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Creative Writing PhD (On-Campus or by Distance Learning)

Annual tuition fee 2024 entry: UK: £4,778 full-time, £2,389 part-time International: £21,840 full-time; £10,920 part-time (distance learning only) More detail .

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Work with our team of award-winning authors to develop your creative practice and its critique. Creative Writing at Birmingham is part of the Department of Film and Creative Writing, and is closely aligned to the Departments of English Literature and English Language and Applied Linguistics, allowing you to benefit from our breadth of expertise.

This practice-based PhD will support you in the development of a long-form piece of creative writing, or a sequence of related works. You will also identify critical concerns and interests related to your creative practice, situating your work within a wider literary context. The final submission is divided between the creative piece and a related critical document.

Your PhD submission will usually entail:

For prose : a creative document of either long-form prose/a novel, or a collection of short-form prose/stories supported by a critical paper. The total word count will be between 80,000 and 100,000 words, though the weighting between the two elements will vary slightly. A novel, for example, usually between 60,000 to 80,000 words. The critical paper can therefore be between 20,000 to 40,000 words. 

For poetry : a creative document of collected poems or a single work of poetry supported by a critical thesis (usually 20,000-50,000 words)

For scriptwriting (film or live performance) : a single project or a collection of multiple shorts, which should be of comparable length and commitment as the prose element, again with an accompanying critical element between 20,000 to 40,000 words.

Other creative formats (for example a script for a graphic novel) will follow the above model/weightings.

The creative document will be an original work of significant, publishable quality which demonstrates a sophisticated understanding of craft, genre, and form. The critical document will present a structured and developed argument that demonstrates an awareness of literary  context, and discuss - where relevant - critical and creative processes.

AHRC funding for PhD students

phd creative writing distance learning

The University of Birmingham is part of the Midlands4Cities Doctoral Training Partnership (M4C), offering Arts and Humanities Research Council PhD studentships for campus-based programmes. These include a number of Collaborative Doctoral Award opportunities. Each studentship includes research fees, a substantial maintenance grant and additional research training support. Applications are open until 12:00 (noon), 13 January 2021.

Find out more

Postgraduate scholarships available

The College of Arts and Law is offering a range of scholarships for our postgraduate taught and research programmes to ensure that the very best talent is nurtured and supported.

Learn more about our scholarships

Virtual Open Day: Postgraduate opportunities in Creative Writing - 7 March 2020, 14:00-15:00

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Join us online to watch a range of staff and student videos, and take part in our online chat where Dr Daniel Vyleta will be answering your questions about postgraduate study.

Find out more and register

You can study our Creative Writing PhD full-time or part-time, on campus or by distance learning. The College of Arts and Law is experienced in delivering high-quality distance learning to students all over the world. Find out more on our  distance learning website .

At Birmingham, