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United States Patent and Trademark Office - An Agency of the Department of Commerce

Trademark assignments: Transferring ownership or changing your name

Assignment Center

Trademark owners may need to transfer ownership or change the name on their application or registration. This could happen while your trademark application is pending or after your trademark has registered. Use Assignment Center to transfer ownership or to request a change in name. See our how-to guide for trademarks on using Assignment Center.

Here are examples of common reasons:

  • I’ve sold my business and need to transfer ownership of the trademark. This is a transfer of ownership called an assignment.
  • I got married just after I filed my application and my last name changed.  This is a name change of the owner. 

There are fees associated with recording assignments, name changes, and other ownership-type changes with the USPTO. See the Trademark Services Fee Code “8521” on the current fee schedule to find the specific fee amount.

See the correcting the owner name page to learn if you can correct an error in the owner's name that does not require an assignment.

Limitations based on filing basis

Intent-to-use section 1(b) applications.

If you’re transferring ownership to a business successor for the goods or services listed in your identification, you can file your assignment at any time. In all other cases, you must wait until after you file an  Amendment to Allege Use or a Statement of Use before you file your assignment. For more information, see the Trademark Manual of Examining Procedure (TMEP)  section 501.01(a) . 

Madrid Protocol section 66(a) U.S. applications and registrations

All ownership changes involving international registrations must be filed with the International Bureau of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). Follow the guidance on the WIPO website about changing ownership or changing an owner’s or holder’s name. See the  TMEP section 502.02(b) for more information.

How to update ownership information

Submit a request to transfer ownership or change the name.

Use Assignment Center to submit your request to transfer ownership or change the owner name for your U.S. application or registration. You will need to fill out a cover sheet with certain information and may also need to upload supporting documents, depending on the type of change. Also, be prepared to pay the Trademark Services Fee Code “8521” on the current fee schedule .

You'll receive a notice of recordation or non-recordation

In about seven days, look for your notice. If you don’t receive one, contact the Assignment Recordation Branch . The Notice of Non-Recordation will explain the reason your request to record was denied. Here are four common reasons: 

  • A critical piece of information was omitted from the cover sheet. 
  • The document is illegible or not scannable. 
  • The information on the cover sheet and the supporting document do not match. 
  • The assignment was not transferred with the good will of the business. 

USPTO trademark database will be automatically updated after recordation

Once recorded, the trademark database should reflect the new owner information or name change. Check the Trademark Status and Document Retrieval (TSDR) system to see if the owner information has been updated. See below for information about what to do if the database isn’t updated.

What to do if the USPTO trademark database isn’t updated

In some cases, the USPTO will not automatically update the trademark database to show the change in ownership or name. This could happen when the execution date conflicts with a previously recorded document or multiple assignments have the same execution date on the same date. For more information, see TMEP section 504.01 . 

If the trademark database wasn’t updated and your trademark has not published in the Trademark Official Gazette yet, and you need to respond to an outstanding USPTO letter or office action, use the appropriate Response form to request the update of the owner information. If you don’t have a response due, use the Voluntary Amendment form . To do this,

  • Answer “yes” to the question at the beginning of the form that asks if you need to change the owner’s name or entity information.
  • Enter the new name in the “Owner” field in the “Owner Information” section of the form.

Your request to update the owner information will be reviewed by a USPTO employee and entered, if appropriate. To request the owner information be updated manually when your trademark has already published or registered, use the appropriate form listed in the “Checking the USPTO trademark database for assignment/name change” section below.

If you made an error in your Assignment Center cover sheet 

Immediately call the Assignment Recordation Branch to request possible suspension of the recordation. The recordation may be suspended for two days. You’ll be instructed to email the specialist you speak with requesting the cancellation and that a refund be issued. However, if the assignment has already been recorded, your request will be denied. You must then follow the procedures outlined in the TMEP section 503.06 to make any corrections to the assignment.

We strongly recommend filing these changes online using Assignment Center , which will record your changes in less than a week. It is possible to request these changes by paper using the Recordation Form Cover Sheet and mailing the cover sheet, any supporting documentation, and fee to: 

Mail Stop Assignment Recordation Branch Director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office PO Box 1450 Alexandria, VA 22313-1450

If you file by paper, we will record your changes within 20 days of filing. 

Checking the USPTO trademark database for assignment /name change

After you receive a Notice of Recordation, wait one week before checking to see if the owner information has been updated in your application or registration in the trademark database. Follow these instructions:

  • Go to TSDR .
  • Enter the application serial number or registration number.
  • Select the “Status” button.
  • Scroll down to the “Current Owner(s) Information” section. 
  • Check to see that your owner information was updated correctly.

If the owner information hasn’t yet been updated, go to the “Prosecution History” section in TSDR to see the status of the assignment or name change. It can take up to seven days to see an entry in the Prosecution History regarding the assignment. If an entry shows "Ownership records not automatically updated," you will need to submit a TEAS form making the owner or name change manually.

The form you need depends on where your application is in the process.

  • If your trademark has not published in the Trademark Official Gazette yet, use the TEAS Response to Examining Attorney Office Action form or the TEAS Voluntary Amendment form . If you are responding to an outstanding USPTO Office action regarding your application or registration, use the TEAS response form.
  • If your trademark has published but hasn't registered, use the TEAS Post-Publication Amendment form . 
  • If your trademark is registered , use the TEAS Section 7 Request form . A fee is required.

Updating your correspondence information

If your ownership information is automatically updated in TSDR , you must ensure your correspondence information, including any attorney information, is also updated. To update your correspondence or attorney information, use the TEAS Change of Address or Representation (CAR) form . This form cannot be used to change the owner name.

For further information, see TMEP Chapter 500 and look at the frequently asked questions .

Additional information about this page

Deed of Assignment (for Intellectual Property)

a formal legal document used to transfer all rights

In the realm of intellectual property, a Deed of Assignment is a formal legal document used to transfer all rights, title, and interest in intellectual property from the assignor (original owner) to the assignee (new owner). This is crucial for the correct transfer of patents, copyrights, trademarks, and other IP rights. The deed typically requires specific legal formalities, sometimes notarization, to ensure it is legally enforceable.

To be legally effective a deed of assignment must contain:

  • Title of the Document : It should clearly be labeled as a "Deed of Assignment" to identify the nature of the document.
  • Date : The date on which the deed is executed should be clearly mentioned.
  • Parties Involved : Full names and addresses of both the assignor (the party transferring the rights) and the assignee (the party receiving the rights). This identifies the parties to the agreement.
  • Recitals : This section provides the background of the transaction. It typically includes details about the ownership of the assignor and the intention behind the assignment.
  • Definition and Interpretation : Any terms used within the deed that have specific meanings should be clearly defined in this section.
  • Description of the Property or Rights : A detailed description of the property or rights being assigned. For intellectual property, this would include details like patent numbers, trademark registrations , or descriptions of the copyrighted material.
  • Terms of Assignment : This should include the extent of the rights being transferred, any conditions or limitations on the assignment, and any obligations the assignor or assignee must fulfill as part of the agreement.
  • Warranties and Representations : The assignor typically makes certain warranties regarding their ownership of the property and the absence of encumbrances or third-party claims against it.
  • Governing Law : The deed should specify which jurisdiction's laws govern the interpretation and enforcement of the agreement.
  • Execution and Witnesses : The deed must be signed by both parties, and depending on jurisdictional requirements, it may also need to be witnessed and possibly notarized.
  • Schedules or Annexures : If there are detailed lists or descriptions (like a list of patent numbers or property descriptions), these are often attached as schedules to the main body of the deed.

Letter of Assignment (for Trademarks and Patents)

Letter of Assignment

This is a less formal document compared to the Deed of Assignment and is often used to record the assignment of rights or licensing of intellectual property on a temporary or limited basis. While it can outline the terms of the assignment, it may not be sufficient for the full transfer of legal title of IP rights. It's more commonly used in situations like assigning the rights to use a copyrighted work or a trademark license.

For example, company X allows company Y to use their trademark for specific products in a specific country for a specific period.  

At the same time, company X can use a Letter of Assignment to transfer a trademark to someone. In this case, it will be similar to the Deed of Assignment. 

Intellectual Property Sales Agreement

Intellectual Property Sales Agreement

An IP Sales Agreement is a detailed contract that stipulates the terms and conditions of the sale of intellectual property. It covers aspects such as the specific rights being sold, payment terms, warranties regarding the ownership and validity of the IP, and any limitations or conditions on the use of the IP. This document is essential in transactions involving the sale of IP assets.

However, clients usually prefer to keep this document confidential and prepare special deeds of assignment or letter of assignment for different countries.

IP Transfer Declaration

IP Transfer Declaration

In the context of intellectual property, a Declaration is often used to assert ownership or the originality of an IP asset. For example, inventors may use declarations in patent applications to declare their invention is original, or authors may use it to assert copyright ownership. It's a formal statement, sometimes required by IP offices or courts.

When assigning a trademark, the Declaration can be a valid document to function as a proof of the transfer. For example, a director of company X declares that the company had sold its Intellectual Property to company Y. 

Merger Document

Merger Document

When companies or entities with significant IP assets merge, an IP Merger Document is used. This document outlines how the intellectual property owned by the merging entities will be combined or managed. It includes details about the transfer, integration, or handling of patents, copyrights, trademarks, and any other intellectual property affected by the merger.

In all these cases, the precise drafting of documents is critical to ensure that IP rights are adequately protected and transferred. Legal advice is often necessary to navigate the complexities of intellectual property laws.

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assignment trademark deed

After a trademark achieves federal registration, ownership of the mark may change hands for a variety of reasons. When a trademark owner transfers their ownership in a particular mark to someone else, it is called an assignment. Generally, for an assignment of a trademark to be valid , the assignment must also include the ‘goodwill’ associated with the mark (goodwill is an intangible asset that refers to the reputation and recognition of the mark among consumers). If the assignment of a trademark includes the mark’s goodwill and is otherwise legal, the assignee gains whatever rights the assignor had in the mark. Importantly, this includes the mark’s priority date, which has implications for protecting the mark from potential infringers going forward.

In contrast, if an assignment of a trademark is made without the mark’s accompanying goodwill, then it is considered an assignment “in gross” — and the assignment is invalid under U.S. law. Courts have analyzed whether an assignment was made in gross in a few different ways, but, as is the case with much of trademark law, protecting customers from deception and confusion is the primary motivation behind any analysis for determining the validity of an assignment.

One way courts determine if an assignment was made in gross is through the substantial similarity test. This test essentially examines whether the assignee is making a product or providing a service that is “substantially similar” to that of the assignor, such that consumers would not be deceived by the assignee’s use of the mark. This analysis includes an assessment of the quality and nature of the goods and services provided under the mark post-assignment.  Thus, even if an assignee is using the mark on the same type of goods, but the goods are of lower quality than the goods previously offered by the assignor under the mark, the assignment could be invalid. However, slight or inconsequential changes to goods and services after an assignment are not likely to invalidate the assignment, as such changes are to be expected and would not thwart consumer expectations.

Decisions on the question of substantial similarity are only marginally instructive, as the  test calls for a fact specific inquiry into what the consuming public has come to expect from the goods or services offered under a given mark. For example, courts have noted that despite similarities in services and goods, “even minor differences can be enough to threaten customer deception.” [1] Instances of products or services that were deemed not substantially similar (and thus resulted in invalid assignments) include: an assignee offering phosphate baking powder instead of alum baking powder; [2] an assignee using the mark on a pepper type beverage instead of a cola type beverage; [3] an assignee producing men’s boots as opposed to women’s boots; [4] an assignee using the mark on beer instead of whiskey; [5] and an assignee selling hi-fidelity consoles instead of audio reproduction equipment. [6]

Conversely, case law has also shown that substantial similarity can be found even when products or services do differ in some aspects, if consumers aren’t likely to be confused. For example, the following product changes did not result in a finding of an invalid assignment: an assignee offering dry cleaning detergent made with a different formula; [7] an assignee using thinner cigarette paper; [8] and an assignee selling a different breed of baby chicks. [9]

Whether goods or services are substantially similar may seem like an easy test to apply, but, as case law demonstrates, this fact-intensive analysis can yield results that look strange in the abstract. Disputes involving the validity of a trademark assignment are decided on a case-by-case basis, using the specific facts at hand to determine if consumer expectations are being met under the new use. Thus, while trademarks acquired through assignment can have significant value (and grant the assignee important rights formerly held by the assignor), assignees should be wary of changes to goods or services under an acquired mark that could be seen as deceiving the public.

[1] Clark & Freeman Corp. v. Heartland Co. Ltd. , 811 F. Supp. 137 (S.D.N.Y. 1993).

[2] Independent Baking Powder Co. v. Boorman , 175 F. 448 (C.C.D.N.J.1910).

[3] Pepsico, Inc. v. Grapette Company , 416 F.2d 285 (8th Cir. 1969).

[4] Clark & Freeman Corp. v. Heartland Co. Ltd. , 811 F. Supp. 137 (S.D.N.Y. 1993).

[5] Atlas Beverage Co. v. Minneapolis Brewing Co. , 113 F.2d 672 (8 Cir. 1940).

[6] H. H. Scott, Inc. v. Annapolis Electroacoustic Corp. , 195 F.Supp. 208 (D.Md.1961).

[7] Glamorene Products Corp. v. Procter & Gamble Co. , 538 F.2d 894 (C.C.P.A. 1976).

[8] Bambu Sales, Inc. v. Sultana Crackers, Inc. , 683 F. Supp. 899 (1988).

[9] Hy-Cross Hatchery, Inc v. Osborne 303 F.2d 947, 950 (C.C.P.A. 1962)

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Trademark Assignment: How to Transfer Trademark Ownership

Trademark assignment agreement

Trademarks are valuable representations of the goodwill of your business that connects a specific product to your brand for your consumers. As your startup or business matures (or if you acquire a company) you will likely need a trademark assignment agreement. This is a type of agreement for transferring ownership that provides a variety of business benefits necessary for protecting purchased or transferred trademark rights.

What Is Trademark Assignment?

A trademark assignment is the formal process for transferring the ownership of a trademark and the associated rights that ownership provides (e.g., use, licensure, further assignment, etc.). Often, a trademark assignment is part of a larger transaction such as an asset purchase agreement or a corporate reorganization.

When Is the Assignment of Trademark Procedure Necessary?

You will need an assignment of trademark any time you are transferring trademarks permanently. Such transfers can be within a larger corporate structure (e.g., from a parent company to a subsidiary), to a family member (e.g., via an estate administration), or to an outside party via sale.

For situations that don’t involve the owner of the trademark transferring to a new owner, you may consider a trademark licensing agreement. Unlike a trademark assignment, a license does not transfer ownership, and instead, gives the rights commonly associated with ownership. For example, you typically see trademark licensing in the context of franchise agreements, merchandising, endorsement deals, etc.

Here’s How to Transfer Trademark Ownership

The process for transferring a trademark via assignment may vary depending on the context of your situation. Relevant to determining the process will be the nature of the transaction along with the relationship between the assignee and assignor. Your checklist will also vary depending on if you are the buyer or seller of the trademark. That said, you will generally consider the following steps for a complete assignment:

  • Due diligence
  • Determine authority to transfer the trademark
  • Execute trademark assignment agreement (What should be included in a trademark assignment form)
  • Complete ancillary agreements necessary to give effect to trademark transfer
  • Notify the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) of change of ownership

1. Due Diligence

Not all trademarks are created equally because of their rights that exist in common law and through statutory law at the state and federal levels. As a result, it’s important to research the trademark status before taking possession. Primarily, you will want to search for its registration number with applicable state and federal agencies (i.e., the USPTO). Having a registered mark improves your ability to enforce against trademark infringement and protect its value after acquisition as part of the goodwill of the business.

2. Determine Authority to Transfer the Trademark

Another integral part of transferring a trademark through an assignment is verifying that the assignor has the authority to transfer the title to the assignee. Your Florida trademark lawyer will be able to help you verify that authority, but you will generally check in two ways. The first will be confirming ownership reflected on trademark registration documents recorded with the USPTO. However, you will also want to confirm that ownership and authority via the business entity organizational documents.

3. Execute Trademark Assignment Agreement

After completing proper due diligence, you will need to execute a trademark assignment agreement. The purpose of the agreement is to provide evidence of the transfer and to allocate rights and obligations among the assignor and assignee.

What Should Be Included in a Trademark Assignment Form?

The contents of your trademark assignment agreement will also depend on the nature of the transaction and the relationship between the original owner and the new owner of the mark. Typically, you will see the following elements with a trademark assignment form contract:

  • Names of the parties and the agreement’s effective date
  • Recitals explaining the circumstance for the trademark transfer (e.g., gift, reorganization, purchase asset agreement, etc.)
  • Consideration for the intellectual property transfer (e.g., value exchanged such as cash, real estate, or other personal property
  • Representations and warranties surrounding past use, current owner, etc.
  • Indemnity surrounding past or future claims related to the use of the trademark
  • Conflict resolution provisions (e.g., mediation, arbitration, governing law, choice of venue, etc.)

4. Complete Ancillary Agreements

As mentioned above, transferring ownership of the trademark is likely part of a larger transaction such as the sale of a company. This fact usually means you will need to complete other contracts and documents for the assignment to be enforceable. To name a few, such documents might include:

  • Asset purchase agreement
  • USPTO forms
  • Assumption of liability agreement
  • Intellectual property licensing agreements
  • Corporate consent resolutions

5. Notify the USPTO of Change of Ownership

Part of a complete assignment of a trademark will require finishing the USPTO application process for a name change on the trademark registration. It’s important to notify the USPTO of the change in ownership and to update contact information for future correspondence related to your trademark. Additionally, maintaining accurate information with the USPTO for your registered trademark is necessary for protecting your trademark rights against infringement, dilution, and other legal issues.

What Are the Implications if a Trademark Transfer Is Not Done Properly?

Failing to properly transfer a trademark from one party to another can lead to exposure and create unnecessary risk. Most of the consequences stem from the fact that improper trademark transfers create confusion about who actually owns the mark. If uncertainty exists about proper ownership, it can make it more difficult to enforce your trademark rights and protect against future trademark infringement or track trademark infringement statute of limitations .

When it appears multiple parties have rights to a trademark, it can also create a risk of trademark dilution (i.e., its use becomes more in the public domain, weakening its proprietary value). As a final point, trademark transfers are usually part of a broader transaction, and failing to properly execute the assignment may jeopardize the success of the whole transaction or, at the least, substantially add to the closing costs.

As detailed above, a trademark assignment form should provide all of the information surrounding the transfer (e.g., party names, effective date, value transferred, warranties, etc.). Additionally, the assignment should provide for more general contract terms related to termination rights, conflict resolution methods, indemnities, and necessary cross-references with any simultaneously entered into agreements.

Need Help with a Trademark Assignment Agreement?

If you are in the process of buying, selling, or otherwise transferring a trademark, then a trademark assignment agreement will be a key document for establishing and protecting those trademark rights. The trademark attorneys at our firm help clients draft and negotiate these agreements along with related legal advice and services such as representations in front of the USPTO.

Contact Cueto Law Group today to properly transfer ownership of a trademark.

Trademark Assignment Template Sample

Below are a PDF and Word version of a trademark consent agreement template that you can review as a trademark assignment agreement sample. As a reminder, these are just sample forms and further modification is likely necessary to meet any particular assignment needs.

Key Takeaways on How to Transfer a Trademark

When transferring a trademark, two fundamentals will be essential for increasing the chances of a smooth transition. The first is having sound documentation and contracts (i.e., an assignment agreement) in place between the assignor and assignee. The second is confirming that all applications and registrations with the USPTO accurately reflect that new proprietorship.

Can You Use an Asset Purchase Agreement in Place of a Trademark Transfer Agreement?

How do i submit a trademark assignment to uspto, do patent assignments need to be recorded.

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Our vast corporate and business experience has served to counsel companies operating throughout the world. We currently serve as executive counsel to companies in the insurance and technology industries. It is the spirit of teamwork and working together that enables us to be the best.

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Trademark Assignment Agreement Template

Use our trademark assignment agreement to transfer a trademark to a new owner.

trademark assignment agreement template

Updated February 5, 2024 Reviewed by Brooke Davis

A trademark assignment agreement is a written document that transfers a legally recognized word, phrase, symbol, and design (the “trademark”) from the current owner (the “assignor”) to the future owner (the “assignee”).

What Is a Trademark Assignment Agreement?

When is a trademark assignment agreement necessary, consequences of not using a trademark assignment agreement, common situations for using a trademark assignment agreement, what to include in a trademark assignment agreement, changing ownership of federally registered trademarks, trademark assignment agreement sample.

A trademark assignment agreement allows the owner to properly transfer a business’s trademark to another party. Although intangible, a trademark is valuable because customers instantly associate certain qualities with a recognized brand.

The term trademark usually refers to both a trademark and a service mark [1] . Trademarks identify products or goods, while service marks identify services a company provides.

Remember that a  trading name is different from a trademark. A trading name is the actual name under which you conduct your company, while a trademark is some kind of symbol that represents your business.

In addition to words, phrases, or logos, a trademark can include a slogan, scent, logo shape, or a distinctive combination of musical notes. For example, even color can be a trademark if it acts purely as a symbol, according to the 1995 US Supreme Court case Qualitex Co. v. Jacobson Products Co., Inc. [2]

A trademark assignment agreement is commonly used to document a trademark or service mark transfer of ownership. A transfer of ownership is often necessary when another person or organization sells or purchases a product or company.

Two types of trademarks can be transferred:

Without a trademark assignment agreement, there is no clear record of who owns the symbol. Trademarks are often part of a company’s valuable assets and should be treated like property.

Some of the consequences of not using this agreement for both assignors and assignees include the following:

These are some common situations in which a trademark assignment agreement is important:

If you don’t want to transfer complete ownership of the mark, consider a trademark license agreement. A license grants the licensee temporary permission to use the trademark in a limited way. For example, a license allows you to use the trademark for a certain amount of time or a particular use or region of the country.

A simple trademark assignment agreement will identify the following essential elements:

  • Effective Date: when the trademark is officially transferred to the new owner
  • Trademark: a description of the legally recognized word, phrase, symbol, and/or design, including the official trademark number if the mark has been registered with the US Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”)
  • Assignor: the current owner giving up ownership of the mark
  • Assignee: the future owner giving money to obtain the mark
  • Consideration: how much money the assignee is paying for the mark
  • Warranties: a guarantee from the assignor that they’re the proper owner and have the authority to transfer the mark
  • Signatures: the signatures of the assignor and the assignee
  • Notary Public: the agreement should be notarized to maintain its validity

Ask yourself the following questions when creating a trademark assignment agreement:

  • Who currently owns the trademark, and who will be the new owner
  • What the trademark consists of and any associated registration numbers
  • Where any future disputes will be handled (“Governing Law”)
  • When the trademark is officially transferred to the new owner
  • Why the assignor has the right to transfer the mark and associated goodwill
  • How much will the assignee pay to be the new owner of the mark

If the trademark is federally registered, be sure to record the change of ownership with the USPTO Assignment Recordation Branch . A fee of $40 is required to record an assignment based on the USPTO Fee Schedule .

The USPTO Recordation Form Cover Sheet for Trademarks is strongly recommended when submitting your trademark. Additional questions about registering a trademark assignment with the USPTO may be answered by their  Transferring Ownership/Assignments FAQs .

View our sample trademark assignment agreement below so you can get an idea of what it looks like. When you’re ready to create your own, download it in PDF or Word format.

trademark assignment agreement template

Legal Templates uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial guidelines to learn more about how we keep our content accurate, reliable and trustworthy.

  • United States Patent and Trademark Office. Trademark, patent, or copyright. https://www.uspto.gov/trademarks/basics/trademark-patent-copyright
  • United States Supreme Court. Qualitex Co. v. Jacobson Products Co., INC. https://scholar.google.com.tw/scholar_case?case=17905304466595211702&hl=en&as_sdt=6&as_vis=1&oi=scholarr&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjo5eKYnKbJAhXIoJQKHZvIDAsQgAMIGygAMAA
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The document above is a sample. Please note that the language you see here may change depending on your answers to the document questionnaire.

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Free Trademark Assignment Agreement Template for Microsoft Word

Download this free Trademark Assignment Agreement template as a Word document to outline transfers and interests in a trademark from one party to another

Trademark Assignment Agreement

This Trademark Assignment (hereinafter referred to as the “Assignment”) is made and entered into on [Insert Date Here] (the “Effective Date”) by and between the following parties:

[Insert Assignor Name] [Insert Assignor Address]

(the “Assignor”)

[Insert Assignee Name] [Insert Assignee Address]

(the “Assignee”)

WHEREAS, the Assignor is the sole and rightful owner of certain trademarks and/or service marks and the corresponding registrations and/or applications for registration (collectively referred to as the Trademarks) set forth in Exhibit A attached hereto; and

WHEREAS, the Assignee desires to purchase or acquire the Assignor’s right, title, and interest in and to the Trademarks; and

WHEREAS, the Assignor and Assignee are both duly authorized and capable of entering into this Assignment.

NOW, THEREFORE, for valuable consideration, the receipt of which is acknowledged, the parties hereto agree as follows:

1. ASSIGNMENT.

The Assignor does hereby sell, assign, transfer and set over to Assignee all of its right, title, and interest in and to the Trademarks in the United States and all jurisdictions outside the United States including, without limitation, the ongoing and existing portion of the Assignor’s business associated with the Trademarks, together with the goodwill of the business connected with and symbolized by the Trademarks (including, without limitation, the right to sue and recover for any past or continuing infringements or contract breaches related to the Trademarks, the right to renew any registrations included in the Trademarks, the right to apply for trademark registrations within or outside the United States based in whole or in part upon the Trademarks, and any priority right that may arise from the Trademarks), the same to be held and enjoyed by Assignee as fully and entirely as said interest could have been held and enjoyed by Assignor had this sale, assignment, transfer and conveyance not been made.

The Assignor authorizes the United States Patent and Trademark Office and any other applicable jurisdictions outside the United States to record the transfer of the registrations and/or registration applications set forth in Exhibit A to Assignee as the recipient of Assignors entire right, title, and interest therein.

Assignor further agrees to upon the request and at the expense of Assignee: (a) cooperate with Assignee in the protection of the trademark rights and prosecution and protection of foreign counterparts; (b) execute, verify, acknowledge and deliver all such further papers, including registration applications and instruments of transfer; and (c) perform such other acts as Assignee lawfully may request to obtain or maintain the Trademarks and any and all applications and registrations for the Trademarks.

2. WARRANTY.

Assignor warrants that Assignor is the legal owner of all right, title, and interest in the Trademarks, that the Trademarks have not been previously pledged, assigned, or encumbered, and that this Assignment does not infringe on the rights of any person.

3. GOVERNING LAW.

This Assignment is governed by and is to be construed in accordance with the laws of the State of [Insert State]

4. ENTIRE AGREEMENT.

This Assignment constitutes the sole agreement of the parties and supersedes all oral negotiations and prior writings with respect to the subject matter hereof.

5. SEVERABILITY.

If one or more provisions of this Assignment are held to be unenforceable under applicable law, the parties agree to renegotiate such provision in good faith. If the parties cannot reach a mutually agreeable and enforceable replacement for such provision, then (i) such provision will be excluded from this Assignment, (ii) the balance of the Assignment will be interpreted as if such provision were so excluded and (iii) the balance of the Assignment will be enforceable in accordance with its terms.

6. ADVICE OF COUNSEL.

EACH PARTY ACKNOWLEDGES THAT, IN EXECUTING THIS AGREEMENT, SUCH PARTY HAS HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO SEEK THE ADVICE OF INDEPENDENT LEGAL COUNSEL, AND HAS READ AND UNDERSTOOD ALL OF THE TERMS AND PROVISIONS OF THIS AGREEMENT. THIS AGREEMENT WILL NOT BE CONSTRUED AGAINST ANY PARTY BY REASON OF THE DRAFTING OR PREPARATION HEREOF.

IN WITNESS whereof, the Assignor and Assignee have executed this Agreement as of the Effective Date.

By: ___________________________________ Date: __________________ _________________

[Notary Acknowledgement to Follow]

List of Trademark/Service Mark

Trademark/Service mark: _________________ Registration/Application number: _________________ Dated: _________________

Assignor Acknowledgement

State of _________________ ) County of _________________ )

On ____________________ before me the undersigned Notary Public, personally appeared ____________________________ ASSIGNOR, who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within the instrument and acknowledged to me that he/she executed the same in his/her authorized capacity and that by his/her signature on the instrument the person, or the entity upon behalf of which the person acted, executed the instrument.

I certify under PENALTY OF PERJURY under the laws of the State of _________________ that the foregoing paragraph is true and correct.

WITNESS my hand and official seal.

________________________________________ (Notary Seal) Notary Public

________________________________________ My commission expires

Assignee Acknowledgement

On ____________________ before me the undersigned Notary Public, personally appeared ____________________________ ASSIGNEE, who proved to me on the basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person whose name is subscribed to the within the instrument and acknowledged to me that he/she executed the same in his/her authorized capacity and that by his/her signature on the instrument the person, or the entity upon behalf of which the person acted, executed the instrument.

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AI Summary to Minimize your effort

Assignment of Trademark

Updated on : Feb 22nd, 2022

Trademark proprietors can transfer trademarks similarly to how they can transfer physical properties. One of the ways to transfer a trademark is through an assignment. Assignment means transferring rights, interests, titles and benefits from one person to another. Assignment of a trademark means to transfer the owner’s right in a trademark to another person.

The transferring party is called the assignor, and the receiving party is called the assignee. Section 2(1)(b) of the Trade Marks Act, 1999 states that assignment means an assignment of a trademark in writing by the act of the concerned parties. Both unregistered and registered trademarks can be assigned with or without the goodwill of the business.

Who can Assign a Trademark?

Section 37 of the Trade Marks Act, 1999 states that the person registered as proprietor of trademark in the register of trademarks has the power to assign a trademark and receive consideration for such assignment. Thus, a trademark proprietor can assign a trademark to another person.

Kinds of Trademark Assignment

The different kinds of trademark assignments are as follows:

Complete Assignment  

The trademark proprietor transfers all rights in the trademark to another person, including the right to earn royalties, to further transfer, etc. 

For example: X is the proprietor of brand ‘ABC’. X assigns his trademark ‘ABC’ completely through an agreement to Y. After this, X will not have any rights with respect to the brand ‘ABC’.

Partial Assignment

The trademark proprietor assigns the trademark to another person with respect to only specific services or goods. The transfer of ownership in the trademark is restricted to specific services or products.

For example: X is the proprietor of a brand ‘ABC’ used for sauces and dairy products. X assigns the rights in the brand ‘ABC’ with respect to only dairy products to Y and retains the rights in the brand  ‘ABC’ with respect to sauces.

Assignment with Goodwill of Business  

The trademark proprietor assigns the rights, entitlements and values associated with a trademark to another person. When the trademark is assigned with goodwill, the assignee can use the trademark for any class of goods or services, including the goods or services which were already in use by the assignor. 

For example: X is the proprietor of ‘Sherry’ brand relating to hair products. X assigns the brand ‘Sherry’ to Y with goodwill. Y will be able to use the brand ‘Sherry’ with respect to food products and any other products they manufacture.

Assignment without the Goodwill of Business  

The trademark proprietor assigns to the assignee rights and entitlements in a trademark with respect to the products or services that are not in use. The assignor restricts the transfer of the rights in the trademark in the case of assignment without goodwill. The assignor assigns with the condition that the assignee is not entitled to use the trademark relating to the goods or services already in use by the assignor.

For example: X is the proprietor of a brand ‘Sherry’ that he uses for manufacturing and selling bags. X assigns the brand ‘Sherry’ without goodwill to Y. Y will be able to use the brand ‘Sherry’ for any other product other than bags.

Pre-Requisites for Assignment of Trademark

  • The trademark assignment should be in writing.
  • The assignment should be between two identifying parties, i.e. assignor (owner of the trademark) and the assignee (buyer of the trademark).
  • The assignor should have the intent and must consent for the trademark assignment.
  • The trademark assignment should be for a proper and adequate consideration (amount).

Trademark Assignment Agreement

The proprietor of a trademark generally assigns it to the assignee through a properly executed trademark assignment agreement. The trademark assignment agreement should be drafted keeping the following points in mind:

  • The rights of the trademark should not be detrimentally affected due to the obligations contained in the agreement.
  • The decision and requirement regarding whether the assignment is with or without the goodwill of the business must be explicitly mentioned.
  • The agreement should show a clear purpose of the transaction/assignment.
  • The geographical scope of the location where the assignee possesses the values and rights in the trademark must be mentioned.
  • The transfer of the right to collect and sue damages for future and past infringements must be mentioned.
  • The agreement should be duly executed, i.e. it must be stamped and notarised as per the applicable Stamp Act.
  • The signatures and witnesses must be mentioned.
  • The place and date of agreement execution must be mentioned.
  • The date and day of the assignment along with the parties to the assignment must be mentioned.
  • The agreement should mention whether or not it would be binding on the legal heirs of the assignor and assignee.

Process of Assignment of Trademark

The process of assignment of the trademark in India are as follows:

  • The proprietor of the trademark (assignor) assigns his/her rights in the trademark through a trademark assignment agreement to the assignee.
  • The assignor or assignee, or both, can make a joint request to register the assignment by filing an application of a trademark assignment in Form TM-P to the register of trademarks.
  • Form TM-P must be filed with the registrar of the trademark within six months from the date of the assignment. The application can be filed after six months of assignment, but the fee may vary accordingly.
  • The assignment must be advertised in such a manner and within the period directed by the registrar of trademarks.
  • The copy of the advertisement and the registrar’s direction should be submitted to the office of the registrar of trademarks.
  • Upon the receipt of the trademark assignment application (form TM-P) and required documents, the registrar of trademarks will register the assignee as the proprietor of the trademark and record the specifications of the assignment in the register.

Documents Required for Assignment of Trademark

The following documents must be submitted to the registrar of trademark along with form TM-P:

  • Trademark assignment agreement.
  • Trademark certificate.
  • NOC from the assignor.
  • Identification documents of the assignor and assignee.

Restrictions on Assignment of Trademark

The Trademarks Act, 1999 provides the following restrictions on trademark assignment:

Parallel Use Restriction  

The assignor cannot assign a trademark when the assignment results in the creation of exclusive rights in different persons with relation to the same or similar products or services and will likely deceive or cause confusion. Thus, multiple exclusive rights relating to the same/similar products or services in different persons are not allowed. It prevents the parallel use of a trademark by more than one person in relation to the same/similar products or services.

Multiple Territorial Use Restriction  

The assignor cannot assign a trademark when the assignment results in the creation of an exclusive right in different persons in various parts of India relating to the same/similar products or services. The assignor cannot assign a trademark when the assignment results in the creation of an exclusive right in different persons in various parts of India relating to the same/similar products or services sold or delivered outside India. Thus, assigning rights in different parts of India relating to the same/similar products or services is not allowed.

Benefits of Trademark Assignment

  • The trademark assignment enables the trademark proprietor to encash the value of his/her brand.
  • The assignee obtains the rights of an already established brand due to trademark assignment.
  • The trademark assignment supports the assignor and the assignee to expand their respective businesses.
  • The trademark assignment agreement enables the assignor and the assignee to establish their legal rights in case of any dispute.

Disclaimer: The materials provided herein are solely for information purposes. No attorney-client relationship is created when you access or use the site or the materials. The information presented on this site does not constitute legal or professional advice and should not be relied upon for such purposes or used as a substitute for legal advice from an attorney licensed in your state.

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Trade Mark Assignment Agreement

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Trade Mark Assignment Agreement

A Trade Mark Assignment Agreement ("Assignment Agreement") is a legal document under which the Trade Mark owner, known as the "Assignor," assigns another person or entity to own such rights, known as the "Assignee", in exchange for an agreed payment, known as a "Consideration".

Trade Mark is a word or symbol representing a company or product. A Trade Mark can be one that is registered under the Trade Marks Act, 1999 or one that is established by continuous and prolonged use of such a word or symbol in relation to a particular company or product. For example, APPLE, GOOGLE, TATA, etc.

As per the Trade Mark Act, 1999, the Assignment of Trade Mark has to be done by execution of the assignment deed in writing. Both the registered and unregistered Trade Mark under the Act can be assigned to a third party.

An assignment Agreement is different from a License Agreement , under an Assignment Agreement, the Assignor gives away all the rights over the Trade Mark for a fixed amount or consideration and will not be entitled to use such Trade Mark or receive regular Royalty payments on it. On other hand, under the License Agreement , the owner of the Trade Mark grants permission to another person to utilize the Trade Mark in a particular manner for a limited period of time.

The Assignment Agreement can be of two types:

  • Assignment with goodwill: The Assignor transfer absolute rights and values associated with the Trade Mark to the Assignee. After entering into this Agreement, the Assignor will not be able to use any goods or services related to the Trade Mark. For example, ABC Ltd owns a Trade Mark with the wordmark "GREENGO" registered under classes 35 and 42. Under this arrangement, ABC assigns all its rights over the Trade Mark "GREENGO" in relation to Classes 35 and 42 along with any other classes registered in the future.
  • Assignment without goodwill: Under this, the Trade Mark related to particular goods or services will be assigned to the Assignee and the Assignor will retain the right to use and assign the goods or services which are not assigned to the Assignee under this Agreement. For example, XYZ Ltd owes a Trade Mark with the wordmark "ORANGE TECH" registered under classes 30 and 39. Under this arrangement, XYZ assigns the Trade Mark to the assignee only in relation to class 30 and retains the rights over class 39 and any future classes under the same name.

Restrictions on assignment of Trade Mark:

  • Restriction on assignment or transmission where multiple exclusive rights would be created . Thus, the same or similar goods or services cannot be assigned to different entities or people. If different Trade Marks are assigned, such assignments should not cause any confusion among the users of such goods or services.
  • Restriction on assignment or transmission when exclusive rights would be created in different parts of India. Thus, the Trade Mark cannot be assigned to different people on a geographical basis within the boundaries of India.

How to use this document?

This Agreement covers the following major provisions:

  • Parties: The type and details of the parties i.e. Assignor and Assignee are included under this Agreement. The Parties can be an individual, company, partnership, LLP and so on.
  • Description of Trade Mark: the details about the Trade Mark can be mentioned under this Agreement. If required, a detailed description can be mentioned under Schedule-A to the Agreement.
  • Assignment of Trade Mark : defines the assignment of Trade Mark and denotes whether the Trade Mark is assigned with or without the goodwill.
  • Consideration: It includes the method of calculation of consideration payable by the Assignee, how it will be paid to the Assignor and who will bear the cost of GST (Goods and Services Tax) payable on such transaction. This clause also includes the penalty for any late payment of Consideration by the Assignee.
  • Warranties: The warranties or promises by both the Assignor and Assignee regarding their capacity to enter into this Agreement, ownership over the Trade Mark, compliance with the terms of this Agreement and laws are included. If required, such additional warranties can be mentioned under this clause.
  • Confidentiality: Under this, both parties agree not to disclose confidential information including trade secrets, know-how, plans and so on to any third parties. If required, a separate detailed non-disclosure agreement can be signed between the parties.

Once the details are filled in, this Agreement can be printed on non-judicial stamp paper of value prescribed by the concerned state where this Agreement is executed. The Agreement has to be signed by two independent witnesses who are not a party to this Agreement and must be notarized by a notary located in the place where this Agreement has been executed.

Once the Agreement is executed and notarized, it needs to be registered with the Registrar of Trade Mark within six months.

Applicable Law?

Assignment of the Trade Mark is covered under the Trade Marks Act, 1999. Only those assignment agreements registered with the Registrar will have protection under this Act.

An Assignment Agreement is a contract and general principles of the Indian Contract Act, 1872 will be applicable.

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Guides to help you

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  • When and how to Notarize a Document?

Other names for the document:

Trademark Assignment Agreement, Assignment of Trade Mark Agreement, Agreement to sell a trade mark, Assignment of goods trade mark, Assignment of service trade mark

Country: India

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assignment trademark deed

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  • Jun 9, 2021

Can I Transfer My Trademark? How?

This is one of the commonly asked questions by trademark owners about trademark. The answer is yes, a trademark is an intangible asset which can be transferred from one to another. The process is generally known as, assignment of trademark.

Section 64(1) of the Malaysian Trademarks Act 2019 ("Trademarks Act") provides that, a registered trademark shall be transmissible by assignment or assignment in the same way as other personal or movable property, and shall be so transmissible either in connection with the goodwill of a business or independently"

"Wait, does it mean only registered trademark can be assigned? What happened to unregistered trademark?"

Fret not, unregistered trademark can be assigned too! Section 64(6) of the Trademarks Act provides that, nothing in this Act shall be construed as affecting the assignment or other transmission of an unregistered trademark as part of the goodwill of a business. (Phew!)

assignment trademark deed

How to assign a trademark ownership?

To kickstart the process, the original owner of the trademark ("Assignor") and the new owner of the trademark ("Assignee") should sign a deed of assignment, a legal instrument that transfer the trademark from the Assignor to the Assignee. One deed of assignment may include multiple trademarks. The deed of assignment contains the terms and condition to transfer the trademark. Generally, it should include the identity of parties, the details of trademark to be transferred, effective date of transfer, and the consideration, ie. the transfer price. The consideration may be a nominal sum.

Once the parties have signed the Deed of Assignment, the document should be filed with the Government Trademark Office, with the prescribed official form (Form TMH-1) and fees.

Upon filing the documents, the Malaysian Trademark Office will usually take a few months to record the assignment into the database of the registry.

Although it seems like may take some time, but the effective date of transfer of ownership is based on the date of deed of assignment, not the date of recordal by the Trademark Office. So the rights of the parties are not affected, despite the heavy workload in the Trademark Office.

Who should be responsible to file the assignment?

There are no hard and fast rules as to whether the deed of assignment and/or application for recordal of assignment should be done by the assignor or assignee. The parties may decide on a case-to-case basis.

International Assignment of Trademarks

Since registration and protection of trademark is territorial based, the recordal of trademark assignment will also be done country by country.

In some countries, a universal deed of assignment is acceptable. Hence the same document may be used to apply for recordal of trademark assignment in a few countries and save some legal fees in drafting a separate deed of assignment in each country.

However, in some countries, there are specific requirements on format or languages of the Deed of Assignment.

So, it is always safe not to assume and you should seek consultation from your trademark agent .

When is the best timing to assign trademark ownership?

There are many reasons that prompt the need of assignment of trademark. For example, sale of trademark, corporate restructure, moving a business from sole proprietorship to private limited company (Sdn. Bhd.) or vice versa & etc.

Once you have decided any of the above moves, the assignment of trademark should be done immediately without any delay.

There are many instances that the assignment of trademark has been delayed due to procrastination or overlook. This may lead to serious and unwanted consequences.

For instance, after a few years, upon realizing the need of doing the deed of assignment, if the assignor has ceased to operate or passed away (for individual assignor), this may complicate the process of recordal of assignment due to the difficulty in locating the assignor to sign the documents.

Another example is, there may be a problem when the assignee needs to take legal action against trademark infringer, as the legal ownership of the assignee on the trademark is questionable.

Looking for assigning the ownership of your trademark? Don't wait! Contact us today!

Written by,

Li Yen Seow

IP Legal Executive

Bachelor of Laws

Lawrence Tan

Registered Trademark, Patent and Design Agent

LL.B (HONS), CLP Advocate & Solicitor (Non-Practising)

Disclaimer: The above information is merely for general sharing and does not constitute any legal advice. Readers are advised to seek individual advice from the professionals.

Copyright reserved 2021 © IP Gennesis Sdn Bhd

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Assignment of Trademark

GENERAL UNDERSTANDING:

As physical properties are transferred, the same way trademarks are also transferred. This transfer of trademark is called Assignment of trademark. In general terms, Assignment means transfer of title, rights, interest and benefits from one person to another person.

Thus, Assignment of trademark means transfer of Owner’s title, rights, interest and benefits to other person. The transferring party is called as “Assignor” and the receiving party is called as “Assignee”.

STATUTORY DEFINITION:

Section 2(1)(b) of the Trade Marks Act, 1999 “Assignment” means an assignment in writing by the act of the parties concerned;

WHO CAN ASSIGN A TRADEMARK:

As per section 37 of the Trade Marks Act, 1999, the person entered in the register of trademarks, as the proprietor of a trademark, shall have power to assign a trade mark and to give effectual receipt of for any consideration for such assignment.

Trademarks Sign on white paper

ASSIGNABILITY OF REGISTERED OR UNREGISTERED TRADEMARK:-

As per section 38 of the Act, a registered trademark can be transferred with or without the Goodwill of the business concerned either in respect of all the goods or services in respect of which the said trademark is registered or of some of the goods or service.

Moreover, as per section 39 of the Act, an unregistered trademark may be assigned with or without the Goodwill of the business concerned.

  TYPES OF ASSIGNMENT:-

1. Assignment with Goodwill of Business: Where an assignor assigns to the assignee, the value, rights and entitlements also, as associated with a trademark with respect to the goods or services already in use by the assignor. After taking over the goodwill associated with the trademark, the assignee is free to use the trademark assigned to him for all goods or services including for the goods or services which were already in use by the Assignor. Such assignment is called assignment with Goodwill of Business.

For Example: Mr. X is the owner of a trademark “TM” who is already using the said trademark “TM” in relation to clothing and footwear. Mr.  X assign to Mr. Y the said trademark “TM” through an agreement (in writing) in relation to clothing and footwear alongwith the Goodwill associated with trademark “TM”.

In this case, Mr. X has also assigned to Mr. Y, the Goodwill associated with trademark “TM” for the business of clothing and footwear as well as for other goods or services. Therefore, Mr. Y is eligible to use the said trademark “TM”, for clothing and footwear including other goods or service dealt by Mr. Y.

2. Assignment without the Goodwill of Business: Where an assignor assigns to the assignee, the right and entitlements in a trademark with respect to the goods or services which are not in use by the assignor. In other words, where the assignor restricts the assignee with a condition that the assignee is not entitled to use the trademark assigned in relation to the goods or services already in use by the assignor. Such assignment is called assignment without the Goodwill of Business.

For Example: Mr. X is the owner of a trademark “TM” who is already using the said trademark “TM” in relation to clothing and footwear. Mr. X assign to Mr. Y the said trademark “TM” through an agreement (in writing) in relation to goods or services other than clothing and footwear without assigning the Goodwill associated with trademark “TM”.

In this case, Mr. X has not assigned to Mr. Y, the Goodwill associated with trademark “TM” for the business of clothing and footwear. Therefore, Mr. Y is not eligible to use the said trademark “TM”, for clothing and footwear. Thus, in case, Mr. Y wishes to use the said trademark “TM” in relation to other goods or services then he will be required to create separate Goodwill for trademark “TM” for such other goods or services dealt by him.

RESTRICTION ON ASSIGNMENT OF TRADEMARK:-

1. Parallel use Restriction: Where assignment results in creation of exclusive right in different persons, in relation to same or similar goods or services and the use of the trademark will be likely to deceive or cause confusion. Thus, multiple exclusive right in relation to same or similar goods or services, in different person is not allowed. This prevents the parallel use of a trademark by more than one person concerned in relation to same or similar goods or services. (Section-40)

2. Multiple Territorial use Restriction: Where the assignment results in creation of exclusive right, in different person in different parts of India, in relation to same or similar goods or services. Thus, assigning of scattered right in different parts of India is not allowed. (Section-41)  

PROCEDURE FOR ASSIGNMENT OF TRADEMARK:

REGISTRATION OF ASSIGNMENT OF TRADEMARK:

1. A person (subsequent proprietor) who becomes entitled by way of assignment, shall apply for registration of assignment before the Registrar of trademarks. (section 45)

2. After due satisfaction of the Registrar of trademarks, the Registrar shall enter the details of the assignee (subsequent proprietor) as the proprietor of the trademark assigned to him in respect of goods or services for which the assignment has been made. (section 45)

3. Where the validity of assignment is in dispute between the parties, the Registrar may refuse to register the assignment until the rights of the parties are determined by the competent court. (section 45)

4. Registrar of trademark shall dispose of the application for registration of assignment of trademark within a period of 3 (three) months from the date of receipt of application. (rule 76 of Trade Marks Rules, 2017 )

5. Registrar may, where there is reasonable doubt about the veracity of any statement or any document furnished, may call upon any person who has applied to be registered as proprietor of a registered trademark to furnish such proof or additional proof of title as the Registrar may think fit. (rule 77 of Trade Marks Rules, 2017)

6. Where in the opinion of the Registrar any document produced in proof of title of a person is not properly or sufficiently stamped, the Registrar shall impound and deal with it as per Chapter IV of the Indian Stamp Act, 1899 . (rule 78 of Trade Marks Rules, 2017)

7. Where the Registrar has allowed the registration of assignment, then there shall be entered in the register the particulars as follows(rule 84 of Trade Marks Rules, 2017):-

a) the name and address of the assignee;

b) the date of assignment;

c) where the assignment is in respect of any right in the trademark, a description of the right assigned;

d) the basis under which the assignment is made; and

e) the date on which the entry is made in the register.

RIGHT OF THE ASSIGNOR ON ASSIGNMENT OF TRADEMARK:

The assignor terminates to have his rights, title or any interest in the trademark, the moment assignment deed is executed in favour of the assignee, irrespective of the fact that the name of the assignee has not been updated in the record of the Registrar of trademarks.

In the matter of Classic Equipments Pvt. Ltd. Vs. Johnson Enterprises, 2009 (41) PTC 385 (Del), it was observed as follows:

“Once an Assignment Deed has executed, the Assignor ceases to have any right, title or interest in the property assigned. It is not open to the Assignor to cancel the assignment by means of communication”.

RIGHTS OF THE ASSIGNEE: WHEN ASSIGNMENT IS COMPLETE BUT REGISTRATION IS PENDING:

Though as per section 45 of the Act, it is mandated that the assignee shall apply before the Registrar of the trademarks to register his title. But this does not mean that recording of assignment of registered trademark asserts all rights or titles or interest in the assignee.

The reason behind this understanding are the opening words of section 45 of the Act, which says “where a person becomes entitled by assignment or transmission of a registered trademark, ……..”. Therefore, the first condition is entitlement of rights, title or interest by way of assignment or transmission of a registered trademark followed by registration of assignment of a registered trademark. Thus right in assignee does exist even before the registration of assignment.

In the matter of M/S. Modi Threads Limited vs M/S. Som Soot Gola Factory And…. on 4 th December, 1990: AIR 1992 Delhi 4, 1992 (22) DRJ 24 was observed as follows:

“It is true that the plaintiffs application for getting transferred the registered trade mark in its name in the office of the Registrar is still pending but that does not debar the plaintiff to protect the violation of the aforesaid trade mark at the hands of unscrupulous persons by filing an action in court of law for injunction. It is, prima facie, clear to me that during the interregnum period when the application of the plaintiff is kept pending for consideration by the Registrar of Trade Marks the dishonest persons cannot be allowed to make use of the said trade mark in order to get themselves illegally enriched earning upon the reputation built up qua that trade mark by the predecessor-in-interest of the plaintiff.”

The assignee of a trademark is also entitled to file a civil suit, even though the recording of assignment of registered trademark is pending before the registrar of trademarks. Moreover, section 45 does not confer any title over the trademark assigned. Instead the registration granted under section 45 is only proof of title of the trademark of assignee or the person who acquired it by way of assignment.

IMPORTANT KEY POINTS

√ Assignment is to be in writing;

√  Registered or unregistered both type of marks can be assigned;

√  Assignment can be with or without the goodwill of the business;

√  Event of assignment asserts the rights and title in an assignee not the registration thereof;

√  Registration of assignment is only prima facie proof of title of trademark;

√  Rights in an assignee exists even before registration of assignment of trademark.

Conclusion: –

Assignment of trademarks allows the Proprietor thereof to en-cash their intellect, efforts, time and money. It is equally important to register the assignment of trademark, since on registration the details of the assignee are updated in the register of trademark, this serves as a notice to public at large. Moreover, preparation of assignment agreements are also important as it involves rights, entitlements, interests and obligation including the commercial terms between the assignor and the assignee.

Disclaimer: The entire content of this document has been prepared as per the relevant provisions of the Act and rules made thereunder, applicable at the time of preparation. Though proper care has been taken to ensure accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided therein. The users and readers agree that the information provided in this document is not professional advice. Therefore, we assume no responsibility therefrom. Further, this write up shall not be considered as solicitation in any manner.

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Name: Mohit Gulati

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Assignment and Transmission of Trademark

  • Intellectual Property Rights Subject-wise Law Notes
  • Aishwarya Agrawal
  • May 23, 2023

Trademark

Assignment and transmission of trademarks involve transferring ownership rights from one party to another. The Trademark Act provides guidelines and conditions for such assignments and transmissions, distinguishing between assignments with or without the goodwill and specifying requirements for registration and documentation.

Meaning of Assignment and Transmission of Trademark

Assignment and transmission of a trademark refer to the legal process by which the ownership rights of a trademark are transferred from one person or entity to another. This process involves the transfer of the exclusive rights associated with the trademark, which can include the right to use, license, sell or enforce the trademark.

The assignment of a trademark involves the complete transfer of ownership from one party to another. In this case, the assignee (the party receiving the trademark rights) assumes full control and responsibility over the trademark, including the right to use it exclusively for their own commercial purposes. The assignor (the party transferring the trademark rights) relinquishes all rights and interests in the trademark.

On the other hand, the transmission of a trademark typically refers to the transfer of ownership rights in situations where the original owner passes away or there is a change in the ownership due to legal proceedings, inheritance or other circumstances. Transmission may occur through the distribution of assets in a will, the settlement of an estate or a court order.

Both registered and unregistered trademarks can be assigned or transmitted. A registered trademark is one that has been officially registered with the relevant trademark office, providing the owner with statutory rights and protection. An unregistered trademark refers to a mark that has not been formally registered but may still possess some degree of protection based on common law or other legal principles.

Types of Assignment and Transmission of Trademark

Complete assignment and transmission.

Complete Assignment refers to the transfer of all rights associated with a trademark from one individual to another. This includes the rights to further transfer the trademark, receive royalties and exercise full control over its usage. For instance, if proprietor ‘X’ sells all rights of a trademark to proprietor ‘Y’, ‘Y’ becomes the exclusive owner with the freedom to use the trademark as desired, transfer it to others, set guidelines for its usage and receive royalties. No approval from ‘X’ is required in this case.

Partial Assignment

Partial Assignment involves the transfer of ownership restricted to specific services or products. For example, if proprietor ‘X’ has a trademark (♛) related to men’s lifestyle products but only wants to assign it to shoes, ‘X’ can transfer the trademark to ‘Z’ with the condition that ‘Z’ can only use it for shoes. ‘X’ retains the right to use the trademark for all other products. This type of transfer is known as a partial assignment.

Assignment with Goodwill

Assignment with Goodwill refers to the transfer of a trademark along with all the associated rights and values from one person to another. For instance, if ‘X’ assigns and transfers their trademark (♛) to ‘Z’ with all rights and values intact, ‘Z’ gains full rights to use the trademark for men’s lifestyle products or any other future products they manufacture.

Assignment without Goodwill

Assignment without goodwill involves the transfer of a trademark in a way that allows its use for purposes other than the original one. For example, if ‘X’, who deals with men’s lifestyle products, assigns and transfers their trademark (♛) to ‘Z’ with the condition that ‘Z’ can use it for any product except men’s lifestyle products.

Conditions for assignment and transmission as given in section 42

Section 42 of the Trademark Act outlines the conditions for the assignment and transmission of a trademark, specifically when it is not associated with the goodwill of a business. According to this section, the assignment or transmission of a trademark without goodwill will only be effective if the assignee applies to the registrar for directions regarding the advertisement of the assignment. 

The assignee must advertise the assignment within the timeframe specified by the Registrar, which should not exceed six months from the date of the assignment or an extended period of three months if permitted by the Registrar.

However, if the trademark is assigned along with the goodwill of the business for specific goods and services, it will not be considered an assignment without goodwill. Additionally, if the assignment includes goods for export or services used outside of India along with the assignment of goodwill, it is permissible.

Restrictions on Assignment of Trademarks

The Trademark Act imposes certain restrictions on the assignment and transmission of trademarks to prevent confusion among users or the general public. These restrictions include

  • Restriction on assignment or transmission that would create multiple exclusive rights.
  • Restriction on assignment or transmission that would create exclusive rights in different parts of India.

Process of Assignment and Transmission of Trademark (Section 45)

The process for the assignment and transmission of a trademark, as described in Section 45 of the Trademark Act, involves the following steps:

  • Application to the Registrar of Trademarks using Form TM-P, along with duly certified original documents.
  • The Registrar will review the application and provide a decision within three months. The decision may include informing the applicant about the assignment or requesting additional proof if there are doubts.
  • If the assignment is approved, the Registrar will make an entry in the Register, including details such as the name and address of the assignee, the date of the assignment, a description of the rights assigned (if applicable), the basis of the assignment and the date of entry in the register.
  • In case of a dispute between the parties regarding the validity of the assignment or transmission, the registrar may refuse to register it until the rights of the parties have been determined.

Assignment and Transmission of Registered Trademark (Section 38)

Section 38 of the Trademark Act states that a registered trademark can be assigned and transmitted, with or without the goodwill of the business associated with it. This can apply to all the goods or services covered by the registered trademark or only to a specific subset of goods or services.

Assignment and Transmission of Unregistered Trademarks (Section 39)

According to Section 39 of the Trademark Act, an unregistered trademark can also be assigned or transmitted, with or without the goodwill of the business concerned.

Benefits of Assignment and Transmission of Trademark

Expansion of business: By assigning and transmitting a trademark, the owner can expand their business by using the same trademark in multiple locations simultaneously. Additionally, partial authority can be given to assign the trademark to more than one person.

Leveraging an established brand : Assigning and transmitting a trademark allows the assignee to benefit from an already established brand in the market, saving them the effort and resources required to create a new brand.

Legal proof: The assignment and transmission of a trademark serve as legal proof in case of any disputes related to trademark usage. The rights and liabilities associated with the trademark are clearly outlined in a legal document.

Monetary benefits: The owner of the trademark can enjoy monetary benefits through the assignment and transmission process, including any financial gains resulting from the assignment or transmission. Furthermore, operating with the same trademark in multiple locations can increase the value of the brand.

Structural Waterproofing and ORS v. Amit Gupta ORS [93 (2001) DLT 496]

In this case, a dispute arose regarding the assignment and transmission of a trademark. The court highlighted that the registrar has the authority to refuse the registration of the assignment and transmission until a decision is made by the competent court. The plaintiff claimed ownership of the trademark based on a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the parties. 

However, the court rejected the plaintiff’s request for an injunction against the defendant. The court emphasised that a change in the name of the registered proprietor does not automatically render the trademark unsuitable.

Cinni Foundation v. Raj Kumar Shah and Sons [2009 (41) PTC 320 (Del)]

In this case, the trademark “CINNI” was being used by the owner. A deed of assignment had been executed and signed between the parties. However, it was later discovered that the trademark was not registered. The defendant attempted to claim rights over the trademark. The court ruled that according to the law, the assignee acquires no title to the trademark without the registration of the assignment deed. Consequently, the defendant’s claim to the trademark was dismissed.

These cases illustrate the importance of registration and proper documentation in the assignment and transmission of trademarks. Registration provides legal protection and establishes ownership rights, while adherence to the legal requirements ensures the validity and enforceability of the assignment or transmission of the trademark.

Difference between the Assignment and Transmission of the Trademark

Assignment and transmission are two terms often used interchangeably, but they are distinct concepts according to Section 2 of the Trademark Act. In the case of trademark assignment, there is a transfer of ownership of the registered trademark to another party. On the other hand, in the case of trademark transmission, the original owner retains the rights to the trademark but grants limited rights to a third party for its use.

For instance, let’s consider the example of X, the current owner of the trademark “œ,” who decides to assign the trademark to Y. In this scenario, X relinquishes ownership of the trademark and after a proper assignment process, Y becomes the registered owner with full rights to the trademark.

However, if X chooses to transmit the trademark instead, it means that X remains the original owner of the trademark, but grants limited rights and responsibilities to Y for its use.

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  • What are Trademarks?
  • Types of Trademarks
  • Marks Not Registrable
  • Well Known Trademarks?
  • Trademark Licensing in India
  • Knock out Searches
  • Clearance Searches
  • INN Searches
  • Types of Trademark Application
  • Trademark Classification
  • Filing of Trademark Application
  • Examination of Trademark Application
  • Show cause Hearing
  • Advertisement of Trademark Application
  • Filing Notice of Opposition
  • Filing a Counter Statement
  • Filing Evidence in Support of Application
  • Filing Evidence in Support of Opposition
  • Filing Reply Evidence in Support of Opposition
  • Hearing in Opposition Proceedings
  • Renewal with Surcharge
  • Trademark Restoration in India
  • Removal/Rectification of Trademark in India
  • Name Change
  • Address Change
  • Assignment or Transmission of Rights
  • Change of Counsel
  • Enforcement of Trademarks in India
  • Passing off action
  • Infringement
  • Anti-Counterfeiting actions
  • Customs recordal / Border Control
  • Madrid Protocol

Trademarks like any asset can be transferred from one owner to another. Such transfers can take place in the form of an assignment, or merger or amalgamation between two entities.

For instance: Assignment is where entity A assigns or transfers or transmits the rights over his/her trademarks to entity B.

In case entity A mergers with entity B, and there is transmission of trademarks rights from A to B, it would also constitute assignment.

Assignment of trademarks is a process in which the owner of the trademark transfers the ownership of the mark either with or without the goodwill of the business. An assignment can either be with goodwill or without goodwill:

Assignment with goodwill : This is an assignment where the owner transfers the rights and value of the trademark as associated with the product it sells.

For example, A, owner of “TH” trademark for manufacturing and selling of watches, can assign the trademark along with giving the assignee the right to use the said trademark for the same product.

1. Forms and Fees: An application to record assignment of a pending or a registered trademark can be made through the following respective Forms:

  • Pending Trademark: (assignment with goodwill) Form TM-M (CORRECTION OF CLERICAL ERROR OR FOR AMENDMENT U/R 37) Official fee- INR 900 per mark
  • Registered Trademark: (assignment with goodwill) Form TM-P (SUBSEQUENT PROPRIETOR BY WAY OF ASSIGNMENT OR TRANSFER OF MARK) Official fee- INR 9000 for each assigned mark

Assignment without goodwill : This is an assignment where the owner restricts the assignee to use trademark for the products he uses it for. That is, the goodwill attached to the owner’s brand with respect to the product already being sold under such brand, is not transferred to the buyer. This means that assignor & assignee both can use the same trademark but in dissimilar goods or services.

For example, if the owner of the trademark “TH” uses it for manufacturing and selling of watches and decides to assign it without goodwill, it means that the assignee can use the trademark “TH” for any other product other than watches.

Procedure for filing an application to record assignment without goodwill: In order to record assignment without goodwill of business, the Applicant needs to make an application under Form TM-P (DIRECTION OF REGISTRAR FOR ADVERTISEMENT OF ASSIGNMENT WITHOUT GOODWILL- official fee INR 2700) within 6 months from the date of the assignment (extendable by 3 months as per prescribed forms), requesting the Registrar to advertise the assignment, that is give notice to the public of the assignment without goodwill of business.

Post such advertisement, the application for recording the assignment can be filed with the above-mentioned Form TM-M/TM-P respectively.

Such a Form shall be accompanied with a copy of the Form TM-P (DIRECTION OF REGISTRAR FOR ADVERTISEMENT OF ASSIGNMENT WITHOUT GOODWILL) as well as a copy of the advertisement notice as issued by the Registrar.

2. Documentary Requirements: Assignment Deed: A duly stamped and notarized assignment deed, which shall mandatorily mention the effective date; the full name and address of the assignor (transferor) and assignee (the subsequent transferee), along with their signatures; the consideration paid by the assignee to the assignor for the assignment; statement pertaining to whether the assignment is with goodwill or without goodwill of business along with the details of trademarks to be assigned.

For Applicants outside India, the assignment deed must to be notarized in the country where it is executed, and the same can be stamped in India.

Affidavit of no-pending litigation: In order to process such assignment requests, the Indian Trade Marks Registry has now made it mandatory to submit an affidavit attesting that there is no pending litigation and that the ownership of the trademarks are not in dispute. Accordingly, along with the assignment deed, the assignee (transferee) ought to submit a duly stamped and notarized affidavit to mentioning the details of the assignment and the assigned trademark and attesting that the ownership of the said trademark is not in dispute.

Need assistance on assignment of trademark in India? Please email us to [email protected] .

Opinion How to help third-graders struggling to read: Don’t socially promote them

K-12 education needs extensive reform, but teachers unions and educrats oppose even this simple fix.

assignment trademark deed

In 1961, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Newton Minow got a virtual trademark on the term “vast wasteland.” So, although highly apt, it isn’t available now for application to K-12 public schools in the United States.

Yes, there are oases of high-quality education, just as Minow acknowledged some exceptions in the early world of television. But the statistics showing our country’s systemic educational failure are too dreary and well known to need further recitation. And the educrat establishment of unions and career administrators continues to prove more than a match for reformers attempting fundamental, system-wide change.

While we wait and hope for the kind of sweeping reforms the nation’s schoolchildren desperately need, we do at least know the best place to start. It’s what one looks for when confronted with a daunting and seemingly intractable problem: a step of high leverage, offering significant gains for relatively little investment, that is actionable at scale.

In the K-12 wasteland, the good news is that we know not only where to apply the leverage, but also when. The critical skill is reading, and the critical juncture is third grade , or more precisely the transition from third to fourth grade .

No other variable is more important; whether a fourth grader can read is the “pivot point” in their education. As the saying goes, by then children must learn to read, because afterward they will have to read to learn. The Annie E. Casey Foundation , a children’s welfare organization, has found that kids who leave third grade without reading proficiency are four times less likely to finish high school, with all the handicaps that places on their lives as adults.

