Graduates with multiple degrees

If you’ve acquired several degrees or qualifications, you should list them with the highest-level qualification at the top. You can check the Australian Qualifications Framework to see how they’re ranked. There’s no need to go into too much detail unless it’s relevant for the position – just be sure to include the name of your qualification and the educational institution. For example:

Master of Business Administration MBA Melbourne Business School 

How to list incomplete or in-progress education (with examples)

If you haven’t finished your degree or you have an incomplete education, it’s still perfectly acceptable to include this in the education section of your resumé, as long as it’s relevant to the position you’re applying for. 

For in-progress education, you should include your projected graduation date if you’re on track to finish your degree. You might want to consider adding optional information, like honours, relevant coursework and any extracurricular activities. An example of this would be:

Bachelor of Business Management  The University of Queensland Graduating in November 2024

If you started a degree but chose not to finish it, you might still want to consider including it on your resumé. List the coursework you’ve completed and any special recognitions that are relevant to the job. 

Bachelor of Business Management  The University of Queensland Completed coursework: Accounting for Decision-Making, Economics for Business, Business Law and Introduction to Management

How do you list education on a resumé without a degree? 

You don’t need a degree to be able to list education on your resumé. You can list your high school certificate, TAFE qualifications, online courses, professional training and any other certifications you might have. 

If you’ve recently graduated high school, then list your school, the years you attended, and any additional achievements or qualifications. If you’ve been in the workforce for five or more years, then you can drop your high school education and focus on your other qualifications or professional experience. List items starting with the highest level of education first: 

Diploma of Leadership and Management TAFE Queensland, South Bank 2021–2022

Brisbane State High School 2015–2020 ATAR: 84.00 Electives: Accounting, Legal, English and Literature Extension, Economics Achievements: Excellence Award in Economics (2019)

Tips for your resumé education section

While the education section may only be a small portion of your resumé, it provides potential employers with crucial information about your technical skills , subject knowledge and academic accomplishments. It’s an opportunity to make a positive first impression and get one step closer to landing the role.

Here are a few tips for putting together an effective education section on your resumé:

  • Start with your highest level of education: always list your education, certifications and qualifications from the highest level to the lowest. 
  • Include relevant details:  make sure to include all the important information, including the name of your school or educational institution, the name of the degree or qualification and the major (if applicable). If you’re still studying, you should also include your expected graduation date.
  • Include awards: list any academic awards, dean’s commendations, scholarships or other relevant recognitions
  • List relevant coursework: if your resumé is lacking professional experience or your studies are incomplete, you might want to consider including the relevant coursework you’ve completed. 
  • Include thesis or capstone project:  completing a thesis or a capstone project is a huge achievement, so be sure to list it as part of your education.
  • Detail study abroad or exchange programs: completing study overseas demonstrates cultural awareness and adaptability, so it’s also worth mentioning in your education section.
  • List professional development certifications: include any certifications, qualifications or workshops relevant to your education or the job you're seeking.
  • Omit high school details: if you’ve completed tertiary education or you’ve been in the workforce for several years, it’s often not necessary to include your high school education.
  • Tailor to the job:  you should customise the education section of your resumé based on the role you’re applying for. You only have limited space to work with, so be sure to highlight aspects of your education that are most relevant to the position. If you have several degrees or qualifications, it could be worth narrowing down your list to feature only those that are applicable.
  • Proofread your resumé: double- and triple-check your resumé to make sure you haven’t missed any typos or grammatical errors. It’s also important to make sure you’re being consistent with your formatting throughout the education section so it’s visually appealing and easy to read.
  • Use action verbs for descriptions: when incorporating action verbs into your education section, focus on describing your achievements, responsibilities and the impact of your activities. This will help to enhance readability and demonstrate your skills.

The education section is an essential part of your resumé. It demonstrates to potential employers that you possess the relevant skills and knowledge to succeed in the position you’re applying for. It also demonstrates commitment, diligence and other transferable skills that are important for success in the workplace. Whether you’ve recently completed additional qualifications or you’re applying for a new role, now’s a great time to review and refresh the education section on your resumé.  

Is it okay to list all your subjects under the education section of a resumé or is just mentioning a degree's title good enough?

When it comes to listing your subjects under the education section of your resumé, it’s usually best to only include the coursework you’ve completed that’s relevant to the position you’re applying for. Listing your subjects in addition to the degree’s title usually isn’t necessary if you’ve got multiple degrees, certificates or qualifications to include. Alternatively, if you’re including incomplete education, you’ve only recently graduated from high school, or you’re in the process of completing your degree, then including subjects can help to demonstrate relevant skills and knowledge for the position. 

Should I put education first on my resumé?

Your personal details and career objective or summary should always be listed first on your resumé. You should then include whatever is most recent from your work experience or education. If you’ve recently graduated, chances are you haven’t gained much work experience, so place the emphasis on your education and the relevant skills and knowledge you’ve gained. Alternatively, if you’ve been in the workforce for a few years, most employers will be more interested in your professional experience and how it can contribute to the position you’re applying for.  

Should I include my high school education on my resumé?

Unless you’ve recently left high school, there’s no need to include your high school education on your resumé. If you’re currently studying for a degree or other qualification, you might want to include more information about that than about your high school education. You can provide details about relevant coursework, academic achievements and your expected graduation date instead.

Should I list my GPA on my resumé?

If you’re a recent graduate of Law of Medicine and you achieved a high GPA, it can be a good idea to include your GPA in the education section of your resumé. After all, a high GPA demonstrates your academic achievement. With that said, the GPA grading system is not commonly used in Australia, and most employers scanning your resumé are only interested in your qualifications.

Should I include online courses or certificates in my education section?

Online courses, certificates and other qualifications all fall into the category of education, so if they’re recent and relevant to the position that you’re applying for, then it’s worth including them in the education section of your resumé. Completing courses and certifications helps to demonstrate your commitment to learning, as well as the skills and knowledge that you possess. 

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Education in Progress on Your Resume: How to List it

what do i put on my resume for education

As job markets become increasingly competitive, it’s essential to have an impressive resume that stands out from the crowd. One key element of a strong resume is education. Employers seek candidates who combine practical experience with a solid learning background. But what if you’re still pursuing your degree or professional development courses? How do you include that education in progress on your resume effectively? This article discusses the importance of education on a resume and provides practical tips on how to present ongoing education.

Importance of education in a resume

Listing your education on a resume is essential as it demonstrates your commitment to learning, a strong work ethic, and a desire to fill knowledge gaps that enhance your skills. Formal education, such as a bachelor’s or master’s degree, is crucial for some professions, while others demand additional training and certification.

Education information gives employers insight into your skills, which leads them to measure your potential for learning, reasoning, and critical thinking. Even if you don’t have completed education, highlighting the courses you’re currently taking or training you’re participating in can showcase your willingness to learn and your dedication to personal development.

How to present education in progress on a resume

If you’re still in school or taking courses, be sure to list the degree or certification you’re pursuing and include the expected date of completion. You can also provide details on relevant course work and academic achievements. If you’re taking courses for career development, mention the name of the course, the issuing institution, and the expected completion date. Remember to include any certifications you’ve earned from those courses or training programs.

Another way to showcase education in progress is to include the phrase “in progress,” “anticipated completion date,” or “expected graduation date” next to the corresponding certification or degree. These phrases help recruiters understand your current status in your academic journey.

The benefits of highlighting ongoing education on your resume

There are several advantages to highlighting education in progress on your resume. First, it demonstrates your commitment to your profession, your desire to learn, and your willingness to grow professionally. Additionally, it highlights the fact that you’re not resting on your past laurels.

what do i put on my resume for education

Moreover, showing relevant courses and training programs can also help employers see that you have the necessary skills to handle the job’s requirements. This demonstrates that you have taken the initiative to develop those skills proactively.

Including relevant education in progress on your resume can enhance your credibility, and it’s an excellent strategy to differentiate yourself in a highly competitive job market. When done well, your resume can be your ticket to a more prosperous future.

Types of Education in Progress

If you’re still pursuing a new degree or certification, it’s important to list that information on your resume. Employers love to see that you’re working towards improving yourself and staying up-to-date in your field. Here are several types of education in progress that you may want to include:

Traditional College or University Degree

If you’re working towards a bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral degree at a traditional college or university, make sure to list your degree, major, and expected graduation date. You can also include any relevant coursework or projects that highlight your skills and knowledge. Employers want to see that you have a clear plan for completing your degree and are committed to your education.

Online Courses and Certifications

In today’s digital age, many people are turning to online courses and certifications to further their education. This option is great for those who may not have the time or resources to attend a traditional college or university. List any online courses or certifications you are currently taking or plan to take in the near future. Be specific about the course or certification title, the date you expect to complete it, and any relevant skills or knowledge gained.

Boot Camp Programs

Boot camp programs are intensive, short-term educational courses designed to teach specific technical skills. If you’re enrolled in a boot camp program, make sure to list the program title, start and end dates, and any relevant projects or skills learned. Boot camps are highly focused on practical skills that are in demand by employers, so highlighting your participation in one can be a major selling point on your resume.

Apprenticeships and Internships

If you’re gaining practical experience through an apprenticeship or internship, it’s important to include this on your resume. List the company name, your position or title, the dates of your apprenticeship or internship, and any relevant projects or achievements. Employers love to see that you’ve gained real-world experience and are actively working towards developing your skills.

Education in progress can be a major asset on your resume. Whether you’re pursuing a traditional degree, taking online courses, participating in a boot camp, or gaining practical experience through an apprenticeship or internship, make sure to list these education endeavors to showcase your commitment to personal and professional growth.

Choosing the Right Section for Ongoing Education

The education section of a resume is a crucial aspect that indicates the level of education and academic achievements. However, ongoing education and training also play a critical role in demonstrating the candidate’s continuous learning and career growth.

When it comes to highlighting ongoing education on your resume, several sections can showcase your dedication to growth and development. Here are the four main sections that you can consider:

Education Section

The education section is the most common section to showcase ongoing education, as it is the primary place where academic qualifications are listed. This section should include your formal education, such as degree or diploma programs, and mention any ongoing studies, coursework, or current enrollment in a degree program.

If you’re currently pursuing a degree or certificate program, it’s essential to mention the program’s name, educational institution, start and anticipated completion date, and degree or certification name.

what do i put on my resume for education

Certifications Section

Another section to consider including your ongoing education is the certification section. This section focuses on industry-specific certifications and credentials that demonstrate your skills and expertise. Listing your certifications highlights your commitment to your field and indicates that you’re up-to-date with current practices and trends.

If you’re pursuing additional certifications, list them in this section, and mention the certification body, date of completion, and certification name.

Professional Development Section

The professional development section is an excellent place to highlight any non-degree programs or courses that you’re currently enrolled in or completed. This section can include workshops, webinars, conferences, or training programs that you attend to enhance your skills and knowledge.

It’s essential to list these programs according to the level of relevance to your career goals and industry. Also, mention the event or program name, the institution or organization providing the learning experience, and the date of completion.

Relevant Experience Section

Lastly, you can incorporate your ongoing education and training by emphasizing the skills gained from your education and professional development sections in your relevant experience section. This section should include a summary of your work experience, skills, and accomplishments relevant to your career goals.

Emphasize how your continual learning and ongoing education contribute to your skill set and demonstrate your commitment to professional growth. For example, mention any responsibilities, tasks, or projects that showcase the skills acquired from your current and previous education and training experiences.

Carefully choosing the right section for ongoing education on your resume is crucial to reflect your career’s progression and dedication to growth and development. Consider all the above sections and highlight your ongoing education and learning commitment to the best of your ability.

Where to List Education in Progress on Your Resume

When it comes to listing education in progress on your resume, there are a few different options for placement. Depending on the details of your education and professional experience, you may want to consider one or more of the following methods:

Top of the Resume

One common option is to include any education in progress at the very top of your resume. This can be especially effective if your education is relevant to your desired job or career path. By highlighting your ongoing education right away, you can demonstrate your commitment to learning and professional development.

After Completed Education

Another option is to list any completed education first, followed by any education in progress. This may make the most sense if you’ve already achieved a degree or certification that is relevant to your field. By showing your completed education first, you can establish your qualifications and expertise before highlighting your ongoing education.

In the Professional Development Section

If you have a section on your resume that is specifically dedicated to professional development or continued education, you can include your education in progress there. This can be a great way to demonstrate your commitment to lifelong learning and staying up-to-date in your field.

In Description of Relevant Experience

Finally, if you have relevant experience that is directly tied to your ongoing education, you can mention your education in progress in the description of that experience. For example, if you’re currently pursuing a degree in marketing and you have hands-on experience working on marketing campaigns, you could mention your degree program in the bullet points describing your marketing experience. This can help to demonstrate how your education and experience are working together to make you a strong candidate for the job.

There is no one “right” way to list education in progress on your resume – you’ll need to consider your own background and goals in order to determine the best approach for you. By thinking carefully about where to include your education in progress, however, you can create a resume that showcases your skills, knowledge, and dedication to personal and professional growth.

How to Format Education in Progress

When you’re still in the process of completing your education, it’s important to format it correctly on your resume. Here are some key elements to include:

Name of the Program or Degree

Clearly state the name of the program or degree you’re pursuing. This will help recruiters and hiring managers understand your area of focus and level of expertise.

Institution or Provider

Include the name of the institution or provider where you are pursuing your education. This can help give insight into the rigor and quality of the program you’re taking.

Expected Completion Date

Indicate when you expect to complete your program or degree. This can be helpful for recruiters and hiring managers who are trying to assess your availability and qualifications.

Relevant Coursework and Projects

Highlight any relevant coursework or projects you’ve completed that relate to the field you’re pursuing. This can demonstrate not only your knowledge but also your initiative and ingenuity.

GPA or Grade Point Average

Include your GPA or grade point average if it is reasonably high. This can indicate that you’ve maintained good academic standing and that you are serious about your education.

Education in progress can be a valuable asset to include on your resume. By following these key formatting guidelines, you can help ensure that potential employers understand your qualifications and accomplishments in the best light possible.

How to Highlight Education in Progress in Your Work Experience

If you’re currently pursuing a degree or additional education while working, it’s important to showcase this ongoing education in your work experience section of your resume. Here are some techniques to effectively highlight your education in progress:

Including ongoing education in job titles

One way to display your education in progress is by adding it in your job titles. For example, if you’re currently pursuing a Masters in Marketing, you could list your job title as “Marketing Coordinator (Masters in Marketing in Progress)”. This will grab the employer’s attention and showcase your eagerness for continued learning and professional development.

Listing completed coursework in job descriptions

If you’re in the midst of completing your education, it can be helpful to list relevant coursework in your job descriptions. This not only highlights your education in progress, but it also demonstrates your knowledge and skills gained through your courses. For instance, if you’re applying for a job in finance and have completed several finance courses, mention them in your job description to show your expertise in that area.

Highlighting relevant projects

Finally, you can highlight your education in progress by showcasing relevant projects you’ve worked on that directly relate to your ongoing education. Choose projects that demonstrate the skills and knowledge you’ve gained through your coursework. Include a brief description of the project, your role, and how it showcases your education in progress.

By implementing these techniques, you can effectively highlight your education in progress in your work experience section of your resume. This not only shows your eagerness for continued learning, but also demonstrates to potential employers that you have value to bring to their organization.

Example of Listing Education in Progress

When it comes to your resume, it’s important to showcase your ongoing learning and development. Listing education in progress can demonstrate your dedication to self-improvement and an eagerness to stay up-to-date in your field. Here are some examples of how to list different types of education in progress on your resume.

Traditional Degrees in Progress

If you’re currently working towards a traditional degree, such as a bachelor’s or master’s, you can list it on your resume in a few different ways. One option is to simply include the degree program and expected graduation date under your education section. For example:

Bachelor of Science in Marketing, XYZ University   Expected Graduation: May 2022

Alternatively, you can include any relevant coursework or special projects you’ve completed within the degree program, as well as any notable achievements. Here’s an example:

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, ABC University

  • Relevant coursework: Data Structures and Algorithms, Operating Systems, Database Systems
  • Special project: Developed a chatbot using Python and TensorFlow
  • Dean’s List (GPA above 3.5)

Online Courses and Certifications in Progress

With the rise of online learning, many people are pursuing courses and certifications outside of traditional degree programs. If you’re currently taking an online course or working towards a certification, you can list it on your resume like this:

Google Analytics Certification, Google   In progress

Make sure to include the name of the course or certification, the organization offering it, and the fact that it’s in progress. If you’ve already completed some coursework or modules, you can mention that as well.

Boot Camp Programs in Progress

Boot camps are intensive programs that provide hands-on training in specific skills, such as coding, UX design, or digital marketing. If you’re currently enrolled in a boot camp program, you can list it on your resume like this:

Full Stack Web Development Boot Camp, Coding School   Expected Completion: December 2021

Be sure to include the name of the program, the organization offering it, and the expected completion date.

Apprenticeships and Internships in Progress

If you’re gaining on-the-job experience through an apprenticeship or internship, you can list it on your resume to showcase your practical skills and industry-specific knowledge. Here’s an example:

Marketing Intern, Company X   Expected Completion: August 2021

Include the title of your role, the company you’re interning with, and the expected completion date. You can also mention any specific projects or tasks you’ve worked on during your internship.

Listing education in progress on your resume can demonstrate your commitment to ongoing learning and development. Whether you’re pursuing a traditional degree, online certification, boot camp program, or on-the-job training, make sure to highlight your education and experience in a way that showcases your skills and expertise.

How Education in Progress Enhances Your Skills

Continuous learning is essential in today’s fast-paced world. It is not enough to have a degree, as the skills and knowledge required in most professions are constantly evolving. Therefore, it is paramount for individuals to seek out and take advantage of educational opportunities throughout their careers.

Acquiring new skills and knowledge through education in progress demonstrates initiative, curiosity, and resilience, all of which are highly valued by employers. Learning a new skill or gaining knowledge in a particular area shows that you are investing in yourself and your career development, making you a more valuable asset to any company.

Moreover, education in progress highlights your dedication and commitment to a specific field or profession. It is evidence of your willingness to take responsibility for your professional development and, in turn, demonstrates your motivation to succeed in your chosen career.

Education in progress enhances your skills by keeping you up to date with the latest industry trends and advancements. It also shows that you are constantly seeking to improve and learn, which can only be a benefit to you and any company you work for. Demonstrating motivation and commitment is crucial when looking for employment or career advancement, and education in progress is an excellent way to showcase these traits.

Listing your education in progress on your resume is a simple yet effective way to demonstrate your commitment to professional development and increase your employability. By continuing to learn and develop your skills, you increase your value to employers and set yourself up for long-term career success.

Tips for Presenting Education in Progress on Your Resume

When it comes to listing education in progress on your resume, there are a few key tips to keep in mind. By following these guidelines, you can ensure that your education section sets you up for success and highlights your achievements and progress:

Emphasize achievements and progress:  Rather than simply listing the courses you are currently taking, focus on the accomplishments and progress you’ve made thus far. This could include stellar grades, completed projects, or any other noteworthy achievements.

Avoid exaggeration and misrepresentation:  While you want to highlight your accomplishments, it’s important to be truthful and avoid exaggerating or misrepresenting your education. This includes being honest about the courses you’ve taken and the grades you’ve earned.

Tailor the presentation to the position and industry:  Depending on the position and industry you’re applying to, the way you present your education in progress may differ. For example, if you’re applying to a job in a highly technical field, you may want to include more specific details about the coursework you’ve completed. On the other hand, if you’re applying to a job in a more creative field, you may want to focus on the projects you’ve completed or the skills you’ve developed.

The key to presenting education in progress on your resume is to focus on your achievements and progress, while also being truthful and tailoring your presentation to the position and industry you’re applying to. By following these tips, you can create a compelling education section that helps you stand out from the competition.

Common Mistakes When Listing Education in Progress

When including ongoing education in your resume, there are some common mistakes to avoid. Here are three of the most significant:

1. Listing Too Many Programs

While it’s great to have a broad range of skills, listing too many ongoing education programs can give the impression that you’re indecisive or jack-of-all-trades. Instead of overwhelming your potential employer with many programs, focus on the ones that are the most relevant to the job or industry you’re applying for.

2. Disregarding Previous Education

Just because you’re still working on obtaining further education doesn’t mean that previous education has lost its value. It’s important to highlight previous educational experiences in your resume and show how they have prepared you for your current education.

3. Overemphasizing Ongoing Education

Of course, ongoing education is essential, but overemphasizing it can make it look like you don’t have any real-world job experience. Instead, find a balance between emphasizing your ongoing education while also drawing attention to your job experience.

By avoiding these common mistakes, your resume will showcase the value that your ongoing education brings to the table without losing sight of your previous experience.

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  • Career Development

How to List Education in Progress on Your Resume (+ Examples)

Marsha Hebert, professional resume writer

10 min read

A man sitting outside in front of some windows using his Apple laptop.

Are you unsure about how to list your in-progress education on your resume? Many people are, including current students, students taking online classes, and people taking a break from their degree programs.

Is it acceptable to include unfinished degrees on a resume?

ZipJob’s career experts agree that education in progress should usually be included on a resume. A degree in progress is still important to employers, as well as a degree that was started and holds relevance to a position. However, it needs to be included in an honest way so it’s an accurate reflection of your learning and accomplishments.

If you’re currently pursuing a degree, here is how you can list education in progress on your resume – plus some examples for you to use as templates on your own resume.

Key Takeaway

KEY TAKEAWAY: Are you working on a degree and want to tell prospective employers about your efforts? These tips can help you to list your in-progress education on your resume.

How to list education in progress on a resume

There are two things you need to learn if you want to know how to list education in progress on your resume. The first is how to provide that information in a way that clearly conveys your education status to an employer. The second is where to place that information in the body of your resume. With respect to the how, there are a few different ways to convey these details. There are only a couple of basic rules to follow when you list these education details:

Be as clear as possible. You don’t want to give the employer the wrong impression, after all. If you have completed one degree and are pursuing advanced education, be sure to clearly state that fact. If your degree is not yet complete, be clear about that as well.

Be honest. If you are in the process of withdrawing from school, don’t list that educational program. Don’t try to enhance your education section in any way. Just state the facts in an honest way.

Feel free to include in-progress university degrees , as well as online degrees that you may be pursuing. Both are popular in 2023/2024.

Resume degree in progress examples

When you include details indicating that you’re currently pursuing a degree on your resume, it’s important to provide clarity. The last thing you want is to inadvertently leave the impression that you’re trying to pretend like you’ve completed the degree. And while it might be tempting to just note that the degree is still a work-in-progress, we believe that you should be even more specific. The best way to do that is to include the anticipated graduation date.

Now, if you’re like many students, you may not be entirely sure that you’ll complete your degree by a set date. However, that shouldn’t stop you from providing an anticipated date of completion. In fact, it’s essential that you provide this information so that employers know that you’re serious about your studies. This is especially true in cases where the job you’re seeking requires that degree. Fortunately, it’s a relatively easy task to accomplish.

We wrote a good post here on how to include an MBA on a resume.

For example, check out this listing from a sample resume with a master’s degree in progress:

Master of Business Administration (MBA), Human Resources Program

Dynamic University, Anytown, AnyState. Expected completion 2025

If you’re closer to graduation and are more certain about the date, you can use something like this:

Graduate Studies, Computer Engineering

XYZ University, MyCity, MyState, Graduation Date: Spring, 2024

What if I don't expect to finish the degree?

If you are taking a break from your education (or a permanent hiatus) you need to consider whether or not the coursework you did complete is relevant. Ask yourself:

Is this degree related to the job I'm applying for?

Is this degree more relevant to the job than my other relevant experience including jobs, volunteer work, or certifications?

Is this in-progress degree recent enough? (Can I still remember what I learned? Has a lot changed in the industry since I learned it?)

Is having a degree required for this job?

While you should never lie about having a degree you don't have, including any progress made toward a required degree may help you reach the interview stage. The trick is you have to be qualified for the job in every other aspect. If you don't have an MBA, but you do have 10+ years in the business field, you may still have a shot at landing the interview.

To accurately represent this on your resume, don't include a prospective graduation date. Instead, try including the number of credits and the years you attended.

University of California, Riverside (2019 to 2021) | Riverside, CA

36 units toward a Bachelor of Arts in Media and Cultural Studies

EXPERT TIP: View 200+ more professional resume samples for all industries, along with a guide to writing resumes from our career experts.

Should I include other information about my degree?

You may want to consider whether you should list relevant coursework and major projects on your resume. In general, work experience is more compelling than education, but either way, adding classes that you’ve taken or capstone-type projects can elevate your resume with more relevant keywords.

Relevant coursework

Adding relevant coursework to the education section of your resume can be a great idea, especially if you lack the professional experience needed to set you apart from other job seekers. The great thing about adding coursework is that you can include it whether you’ve finished your degree or not. Here’s what it would look like:

Bachelor of Arts in Media and Cultural Studies | University of Chicago (GPA: 3.89) 

Relevant Coursework: Media Technology, Games Culture, Intercultural Communication, Web Design, Advanced Video Production, Multimedia Performance, and Strategic Social Media

Adding coursework isn’t a place to dump every class you took pursuing your degree. Rather, it’s a place to inject relevant keywords into your resume. So, if the job description calls for someone with experience in video production and you haven’t had a job that allowed you access to that but you did take a class in college, then you can add it to your Education section. 

Related read: Relevant Coursework on a Resume: Good or Bad?

Capstone or other major projects

Similar to adding coursework, you can talk about projects you’ve worked on. Remember that relevancy is critical. You should always be thinking about how your experience and education relate to what the prospective employer is looking for in a new hire. If you need to add something else on your resume that helps you demonstrate skills or knowledge, a project from school can be just the ticket. Write the project details in your Education section in the same way you’d write a job role – meaning, use bullet points to call attention to things you achieved as you worked on the project. Here’s what that looks like:

Notable project: Project title

Describe the project and goals along with how many team members were involved

Talk about what you did – your role – to achieve the project goals

Mention the skills you gained – “Honed skills in [skill 1], [skill 2], and [skill 3]

If you won an award or earned some recognition for a project well done, write about it

Where to place education in progress on your resume

The second issue you need to address is placement. Where should you place these details when you’re trying to figure out how to list education in progress on a resume? There are two main possibilities, depending upon whether the degree is needed for the job you’re seeking.

If the job requirements include the degree that you’re pursuing, then you should try to emphasize that information in your resume. Position it near the beginning of your resume, after the summary section. That way, the employer will see that you’re close to completing that requirement before he or she delves any further into the document. This placement helps showcase your interest and suitability right away.

On the other hand, you should place this detail later in the resume if the degree isn’t needed for the position. In that instance, you can put your work history and skills higher up in the resume and leave your education for the end.

Tie it all together in your cover letter

Don’t forget about the power of your cover letter . Since your cover letter is meant to complement your resume, a degree in progress could give you another opportunity to sell the point that you are qualified for the role. Talking about education in progress or unfinished education in your cover letter can also allow you to explain any gaps on your resume that are related to pursuing education. 

Gaps can happen if you decide to go to school, and then change your mind. If you didn’t work while you were in school, then you’ll have a gap. It’s not something to fret about, gaps happen all the time. You just have to be ready to explain why it exists and being able to tell a story about how you were actively working to improve your qualifications and skills can go a long way in showing future employers your dedication to continuous improvement. 

As always, whether you bring up unfinished education in your cover letter depends on whether it’s relevant to the job you’re applying to. If it doesn’t add value to your job application, then leave it off. 

Here are some example statements you can use when mentioning a resume degree in progress on your cover letter:

I am currently pursuing a degree in [field or industry] to enhance my skills in [skill 1], [skill 2], and [skill 3].

While my education journey is still ongoing, I’m excited to apply the knowledge I’ve gained to the [position name] role.

I am actively working toward completing my [degree name] to meet the educational requirements for this position.

A final note: grade point average

We should also address another common question that we encounter: do you need to include your grade point average ? There are different schools of thought on this, so it’s really up to you. As a rule, however, most experts agree that it’s generally unwise to include anything less than the best GPAs. That typically means leaving it out unless it’s at least 3.5. In most instances, however, you won’t need to include that detail unless the job description requires a certain grade point average or you’re seeking a job at a major firm.

For your resume, a degree in progress is one more tool for success!

As you can see, it is not difficult to enhance your resume with a degree in progress. Yes, you need to know the right format to use, and where to list that information. Still, it is a relatively simple thing to handle if you stick to the basic principles we’ve outlined here. So, be sure to include those educational details, to showcase your developing skills and help you stand out from the crowd!

Recommended reading:

7 Free Certifications To Enhance Your Resume

How to List Online Courses on a Resume (Examples and Tips)

200+ Resume Examples for Every Job & Industry

Marsha Hebert, Professional Resume Writer

Marsha is a resume writer with a strong background in marketing and writing. After completing a Business Marketing degree, she discovered that she could combine her passion for writing with a natural talent for marketing. For more than 10 years, Marsha has helped companies and individuals market themselves. Read more advice from Marsha on ZipJob's blog .

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Education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world.

Mandela has left us with a compelling line that no one in the 21st century can ignore.

Currently, every student is concerned about getting a higher-level education to get a pleasant job and live a prosperous life.

Every year nearly 2 million students get a bachelor’s degree in the United States . So, how can you present yourself better than others in this competitive market?

You must showcase your education on resume elegantly to beat your competitors during the recruitment process.

We are helping you make that happen by answering these below-given queries:

  • Should I put my GPA on my resume?
  • How to list education on resume?
  • How to list minors on a resume?
  • When to include coursework on resume?
  • Should you include high school on a resume?
  • How to list education in progress on a resume?

How to List Education on a Resume?

Crafting your resume education section can be tricky. However, you can follow the tips below to frame an impressive education section on your resume.

The two possible places for your resume education section can be:

  • Before your work experience section
  • After your work experience section

Education on a Resume Before Your Work Experience Section

You should put your resume education section before your work experience section in the following cases:

Just graduated :

  • You can consider putting your resume education section before your work experience if you just graduated from high school or college.
  • It helps you build a good resume because you will have more educational background than work experience.

Starting a new education :

  • If you were a professional and recently planned to get a new degree, it is advisable to put your resume education section first.
  • Your new degree should be relevant to the job description.

An academic resume :

  • Your resume education section should be positioned above the work experience for a fresher or academic resume.
  • For academic posts/ fellowships, education matters more than the outside work experience.

Education on a Resume After Your Work Experience Section

You should put your resume education section after your work experience section in the following cases:

Seasoned professional :

  • As a seasoned professional, you should put your resume education before your work experience section.
  • Employers find your educational experience more relevant throughout your career.

High school graduate/fresher :

  • If you are a fresher or high school graduate, you can place your resume education before your work experience section. Employers will look for your educational experience in your career.

How to List Education on a Resume: Educational Information

Choosing the correct resume education template is the first step you must take while building your resume.

You can follow the tips below to write an effective resume education section:

  • Put your highest degree first.
  • Follow reverse-chronological order for other degrees.

If you are a distinguished professional with tons of experience, it is not recommended to add your high school information.

The information that must add to your resume education section is:

  • Degree you received
  • Major/minor
  • Institution Name
  • Location of your institution (Area, Country)
  • Graduation Year

Following are the resume education examples:

  • BA in English LiteratureCambridge University | Cambridge, US | 20173.8 CGPA
  • Stanford University | Chicago, US | 2013Masters in Computer Science4.0 GPA

In case you're lost, here is a quick resume education checklist:

  • Spell out your degree as “Master of Science” or use the initials “MSc.”
  • Use periods to separate the initials "B.A." or leave them like "BA."
  • Write the name of your major as “MA in Business Administration” or separate your degree with a comma from your major as “MA, Business Administration.”
  • Arrange the information based on importance. If your degree is not directly related to the job description, focus on the university rather than the course.
  • Make sure your format remains consistent for all your resume education section entries.

How to List Education on Resume for High School Students

High school students should place the resume education section at the beginning of their resume.

No Work Experience

For a high school resume with no work experience, you can list the following parameters:

  • GPA (if above 3.0)
  • Relevant Courses (Courses that are related to the job profile)
  • Honors/Academic Achievements
  • Clubs/Organizations (Extracurricular activities)
  • Positions of Responsibility

You can highlight the essential steps in your academic career by creating a “Major Achievements” section. It gives a detailed look at your skills and abilities.

You can include volunteer work also. It presents you as an active person. You appear as someone who learns quickly and manages a job efficiently.

Also Read: How to create a resume for your first job?

Some Work Experience

If you have actual work experience, you can keep the education section concise.

Having work experience means you have hands-on experience in your working area, which keeps more importance than any other theoretical knowledge.

Hence, if you have work experience, you can focus on detailing that in your resume rather than the education section.

How to List Education on Resume for College Students

  • As a college student or recent graduate, place your resume education section at the beginning of your resume.

The length of your resume section depends on the amount of work experience you have

For the lack of work experience, make your resume education stand out, follow the following steps:

  • Convey your organization skills, charisma, interpersonal ability, and active lifestyle
  • Include your activities like clubs, major group projects, or your participation outside of academic life

If you already have work experience, focus on it more than the resume education section. It shows that you are familiar with the pressures and expectations of the professional world.

  • Keep your resume education section to a minimum
  • Feel free to list your activities, but emphasize your work experience

How to List Education on Resume for Working Professionals

If you are a working professional, your resume education section is just evidence of your degrees.

  • You should place your resume education section below the Professional Experience section
  • Be straightforward, do not include unnecessary details
  • State your educational degree with your field of study and best achievements
  • Try to avoid positions of responsibility, awards, recognitions
  • Try to include a vast skill set, list your training, certifications

How to List Education on a Resume: Special Cases

What if you fall into the category of professionals who bore the brunt of misfortune for reasons beyond their control?

You don't have to worry. Here's a list of what you can do:

How to List Education on Resume for a Degree in Progress

If you are still in high school/or pursuing a degree, write:

Expected to graduate in 2022

You can use the following phrases to describe your education in high school resume:

  • In progress
  • Expected + year
  • Expected Graduation + year
  • To be completed + year

How to List Education on a Resume for an Unfinished Degree

  • If you did not graduate high school, write the name of your school and the years you attended as Attended school from 2013-15
  • If you did not finish a college or university level degree, write the credits you managed to get as Completed 63 credits toward MA in Physics

Awards, publications, and training

  • If you want to show off your skills and achievements, add honors, awards, training, certifications, licenses, extracurricular activities you did during high school.
  • Pick activities that illustrate the keyword skills listed
  • Mention all the honors programs like graduated with Spanish honors (summa cum laude or magna cum laude), if any
  • Acceptance into campus, national, or international honors societies
  • List your publications under your degree
  • Include a coursework description and add relevant classes to the job profile.
  • A course of study that has a particular skillset
  • List your recent extracurricular roles/ positions of responsibility
  • Avoid adding controversial activities (political or religious)

Highlighting Soft Skills

If you have specific soft skills, you can add them to your resume education section.

Mention your participation in any activity that highlights these skills.

Following is the list of skills employers prefer on a high school resume:

  • Ability to Work on a Team
  • Communication Skills (Written + Verbal)
  • Problem-solving Skills

Optimizing Resume Education for an ATS

Many companies have started using the Applicant Tracking Systems. This software helps an organization filter out undesirable applicants. This program goes through resumes and looks for keywords specific to the job profile.

If you want your resume to make it past an ATS, you need to keep in mind the following things:

  • Use a clean format
  • Ensure that this program can read your full resume
  • Minimize the use of tables, graphs, or pictures
  • Use keywords relevant to your job profile
Also Read: What are resume action words and power verbs?

Education Resume Template

A well-written education should follow this order:

education-resume-template

Let's say that this is your educational background:

  • Degree: Bachelor of Science in Electrical Science
  • University: Harvard University
  • Location of University: Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Graduation year: 2022

In addition to this information, you can also put this add-on information to make your education section more meaningful:

  • Relevant Coursework : Business Communication, Systems, and Circuits Designing, English Language Studies, Analog, and Digital Designing, Embedded Systems
  • Extracurricular Activities : Captain of the Tennis Team

When you incorporate all that information in your resume, it looks something like this:

optimized-resume-education-section

Dos and Don’ts while listing Education on Resume

You can practice and avoid the below-given points while listing education on resume for your next job search:

my-visual_53399800

Resume Education FAQ

1. Should I put my GPA on my resume?

You should put the GPA in your resume if it is >3.5 or if the hiring organization asks for it.

2. How to list education on a resume?

The necessary educational details are:

  • Institution
  • Contribution

3. How to list minors on a resume?

The education on a resume often includes minors if it's relevant to the target job. In that case, you may include it under a sub-header of "Coursework.”

4. When to include coursework on resume?

Include coursework as a part of education on a resume only when:

  • The candidate is a fresher
  • It is required in the target job description
  • It is relevant to the target job

5. Should you include high school on a resume?

Your resume education section can only include high school data when:

  • High-school qualification is relevant
  • To state high-school extracurricular activities/achievements

6. How to list education in progress on the resume?

To list continuing education on a resume, you should:

  • List your education section at the top
  • Write your dates in "Date - Present" format

Key Takeaways

You can keep these points in mind while framing your resume to make it impressive and technically stronger than your competitors:

  • If you already have work experience, focus on it more than the resume education section
  • Put your highest degree first . Follow reverse-chronological order for other degrees.
  • If you are a working professional, your education on a resume is just evidence of your degrees.

Go to Hiration’s 360-Degree Career Platform , which has 24/7 chat support, and get professional assistance with all your job & career-related queries.

You can also write to us at [email protected] .

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what do i put on my resume for education

Should students include a resume for their college application?

Application process.

A resume is a document that lists your experience and qualifications. It is often used when applying for jobs, but it can also be helpful when applying to colleges. Many students wonder if they should include a resume with their college applications.

There are pros and cons to including a resume with your college application. On the one hand, having a resume can give you a leg up on the competition by helping you stand out from other applicants. On the other hand, resumes can be time-consuming to create and may not be necessary for all colleges.

Here are some things to consider when deciding whether or not to include a resume with your college application:

The type of college you are applying to.

  • Some colleges, such as liberal arts schools, may require a resume.
  • Other colleges, such as engineering schools, may not even accept applications that include a resume.

The kind of program you are applying to.

  • Certain programs, such as business or law school, typically require a resume.
  • Other programs, such as art school, may not place as much emphasis on resume.

What should you include in a college resume?

Your resume should list your education, work experience, and any other relevant information. It is important to tailor your resume to the specific program you are applying to. For example, if you are applying to a business school, you would want to highlight your work experience in the business world.

Do you put transfer schools on resume?

If you are transferring from one college to another, you should include both colleges on your resume. This will show that you have both experience and credits from another institution.

What is the difference between a CV and a resume?

A resume is a shorter document that highlights your qualifications and experience. A CV, or curriculum vitae, is a longer document that includes a list of your publications, awards, research experience, and teaching experience. CVs are typically used for academic or research positions.

Our Counselors Answered:

Should students include a resume in their college application.

what do i put on my resume for education

Absolutely! But only when requested as part of the application.

For example, many larger, public institutions base their admission decisions off of a test scores and gpa matrix and, even if one is sent, will not look at a student’s resume because it is not part of their process. However, those same schools may require a resume for scholarship consideration.

But when it is an option or a required aspect of the application, be sure to include a well-crafted resume that will help the admission representative get a full picture of how you choose to spend your time outside of the classroom.

Some schools offer leadership and/or service scholarships in addition to academic awards and they consider your credentials for these awards based on the information presented in your resume.

what do i put on my resume for education

Though some schools do ask for students to include a resume, this is generally unnecessary. The items that you would include on a resume (club memberships, work experience, awards, etc.) are all things that are already being asked of you on your application. Though a resume does streamline this information, some admission officers may just bypass your resume as an additional piece of paper with repetitive information.

what do i put on my resume for education

If the application allows for a resume to be submitted, then yes include it. It is more than likely that you have included all this information in the body of your application so if there is an option to upload a resume than do so however, if not, then it is best that you not include another document. The college admissions counselors have an abundance of paperwork they receive on thousands of other applicants…following directions is important.

what do i put on my resume for education

Yes, and it better be more than 1 page, or you surely haven’t accomplished much. Don’t include one if the school forbids it, otherwise, talk to some admissions experts in advance to see if your resume has all the right stuff.

what do i put on my resume for education

Absolutely Yes! Including a resume in your college application is advantageous for two reasons. First, a resume serve as a great summary of your leadership examples and achievements in and outside of the classroom. Instead of provide a list of extracurricular activities, achievements, and leadership roles, you should provide the admission team with a story through your resume. Second, a resume can be an useful tool to elaborate on experiences not mentioned in other places in your application. Overall, a resume is helpful as a quick summary of who you are as a person, a student, and a leader.

what do i put on my resume for education

The reason to include a resume is if you have information that cannot be conveyed through the designated spaces on the Common Application. If you are able to tell admissions officers what they need to know with just the Common App, don’t bother. But if you have more to say than what fits, use a resume.

what do i put on my resume for education

A resume can be a valuable addition to an application for some of the smaller liberal arts colleges. You will find that some ask for them within their application materials, while others will accept them in a separate mailing. Once you have a well composed resume, contact the admissions office and ask them about their receptivity to such an item. Larger campuses may not have the time or simply the space to store such an item.

If a school has indicated that they they welcome a resume, then by all means provide one. Some schools prefer to manage with the categories and blanks provided in their application. It never hurts to create a resume at this point in your career. You may need it to share with the person you are asking for a recommendation. You may need it for a scholarship application. Once you’ve created a template, it will be easy to continue to update over the years. You will be so happy when you really need one down the road.

what do i put on my resume for education

If you honestly feel that the common app spaces for extracurricular activities as well as the essays do not allow you to describe your extracurricular activities in enough depth, then you can add a resume or at least expand on some of your extracurricular activities in the additional info section. In addition, if you have a particular expertise, for example in performing arts, then you could add a resume highlighting your accomplishments and training in that particular field. However, what you don’t want to do is just regurgitate the common app answers without adding more substance, because the admissions office might think that shows poor judgment.

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How to Write a Nursing Resume (With Expert Advice!)

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Putting together a nursing resume can be tough—it's a competitive field, and you need to make your skills and qualifications stand out from the crowd. While some elements are consistent across the board (e.g. having your name, contact info, and education listed, for instance), it’s easy to underestimate the power of nuance and individuality in resume writing .

Below, we’ve outlined how to create (and update) an effective nursing resume, thanks to expertise from Nursing Professional Development & Education Specialist, Damion K. Jenkins, MSN, RN .

Get your amazing resume out there—apply now to these amazing nurse jobs on The Muse »

How to write a nursing resume in 5 steps

When crafting a nursing resume, Jenkins emphasizes the importance of following a structured approach to ensure that yours makes an impression with the hiring manager. Above all, you want your resume to be organized, easy to read, and succinct.

Step 1: Start with a strong summary statement

“Begin with a strong summary that highlights your qualifications and career goals,” Jenkins says. “Make sure to use keywords from the job description and qualifications required.” (Here's how to read a job description the right way .)

Your summary statement will speak to your past, present, and future as a nurse, while also making it easy for a recruiter to draw clear connections between your professional life and the job in question.

Need specific ideas? Read this next: 20 Resume Summary Examples to Make Writing Your Own Easier

Step 2: Include non-negotiable sections

Next, make sure you’ve accounted for the non-negotiable sections that every nursing resume needs. According to Jenkins, these include: your contact information, a professional summary of your achievements, your nursing education, licensure and certifications, clinical experience, and relevant role-specific skills.

On top of that, list any professional affiliations, volunteer work, and professional references. Together, these sections will make up the bulk of your resume.

Step 3: Highlight your most valuable skills

A good nursing resume includes hard and soft skills , both of which are necessary for patient care. Jenkins suggests highlighting specific clinical and interpersonal skills that are considered very valuable in the nursing world, including patient assessment, medication administration, wound care, critical thinking, conflict resolution, customer service, and effective communication.

Certifications like BLS, ACLS, PALS, or a specialty-specific certification should also be prominently featured.

Step 4: Do a thorough check for mistakes

As a nurse career coach and mentor, Jenkins has come face-to-face with countless nursing resume mistakes. To make your resume shine, he urges you to check their resumes for the following:

  • Grammatical errors and typos
  • An unprofessional email address (e.g. anything besides your first and last name, with a number, if necessary)
  • Irrelevant information that doesn’t pertain to the role
  • Dense blocks of text

Using this list to clean up your resume will improve your chances of getting noticed during your job search . Consider this your list of “don’t dos.”

Step 5: Follow nursing resume best practices

In terms of what you should do, Jenkins endorses the use of bullet points for better readability (vs. long text blocks), using keywords from the job description to help your resume pass through application tracking systems (ATS) , tailoring your resume for each job application, and proofreading vigorously.

Your nursing resume format should be clean and professional, and up to date with any new skills, certifications and experiences.

“Remember, keeping your resume concise and relevant matters,” he says. “If you are including a detailed summary about the dog-sitting job you had as a teenager for a charge nurse position, chances are that your resume won’t make it through the initial screening process.”

Nursing resumes FAQs

How often should you update your nursing resume.

Nurses should update their resume at least every six months, or immediately after acquiring a new skill, certification, or job experience. “Regular updates ensure that your resume is always current and ready for new opportunities, reflecting your most recent and relevant qualifications,” Jenkins says.

How should nurses describe their nursing experience and clinical skills?

To make your experience and clinical skills stand out, use action verbs and quantify your achievements , says Jenkins.

For example, a solid resume bullet point could be:

Provided care for a 30-bed unit, reducing patient falls by 20% through the

implementation of a new safety protocol and interprofessional collaboration with hourly rounding.

“Highlight specific clinical skills and procedures you’re proficient in, and showcase any leadership roles or special projects you’ve undertaken,” he says. “Be proud of your positive outcomes, and include stories that highlight how you’ve grown professionally through some failures and unanticipated setbacks. Hiring managers don’t want robots—they want to know that they have people who are resilient and willing to adapt to the needs of the organization.”

What are the essentials for a new grad nurse resume, versus a nursing student or experienced nurse resume?

For a new grad nurse…

  • Emphasize your clinical rotations, relevant coursework, and any nursing-related internships or volunteer work. Include a strong objective statement tailored to the role you’re applying for

For a nursing student resume…

  • Focus on your education, clinical placements, and any healthcare-related work experience.

And for an experienced nurse…

  • Prioritize your professional experience, listing roles in reverse chronological order (most recent experience first) with detailed descriptions of your responsibilities and achievements.

How should a nursing assistant, travel nurse, or nurse practitioner tailor their resume?

Per Jenkins’ advice, a nursing assistant resume should…

  • Highlight your direct patient care experience and any specialized skills like phlebotomy or EKG administration, as well as team work, interdisciplinary collaboration and ability to follow instructions & escalation of abnormal findings.

A travel nurse resume should…

  • Emphasize your adaptability, diverse clinical experiences, and ability to quickly integrate into new teams.

And a nurse practitioner resume should…

  • Detail your advanced practice skills, patient caseload, and any specialized areas of practice, as well as leadership or teaching roles.

What are the essentials for a critical care nurse or emergency room nurse resume?

As for critical care nurses and ER nurses, Jenkins recommends emphasizing your ability to handle high-stress environments, proficiency in advanced life support, and experience with critical interventions such as intubation and other bedside emergency procedures.

Be sure to mention the diverse populations you’ve worked with, such as pediatric or trauma patients, and highlight your experience with critical care monitoring equipment and protocols.

What about nurses re-entering the workforce or changing specialties?

“For nurses re-entering the workforce or changing specialties, consider taking refresher courses or obtaining new certifications relevant to your desired role,” Jenkins says. “Note any continuing education or recent volunteer work to demonstrate your commitment to maintaining your skills. Finally, tailor your resume to showcase transferable skills and experiences that are applicable to the new specialty.”

Resume writing doesn’t come naturally to everyone, but you can still put together a standout nursing resume by using this guide. Good luck out there!

Once you get that interview, read this: 16 Nursing Interview Questions You Might Get Asked (and How to Answer Them)

what do i put on my resume for education

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  1. How to List Education on Resume in 2024 [Tips & Examples]

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  3. 12 Amazing Education Resume Examples

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  6. 12 Amazing Education Resume Examples

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COMMENTS

  1. How To List Education on a Resume (With Examples)

    Listing your education on a resume should be strategic and concise. It's essential to highlight the most relevant and recent educational experiences that align with the job requirements. Focus on providing key details such as the degree earned, institution name and graduation year. Emphasize any honors, scholarships or academic achievements ...

  2. How to List Education on a Resume in 2024 (With Examples & Tips)

    In general, there is some basic information that should be included within the education section of a resume: The name of the school — "e.g. Georgia Institute of Technology". The location of the school. Your degree ( high-school diploma, GED, associate's degree, bachelor's degree, etc.)

  3. How to List Education on Your Resume (with Examples)

    University, college, or institution. Add some context to your education by listing the university, college, or institution where you went to school. This is especially important if you attended a well-respected program in your field, because it will make you seem all the more impressive. 4. Years attended.

