Problem-Solving Method in Teaching

The problem-solving method is a highly effective teaching strategy that is designed to help students develop critical thinking skills and problem-solving abilities . It involves providing students with real-world problems and challenges that require them to apply their knowledge, skills, and creativity to find solutions. This method encourages active learning, promotes collaboration, and allows students to take ownership of their learning.

Table of Contents

Definition of problem-solving method.

Problem-solving is a process of identifying, analyzing, and resolving problems. The problem-solving method in teaching involves providing students with real-world problems that they must solve through collaboration and critical thinking. This method encourages students to apply their knowledge and creativity to develop solutions that are effective and practical.

Meaning of Problem-Solving Method

The meaning and Definition of problem-solving are given by different Scholars. These are-

Woodworth and Marquis(1948) : Problem-solving behavior occurs in novel or difficult situations in which a solution is not obtainable by the habitual methods of applying concepts and principles derived from past experience in very similar situations.

Skinner (1968): Problem-solving is a process of overcoming difficulties that appear to interfere with the attainment of a goal. It is the procedure of making adjustments in spite of interference

Benefits of Problem-Solving Method

The problem-solving method has several benefits for both students and teachers. These benefits include:

  • Encourages active learning: The problem-solving method encourages students to actively participate in their own learning by engaging them in real-world problems that require critical thinking and collaboration
  • Promotes collaboration: Problem-solving requires students to work together to find solutions. This promotes teamwork, communication, and cooperation.
  • Builds critical thinking skills: The problem-solving method helps students develop critical thinking skills by providing them with opportunities to analyze and evaluate problems
  • Increases motivation: When students are engaged in solving real-world problems, they are more motivated to learn and apply their knowledge.
  • Enhances creativity: The problem-solving method encourages students to be creative in finding solutions to problems.

Steps in Problem-Solving Method

The problem-solving method involves several steps that teachers can use to guide their students. These steps include

  • Identifying the problem: The first step in problem-solving is identifying the problem that needs to be solved. Teachers can present students with a real-world problem or challenge that requires critical thinking and collaboration.
  • Analyzing the problem: Once the problem is identified, students should analyze it to determine its scope and underlying causes.
  • Generating solutions: After analyzing the problem, students should generate possible solutions. This step requires creativity and critical thinking.
  • Evaluating solutions: The next step is to evaluate each solution based on its effectiveness and practicality
  • Selecting the best solution: The final step is to select the best solution and implement it.

Verification of the concluded solution or Hypothesis

The solution arrived at or the conclusion drawn must be further verified by utilizing it in solving various other likewise problems. In case, the derived solution helps in solving these problems, then and only then if one is free to agree with his finding regarding the solution. The verified solution may then become a useful product of his problem-solving behavior that can be utilized in solving further problems. The above steps can be utilized in solving various problems thereby fostering creative thinking ability in an individual.

The problem-solving method is an effective teaching strategy that promotes critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration. It provides students with real-world problems that require them to apply their knowledge and skills to find solutions. By using the problem-solving method, teachers can help their students develop the skills they need to succeed in school and in life.

  • Jonassen, D. (2011). Learning to solve problems: A handbook for designing problem-solving learning environments. Routledge.
  • Hmelo-Silver, C. E. (2004). Problem-based learning: What and how do students learn? Educational Psychology Review, 16(3), 235-266.
  • Mergendoller, J. R., Maxwell, N. L., & Bellisimo, Y. (2006). The effectiveness of problem-based instruction: A comparative study of instructional methods and student characteristics. Interdisciplinary Journal of Problem-based Learning, 1(2), 49-69.
  • Richey, R. C., Klein, J. D., & Tracey, M. W. (2011). The instructional design knowledge base: Theory, research, and practice. Routledge.
  • Savery, J. R., & Duffy, T. M. (2001). Problem-based learning: An instructional model and its constructivist framework. CRLT Technical Report No. 16-01, University of Michigan. Wojcikowski, J. (2013). Solving real-world problems through problem-based learning. College Teaching, 61(4), 153-156

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Teaching problem solving.

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Tips and Techniques

Expert vs. novice problem solvers, communicate.

  • Have students  identify specific problems, difficulties, or confusions . Don’t waste time working through problems that students already understand.
  • If students are unable to articulate their concerns, determine where they are having trouble by  asking them to identify the specific concepts or principles associated with the problem.
  • In a one-on-one tutoring session, ask the student to  work his/her problem out loud . This slows down the thinking process, making it more accurate and allowing you to access understanding.
  • When working with larger groups you can ask students to provide a written “two-column solution.” Have students write up their solution to a problem by putting all their calculations in one column and all of their reasoning (in complete sentences) in the other column. This helps them to think critically about their own problem solving and helps you to more easily identify where they may be having problems. Two-Column Solution (Math) Two-Column Solution (Physics)

Encourage Independence

  • Model the problem solving process rather than just giving students the answer. As you work through the problem, consider how a novice might struggle with the concepts and make your thinking clear
  • Have students work through problems on their own. Ask directing questions or give helpful suggestions, but  provide only minimal assistance and only when needed to overcome obstacles.
  • Don’t fear  group work ! Students can frequently help each other, and talking about a problem helps them think more critically about the steps needed to solve the problem. Additionally, group work helps students realize that problems often have multiple solution strategies, some that might be more effective than others

Be sensitive

  • Frequently, when working problems, students are unsure of themselves. This lack of confidence may hamper their learning. It is important to recognize this when students come to us for help, and to give each student some feeling of mastery. Do this by providing  positive reinforcement to let students know when they have mastered a new concept or skill.

Encourage Thoroughness and Patience

  • Try to communicate that  the process is more important than the answer so that the student learns that it is OK to not have an instant solution. This is learned through your acceptance of his/her pace of doing things, through your refusal to let anxiety pressure you into giving the right answer, and through your example of problem solving through a step-by step process.

Experts (teachers) in a particular field are often so fluent in solving problems from that field that they can find it difficult to articulate the problem solving principles and strategies they use to novices (students) in their field because these principles and strategies are second nature to the expert. To teach students problem solving skills,  a teacher should be aware of principles and strategies of good problem solving in his or her discipline .

The mathematician George Polya captured the problem solving principles and strategies he used in his discipline in the book  How to Solve It: A New Aspect of Mathematical Method (Princeton University Press, 1957). The book includes  a summary of Polya’s problem solving heuristic as well as advice on the teaching of problem solving.

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Teaching Problem-Solving Skills

Many instructors design opportunities for students to solve “problems”. But are their students solving true problems or merely participating in practice exercises? The former stresses critical thinking and decision­ making skills whereas the latter requires only the application of previously learned procedures.

Problem solving is often broadly defined as "the ability to understand the environment, identify complex problems, review related information to develop, evaluate strategies and implement solutions to build the desired outcome" (Fissore, C. et al, 2021). True problem solving is the process of applying a method – not known in advance – to a problem that is subject to a specific set of conditions and that the problem solver has not seen before, in order to obtain a satisfactory solution.

Below you will find some basic principles for teaching problem solving and one model to implement in your classroom teaching.

Principles for teaching problem solving

  • Model a useful problem-solving method . Problem solving can be difficult and sometimes tedious. Show students how to be patient and persistent, and how to follow a structured method, such as Woods’ model described below. Articulate your method as you use it so students see the connections.
  • Teach within a specific context . Teach problem-solving skills in the context in which they will be used by students (e.g., mole fraction calculations in a chemistry course). Use real-life problems in explanations, examples, and exams. Do not teach problem solving as an independent, abstract skill.
  • Help students understand the problem . In order to solve problems, students need to define the end goal. This step is crucial to successful learning of problem-solving skills. If you succeed at helping students answer the questions “what?” and “why?”, finding the answer to “how?” will be easier.
  • Take enough time . When planning a lecture/tutorial, budget enough time for: understanding the problem and defining the goal (both individually and as a class); dealing with questions from you and your students; making, finding, and fixing mistakes; and solving entire problems in a single session.
  • Ask questions and make suggestions . Ask students to predict “what would happen if …” or explain why something happened. This will help them to develop analytical and deductive thinking skills. Also, ask questions and make suggestions about strategies to encourage students to reflect on the problem-solving strategies that they use.
  • Link errors to misconceptions . Use errors as evidence of misconceptions, not carelessness or random guessing. Make an effort to isolate the misconception and correct it, then teach students to do this by themselves. We can all learn from mistakes.

Woods’ problem-solving model

Define the problem.

  • The system . Have students identify the system under study (e.g., a metal bridge subject to certain forces) by interpreting the information provided in the problem statement. Drawing a diagram is a great way to do this.
  • Known(s) and concepts . List what is known about the problem, and identify the knowledge needed to understand (and eventually) solve it.
  • Unknown(s) . Once you have a list of knowns, identifying the unknown(s) becomes simpler. One unknown is generally the answer to the problem, but there may be other unknowns. Be sure that students understand what they are expected to find.
  • Units and symbols . One key aspect in problem solving is teaching students how to select, interpret, and use units and symbols. Emphasize the use of units whenever applicable. Develop a habit of using appropriate units and symbols yourself at all times.
  • Constraints . All problems have some stated or implied constraints. Teach students to look for the words "only", "must", "neglect", or "assume" to help identify the constraints.
  • Criteria for success . Help students consider, from the beginning, what a logical type of answer would be. What characteristics will it possess? For example, a quantitative problem will require an answer in some form of numerical units (e.g., $/kg product, square cm, etc.) while an optimization problem requires an answer in the form of either a numerical maximum or minimum.

Think about it

  • “Let it simmer”.  Use this stage to ponder the problem. Ideally, students will develop a mental image of the problem at hand during this stage.
  • Identify specific pieces of knowledge . Students need to determine by themselves the required background knowledge from illustrations, examples and problems covered in the course.
  • Collect information . Encourage students to collect pertinent information such as conversion factors, constants, and tables needed to solve the problem.

Plan a solution

  • Consider possible strategies . Often, the type of solution will be determined by the type of problem. Some common problem-solving strategies are: compute; simplify; use an equation; make a model, diagram, table, or chart; or work backwards.
  • Choose the best strategy . Help students to choose the best strategy by reminding them again what they are required to find or calculate.

Carry out the plan

  • Be patient . Most problems are not solved quickly or on the first attempt. In other cases, executing the solution may be the easiest step.
  • Be persistent . If a plan does not work immediately, do not let students get discouraged. Encourage them to try a different strategy and keep trying.

Encourage students to reflect. Once a solution has been reached, students should ask themselves the following questions:

  • Does the answer make sense?
  • Does it fit with the criteria established in step 1?
  • Did I answer the question(s)?
  • What did I learn by doing this?
  • Could I have done the problem another way?

If you would like support applying these tips to your own teaching, CTE staff members are here to help.  View the  CTE Support  page to find the most relevant staff member to contact. 

  • Fissore, C., Marchisio, M., Roman, F., & Sacchet, M. (2021). Development of problem solving skills with Maple in higher education. In: Corless, R.M., Gerhard, J., Kotsireas, I.S. (eds) Maple in Mathematics Education and Research. MC 2020. Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol 1414. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-81698-8_15
  • Foshay, R., & Kirkley, J. (1998). Principles for Teaching Problem Solving. TRO Learning Inc., Edina MN.  (PDF) Principles for Teaching Problem Solving (researchgate.net)
  • Hayes, J.R. (1989). The Complete Problem Solver. 2nd Edition. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Woods, D.R., Wright, J.D., Hoffman, T.W., Swartman, R.K., Doig, I.D. (1975). Teaching Problem solving Skills.
  • Engineering Education. Vol 1, No. 1. p. 238. Washington, DC: The American Society for Engineering Education.

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Teaching problem solving

Strategies for teaching problem solving apply across disciplines and instructional contexts. First, introduce the problem and explain how people in your discipline generally make sense of the given information. Then, explain how to apply these approaches to solve the problem.

Introducing the problem

Explaining how people in your discipline understand and interpret these types of problems can help students develop the skills they need to understand the problem (and find a solution). After introducing how you would go about solving a problem, you could then ask students to:

  • frame the problem in their own words
  • define key terms and concepts
  • determine statements that accurately represent the givens of a problem
  • identify analogous problems
  • determine what information is needed to solve the problem

Working on solutions

In the solution phase, one develops and then implements a coherent plan for solving the problem. As you help students with this phase, you might ask them to:

  • identify the general model or procedure they have in mind for solving the problem
  • set sub-goals for solving the problem
  • identify necessary operations and steps
  • draw conclusions
  • carry out necessary operations

You can help students tackle a problem effectively by asking them to:

  • systematically explain each step and its rationale
  • explain how they would approach solving the problem
  • help you solve the problem by posing questions at key points in the process
  • work together in small groups (3 to 5 students) to solve the problem and then have the solution presented to the rest of the class (either by you or by a student in the group)

In all cases, the more you get the students to articulate their own understandings of the problem and potential solutions, the more you can help them develop their expertise in approaching problems in your discipline.