Even better news: We know not only what to do and when to do it, but also how. Ending the pernicious, self-defeating practice known as “social promotion” is the key. Schools must be prevented from shuffling kids who do not yet have basic reading skills on to the fourth grade and likely failure in the years beyond. As science writer Annie Murphy Paul has noted, “Children who haven’t made the leap to fast, fluent reading begin at this moment to fall behind, and for most of them the gap will continue to grow.”

This reform left the realm of theory long ago. In Indiana, when I was governor, a 2010 statute prohibited social promotion of students flunking the statewide reading exam, absent clearly defined potential exceptions for English learners and special education students, or if “good cause” could be shown.

A year after the law was passed and a new reading test was instituted, the third-grade pass rate was 85.7 percent . The following school year, 2012-2013, the pass rate hit what turned out to be an all-time high, 91.4 percent, and held above 91 percent for two more years . Analyzing the 2013 National Assessment of Educational Progress scores , President Barack Obama’s education secretary, Arne Duncan, singled out Indiana’s improvement as one of the nation’s bright spots.

But if no good deed goes unpunished, no education reform goes unopposed by the special interests that dominate the space. In 2012, a union-funded campaign evicted the state’s reformist superintendent of public instruction , and he was replaced with someone — an elementary school librarian and teachers union official — whose assignment seemed to be to throw sand in the gears of all the changes the legislature had approved in the previous two years.

The number of social promotion exemptions granted began to swell . From 4 percent in 2013, the percentage of nonreaders passed to fourth grade had doubled by 2017 and reached 17 percent by 2021. The 81.9 percent reading test pass rate for third-graders in 2022-2023 was an almost 10 percent plunge from a decade ago.

Since the worst years of the pandemic, the Indiana education system has seized the opportunity to evade the reform even more ruthlessly. Since 2021, more than half the nonreaders have been shuffled along. In March, Indiana lawmakers signaled that they’d had enough, passing legislation requiring more early interventions and remedial efforts to reduce failure rates, and limiting schools’ leeway for ignoring the “last resort” retention instruction.

The legislation passed despite opposition mobilized by the teachers unions and other members of Indiana’s educrat coalition. In Michigan this spring, a similar coalition succeeded in repealing that state’s requirements for third-grade reading competency.

I described the opposition earlier as working “ruthlessly,” but “heartlessly” would be more apposite. Those sending nonreading third-graders on to likely academic dead ends may believe they are protecting the little ones’ self-esteem, or otherwise doing the right thing. But the evidence says that social promotion is not merely educational malpractice, but a cruel policy that blights the future of young people, none more so than the most vulnerable.

At least 16 state and D.C. have now enacted social promotion laws. The results have been positive, and swift. States including Florida , Alabama and Mississippi have done so, and now they are national leaders in reading improvement.

Ensuring the brightest future for America’s children, and the nation itself, means working for expanded school choice, better use of technology and the reprofessionalization of K-12 teaching. But while we await such miracles, the simple reform of ending social promotion would have far-reaching, lifelong benefits for millions of students.

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COMMENTS

  1. Trademark assignments: Transferring ownership or changing your name

    The assignment was not transferred with the good will of the business. USPTO trademark database will be automatically updated after recordation. Once recorded, the trademark database should reflect the new owner information or name change. Check the Trademark Status and Document Retrieval (TSDR) system to see if the owner information has been ...

  2. Trademark Assignment

    1) Sign and execute the form in front of a notary (both parties) 2) Have the notarization completed. 3) Record the Trademark Assignment with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Applicable law. Trademark Assignments are related to the trademark law of the United States, which is covered by a federal statute called the Lanham Act.

  3. Understanding a deed of assignment for intellectual property

    A deed of assignment must be in writing and should include: The names and addresses of the assignor and assignee. A description of the program or product for which the rights are being transferred. A statement that all intellectual property rights to the property are being transferred.

  4. Trademark assignment—How-to guide

    An assignment is different than a license, which is a grant of permission to use a trademark in some restricted way (e.g., a limited time, specific purpose, particular area, etc.). A transfer of partial rights is not a trademark assignment: do not revise the agreement to limit the reach of the rights being provided.

  5. Deed of Assignment: Everything You Need to Know

    4 min. In the realm of intellectual property, a Deed of Assignment is a formal legal document used to transfer all rights, title, and interest in intellectual property from the assignor (original owner) to the assignee (new owner). This is crucial for the correct transfer of patents, copyrights, trademarks, and other IP rights.

  6. Trademark Assignments: Keeping it Valid

    When a trademark owner transfers their ownership in a particular mark to someone else, it is called an assignment. Generally, for an assignment of a trademark to be valid, the assignment must also ...

  7. Trademark Assignment: How to Transfer Trademark Ownership

    Due diligence. Determine authority to transfer the trademark. Execute trademark assignment agreement (What should be included in a trademark assignment form) Complete ancillary agreements necessary to give effect to trademark transfer. Notify the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) of change of ownership. 1.

  8. PDF A Specimen of Deed of Assignment of a Registered Trade Mark

    claiming through him, do or cause to be done any other act, deed or thing as may be required for more perfectly assuring the aforesaid assignment. IN WITNESS WHEREOF the parties aforesaid have set their respective hands in the presence of the witnesses hereunder. Witness: Assignor Witness: Assignee

  9. Free Trademark Assignment Agreement Template

    A trademark assignment agreement is commonly used to document a trademark or service mark transfer of ownership. A transfer of ownership is often necessary when another person or organization sells or purchases a product or company. Two types of trademarks can be transferred: Federally Registered. Common Law or Unregistered.

  10. PDF Microsoft Word

    8) Entire Agreement: This Agreement contains the entire Agreement of the Parties to the subject matter hereof and supersede all previous understandings or arrangements between the Parties. 9) Modification: This Agreement may be modified only by an instrument in writing signed by both the Parties hereto. 10)

  11. Free Trademark Assignment Agreement Template for Microsoft Word

    Trademark Assignment Agreement. This Trademark Assignment (hereinafter referred to as the "Assignment") is made and entered into on [Insert Date Here] (the "Effective Date") by and between the following parties: (the "Assignor") AND. (the "Assignee") WHEREAS, the Assignor is the sole and rightful owner of certain trademarks and ...

  12. Assignment of Trademark

    Assignment of a trademark means to transfer the owner's right in a trademark to another person. The transferring party is called the assignor, and the receiving party is called the assignee. Section 2 (1) (b) of the Trade Marks Act, 1999 states that assignment means an assignment of a trademark in writing by the act of the concerned parties.

  13. Trade Mark Assignment Agreement

    Formats Word and PDF. Size 8 to 13 pages. Fill out the template. A Trade Mark Assignment Agreement ("Assignment Agreement") is a legal document under which the Trade Mark owner, known as the "Assignor," assigns another person or entity to own such rights, known as the "Assignee", in exchange for an agreed payment, known as a "Consideration".

  14. Can I Transfer My Trademark? How?

    Yes, a trademark is an intangible asset which can be transferred from one to another. The process is generally known as, assignment of trademark. Section 64 (1) of the Malaysian Trademarks Act 2019 ("Trademarks Act") provides that, a registered trademark shall be transmissible by assignment or assignment in the same way as other personal or ...

  15. Assignment of Trademark

    In general terms, Assignment means transfer of title, rights, interest and benefits from one person to another person. Thus, Assignment of trademark means transfer of Owner's title, rights, interest and benefits to other person. The transferring party is called as "Assignor" and the receiving party is called as "Assignee". STATUTORY ...

  16. Assignment and Transmission of Trademark

    A deed of assignment had been executed and signed between the parties. However, it was later discovered that the trademark was not registered. The defendant attempted to claim rights over the trademark. The court ruled that according to the law, the assignee acquires no title to the trademark without the registration of the assignment deed.

  17. Trademark Assignment

    Trademark Assignment. A Trademark Assignment is a deed for the assignment of registered trademarks and of domain names that include trademarks. star star star star star_half. 4.8 (6 reviews) timer. Under 10 minutes. location_on. Suitable for Australia. Get 1st document free. preview View Sample.

  18. PDF TRADEMARK ASSIGNMENT & GUIDELINES

    trademark assignment can help in both circumstances. A trademark assignment is the transfer of an owner's property rights in a given mark or marks. Such transfers may occur on their own or as parts of larger asset sales or purchases. Trademark assignment agreements both provide records of ownership and transfer and protect the rights of all ...

  19. Trademark Assignment Template

    Our Trademark Assignment template is for use in drafting a trademark assignment agreement. The agreement transfers the rights in the trademark and you can use it to transfer both: unregistered trademarks. If you want an agreement that clearly sets out what trademarks you are transferring and the rights and obligations of each party in a clear ...

  20. Trademark Assignment or Transmission of Rights

    For example, A, owner of "TH" trademark for manufacturing and selling of watches, can assign the trademark along with giving the assignee the right to use the said trademark for the same product. 1. Forms and Fees: An application to record assignment of a pending or a registered trademark can be made through the following respective Forms:

  21. How To Assign Ownership Of A Trade Mark

    Step 2. Draft a contract agreement. Your contract should: partial assignment — the full or partial transfer of ownership title, with partial transfer of good and services. This will result in two (or more) trade marks with the same representation, but with different owners of the associated goods and services. Step 3.

  22. Opinion

    By Mitch Daniels. May 13, 2024 at 6:30 a.m. EDT. (Anastasiia Stiahailo/Getty Images) 5 min. In 1961, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Newton Minow got a virtual trademark on the term ...