  4. How to List Education on Your Resume [Examples 2024]

    In terms of a layout, a resume's education section includes: Name of the institution. Degree. School location. Date of graduation. GPA (only when over 3.0) When wondering how to list education on resume: Start with your highest qualification and work your way back in reverse-chronological order.

  5. How to List Education on a Resume in 2024 + Examples

    Overall, the process of listing your education is always the same. You'll list each school you attended in reverse-chronological (most recent first) order. You need these details in each entry: The degree or certificate earned. Name of the school that you attended. The city/state location of the school.

  6. Resume Education Section Writing Guide and Examples

    Here's an example of a resume with the education section featured near the top: If you have more than a couple of years of relevant work experience, list your education below your work experience section. For most jobs, your education is less relevant to your ability to do the job than your hands-on work experience.

  7. How to List Education on a Resume [+ Examples]

    Let's start with the basics— what to include in your resume education section: Your most recent degree (or education in progress) The name of your school. Location of your school. Dates attended and graduation date (or expected graduation date) Your GPA (only if it's above 3.5) Your field of study and degree major.

  8. How to List Education on Your Resume (2024 Examples)

    There are specific details a hiring manager is looking for in your educational section that include: Your most recent degree, or education in progress. The name of the school. The location of the school. Your field of study or degree major. Graduation year or expected graduation date. Your GPA, if above 3.5.

  9. How to List Education on a Resume [13+ Real-Life Examples]

    Use a (Free) Resume Template 16 Examples of Education on a Resume #1. High School Education #2. General Education Development #3. Associate Degree #4. Certificates #5. Undergraduate Degree #6. Graduate and Postgraduate Degrees #7. Unfinished Education FAQs Key Takeaways. Share this article.

  10. How to List Your Education on a Resume (+Best Format Examples)

    1. High School. How to add your high school education to your resume. Below are different resume education examples, depending on where you are in your high school education. Examples for High School. If high school is your highest level of education, list it like this: "Western High School, Baltimore, MD.

  11. How to List Education on a Resume With Examples

    Follow these steps to format education on a resume: First, list school or education provider's name, type of school (if unclear) and location. Second, list the time period that you attended or date that you graduated, making sure it is clear whether this education is completed, ongoing or unfinished.

  12. How to List Education on a Resume: Tips, Examples, and More

    4. Keep your formatting consistent. While there are many different ways to format the contents of your education, consistency between each is key. Once you decide on a format, stick with it for your entire resume. 5. Keep it concise. In many cases, the education section should be one of the shortest on your resume.

  13. How to List Education on a Resume: 30 Examples & Tips

    At the top of the resume: If you are a recent graduate or your education is directly related to the job you are applying for, placing your education section at the top of your resume can help to draw attention to your qualifications.. After your work experience: If you have several years of relevant work experience, placing your education section after your work experience section can help to ...

  14. How to List Education on Resume in 2024 [Tips & Examples]

    Add the degree earned if you completed it. Include the school name, city, and state. List the program or major if the schooling is yet unfinished. Add extras to make the education section soar, such as honors, awards, relevant coursework, and minors. Use a second educational entry if the first one is unfinished.

  15. How to List an Unfinished Degree on a Resume (With Examples)

    Here's an example of how to list an unfinished degree on your resume: SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY - Syracuse, NY. 2017-2019. If you took some courses related to the job, include those under your university information. You can list them by individual courses taken or by number of credits earned in a certain area of study.

  16. How to List Education on a Resume [Examples]

    Here is the best way to list your education on your resume if you are still in college : BA in Economics in Progress. Trinity College, Hartford, CT. Simply mention when you will have your degree. You can use the phrase "in progress," or "anticipated," or "expected.". These terms are interchangeable.

  17. Expert Tips for Listing Education on a Resume

    What to put in the education section of your resume. As a general rule, include the following information when listing education on your resume: Your degree, major and minor (if applicable). The name of the school you attended. The city and state where the school is located. The dates you started and ended each school you attended.

  18. How to list education on a resumé

    You don't need a degree to be able to list education on your resumé. You can list your high school certificate, TAFE qualifications, online courses, professional training and any other certifications you might have. If you've recently graduated high school, then list your school, the years you attended, and any additional achievements or ...

  19. How To List Education On Your Resume (With Examples)

    Here is a guideline of how to list education on a resume: 1. List your professional degrees. The degree is a vital piece of information as it helps recruiters assess if you have the essential qualifications for the role. Start by listing your latest degree. You can either mention the complete name or shorten it. 2.

  20. Education in Progress on Your Resume: How to List it

    Another way to showcase education in progress is to include the phrase "in progress," "anticipated completion date," or "expected graduation date" next to the corresponding certification or degree. These phrases help recruiters understand your current status in your academic journey.

  21. How to List Education on Your Resume

    Put Advanced Degrees First (Usually) Usually, you should lay down your educational background by listing the most recent or advanced degree first, working in reverse chronological order. But there are exceptions. Say you earned a degree in geography, but are now working in the field of online marketing.

  22. How to List Education in Progress on Your Resume (+ Examples)

    On the other hand, you should place this detail later in the resume if the degree isn't needed for the position. In that instance, you can put your work history and skills higher up in the resume and leave your education for the end. Tie it all together in your cover letter. Don't forget about the power of your cover letter. Since your ...

  23. How to List Education on Resume: 2022 Guide with 10+ Tips

    Spell out your degree as "Master of Science" or use the initials "MSc.". Use periods to separate the initials "B.A." or leave them like "BA." Write the name of your major as "MA in Business Administration" or separate your degree with a comma from your major as "MA, Business Administration.".

  24. The 12 Best Skills to Put on Your Resume (Plus Examples)

    5. Critical Thinking. Critical thinking is your ability to find solutions beyond the obvious. Good critical thinkers can get to the "why" behind a problem, anticipate future problems and elevate ...

  25. Should students include a resume for their college application?

    Your resume should list your education, work experience, and any other relevant information. It is important to tailor your resume to the specific program you are applying to. For example, if you are applying to a business school, you would want to highlight your work experience in the business world. Do you put transfer schools on resume?

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    A federal appeals court will allow the Department of Education to proceed with lowering millions of student loan borrowers' monthly payments in July as the Biden administration faces two legal ...

  27. Student Teacher Resume Examples & Templates

    Use action words like implement and facilitate to impact your student teacher resume. Tailor your resume to your target student teacher job. Use keywords from the job description throughout your student teacher resume. Format your student teacher's resume so that it is easy to read by ATS software and human eyes.

  28. Should you include your LinkedIn on your CV? · Resume.io

    Placing your LinkedIn profile URL on your CV is a great way to give the hiring manager more insight into your experience, aspirations, and even your personality. LinkedIn has become the place where professionals go to make connections, share their interests and achievements, and stand out among the myriad of job seekers.

  29. How to Write a Nursing Resume (With Expert Advice!)

    For a nursing student resume… Focus on your education, clinical placements, and any healthcare-related work experience. ... Resume writing doesn't come naturally to everyone, but you can still put together a standout nursing resume by using this guide. Good luck out there! Once you get that interview, read this: ...

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