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  • Getting Started with Establishing Ground Rules
  • Sample group work rubric
  • Problem-Based Learning Clearinghouse of Activities, University of Delaware

Problem-Based Learning

Problem-based learning  (PBL) is a student-centered approach in which students learn about a subject by working in groups to solve an open-ended problem. This problem is what drives the motivation and the learning. 

Why Use Problem-Based Learning?

Nilson (2010) lists the following learning outcomes that are associated with PBL. A well-designed PBL project provides students with the opportunity to develop skills related to:

  • Working in teams.
  • Managing projects and holding leadership roles.
  • Oral and written communication.
  • Self-awareness and evaluation of group processes.
  • Working independently.
  • Critical thinking and analysis.
  • Explaining concepts.
  • Self-directed learning.
  • Applying course content to real-world examples.
  • Researching and information literacy.
  • Problem solving across disciplines.

Considerations for Using Problem-Based Learning

Rather than teaching relevant material and subsequently having students apply the knowledge to solve problems, the problem is presented first. PBL assignments can be short, or they can be more involved and take a whole semester. PBL is often group-oriented, so it is beneficial to set aside classroom time to prepare students to   work in groups  and to allow them to engage in their PBL project.

Students generally must:

  • Examine and define the problem.
  • Explore what they already know about underlying issues related to it.
  • Determine what they need to learn and where they can acquire the information and tools necessary to solve the problem.
  • Evaluate possible ways to solve the problem.
  • Solve the problem.
  • Report on their findings.

Getting Started with Problem-Based Learning

  • Articulate the learning outcomes of the project. What do you want students to know or be able to do as a result of participating in the assignment?
  • Create the problem. Ideally, this will be a real-world situation that resembles something students may encounter in their future careers or lives. Cases are often the basis of PBL activities. Previously developed PBL activities can be found online through the University of Delaware’s PBL Clearinghouse of Activities .
  • Establish ground rules at the beginning to prepare students to work effectively in groups.
  • Introduce students to group processes and do some warm up exercises to allow them to practice assessing both their own work and that of their peers.
  • Consider having students take on different roles or divide up the work up amongst themselves. Alternatively, the project might require students to assume various perspectives, such as those of government officials, local business owners, etc.
  • Establish how you will evaluate and assess the assignment. Consider making the self and peer assessments a part of the assignment grade.

Nilson, L. B. (2010).  Teaching at its best: A research-based resource for college instructors  (2nd ed.).  San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. 

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Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a teaching method in which complex real-world problems are used as the vehicle to promote student learning of concepts and principles as opposed to direct presentation of facts and concepts. In addition to course content, PBL can promote the development of critical thinking skills, problem-solving abilities, and communication skills. It can also provide opportunities for working in groups, finding and evaluating research materials, and life-long learning (Duch et al, 2001).

PBL can be incorporated into any learning situation. In the strictest definition of PBL, the approach is used over the entire semester as the primary method of teaching. However, broader definitions and uses range from including PBL in lab and design classes, to using it simply to start a single discussion. PBL can also be used to create assessment items. The main thread connecting these various uses is the real-world problem.

Any subject area can be adapted to PBL with a little creativity. While the core problems will vary among disciplines, there are some characteristics of good PBL problems that transcend fields (Duch, Groh, and Allen, 2001):

  • The problem must motivate students to seek out a deeper understanding of concepts.
  • The problem should require students to make reasoned decisions and to defend them.
  • The problem should incorporate the content objectives in such a way as to connect it to previous courses/knowledge.
  • If used for a group project, the problem needs a level of complexity to ensure that the students must work together to solve it.
  • If used for a multistage project, the initial steps of the problem should be open-ended and engaging to draw students into the problem.

The problems can come from a variety of sources: newspapers, magazines, journals, books, textbooks, and television/ movies. Some are in such form that they can be used with little editing; however, others need to be rewritten to be of use. The following guidelines from The Power of Problem-Based Learning (Duch et al, 2001) are written for creating PBL problems for a class centered around the method; however, the general ideas can be applied in simpler uses of PBL:

  • Choose a central idea, concept, or principle that is always taught in a given course, and then think of a typical end-of-chapter problem, assignment, or homework that is usually assigned to students to help them learn that concept. List the learning objectives that students should meet when they work through the problem.
  • Think of a real-world context for the concept under consideration. Develop a storytelling aspect to an end-of-chapter problem, or research an actual case that can be adapted, adding some motivation for students to solve the problem. More complex problems will challenge students to go beyond simple plug-and-chug to solve it. Look at magazines, newspapers, and articles for ideas on the story line. Some PBL practitioners talk to professionals in the field, searching for ideas of realistic applications of the concept being taught.
  • What will the first page (or stage) look like? What open-ended questions can be asked? What learning issues will be identified?
  • How will the problem be structured?
  • How long will the problem be? How many class periods will it take to complete?
  • Will students be given information in subsequent pages (or stages) as they work through the problem?
  • What resources will the students need?
  • What end product will the students produce at the completion of the problem?
  • Write a teacher's guide detailing the instructional plans on using the problem in the course. If the course is a medium- to large-size class, a combination of mini-lectures, whole-class discussions, and small group work with regular reporting may be necessary. The teacher's guide can indicate plans or options for cycling through the pages of the problem interspersing the various modes of learning.
  • The final step is to identify key resources for students. Students need to learn to identify and utilize learning resources on their own, but it can be helpful if the instructor indicates a few good sources to get them started. Many students will want to limit their research to the Internet, so it will be important to guide them toward the library as well.

The method for distributing a PBL problem falls under three closely related teaching techniques: case studies, role-plays, and simulations. Case studies are presented to students in written form. Role-plays have students improvise scenes based on character descriptions given. Today, simulations often involve computer-based programs. Regardless of which technique is used, the heart of the method remains the same: the real-world problem.

Where can I learn more?

  • PBL through the Institute for Transforming Undergraduate Education at the University of Delaware
  • Duch, B. J., Groh, S. E, & Allen, D. E. (Eds.). (2001). The power of problem-based learning . Sterling, VA: Stylus.
  • Grasha, A. F. (1996). Teaching with style: A practical guide to enhancing learning by understanding teaching and learning styles. Pittsburgh: Alliance Publishers.

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Teaching problem solving: Let students get ‘stuck’ and ‘unstuck’

Subscribe to the center for universal education bulletin, kate mills and km kate mills literacy interventionist - red bank primary school helyn kim helyn kim former brookings expert @helyn_kim.

October 31, 2017

This is the second in a six-part  blog series  on  teaching 21st century skills , including  problem solving ,  metacognition , critical thinking , and collaboration , in classrooms.

In the real world, students encounter problems that are complex, not well defined, and lack a clear solution and approach. They need to be able to identify and apply different strategies to solve these problems. However, problem solving skills do not necessarily develop naturally; they need to be explicitly taught in a way that can be transferred across multiple settings and contexts.

Here’s what Kate Mills, who taught 4 th grade for 10 years at Knollwood School in New Jersey and is now a Literacy Interventionist at Red Bank Primary School, has to say about creating a classroom culture of problem solvers:

Helping my students grow to be people who will be successful outside of the classroom is equally as important as teaching the curriculum. From the first day of school, I intentionally choose language and activities that help to create a classroom culture of problem solvers. I want to produce students who are able to think about achieving a particular goal and manage their mental processes . This is known as metacognition , and research shows that metacognitive skills help students become better problem solvers.

I begin by “normalizing trouble” in the classroom. Peter H. Johnston teaches the importance of normalizing struggle , of naming it, acknowledging it, and calling it what it is: a sign that we’re growing. The goal is for the students to accept challenge and failure as a chance to grow and do better.

I look for every chance to share problems and highlight how the students— not the teachers— worked through those problems. There is, of course, coaching along the way. For example, a science class that is arguing over whose turn it is to build a vehicle will most likely need a teacher to help them find a way to the balance the work in an equitable way. Afterwards, I make it a point to turn it back to the class and say, “Do you see how you …” By naming what it is they did to solve the problem , students can be more independent and productive as they apply and adapt their thinking when engaging in future complex tasks.

After a few weeks, most of the class understands that the teachers aren’t there to solve problems for the students, but to support them in solving the problems themselves. With that important part of our classroom culture established, we can move to focusing on the strategies that students might need.

Here’s one way I do this in the classroom:

I show the broken escalator video to the class. Since my students are fourth graders, they think it’s hilarious and immediately start exclaiming, “Just get off! Walk!”

When the video is over, I say, “Many of us, probably all of us, are like the man in the video yelling for help when we get stuck. When we get stuck, we stop and immediately say ‘Help!’ instead of embracing the challenge and trying new ways to work through it.” I often introduce this lesson during math class, but it can apply to any area of our lives, and I can refer to the experience and conversation we had during any part of our day.

Research shows that just because students know the strategies does not mean they will engage in the appropriate strategies. Therefore, I try to provide opportunities where students can explicitly practice learning how, when, and why to use which strategies effectively  so that they can become self-directed learners.

For example, I give students a math problem that will make many of them feel “stuck”. I will say, “Your job is to get yourselves stuck—or to allow yourselves to get stuck on this problem—and then work through it, being mindful of how you’re getting yourselves unstuck.” As students work, I check-in to help them name their process: “How did you get yourself unstuck?” or “What was your first step? What are you doing now? What might you try next?” As students talk about their process, I’ll add to a list of strategies that students are using and, if they are struggling, help students name a specific process. For instance, if a student says he wrote the information from the math problem down and points to a chart, I will say: “Oh that’s interesting. You pulled the important information from the problem out and organized it into a chart.” In this way, I am giving him the language to match what he did, so that he now has a strategy he could use in other times of struggle.

The charts grow with us over time and are something that we refer to when students are stuck or struggling. They become a resource for students and a way for them to talk about their process when they are reflecting on and monitoring what did or did not work.

For me, as a teacher, it is important that I create a classroom environment in which students are problem solvers. This helps tie struggles to strategies so that the students will not only see value in working harder but in working smarter by trying new and different strategies and revising their process. In doing so, they will more successful the next time around.

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Don’t Just Tell Students to Solve Problems. Teach Them How.

The positive impact of an innovative uc san diego problem-solving educational curriculum continues to grow.

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Problem solving is a critical skill for technical education and technical careers of all types. But what are best practices for teaching problem solving to high school and college students? 

The University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering is on the forefront of efforts to improve how problem solving is taught. This UC San Diego approach puts hands-on problem-identification and problem-solving techniques front and center. Over 1,500 students across the San Diego region have already benefited over the last three years from this program. In the 2023-2024 academic year, approximately 1,000 upper-level high school students will be taking the problem solving course in four different school districts in the San Diego region. Based on the positive results with college students, as well as high school juniors and seniors in the San Diego region, the project is getting attention from educators across the state of California, and around the nation and the world.

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In Summer 2023, th e 27 community college students who took the unique problem-solving course developed at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering thrived, according to Alex Phan PhD, the Executive Director of Student Success at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. Phan oversees the project. 

Over the course of three weeks, these students from Southwestern College and San Diego City College poured their enthusiasm into problem solving through hands-on team engineering challenges. The students brimmed with positive energy as they worked together. 

What was noticeably absent from this laboratory classroom: frustration.

“In school, we often tell students to brainstorm, but they don’t often know where to start. This curriculum gives students direct strategies for brainstorming, for identifying problems, for solving problems,” sai d Jennifer Ogo, a teacher from Kearny High School who taught the problem-solving course in summer 2023 at UC San Diego. Ogo was part of group of educators who took the course themselves last summer.

The curriculum has been created, refined and administered over the last three years through a collaboration between the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and the UC San Diego Division of Extended Studies. The project kicked off in 2020 with a generous gift from a local philanthropist.

Not getting stuck

One of the overarching goals of this project is to teach both problem-identification and problem-solving skills that help students avoid getting stuck during the learning process. Stuck feelings lead to frustration – and when it’s a Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) project, that frustration can lead students to feel they don’t belong in a STEM major or a STEM career. Instead, the UC San Diego curriculum is designed to give students the tools that lead to reactions like “this class is hard, but I know I can do this!” –  as Ogo, a celebrated high school biomedical sciences and technology teacher, put it. 

Three years into the curriculum development effort, the light-hearted energy of the students combined with their intense focus points to success. On the last day of the class, Mourad Mjahed PhD, Director of the MESA Program at Southwestern College’s School of Mathematics, Science and Engineering came to UC San Diego to see the final project presentations made by his 22 MESA students.

“Industry is looking for students who have learned from their failures and who have worked outside of their comfort zones,” said Mjahed. The UC San Diego problem-solving curriculum, Mjahed noted, is an opportunity for students to build the skills and the confidence to learn from their failures and to work outside their comfort zone. “And from there, they see pathways to real careers,” he said. 

What does it mean to explicitly teach problem solving? 

This approach to teaching problem solving includes a significant focus on learning to identify the problem that actually needs to be solved, in order to avoid solving the wrong problem. The curriculum is organized so that each day is a complete experience. It begins with the teacher introducing the problem-identification or problem-solving strategy of the day. The teacher then presents case studies of that particular strategy in action. Next, the students get introduced to the day’s challenge project. Working in teams, the students compete to win the challenge while integrating the day’s technique. Finally, the class reconvenes to reflect. They discuss what worked and didn't work with their designs as well as how they could have used the day’s problem-identification or problem-solving technique more effectively. 

The challenges are designed to be engaging – and over three years, they have been refined to be even more engaging. But the student engagement is about much more than being entertained. Many of the students recognize early on that the problem-identification and problem-solving skills they are learning can be applied not just in the classroom, but in other classes and in life in general. 

Gabriel from Southwestern College is one of the students who saw benefits outside the classroom almost immediately. In addition to taking the UC San Diego problem-solving course, Gabriel was concurrently enrolled in an online computer science programming class. He said he immediately started applying the UC San Diego problem-identification and troubleshooting strategies to his coding assignments. 

Gabriel noted that he was given a coding-specific troubleshooting strategy in the computer science course, but the more general problem-identification strategies from the UC San Diego class had been extremely helpful. It’s critical to “find the right problem so you can get the right solution. The strategies here,” he said, “they work everywhere.”

Phan echoed this sentiment. “We believe this curriculum can prepare students for the technical workforce. It can prepare students to be impactful for any career path.”

The goal is to be able to offer the course in community colleges for course credit that transfers to the UC, and to possibly offer a version of the course to incoming students at UC San Diego. 

As the team continues to work towards integrating the curriculum in both standardized high school courses such as physics, and incorporating the content as a part of the general education curriculum at UC San Diego, the project is expected to impact thousands more students across San Diego annually. 

Portrait of the Problem-Solving Curriculum

On a sunny Wednesday in July 2023, an experiential-learning classroom was full of San Diego community college students. They were about half-way through the three-week problem-solving course at UC San Diego, held in the campus’ EnVision Arts and Engineering Maker Studio. On this day, the students were challenged to build a contraption that would propel at least six ping pong balls along a kite string spanning the laboratory. The only propulsive force they could rely on was the air shooting out of a party balloon.

A team of three students from Southwestern College – Valeria, Melissa and Alondra – took an early lead in the classroom competition. They were the first to use a plastic bag instead of disposable cups to hold the ping pong balls. Using a bag, their design got more than half-way to the finish line – better than any other team at the time – but there was more work to do. 

As the trio considered what design changes to make next, they returned to the problem-solving theme of the day: unintended consequences. Earlier in the day, all the students had been challenged to consider unintended consequences and ask questions like: When you design to reduce friction, what happens? Do new problems emerge? Did other things improve that you hadn’t anticipated? 

Other groups soon followed Valeria, Melissa and Alondra’s lead and began iterating on their own plastic-bag solutions to the day’s challenge. New unintended consequences popped up everywhere. Switching from cups to a bag, for example, reduced friction but sometimes increased wind drag. 

Over the course of several iterations, Valeria, Melissa and Alondra made their bag smaller, blew their balloon up bigger, and switched to a different kind of tape to get a better connection with the plastic straw that slid along the kite string, carrying the ping pong balls. 

One of the groups on the other side of the room watched the emergence of the plastic-bag solution with great interest. 

“We tried everything, then we saw a team using a bag,” said Alexander, a student from City College. His team adopted the plastic-bag strategy as well, and iterated on it like everyone else. They also chose to blow up their balloon with a hand pump after the balloon was already attached to the bag filled with ping pong balls – which was unique. 

“I don’t want to be trying to put the balloon in place when it's about to explode,” Alexander explained. 

Asked about whether the structured problem solving approaches were useful, Alexander’s teammate Brianna, who is a Southwestern College student, talked about how the problem-solving tools have helped her get over mental blocks. “Sometimes we make the most ridiculous things work,” she said. “It’s a pretty fun class for sure.” 

Yoshadara, a City College student who is the third member of this team, described some of the problem solving techniques this way: “It’s about letting yourself be a little absurd.”

Alexander jumped back into the conversation. “The value is in the abstraction. As students, we learn to look at the problem solving that worked and then abstract out the problem solving strategy that can then be applied to other challenges. That’s what mathematicians do all the time,” he said, adding that he is already thinking about how he can apply the process of looking at unintended consequences to improve both how he plays chess and how he goes about solving math problems.

Looking ahead, the goal is to empower as many students as possible in the San Diego area and  beyond to learn to problem solve more enjoyably. It’s a concrete way to give students tools that could encourage them to thrive in the growing number of technical careers that require sharp problem-solving skills, whether or not they require a four-year degree. 

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Problem-Solving

TeacherVision Staff

Jabberwocky

Problem-solving is the ability to identify and solve problems by applying appropriate skills systematically.

Problem-solving is a process—an ongoing activity in which we take what we know to discover what we don't know. It involves overcoming obstacles by generating hypo-theses, testing those predictions, and arriving at satisfactory solutions.

Problem-solving involves three basic functions:

Seeking information

Generating new knowledge

Making decisions

Problem-solving is, and should be, a very real part of the curriculum. It presupposes that students can take on some of the responsibility for their own learning and can take personal action to solve problems, resolve conflicts, discuss alternatives, and focus on thinking as a vital element of the curriculum. It provides students with opportunities to use their newly acquired knowledge in meaningful, real-life activities and assists them in working at higher levels of thinking (see Levels of Questions ).

Here is a five-stage model that most students can easily memorize and put into action and which has direct applications to many areas of the curriculum as well as everyday life:

Expert Opinion

Here are some techniques that will help students understand the nature of a problem and the conditions that surround it:

  • List all related relevant facts.
  • Make a list of all the given information.
  • Restate the problem in their own words.
  • List the conditions that surround a problem.
  • Describe related known problems.

It's Elementary

For younger students, illustrations are helpful in organizing data, manipulating information, and outlining the limits of a problem and its possible solution(s). Students can use drawings to help them look at a problem from many different perspectives.

Understand the problem. It's important that students understand the nature of a problem and its related goals. Encourage students to frame a problem in their own words.

Describe any barriers. Students need to be aware of any barriers or constraints that may be preventing them from achieving their goal. In short, what is creating the problem? Encouraging students to verbalize these impediments is always an important step.

Identify various solutions. After the nature and parameters of a problem are understood, students will need to select one or more appropriate strategies to help resolve the problem. Students need to understand that they have many strategies available to them and that no single strategy will work for all problems. Here are some problem-solving possibilities:

Create visual images. Many problem-solvers find it useful to create “mind pictures” of a problem and its potential solutions prior to working on the problem. Mental imaging allows the problem-solvers to map out many dimensions of a problem and “see” it clearly.

Guesstimate. Give students opportunities to engage in some trial-and-error approaches to problem-solving. It should be understood, however, that this is not a singular approach to problem-solving but rather an attempt to gather some preliminary data.

Create a table. A table is an orderly arrangement of data. When students have opportunities to design and create tables of information, they begin to understand that they can group and organize most data relative to a problem.

Use manipulatives. By moving objects around on a table or desk, students can develop patterns and organize elements of a problem into recognizable and visually satisfying components.

Work backward. It's frequently helpful for students to take the data presented at the end of a problem and use a series of computations to arrive at the data presented at the beginning of the problem.

Look for a pattern. Looking for patterns is an important problem-solving strategy because many problems are similar and fall into predictable patterns. A pattern, by definition, is a regular, systematic repetition and may be numerical, visual, or behavioral.

Create a systematic list. Recording information in list form is a process used quite frequently to map out a plan of attack for defining and solving problems. Encourage students to record their ideas in lists to determine regularities, patterns, or similarities between problem elements.

Try out a solution. When working through a strategy or combination of strategies, it will be important for students to …

Keep accurate and up-to-date records of their thoughts, proceedings, and procedures. Recording the data collected, the predictions made, and the strategies used is an important part of the problem solving process.

Try to work through a selected strategy or combination of strategies until it becomes evident that it's not working, it needs to be modified, or it is yielding inappropriate data. As students become more proficient problem-solvers, they should feel comfortable rejecting potential strategies at any time during their quest for solutions.

Monitor with great care the steps undertaken as part of a solution. Although it might be a natural tendency for students to “rush” through a strategy to arrive at a quick answer, encourage them to carefully assess and monitor their progress.

Feel comfortable putting a problem aside for a period of time and tackling it at a later time. For example, scientists rarely come up with a solution the first time they approach a problem. Students should also feel comfortable letting a problem rest for a while and returning to it later.

Evaluate the results. It's vitally important that students have multiple opportunities to assess their own problem-solving skills and the solutions they generate from using those skills. Frequently, students are overly dependent upon teachers to evaluate their performance in the classroom. The process of self-assessment is not easy, however. It involves risk-taking, self-assurance, and a certain level of independence. But it can be effectively promoted by asking students questions such as “How do you feel about your progress so far?” “Are you satisfied with the results you obtained?” and “Why do you believe this is an appropriate response to the problem?”

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5 Teaching Mathematics Through Problem Solving

Janet Stramel

Problem Solving

In his book “How to Solve It,” George Pólya (1945) said, “One of the most important tasks of the teacher is to help his students. This task is not quite easy; it demands time, practice, devotion, and sound principles. The student should acquire as much experience of independent work as possible. But if he is left alone with his problem without any help, he may make no progress at all. If the teacher helps too much, nothing is left to the student. The teacher should help, but not too much and not too little, so that the student shall have a reasonable share of the work.” (page 1)

What is a problem  in mathematics? A problem is “any task or activity for which the students have no prescribed or memorized rules or methods, nor is there a perception by students that there is a specific ‘correct’ solution method” (Hiebert, et. al., 1997). Problem solving in mathematics is one of the most important topics to teach; learning to problem solve helps students develop a sense of solving real-life problems and apply mathematics to real world situations. It is also used for a deeper understanding of mathematical concepts. Learning “math facts” is not enough; students must also learn how to use these facts to develop their thinking skills.

According to NCTM (2010), the term “problem solving” refers to mathematical tasks that have the potential to provide intellectual challenges for enhancing students’ mathematical understanding and development. When you first hear “problem solving,” what do you think about? Story problems or word problems? Story problems may be limited to and not “problematic” enough. For example, you may ask students to find the area of a rectangle, given the length and width. This type of problem is an exercise in computation and can be completed mindlessly without understanding the concept of area. Worthwhile problems  includes problems that are truly problematic and have the potential to provide contexts for students’ mathematical development.

There are three ways to solve problems: teaching for problem solving, teaching about problem solving, and teaching through problem solving.

Teaching for problem solving begins with learning a skill. For example, students are learning how to multiply a two-digit number by a one-digit number, and the story problems you select are multiplication problems. Be sure when you are teaching for problem solving, you select or develop tasks that can promote the development of mathematical understanding.

Teaching about problem solving begins with suggested strategies to solve a problem. For example, “draw a picture,” “make a table,” etc. You may see posters in teachers’ classrooms of the “Problem Solving Method” such as: 1) Read the problem, 2) Devise a plan, 3) Solve the problem, and 4) Check your work. There is little or no evidence that students’ problem-solving abilities are improved when teaching about problem solving. Students will see a word problem as a separate endeavor and focus on the steps to follow rather than the mathematics. In addition, students will tend to use trial and error instead of focusing on sense making.

Teaching through problem solving  focuses students’ attention on ideas and sense making and develops mathematical practices. Teaching through problem solving also develops a student’s confidence and builds on their strengths. It allows for collaboration among students and engages students in their own learning.

Consider the following worthwhile-problem criteria developed by Lappan and Phillips (1998):

  • The problem has important, useful mathematics embedded in it.
  • The problem requires high-level thinking and problem solving.
  • The problem contributes to the conceptual development of students.
  • The problem creates an opportunity for the teacher to assess what his or her students are learning and where they are experiencing difficulty.
  • The problem can be approached by students in multiple ways using different solution strategies.
  • The problem has various solutions or allows different decisions or positions to be taken and defended.
  • The problem encourages student engagement and discourse.
  • The problem connects to other important mathematical ideas.
  • The problem promotes the skillful use of mathematics.
  • The problem provides an opportunity to practice important skills.

Of course, not every problem will include all of the above. Sometimes, you will choose a problem because your students need an opportunity to practice a certain skill.

Key features of a good mathematics problem includes:

  • It must begin where the students are mathematically.
  • The feature of the problem must be the mathematics that students are to learn.
  • It must require justifications and explanations for both answers and methods of solving.

Needlepoint of cats

Problem solving is not a  neat and orderly process. Think about needlework. On the front side, it is neat and perfect and pretty.

Back of a needlepoint

But look at the b ack.

It is messy and full of knots and loops. Problem solving in mathematics is also like this and we need to help our students be “messy” with problem solving; they need to go through those knots and loops and learn how to solve problems with the teacher’s guidance.

When you teach through problem solving , your students are focused on ideas and sense-making and they develop confidence in mathematics!

Mathematics Tasks and Activities that Promote Teaching through Problem Solving

Teacher teaching a math lesson

Choosing the Right Task

Selecting activities and/or tasks is the most significant decision teachers make that will affect students’ learning. Consider the following questions:

  • Teachers must do the activity first. What is problematic about the activity? What will you need to do BEFORE the activity and AFTER the activity? Additionally, think how your students would do the activity.
  • What mathematical ideas will the activity develop? Are there connections to other related mathematics topics, or other content areas?
  • Can the activity accomplish your learning objective/goals?

solving problem method of teaching

Low Floor High Ceiling Tasks

By definition, a “ low floor/high ceiling task ” is a mathematical activity where everyone in the group can begin and then work on at their own level of engagement. Low Floor High Ceiling Tasks are activities that everyone can begin and work on based on their own level, and have many possibilities for students to do more challenging mathematics. One gauge of knowing whether an activity is a Low Floor High Ceiling Task is when the work on the problems becomes more important than the answer itself, and leads to rich mathematical discourse [Hover: ways of representing, thinking, talking, agreeing, and disagreeing; the way ideas are exchanged and what the ideas entail; and as being shaped by the tasks in which students engage as well as by the nature of the learning environment].

The strengths of using Low Floor High Ceiling Tasks:

  • Allows students to show what they can do, not what they can’t.
  • Provides differentiation to all students.
  • Promotes a positive classroom environment.
  • Advances a growth mindset in students
  • Aligns with the Standards for Mathematical Practice

Examples of some Low Floor High Ceiling Tasks can be found at the following sites:

  • YouCubed – under grades choose Low Floor High Ceiling
  • NRICH Creating a Low Threshold High Ceiling Classroom
  • Inside Mathematics Problems of the Month

Math in 3-Acts

Math in 3-Acts was developed by Dan Meyer to spark an interest in and engage students in thought-provoking mathematical inquiry. Math in 3-Acts is a whole-group mathematics task consisting of three distinct parts:

Act One is about noticing and wondering. The teacher shares with students an image, video, or other situation that is engaging and perplexing. Students then generate questions about the situation.

In Act Two , the teacher offers some information for the students to use as they find the solutions to the problem.

Act Three is the “reveal.” Students share their thinking as well as their solutions.

“Math in 3 Acts” is a fun way to engage your students, there is a low entry point that gives students confidence, there are multiple paths to a solution, and it encourages students to work in groups to solve the problem. Some examples of Math in 3-Acts can be found at the following websites:

  • Dan Meyer’s Three-Act Math Tasks
  • Graham Fletcher3-Act Tasks ]
  • Math in 3-Acts: Real World Math Problems to Make Math Contextual, Visual and Concrete

Number Talks

Number talks are brief, 5-15 minute discussions that focus on student solutions for a mental math computation problem. Students share their different mental math processes aloud while the teacher records their thinking visually on a chart or board. In addition, students learn from each other’s strategies as they question, critique, or build on the strategies that are shared.. To use a “number talk,” you would include the following steps:

  • The teacher presents a problem for students to solve mentally.
  • Provide adequate “ wait time .”
  • The teacher calls on a students and asks, “What were you thinking?” and “Explain your thinking.”
  • For each student who volunteers to share their strategy, write their thinking on the board. Make sure to accurately record their thinking; do not correct their responses.
  • Invite students to question each other about their strategies, compare and contrast the strategies, and ask for clarification about strategies that are confusing.

“Number Talks” can be used as an introduction, a warm up to a lesson, or an extension. Some examples of Number Talks can be found at the following websites:

  • Inside Mathematics Number Talks
  • Number Talks Build Numerical Reasoning

Light bulb

Saying “This is Easy”

“This is easy.” Three little words that can have a big impact on students. What may be “easy” for one person, may be more “difficult” for someone else. And saying “this is easy” defeats the purpose of a growth mindset classroom, where students are comfortable making mistakes.

When the teacher says, “this is easy,” students may think,

  • “Everyone else understands and I don’t. I can’t do this!”
  • Students may just give up and surrender the mathematics to their classmates.
  • Students may shut down.

Instead, you and your students could say the following:

  • “I think I can do this.”
  • “I have an idea I want to try.”
  • “I’ve seen this kind of problem before.”

Tracy Zager wrote a short article, “This is easy”: The Little Phrase That Causes Big Problems” that can give you more information. Read Tracy Zager’s article here.

Using “Worksheets”

Do you want your students to memorize concepts, or do you want them to understand and apply the mathematics for different situations?

What is a “worksheet” in mathematics? It is a paper and pencil assignment when no other materials are used. A worksheet does not allow your students to use hands-on materials/manipulatives [Hover: physical objects that are used as teaching tools to engage students in the hands-on learning of mathematics]; and worksheets are many times “naked number” with no context. And a worksheet should not be used to enhance a hands-on activity.

Students need time to explore and manipulate materials in order to learn the mathematics concept. Worksheets are just a test of rote memory. Students need to develop those higher-order thinking skills, and worksheets will not allow them to do that.

One productive belief from the NCTM publication, Principles to Action (2014), states, “Students at all grade levels can benefit from the use of physical and virtual manipulative materials to provide visual models of a range of mathematical ideas.”

You may need an “activity sheet,” a “graphic organizer,” etc. as you plan your mathematics activities/lessons, but be sure to include hands-on manipulatives. Using manipulatives can

  • Provide your students a bridge between the concrete and abstract
  • Serve as models that support students’ thinking
  • Provide another representation
  • Support student engagement
  • Give students ownership of their own learning.

Adapted from “ The Top 5 Reasons for Using Manipulatives in the Classroom ”.

any task or activity for which the students have no prescribed or memorized rules or methods, nor is there a perception by students that there is a specific ‘correct’ solution method

should be intriguing and contain a level of challenge that invites speculation and hard work, and directs students to investigate important mathematical ideas and ways of thinking toward the learning

involves teaching a skill so that a student can later solve a story problem

when we teach students how to problem solve

teaching mathematics content through real contexts, problems, situations, and models

a mathematical activity where everyone in the group can begin and then work on at their own level of engagement

20 seconds to 2 minutes for students to make sense of questions

Mathematics Methods for Early Childhood Copyright © 2021 by Janet Stramel is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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Problem Solving Method Of Teaching

A woman stands beside an expansive screen, showing a map of different locations. She holds a clipboard in her hands as she looks intently at the map. A man in a black shirt and grey pants is pointing to something on the map. On the right-hand side of the map, there is a truck symbol with a pointer. On the left-hand side, there is a white airplane on a black and orange pin. Above the map is a yellow and black striped object, with a white object with black lines beside it. Below the map is a yellow and white logo and a yellow and grey sign with black text.

The problem-solving method of teaching is the learning method that allows children to learn by doing. This is because they are given examples and real-world situations so that the theory behind it can be understood better, as well as practice with each new concept or skill taught on top of what was previously learned in class before moving onto another topic at hand.

What is your preferred problem-solving technique?

Answers : - I like to brainstorm and see what works for me - I enjoy the trial and error method - I am a linear thinker

Share it with me by commenting.

For example, while solving a problem, the child may encounter terms he has not studied yet. These will further help him understand their use in context while developing his vocabulary. At the same time, being able to practice math concepts by tapping into daily activities helps an individual retain these skills better.

One way this type of teaching is applied for younger students particularly is through games played during lessons. By allowing them to become comfortable with the concepts taught through these games, they can put their knowledge into use later on. This is done by developing thinking processes that precede an action or behavior. These games can be used by teachers for different subjects including science and language.

For younger students still, the method of teaching using real-life examples helps them understand better. Through this, it becomes easier for them to relate what they learned in school with terms used outside of school settings so that the information sticks better than if all they were given were theoretical definitions. For instance, instead of just studying photosynthesis as part of biology lessons, children are asked to imagine plants growing inside a dark room because there is no sunlight present. When questioned about the plants, children will be able to recall photosynthesis more easily because they were able to see its importance in real life.

Despite being given specific examples, the act of solving problems helps students think for themselves. They learn how to approach situations and predict outcomes based on what they already know about concepts or ideas taught in class including the use of various skills they have acquired over time. These include problem-solving strategies like using drawings when describing a solution or asking advice if they are stuck to unlock solutions that would otherwise go beyond their reach.

Teachers need to point out in advance which method will be used for any particular lesson before having children engage with it. By doing this, individuals can prepare themselves mentally for what is to come. This is especially true for students who have difficulty with a particular subject. In these cases, the teacher can help them get started by providing a worked example for reference or breaking the problem down into manageable chunks that are easier to digest.

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Ultimately, the goal of teaching using a problem-solving method is to give children the opportunity to think for themselves and to be able to do so in different contexts. Doing this helps foster independent learners who can utilize the skills they acquired in school for future endeavors.

The problem-solving method of teaching allows children to learn by doing. This is because they are given examples and real-world situations so that the theory behind it can be understood better, as practice with each new concept or skill taught on top of what was previously learned in class before moving onto another topic at hand.

One way this type of teaching is applied for younger students particularly is through games played during lessons. By allowing them to become comfortable with the concepts taught through these games, they are able to put their knowledge into use later on. This is done by developing thinking processes that precede an action or behavior. These games can be used by teachers for different subjects including science and language.

For instance, a teacher may ask students to imagine they are plants in a dark room because there is no sunlight present. When questioned about the plants, children will be able to recall photosynthesis more easily because they were able to see its importance in real life.

It is important for teachers to point out in advance which method will be used for any particular lesson before having children engage with it. By doing this, individuals can prepare themselves mentally for what is to come. This is especially true for students who have difficulty with a particular subject. In these cases, the teacher can help them get started by providing a worked example for reference or breaking the problem down into manageable chunks that are easier to digest.

lesson before having children engage with it. By doing this, individuals can prepare themselves mentally for what is to come. This is especially true for students who have difficulty with a particular subject. In these cases, the teacher can help them get started by providing a worked example for reference or breaking the problem down into manageable chunks that are easier to digest.

The teacher should have a few different ways to solve the problem.

For example, the teacher can provide a worked example for reference or break down the problem into chunks that are easier to digest.

The goal of teaching using a problem-solving method is to give children the opportunity to think for themselves and to be able to do so in different contexts. Successful problem solving allows children to become comfortable with concepts taught through games that develop thinking processes that precede an action or behavior.

Introduce the problem

The problem solving method of teaching is a popular approach to learning that allows students to understand new concepts by doing. This approach provides students with examples and real-world situations, so they can see how the theory behind a concept or skill works in practice. In addition, students are given practice with each new concept or skill taught, before moving on to the next topic. This helps them learn and retain the information better.

Explain why the problem solving method of teaching is effective.

The problem solving method of teaching is effective because it allows students to learn by doing. This means they can see how the theory behind a concept or skill works in practice, which helps them understand and remember the information better. This would not be possible if they are only told about the new concept or skill, or read a textbook to learn on their own. Since students can see how the theory works in practice through examples and real-world situations, the information is easier for them to understand.

List some advantages of using the problem solving method of teaching.

Some advantages of using the problem solving method of teaching are that it helps students retain information better since they are able to practice with each new concept or skill taught until they master it before moving on to another topic. This also allows them to learn by doing so they will have hands-on experience with facts which helps them remember important facts faster rather than just hearing about it or reading about it on their own. Furthermore, this teaching method is beneficial for students of all ages and can be adapted to different subjects making it an approach that is versatile and easily used in a classroom setting. Lastly, the problem solving method of teaching presents new information in a way that is easy to understand so students are not overwhelmed with complex material.

The problem solving method of teaching is an effective way for students to learn new concepts and skills. By providing them with examples and real-world situations, they can see how the theory behind a concept or skill works in practice. In addition, students are given practice with each new concept or skill taught, before moving on to the next topic. This them learn and retain the information better.

What has been your experience with adopting a problem-solving teaching method?

How do you feel the usefulness of your lesson plans changed since adopting this method?

What was one of your most successful attempts in using this technique to teach students, and why do you believe it was so successful?

Were there any obstacles when trying to incorporate this technique into your class? 

Did it take a while for all students to get used to the new type of teaching style before they felt comfortable enough to participate in discussions and ask questions about their newly acquired knowledge?

What are your thoughts on this method? 

“I have had the opportunity to work in several districts, including one where they used problem solving for all subjects. I never looked back after that experience--it was exciting and motivating for students and teachers alike." 

"The problem solving method of teaching is great because it makes my subject matter more interesting with hands-on activities."

Active Learning, Teaching through problem-solving allows for active learning, Children understand the theory better by getting involved in real-world situations, Practice, Continuous practice is integral to problem-solving teaching, Each new skill or concept is practiced after being learned in class, Relevance, Problem-solving techniques make learning more relevant, Real-world examples related to the topic are presented, Incremental Learning, Each new topic builds on previous lessons, Relating new problems to ones solved in previous sessions, Overcome Challenges, Enhances ability to overcome real-world situations, Children understand the application of skills learned, Variety, Problem-solving allows flexibility in teaching methods, Problems can be practical, conceptual, or theoretical, Critical Thinking, Improves children's critical thinking skills, Adding alternative paths to a solution, Confidence, Boosts children's confidence in handling problems, Children feel empowered after successfully solving a problem, Adaptability, Increases adaptability to new learning situations, Children can apply learned strategies to new problems, Engagement, Problem-solving increases engagement and interest, Children find solving real-world examples interesting

What is the role of educators in facilitating problem-solving method of teaching?

Role of Educators in Facilitating Problem-Solving Understanding the Problem-Solving Method The problem-solving method of teaching encourages students to actively engage their critical thinking skills to analyze and seek solutions to real-world problems. As such, educators play a crucial part in facilitating this learning style to ensure the effective attainment of desired skills. Encouraging Collaboration and Communication One of the ways educators can facilitate problem-solving is by promoting collaboration and communication among students. Working as a team allows students to share diverse perspectives while considering multiple solutions, thereby fostering an open-minded and inclusive environment that is crucial for effective problem-solving. Creating a Safe Space for Failure Educators must recognize that failure is an integral component of the learning process in a problem-solving method. By establishing a safe environment that allows students to fail without facing judgment or embarrassment, teachers enable students to develop perseverance, resilience, and an enhanced ability to learn from mistakes. Designing Relevant and Engaging Problems The selection and design of appropriate problems contribute significantly to the success of the problem-solving method of teaching. Educators should focus on presenting issues that are relevant, engaging, and age-appropriate, thereby sparking curiosity and interest amongst students, which further improves their problem-solving abilities. Scaffolding Learning Scaffolding is essential in the problem-solving method for providing adequate support when required. Teachers need to break down complex problems into smaller, manageable steps, and gradually remove support as students develop the necessary skills, thus promoting their self-reliance and independent thinking. Providing Constructive Feedback Constructive feedback from educators is invaluable in facilitating the problem-solving method of teaching, as it enables students to reflect on their progress, recognize areas for improvement, and actively develop their critical thinking and problem-solving abilities. In conclusion, the role of educators in facilitating the problem-solving method of teaching comprises promoting collaboration, creating a safe space for failure, designing relevant problems, scaffolding learning, and providing constructive feedback. By integrating these elements, educators can help students develop essential life-long skills and effectively navigate the complex world they will experience.

The problem-solving method of teaching is a dynamic and interactive instructional strategy that engages students directly with challenges that resemble those they might encounter outside of the classroom. Within this framework, educators are not just conveyors of knowledge, but rather facilitators of learning who empower their students to think critically and deeply. Below, we look into the nuanced role educators play in making the problem-solving method impactful.Firstly, educators must curate an atmosphere that is conducive to inquiry and exploration. They set the tone by modeling an inquisitive mindset, posing thought-provoking questions, and encouraging students to ask why, how, and what if without hesitation. This intellectual curiosity promotes the kind of deep thinking that underpins successful problem-solving.Another key responsibility is to scaffold the complexity of problems. Educators do so by assessing the readiness of their students and designing tasks that are at the appropriate level of difficulty. They must ensure challenges are neither too easy – risking boredom and disengagement – nor too difficult – potentially causing frustration and disheartenment. By striking this balance, educators help students to experience incremental success and build their problem-solving capacities over time.Educators must also provide students with relevant tools and methodologies. This might involve teaching specific problem-solving strategies such as the scientific method, design thinking, or computational thinking. Educators help students to become conversant in these approaches, allowing them to tackle problems methodically and effectively.Assessment is another pivotal area where educators play a vital role in the problem-solving method. The traditional means of assessment may not always capture the depth of understanding and learning that occurs in problem-solving scenarios. Therefore, educators develop alternative forms of assessment, such as reflective journals, portfolios, and presentations, to better gauge student learning and thinking processes.Finally, educators must be adept at facilitating group dynamics. Collaborative problem-solving can be powerful, but it also invites a range of interpersonal challenges. Thus, educators need to guide students in conflict resolution, equitable participation, and recognizing the contribution of each member to the collective effort.Educators facilitate the problem-solving method by fostering inquiry, balancing problem difficulty, equipping students with methodologies, rethinking assessment, and nurturing group cooperation. In doing so, they are not simply providing students with content knowledge but are equipping them with crucial life skills that transcend educational settings and prepare them for real-world challenges.

Can interdisciplinary approaches be incorporated into problem-solving teaching methods, and if so, how?

Interdisciplinary Approaches in Problem-Solving Teaching Methods Integration of Interdisciplinary Approaches Incorporating interdisciplinary approaches into problem-solving teaching methods can be achieved by integrating various subject areas when presenting complex problems that require students to draw from different fields of knowledge. By doing so, learners will develop a deeper understanding of the interconnectedness of various disciplines and improve their problem-solving skills. Project-Based Learning Activities Implementing project-based learning activities in the classroom allows students to work collaboratively on real-world problems. By involving learners in tasks that necessitate the integration of diverse subjects, they develop the ability to transfer skills acquired in one context to novel situations, thereby expanding their problem-solving abilities. Role of Teachers in Interdisciplinary Teaching Teachers play a crucial role in the successful incorporation of interdisciplinary methods in problem-solving teaching. They must be prepared to facilitate student-centered learning and engage in ongoing professional development tailored towards interdisciplinary education. In doing so, educators can create inclusive learning environments that encourage individualized discovery and the application of diverse perspectives to solve complex problems. Benefits of Interdisciplinary Teaching Methods Adopting interdisciplinary teaching methods in problem-solving education not only enhances students' problem-solving abilities but also fosters the development of critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration. These essential skills enable learners to navigate and adapt to an increasingly interconnected world and have been shown to contribute to students' academic and professional success. In conclusion, incorporating interdisciplinary approaches into problem-solving teaching methods can be achieved through the integration of various subject areas, implementing project-based learning activities, and the active role of teachers in interdisciplinary education. These methods benefit students by developing problem-solving skills, critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration, preparing them for future success in an interconnected world.

Interdisciplinary approaches in problem-solving teaching methods present a contemporary framework for preparing students to tackle the complexities of real-world issues. This approach can bridge the gap between various academic disciplines, offering students a more holistic and connected way of thinking.**Embracing Complexity through Interdisciplinary Problem-Solving**Problem-solving in education is no longer confined to single-subject exercises. Interdisciplinary problem-solving recognizes the multifaceted nature of real issues and encourages students to tackle them by drawing from multiple disciplines. For instance, when examining the impacts of urbanization, students might incorporate knowledge from sociology, economics, environmental science, and urban planning.**Strategies for Implementing an Interdisciplinary Approach**Various strategies can be employed to incorporate interdisciplinary methods effectively:1. **Cross-Curricular Projects**: These require students to apply knowledge and skills across different subject areas, fostering an understanding of each discipline’s unique contribution to the whole problem.2. **Thematic Units**: By designing units around broad themes, educators can seamlessly weave multiple subjects into the exploration of a single topic, prompting students to see connections between different areas of study.3. **Collaborative Teaching**: When educators from different disciplines co-teach, they can provide a combined perspective that enriches the learning experience and demonstrates the value of integrating knowledge.4. **Inquiry-Based Learning**: Encourages students to ask questions and conduct research across multiple disciplines, leading to comprehensive investigations and solutions.**Outcome-Benefits of Interdisciplinary Teaching**The merits of an interdisciplinary approach within problem-solving teaching methods are manifold:1. **Complex Problem Understanding**: It can elevate a student’s ability to deconstruct complicated issues by understanding various factors and viewpoints.2. **Adaptability**: Students learn to apply knowledge pragmatically, enabling them to adapt to new and unforeseen problems.3. **Enhanced Cognitive Abilities**: The process can promote cognitive growth, supporting the development of higher-order thinking skills like analysis and synthesis.4. **Real-World Relevance**: Students find meaning and motivation in their work when they see its relevance outside the classroom walls.In summary, integrating interdisciplinary approaches into problem-solving methods is a highly effective way to provide students with robust and adaptable skills for the future. By engaging in project-based learning activities, enjoying the support of proactive educators, and seeing the interconnectivity across subjects, students can foster critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative abilities that transcend traditional learning boundaries. As we navigate a rapidly evolving and interrelated global landscape, such approaches to education become not just advantageous but essential.

In what ways can technology be integrated into the problem-solving method of instruction?

**Role of Technology in Problem-Solving Instruction** Technology can be integrated into the problem-solving method of instruction by enhancing student engagement, promoting collaboration, and supporting personalized learning. **Enhancing Student Engagement** One way technology supports the problem-solving method is by increasing students' interest through interactive and dynamic tools. For instance, digital simulations and educational games can help students develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills in a fun, engaging manner. These tools provide real-world contexts and immediate feedback, allowing students to experiment, take risks, and learn from their mistakes. **Promoting Collaboration** Technology also promotes collaboration among students, as online platforms facilitate communication and cooperation. Utilizing tools like video conferencing and shared workspaces, students can collaborate on group projects, discuss ideas, and solve problems together. This collaborative approach fosters a sense of community, mutual support, and collective problem-solving. Moreover, it helps students develop essential interpersonal skills, such as teamwork and communication, which are crucial in today's workplaces. **Supporting Personalized Learning** Finally, technology can be used to provide personalized learning experiences tailored to individual learners' needs, interests, and abilities. With access to adaptive learning platforms or online resources, students can progress at their own pace, focus on areas where they need improvement, and explore topics that interest them. This kind of personalized approach allows instructors to identify areas where students struggle and offer targeted support, enhancing the problem-solving learning experience. In conclusion, integrating technology into the problem-solving method of instruction can improve the learning process in various ways. By fostering student engagement, promoting collaboration, and facilitating personalized learning experiences, technology can be employed as a valuable resource to develop students' problem-solving skills effectively.

The integration of technology into the problem-solving method of instruction can significantly enhance the educational process, as it offers diverse opportunities for students to engage with challenging concepts and develop practical skills. The deliberate use of technology can stimulate student interaction with course material and encourage a more dynamic approach to learning.**Interactive Problem-Solving Scenarios**Technology can simulate complex scenarios requiring students to apply their knowledge creatively to solve problems. Through interactive case studies and gamified learning environments, students can engage with these scenarios in a manner that is both compelling and educative. Such simulations often incorporate branching choices, offering an exploration of consequences which creates a deeper understanding of the material.**Data Analysis Tools**Incorporating data analysis tools into problem-solving instruction can offer students hands-on experience with real-world data sets. By learning to manipulate and analyze data through software, students can identify patterns, test hypotheses, and make evidence-based conclusions. These skills are particularly valuable in STEM fields, economics, and social sciences.**Global Connectivity & Resources**Through global connectivity, technology enables access to a vast array of resources that can be utilized to enrich problem-solving tasks. Platforms such as IIENSTITU offer courses that are designed to incorporate technology into pedagogical strategies effectively. Moreover, access to international databases, research materials, and expert lectures from around the world ensures that students are exposed to diverse perspectives and approaches to problem-solving.**Interactive Whiteboards and Projection**Interactive whiteboards and projection technology make it possible to visualize complex problems and work though them interactively in the classroom. This technology allows for collaborative diagramming and mapping of ideas, which can aid in visual learning and the synthesis of information in group settings.**Adaptive Learning Software**Educational technology that adapts to individual student performance and preferences enables personalized instruction. Adaptive learning software assesses students' skills and tailors the difficulty of problems accordingly, ensuring that each student is engaged at the appropriate level of challenge.**Formative Assessment through Technology**Technology-enabled formative assessments give teachers and students real-time feedback on understanding and performance. These tools can help identify areas of difficulty, track progress, and adjust teaching strategies to help students develop their problem-solving abilities more effectively.**Facilitating Research and Inquiry**The ability to conduct research and inquiry is central to problem solving. When students are provided with the tools to explore, research, and verify information on the internet securely, they are empowered to seek out answers to their questions and develop solutions based on evidence.**Closing Thoughts**In integrating technology into problem-solving instruction, it's important to ensure that the use of any tool or platform is pedagogically sound, enhances the learning objectives, and actually serves to improve students' problem-solving capabilities. As education evolves with the digital age, so too does the art and science of teaching problem solving, where technology becomes an indispensable ally in preparing students for the challenges of the future.

I graduated from the Family and Consumption Sciences Department at Hacettepe University. I hold certificates in blogging and personnel management. I have a Master's degree in English and have lived in the US for three years.

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What are Problem Solving Skills?

A woman in a white shirt is looking down and holding her head in her hands. She has long blonde hair and blue eyes. Her lips are slightly pursed, and her eyebrows are slightly furrowed. She looks sad and contemplative, as if she is lost in thought. Her arms are crossed in front of her chest, and her head is slightly tilted to the side. Her expression is thoughtful and her posture is relaxed. She is standing in front of a plain white wall, and the light casts shadows on her face. She appears to be alone in the room, and her posture conveys a sense of loneliness and introspection.

How To Solve The Problems? Practical Problem Solving Skills

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A Problem Solving Method: Brainstorming

A close-up of a group of people holding puzzle pieces in their hands. A man is looking at the piece he is holding, while two other people are carefully looking at the pieces they are holding in their hands. The pieces have a wooden texture, and each one is a different color. One person is holding a light blue piece, while another person is holding a red piece. All the pieces are shaped differently, and some are curved while others are straight. The pieces all fit together to form a larger puzzle.

How To Develop Problem Solving Skills?

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Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

What is Problem-Based Learning (PBL)? PBL is a student-centered approach to learning that involves groups of students working to solve a real-world problem, quite different from the direct teaching method of a teacher presenting facts and concepts about a specific subject to a classroom of students. Through PBL, students not only strengthen their teamwork, communication, and research skills, but they also sharpen their critical thinking and problem-solving abilities essential for life-long learning.

See also: Just-in-Time Teaching

Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

In implementing PBL, the teaching role shifts from that of the more traditional model that follows a linear, sequential pattern where the teacher presents relevant material, informs the class what needs to be done, and provides details and information for students to apply their knowledge to a given problem. With PBL, the teacher acts as a facilitator; the learning is student-driven with the aim of solving the given problem (note: the problem is established at the onset of learning opposed to being presented last in the traditional model). Also, the assignments vary in length from relatively short to an entire semester with daily instructional time structured for group work.

Pbl

By working with PBL, students will:

  • Become engaged with open-ended situations that assimilate the world of work
  • Participate in groups to pinpoint what is known/ not known and the methods of finding information to help solve the given problem.
  • Investigate a problem; through critical thinking and problem solving, brainstorm a list of unique solutions.
  • Analyze the situation to see if the real problem is framed or if there are other problems that need to be solved.

How to Begin PBL

  • Establish the learning outcomes (i.e., what is it that you want your students to really learn and to be able to do after completing the learning project).
  • Find a real-world problem that is relevant to the students; often the problems are ones that students may encounter in their own life or future career.
  • Discuss pertinent rules for working in groups to maximize learning success.
  • Practice group processes: listening, involving others, assessing their work/peers.
  • Explore different roles for students to accomplish the work that needs to be done and/or to see the problem from various perspectives depending on the problem (e.g., for a problem about pollution, different roles may be a mayor, business owner, parent, child, neighboring city government officials, etc.).
  • Determine how the project will be evaluated and assessed. Most likely, both self-assessment and peer-assessment will factor into the assignment grade.

Designing Classroom Instruction

See also: Inclusive Teaching Strategies

  • Take the curriculum and divide it into various units. Decide on the types of problems that your students will solve. These will be your objectives.
  • Determine the specific problems that most likely have several answers; consider student interest.
  • Arrange appropriate resources available to students; utilize other teaching personnel to support students where needed (e.g., media specialists to orientate students to electronic references).
  • Decide on presentation formats to communicate learning (e.g., individual paper, group PowerPoint, an online blog, etc.) and appropriate grading mechanisms (e.g., rubric).
  • Decide how to incorporate group participation (e.g., what percent, possible peer evaluation, etc.).

How to Orchestrate a PBL Activity

  • Explain Problem-Based Learning to students: its rationale, daily instruction, class expectations, grading.
  • Serve as a model and resource to the PBL process; work in-tandem through the first problem
  • Help students secure various resources when needed.
  • Supply ample class time for collaborative group work.
  • Give feedback to each group after they share via the established format; critique the solution in quality and thoroughness. Reinforce to the students that the prior thinking and reasoning process in addition to the solution are important as well.

Teacher’s Role in PBL

See also: Flipped teaching

As previously mentioned, the teacher determines a problem that is interesting, relevant, and novel for the students. It also must be multi-faceted enough to engage students in doing research and finding several solutions. The problems stem from the unit curriculum and reflect possible use in future work situations.

  • Determine a problem aligned with the course and your students. The problem needs to be demanding enough that the students most likely cannot solve it on their own. It also needs to teach them new skills. When sharing the problem with students, state it in a narrative complete with pertinent background information without excessive information. Allow the students to find out more details as they work on the problem.
  • Place students in groups, well-mixed in diversity and skill levels, to strengthen the groups. Help students work successfully. One way is to have the students take on various roles in the group process after they self-assess their strengths and weaknesses.
  • Support the students with understanding the content on a deeper level and in ways to best orchestrate the various stages of the problem-solving process.

The Role of the Students

See also: ADDIE model

The students work collaboratively on all facets of the problem to determine the best possible solution.

  • Analyze the problem and the issues it presents. Break the problem down into various parts. Continue to read, discuss, and think about the problem.
  • Construct a list of what is known about the problem. What do your fellow students know about the problem? Do they have any experiences related to the problem? Discuss the contributions expected from the team members. What are their strengths and weaknesses? Follow the rules of brainstorming (i.e., accept all answers without passing judgment) to generate possible solutions for the problem.
  • Get agreement from the team members regarding the problem statement.
  • Put the problem statement in written form.
  • Solicit feedback from the teacher.
  • Be open to changing the written statement based on any new learning that is found or feedback provided.
  • Generate a list of possible solutions. Include relevant thoughts, ideas, and educated guesses as well as causes and possible ways to solve it. Then rank the solutions and select the solution that your group is most likely to perceive as the best in terms of meeting success.
  • Include what needs to be known and done to solve the identified problems.
  • Prioritize the various action steps.
  • Consider how the steps impact the possible solutions.
  • See if the group is in agreement with the timeline; if not, decide how to reach agreement.
  • What resources are available to help (e.g., textbooks, primary/secondary sources, Internet).
  • Determine research assignments per team members.
  • Establish due dates.
  • Determine how your group will present the problem solution and also identify the audience. Usually, in PBL, each group presents their solutions via a team presentation either to the class of other students or to those who are related to the problem.
  • Both the process and the results of the learning activity need to be covered. Include the following: problem statement, questions, data gathered, data analysis, reasons for the solution(s) and/or any recommendations reflective of the data analysis.
  • A well-stated problem and conclusion.
  • The process undertaken by the group in solving the problem, the various options discussed, and the resources used.
  • Your solution’s supporting documents, guests, interviews and their purpose to be convincing to your audience.
  • In addition, be prepared for any audience comments and questions. Determine who will respond and if your team doesn’t know the answer, admit this and be open to looking into the question at a later date.
  • Reflective thinking and transfer of knowledge are important components of PBL. This helps the students be more cognizant of their own learning and teaches them how to ask appropriate questions to address problems that need to be solved. It is important to look at both the individual student and the group effort/delivery throughout the entire process. From here, you can better determine what was learned and how to improve. The students should be asked how they can apply what was learned to a different situation, to their own lives, and to other course projects.

See also: Kirkpatrick Model: Four Levels of Learning Evaluation

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I am a professor of Educational Technology. I have worked at several elite universities. I hold a PhD degree from the University of Illinois and a master's degree from Purdue University.

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Key Tips On Problem Solving Method Of Teaching

solving problem method of teaching

Problem-solving skills are necessary for all strata of life, and none can be better than classroom problem-solving activities. It can be an excellent way to introduce students to problem-solving skills, get them prepped and ready to solve real problems in real-life settings.  

The ability to critically analyze a problem, map out all its elements and then prepare a solution that works is one of the most valuable skills; one must acquire in life. Educating your students about problem-solving techniques from an early age can be facilitated with in-class problem-solving activities. Such efforts encourage cognitive and social development and equip students with the tools they will need to tackle and resolve their lives.  

So, what is  a  problem-solving method of teaching ?

Problem Solving  is the act of defining a problem; determining the cause of the problem; identifying, prioritizing and selecting alternatives for a solution; and implementing a solution. In a problem-solving method, children learn by working on problems. This skill enables the students to learn new knowledge by facing the problems to be solved. It is expected of them to observe, understand, analyze, interpret, find solutions, and perform applications that lead to a holistic understanding of the concept. This method develops scientific process skills. This method helps in developing a brainstorming approach to learning concepts. 

In simple words, problem-solving is an ongoing activity in which we take what we know to discover what we do not know. It involves overcoming obstacles by generating hypotheses, testing those predictions, and arriving at satisfactory solutions. 

The problem-solving method involves three basic functions

  • Seeking information
  • Generating new knowledge 
  • Making decisions 

This post will include key strategies to help you inculcate problem-solving skills in your students. 

First and foremostly, follow the 5-step model of problem-solving presented by Wood

Woods' problem-solving model

Identify the problem .

Allow your students to identify the system under study by interpreting the information provided in the problem statement. Then, prepare a list of what is known about the problem, and identify the knowledge needed to understand (and eventually) solve it. Once you have a list of known problems, identifying the unknown(s) becomes simpler. The unknown one is usually the answer to the problem; however, there may be other unknowns. Make sure that your students have a clear understanding of what they are expected to find. 

While teaching problem solving, it is very important to have students know how to select, interpret, and use units and symbols. Emphasize the use of units and symbols whenever appropriate. Develop a habit of using appropriate units and symbols yourself at all times. Teach your students to look for the words only and neglect or assume to help identify the constraints. 

Furthermore, help students consider from the beginning what a logical type of answer would be. What characteristics will it possess?  

Think about it

Use the next stage to ponder the identified problem. Ideally, students will develop an imaginary image of the problem at hand during this stage. They need to determine the required background knowledge from illustrations, examples and problems covered in the course and collect pertinent information such as conversion factors, constants, and tables needed to solve the problem. 

Plan a solution

Often, the type of problem will determine the type of solution. Some common problem-solving strategies are: compute; simplify; use an equation; make a model, diagram, table, or chart; or work backwards. 

Help your students choose the best strategy by reminding them again what they must find or calculate. 

Carry out the plan

Now that the major part of problem-solving has been done start executing the solution. There are possibilities that a plan may not work immediately, do not let students get discouraged. Encourage them to try a different strategy and keep trying. 

Encourage students to reflect. Once a solution has been reached, students should ask themselves the following questions: 

  •  Does the answer make sense? 
  •  Does it fit with the criteria established in step 1? 
  •  Did I answer the question(s)? 
  •  What did I learn by doing this? 
  •  Could I have done the problem another way?  

Other tips include

Ask open-ended questions.

When a student seeks help, you might be willing to give them the answer they are looking for so you can both move on. But what is recommend is that instead of giving answers promptly, try using open-ended questions and prompts. For example: ask What do you think will happen if..? Why do you think so? What would you do if you get into such situations? Etc. 

Emphasize Process Over Product

For elementary students, reflecting on the process of solving a problem helps them develop a growth mindset. Getting an 'incorrect' response does not have to be a bad thing! What matters most is what they have done to achieve it and how they might change their approach next time. As a teacher, you can help students learn the process of reflection. 

Model The Strategies

As children learn creative problem-solving techniques, there will probably be times when they will be frustrated or uncertain. Here are just a few simple ways to model what creative problem-solving looks like and sounds like. 

  • Ask questions in case you don't understand anything.
  • Admit to not knowing the right answer.
  • Discuss the many possible outcomes of different situations. 
  • Verbalize what you feel when you come across a problem.
  • Practising these strategies with your students will help create an environment where struggle, failure and growth are celebrated!

Encourage Grappling

Grappling is not confined to perseverance! This includes critical thinking, asking questions, observing evidence, asking more questions, formulating hypotheses and building a deep understanding of a problem. 

There are numerous ways to provide opportunities for students to struggle. All that includes the engineering design process is right! Examples include: 

  • Engineering or creative projects
  • Design-thinking challenges
  • Informatics projects
  • Science experiments

Make problem resolution relevant to the lives of your students

Limiting problem solving to class is a bad idea. This will affect students later in life because problem-solving is an essential part of human life, and we have had a chance to look at it from a mathematical perspective. Such problems are relevant to us, and they are not things that we are supposed to remember or learn but to put into practice in real life. These are things from which we can take very significant life lessons and apply them later in life. 

What's your strategy? How do you teach Problem-Solving to your students? Do let us know in the comments. 

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Problem-Solving Method of Teaching: All You Need to Know

Nov 28, 2023 by Harsh S. Leave a Comment

Ever wondered about the problem-solving method of teaching? We’ve got you covered, from its core principles to practical tips, benefits, and real-world examples.

The problem-solving method of teaching is a student-centered approach to learning that focuses on developing students’ problem-solving skills. In this method, students are presented with real-world problems to solve, and they are encouraged to use their own knowledge and skills to come up with solutions. The teacher acts as a facilitator, providing guidance and support as needed, but ultimately the students are responsible for finding their own solutions.

Problem-Solving Method of Teaching – Agenda of the Day

5 most important benefits of problem-solving method of teaching, find out examples of the problem-solving method of teaching, 5 how tos for using the problem-solving method of teaching, how to choose: let’s draw a comparison.

Problem-Solving Method of Teaching Example

Must Read: How to Tell Me About Yourself in an Interview

The new way of teaching primarily helps students develop critical thinking skills and real-world application abilities. It also promotes independence and self-confidence in problem-solving.

The problem-solving method of teaching has a number of benefits. It helps students to:

1. Enhances critical thinking: By presenting students with real-world problems to solve, the problem-solving method of teaching forces them to think critically about the situation and to come up with their own solutions. This process helps students to develop their critical thinking skills, which are essential for success in school and in life.

2. Fosters creativity: The problem-solving method of teaching encourages students to be creative in their approach to solving problems. There is often no one right answer to a problem, so students are free to come up with their own unique solutions. This process helps students to develop their creativity, which is an important skill in all areas of life.

3. Encourages real-world application: The problem-solving method of teaching helps students learn how to apply their knowledge to real-world situations. By solving real-world problems, students are able to see how their knowledge is relevant to their lives and to the world around them. This helps students to become more motivated and engaged learners.

4. Builds student confidence: When students are able to successfully solve problems, they gain confidence in their abilities. This confidence is essential for success in all areas of life, both academic and personal.

5. Promotes collaborative learning: The problem-solving method of teaching often involves students working together to solve problems. This collaborative learning process helps students to develop their teamwork skills and to learn from each other.

Know 6 Steps in the Problem-Solving Method of Teaching

Know the 6 Steps

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The problem-solving method of teaching typically involves the following steps:

  • Identifying the problem. The first step is to identify the problem that students will be working on. This can be done by presenting students with a real-world problem, or by asking them to come up with their own problems.
  • Understanding the problem. Once students have identified the problem, they need to understand it fully. This may involve breaking the problem down into smaller parts or gathering more information about the problem.
  • Generating solutions. Once students understand the problem, they need to generate possible solutions. This can be done by brainstorming, or by using problem-solving techniques such as root cause analysis or the decision matrix.
  • Evaluating solutions. Students need to evaluate the pros and cons of each solution before choosing one to implement.
  • Implementing the solution. Once students have chosen a solution, they need to implement it. This may involve taking action or developing a plan.
  • Evaluating the results. Once students have implemented the solution, they need to evaluate the results to see if it was successful. If the solution is not successful, students may need to go back to step 3 and generate new solutions.

Here are a few examples of how the problem-solving method of teaching can be used in different subjects:

  • Math: Students could be presented with a real-world problem such as budgeting for a family or designing a new product. Students would then need to use their math skills to solve the problem.
  • Science: Students could be presented with a science experiment, or asked to research a scientific topic and come up with a solution to a problem. Students would then need to use their science knowledge and skills to solve the problem.
  • Social studies: Students could be presented with a historical event or current social issue, and asked to come up with a solution. Students would then need to use their social studies knowledge and skills to solve the problem.

Here are a few tips for using the problem-solving method of teaching effectively:

  • Choose problems that are relevant to students’ lives and interests.
  • Make sure that the problems are challenging but achievable.
  • Provide students with the resources they need to solve the problems, such as books, websites, or experts.
  • Encourage students to work collaboratively and to share their ideas.
  • Be patient and supportive. Problem-solving can be a challenging process, but it is also a rewarding one.

Also Try: 1-10 Random Number Generator

The following table compares the different problem-solving methods:

Which Method is the Most Suitable?

The most suitable method of teaching will depend on a number of factors, such as the subject matter, the student’s age and ability level, and the teacher’s own preferences. However, the problem-solving method of teaching is a valuable approach that can be used in any subject area and with students of all ages.

Here are some additional tips for using the problem-solving method of teaching effectively:

  • Differentiate instruction. Not all students learn at the same pace or in the same way. Teachers can differentiate instruction to meet the needs of all learners by providing different levels of support and scaffolding.
  • Use formative assessment. Formative assessment can be used to monitor students’ progress and to identify areas where they need additional support. Teachers can then use this information to provide students with targeted instruction.
  • Create a positive learning environment. Students need to feel safe and supported in order to learn effectively. Teachers can create a positive learning environment by providing students with opportunities for collaboration, celebrating their successes, and creating a classroom culture where mistakes are seen as learning opportunities.

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Some Unique Examples to Refer to Before We Conclude

Here are a few unique examples of how the problem-solving method of teaching can be used in different subjects:

  • English: Students could be presented with a challenging text, such as a poem or a short story, and asked to analyze the text and come up with their own interpretation.
  • Art: Students could be asked to design a new product or to create a piece of art that addresses a social issue.
  • Music: Students could be asked to write a song about a current event or to create a new piece of music that reflects their cultural heritage.

The problem-solving method of teaching is a powerful tool that can be used to help students develop the skills they need to succeed in school and in life. By creating a learning environment where students are encouraged to think critically and solve problems, teachers can help students to become lifelong learners.

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Solving word problem chart

1. Understand the Problem by Paraphrasing

2. identify key information and variables, 3. translate words into mathematical symbols, 4. break down the problem into manageable parts, 5. draw diagrams or visual representations, 6. use estimation to predict answers, 7. apply logical reasoning for unknown variables, 8. leverage similar problems as templates, 9. check answers in the context of the problem, 10. reflect and learn from mistakes.

Have you ever observed the look of confusion on a student’s face when they encounter a math word problem ? It’s a common sight in classrooms worldwide, underscoring the need for effective strategies for solving math word problems . The main hurdle in solving math word problems is not just the math itself but understanding how to translate the words into mathematical equations that can be solved.

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Generic advice like “read the problem carefully” or “practice more” often falls short in addressing students’ specific difficulties with word problems. Students need targeted math word problem strategies that address the root of their struggles head-on. 

A Guide on Steps to Solving Word Problems: 10 Strategies 

One of the first steps in tackling a math word problem is to make sure your students understand what the problem is asking. Encourage them to paraphrase the problem in their own words. This means they rewrite the problem using simpler language or break it down into more digestible parts. Paraphrasing helps students grasp the concept and focus on the problem’s core elements without getting lost in the complex wording.

Original Problem: “If a farmer has 15 apples and gives away 8, how many does he have left?”

Paraphrased: “A farmer had some apples. He gave some away. Now, how many apples does he have?”

This paraphrasing helps students identify the main action (giving away apples) and what they need to find out (how many apples are left).

Play these subtraction word problem games in the classroom for free:

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Students often get overwhelmed by the details in word problems. Teach them to identify key information and variables essential for solving the problem. This includes numbers , operations ( addition , subtraction , multiplication , division ), and what the question is asking them to find. Highlighting or underlining can be very effective here. This visual differentiation can help students focus on what’s important, ignoring irrelevant details.

  • Encourage students to underline numbers and circle keywords that indicate operations (like ‘total’ for addition and ‘left’ for subtraction).
  • Teach them to write down what they’re solving for, such as “Find: Total apples left.”

Problem: “A classroom has 24 students. If 6 more students joined the class, how many students are there in total?”

Key Information:

  • Original number of students (24)
  • Students joined (6)
  • Looking for the total number of students

Here are some fun addition word problems that your students can play for free:

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The transition from the language of word problems to the language of mathematics is a critical skill. Teach your students to convert words into mathematical symbols and equations. This step is about recognizing keywords and phrases corresponding to mathematical operations and expressions .

Common Translations:

  • “Total,” “sum,” “combined” → Addition (+)
  • “Difference,” “less than,” “remain” → Subtraction (−)
  • “Times,” “product of” → Multiplication (×)
  • “Divided by,” “quotient of” → Division (÷)
  • “Equals” → Equals sign (=)

Problem: “If one book costs $5, how much would 4 books cost?”

Translation: The word “costs” indicates a multiplication operation because we find the total cost of multiple items. Therefore, the equation is 4 × 5 = $20

Complex math word problems can often overwhelm students. Incorporating math strategies for problem solving, such as teaching them to break down the problem into smaller, more manageable parts, is a powerful approach to overcome this challenge. This means looking at the problem step by step rather than simultaneously trying to solve it. Breaking it down helps students focus on one aspect of the problem at a time, making finding the solution more straightforward.

Problem: “John has twice as many apples as Sarah. If Sarah has 5 apples, how many apples do they have together?”

Steps to Break Down the Problem:

Find out how many apples John has: Since John has twice as many apples as Sarah, and Sarah has 5, John has 5 × 2 = 10

Calculate the total number of apples: Add Sarah’s apples to John’s to find the total,  5 + 10 = 15

By splitting the problem into two parts, students can solve it without getting confused by all the details at once.

Explore these fun multiplication word problem games:

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Diagrams and visual representations can be incredibly helpful for students, especially when dealing with spatial or quantity relationships in word problems. Encourage students to draw simple sketches or diagrams to represent the problem visually. This can include drawing bars for comparison, shapes for geometry problems, or even a simple distribution to better understand division or multiplication problems .

Problem: “A garden is 3 times as long as it is wide. If the width is 4 meters, how long is the garden?”

Visual Representation: Draw a rectangle and label the width as 4 meters. Then, sketch the length to represent it as three times the width visually, helping students see that the length is 4 × 3 = 12

Estimation is a valuable skill in solving math word problems, as it allows students to predict the answer’s ballpark figure before solving it precisely. Teaching students to use estimation can help them check their answers for reasonableness and avoid common mistakes.

Problem: “If a book costs $4.95 and you buy 3 books, approximately how much will you spend?”

Estimation Strategy: Round $4.95 to the nearest dollar ($5) and multiply by the number of books (3), so 5 × 3 = 15. Hence, the estimated total cost is about $15.

Estimation helps students understand whether their final answer is plausible, providing a quick way to check their work against a rough calculation.

Check out these fun estimation and prediction word problem worksheets that can be of great help:

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When students encounter problems with unknown variables, it’s crucial to introduce them to logical reasoning. This strategy involves using the information in the problem to deduce the value of unknown variables logically. One of the most effective strategies for solving math word problems is working backward from the desired outcome. This means starting with the result and thinking about the steps leading to that result, which can be particularly useful in algebraic problems.

Problem: “A number added to three times itself equals 32. What is the number?”

Working Backward:

Let the unknown number be x.

The equation based on the problem is  x + 3x = 32

Solve for x by simplifying the equation to 4x=32, then dividing by 4 to find x=8.

By working backward, students can more easily connect the dots between the unknown variable and the information provided.

Practicing problems of similar structure can help students recognize patterns and apply known strategies to new situations. Encourage them to leverage similar problems as templates, analyzing how a solved problem’s strategy can apply to a new one. Creating a personal “problem bank”—a collection of solved problems—can be a valuable reference tool, helping students see the commonalities between different problems and reinforcing the strategies that work.

Suppose students have solved a problem about dividing a set of items among a group of people. In that case, they can use that strategy when encountering a similar problem, even if it’s about dividing money or sharing work equally.

It’s essential for students to learn the habit of checking their answers within the context of the problem to ensure their solutions make sense. This step involves going back to the original problem statement after solving it to verify that the answer fits logically with the given information. Providing a checklist for this process can help students systematically review their answers.

Checklist for Reviewing Answers:

  • Re-read the problem: Ensure the question was understood correctly.
  • Compare with the original problem: Does the answer make sense given the scenario?
  • Use estimation: Does the precise answer align with an earlier estimation?
  • Substitute back: If applicable, plug the answer into the problem to see if it works.

Problem: “If you divide 24 apples among 4 children, how many apples does each child get?”

After solving, students should check that they understood the problem (dividing apples equally).

Their answer (6 apples per child) fits logically with the number of apples and children.

Their estimation aligns with the actual calculation.

Substituting back 4×6=24 confirms the answer is correct.

Teaching students to apply logical reasoning, leverage solved problems as templates, and check their answers in context equips them with a robust toolkit for tackling math word problems efficiently and effectively.

One of the most effective ways for students to improve their problem-solving skills is by reflecting on their errors, especially with math word problems. Using word problem worksheets is one of the most effective strategies for solving word problems, and practicing word problems as it fosters a more thoughtful and reflective approach to problem-solving

These worksheets can provide a variety of problems that challenge students in different ways, allowing them to encounter and work through common pitfalls in a controlled setting. After completing a worksheet, students can review their answers, identify any mistakes, and then reflect on them in their mistake journal. This practice reinforces mathematical concepts and improves their math problem solving strategies over time.

3 Additional Tips for Enhancing Word Problem-Solving Skills

Before we dive into the importance of reflecting on mistakes, here are a few impactful tips to enhance students’ word problem-solving skills further:

1. Utilize Online Word Problem Games

A word problem game

Incorporate online games that focus on math word problems into your teaching. These interactive platforms make learning fun and engaging, allowing students to practice in a dynamic environment. Games can offer instant feedback and adaptive challenges, catering to individual learning speeds and styles.

Here are some word problem games that you can use for free:

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2. Practice Regularly with Diverse Problems

Word problem worksheet

Consistent practice with a wide range of word problems helps students become familiar with different questions and mathematical concepts. This exposure is crucial for building confidence and proficiency.

Start Practicing Word Problems with these Printable Word Problem Worksheets:

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3. Encourage Group Work

Solving word problems in groups allows students to share strategies and learn from each other. A collaborative approach is one of the best strategies for solving math word problems that can unveil multiple methods for tackling the same problem, enriching students’ problem-solving toolkit.

Conclusion 

Mastering math word problems is a journey of small steps. Encourage your students to practice regularly, stay curious, and learn from their mistakes. These strategies for solving math word problems are stepping stones to turning challenges into achievements. Keep it simple, and watch your students grow their confidence and skills, one problem at a time.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

How can i help my students stay motivated when solving math word problems.

Encourage small victories and use engaging tools like online games to make practice fun and rewarding.

What's the best way to teach beginners word problems?

Begin with simple problems that integrate everyday scenarios to make the connection between math and real-life clear and relatable.

How often should students practice math word problems?

Regular, daily practice with various problems helps build confidence and problem-solving skills over time.

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Jacquelyn Burt Earns 2024 John Tate Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising

Department of Computer Science & Engineering Undergraduate Academic Advisor Jacquelyn Burt was awarded the 2024 John Tate Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising. Named in honor of John Tate, Professor of Physics and first Dean of University College (1930-41), the Tate Awards serve to recognize and reward high-quality academic advising, calling attention to the contribution academic advising makes to helping students formulate and achieve intellectual, career, and personal goals.

“I thought it was a trick when I got the email that I was being nominated,” said Jacquelyn. “Within the advising field, this award is a big deal; I described it to my parents as ‘the advising Grammys’. Part of what makes it so cool is the nomination process, which involves several letters of support from students and colleagues as well as putting together a kind of portfolio of some of the programs and resources I’ve helped develop. So many different people contributed to that on my behalf, so it was really powerful to be reminded of the impact of my work and the amazing colleagues and students I get to love!”

Jacquelyn is a lifelong Gopher, earning her B.S. in business marketing education in 2014 and her M.Ed. in education policy and leadership in 2019. She joined the CS&E student services team in 2019, where she quickly developed a reputation as a staunch ally and advocate for her students. In 2021, Jacquelyn received the Gopher Spirit Award , recognizing the U of M advisor who contributes to a positive office culture, is inclusive, and brings others up. “I feel the most useful when a student or colleague is misunderstanding something, or experiencing a lot of stress, and I am able to help separate it into smaller pieces or come up with a different way of looking at it,” said Jacquelyn. “If I can shine light on something, help shift a lens or perspective, or give an idea or experience a bit of breathing room, I’m doing my job.”

When asked about what inspired her to work in advising, Jacquelyn replied, “When I first came to the University of Minnesota as a freshman, I was a family and social sciences major - I love relationships and helping, and so figured a career in marriage and family therapy sounded good. However, I’ve also always loved education and felt most at home at school - when I finished my undergraduate degree, I didn’t want to leave college because I loved it so much! Student advising seemed like a cool sweet spot between classroom teaching, advocacy, and being in a helping role. Ultimately, I’ve really come to see advising as facilitation work: I help students identify and navigate barriers to their goals, experiences, and personal development.”

As an undergraduate advisor, Jacquelyn manages a caseload of over 450 students in multiple majors, minors and other departmental programs. On top of her advising duties, Jacquelyn has undertaken a number of projects to better the undergraduate student experience, including establishing a weekly newsletter; designing, promoting, and executing departmental events and programs; and developing and teaching students through a variety of training and credit-bearing coursework. Most notably, Jacquelyn created and now facilitates mandatory implicit bias training for all 200+ undergraduate teaching assistants, as well as teaching CSCI 2915: Teaching Methods in Computer Science (a leadership and communication skills seminar) each semester.

“Within our student services team, we’ve developed a great culture of initiative and problem-solving: like, if you identify a problem and have or can create tools to help address it, amazing - you go get it!” said Jacquelyn. “We all believe that students deserve to have positive and supportive experiences while they are here, and we’ve built an advising team that trusts each of us to help bear that belief out. I definitely could not do my job without the collaboration, encouragement, and love of the whole team.”

On top of her work within CS&E, Jacquelyn has personally designed advising resources that have made an impact for undergraduate students across the entire university. Her “Explore & Expand” tool (originally developed for the college’s major/minor expo) is used widely throughout the entire University, particularly within the Center for Academic Planning and Exploration office. Additionally, her “Academic Progress Audit System Guide” resource (originally used within the departmental “Welcome to the Major” workshops) has been used in advisor training and onboarding. Above all, Jacquelyn has a keen eye for making connections, and for communicating things that can be overwhelmingly complex with both clarity and compassion.

“When I applied for this job, I had to come up with an ‘advising philosophy,’” said Jacquelyn. “What I landed on is anytime a student leaves an interaction with me, I want them to feel a little bit more seen, supported, and celebrated. I am a naturally celebratory person, which I’ve learned to embrace - and this award is a wonderful way to celebrate the work of advising!”

Learn more about the John Tate Award at the Provost website . 

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Find the AI Approach That Fits the Problem You’re Trying to Solve

  • George Westerman,
  • Sam Ransbotham,
  • Chiara Farronato

solving problem method of teaching

Five questions to help leaders discover the right analytics tool for the job.

AI moves quickly, but organizations change much more slowly. What works in a lab may be wrong for your company right now. If you know the right questions to ask, you can make better decisions, regardless of how fast technology changes. You can work with your technical experts to use the right tool for the right job. Then each solution today becomes a foundation to build further innovations tomorrow. But without the right questions, you’ll be starting your journey in the wrong place.

Leaders everywhere are rightly asking about how Generative AI can benefit their businesses. However, as impressive as generative AI is, it’s only one of many advanced data science and analytics techniques. While the world is focusing on generative AI, a better approach is to understand how to use the range of available analytics tools to address your company’s needs. Which analytics tool fits the problem you’re trying to solve? And how do you avoid choosing the wrong one? You don’t need to know deep details about each analytics tool at your disposal, but you do need to know enough to envision what’s possible and to ask technical experts the right questions.

  • George Westerman is a Senior Lecturer in MIT Sloan School of Management and founder of the Global Opportunity Forum  in MIT’s Office of Open Learning.
  • SR Sam Ransbotham is a Professor of Business Analytics at the Boston College Carroll School of Management. He co-hosts the “Me, Myself, and AI” podcast.
  • Chiara Farronato is the Glenn and Mary Jane Creamer Associate Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and co-principal investigator at the Platform Lab at Harvard’s Digital Design Institute (D^3). She is also a fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and the Center for Economic Policy Research (CEPR).

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COMMENTS

  1. Problem-Solving Method In Teaching

    These steps include Identifying the problem: The first step in problem-solving is identifying the problem that needs to be solved. Teachers can present students with a real-world problem or challenge that requires critical thinking and collaboration.

  2. Teaching Problem Solving

    Teaching Problem Solving Print Version Tips and Techniques Expert vs. Novice Problem Solvers Tips and Techniques Communicate Have students identify specific problems, difficulties, or confusions. Don't waste time working through problems that students already understand.

  3. Teaching Problem-Solving Skills

    In order to solve problems, students need to define the end goal. This step is crucial to successful learning of problem-solving skills. If you succeed at helping students answer the questions "what?" and "why?", finding the answer to "how?" will be easier. Take enough time.

  4. Teaching Problem Solving

    Problem solving is a "goal-oriented" process that includes creating and manipulating problems as mental models (Jonassen, 2000). Brown faculty from a variety of disciplines were interviewed by Sheridan staff and asked, "What skills do students need to problem solve effectively?" They responded that students need to be able to do the following:

  5. Teaching problem solving

    Teaching problem solving Strategies for teaching problem solving apply across disciplines and instructional contexts. First, introduce the problem and explain how people in your discipline generally make sense of the given information. Then, explain how to apply these approaches to solve the problem. Introducing the problem

  6. Problem-Based Learning

    Solve the problem. Report on their findings. Getting Started with Problem-Based Learning Articulate the learning outcomes of the project. What do you want students to know or be able to do as a result of participating in the assignment? Create the problem.

  7. Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a teaching method in which complex real-world problems are used as the vehicle to promote student learning of concepts and principles as opposed to direct presentation of facts and concepts.

  8. The process of implementing problem-based learning in a teacher

    For example, studies on topics related to problem solving (Helmi et al., Citation 2016), ... the main teaching method used in the classroom at that time was direct instruction. Based on previous teaching experience, I found that some pre-service teachers had problems in studying. For example, the motivation for one-quarter to one-fifth of pre ...

  9. Teaching problem solving: Let students get 'stuck' and 'unstuck'

    By naming what it is they did to solve the problem, students can be more independent and productive as they apply and adapt their thinking when engaging in future complex tasks. After a few...

  10. Full article: Understanding and explaining pedagogical problem solving

    1. Introduction. The focus of this paper is on understanding and explaining pedagogical problem solving. This theoretical paper builds on two previous studies (Riordan, Citation 2020; and Riordan, Hardman and Cumbers, Citation 2021) by introducing an 'extended Pedagogy Analysis Framework' and a 'Pedagogical Problem Typology' illustrating both with examples from video-based analysis of ...

  11. Don't Just Tell Students to Solve Problems. Teach Them How

    This approach to teaching problem solving includes a significant focus on learning to identify the problem that actually needs to be solved, in order to avoid solving the wrong problem. The curriculum is organized so that each day is a complete experience. It begins with the teacher introducing the problem-identification or problem-solving ...

  12. Problem Solving Resources

    Teaching Resource Problem-Solving Problem-Solving Authored by: TeacherVision Staff Last edited: September 2, 2022 FutureFit ? Help your students learn how to overcome issues independently by integrating problem-solving skills into your lesson plans.

  13. Solve a Teaching Problem

    Step 1: Identify a PROBLEM you encounter in your teaching. Step 2: Identify possible REASONS for the problem Step 3: Explore STRATEGIES to address the problem. This site supplements our 1-on-1 teaching consultations. CONTACT US to talk with an Eberly colleague in person!

  14. Teaching Mathematics Through Problem Solving

    You may see posters in teachers' classrooms of the "Problem Solving Method" such as: 1) Read the problem, 2) Devise a plan, 3) Solve the problem, and 4) Check your work. There is little or no evidence that students' problem-solving abilities are improved when teaching about problem solving.

  15. Problem Solving Method Of Teaching

    03 December 2021 The problem-solving method of teaching is the learning method that allows children to learn by doing.

  16. Problem Solving and Teaching How to Solve Problems in Technology-Rich

    By drawing from the literature on technological pedagogical content knowledge, design thinking, general and specific methods of problem solving, and role of technologies for solving problems, this article highlights the importance of problem solving for future teachers and discusses strategies that can help them become good problem solvers and ...

  17. Problem-Based Learning (PBL)

    PBL is a student-centered approach to learning that involves groups of students working to solve a real-world problem, quite different from the direct teaching method of a teacher presenting facts and concepts about a specific subject to a classroom of students.

  18. Key Tips On Problem Solving Method Of Teaching

    So, what is a problem-solving method of teaching? Problem Solving is the act of defining a problem; determining the cause of the problem; identifying, prioritizing and selecting alternatives for a solution; and implementing a solution. In a problem-solving method, children learn by working on problems.

  19. Problem-Solving Method of Teaching: All You Need to Know

    The problem-solving method of teaching is a student-centered approach to learning that focuses on developing students' problem-solving skills. In this method, students are presented with real-world problems to solve, and they are encouraged to use their own knowledge and skills to come up with solutions.

  20. PDF Problem Based Learning: A Student-Centered Approach

    Problem-based learning is a teaching method in which students' learn through the complex and open ended problems. These problems are real world problems and are used to encourage students' learning through principles and concept. PBL is both a teaching method and approach to the curriculum.

  21. (Pdf) Learning and Problem Solving: the Use of Problem Solving Method

    Problem solving is a type of learning and is the pinnacle of Gagne's hierarchy of learning process and it depends on stimulus response learning, chain learning, verbal association learning,...

  22. PDF A Problem With Problem Solving: Teaching Thinking Without Teaching ...

    Three examples of a problem solving heuristic are presented in Table 1. The first belongs to John Dewey, who explicated a method of problem solving in How We Think (1933). The second is George Polya's, whose method is mostly associated with problem solving in mathematics. The last is a more contemporary version

  23. PDF Effectiveness of Problem Solving Method in Teaching Mathematics at ...

    Effectiveness ofProblem Solving Method in Teaching Mathematics at Elementary Level 234 According to Nafees (2011), problem solving is a process to solve problems ... In using the problem solving method, the subject matter must be organized on a basis of problem. The teacher must always be conscious of the practical value

  24. 10 Best strategies for solving math word problems in 2024

    Incorporating math strategies for problem solving, such as teaching them to break down the problem into smaller, more manageable parts, is a powerful approach to overcome this challenge. ... A collaborative approach is one of the best strategies for solving math word problems that can unveil multiple methods for tackling the same problem ...

  25. Jacquelyn Burt Earns 2024 John Tate Award for Excellence in

    Department of Computer Science & Engineering Undergraduate Academic Advisor Jacquelyn Burt was awarded the 2024 John Tate Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising. Named in honor of John Tate, Professor of Physics and first Dean of University College (1930-41), the Tate Awards serve to recognize and reward high-quality academic advising, calling attention to the contribution academic ...

  26. PDF Fostering Problem Solving and Critical Thinking in Mathematics Through

    mathematical problem-solving activities. In particular, we show that this AI can support the problem solving strategies and the critical thinking process. We answered to the research question "What strategies proper of problem solving and phases belonging to critical thinking do students activate when solving mathematical

  27. Find the AI Approach That Fits the Problem You're Trying to Solve

    Summary. AI moves quickly, but organizations change much more slowly. What works in a lab may be wrong for your company right now. If you know the right questions to ask, you can make better ...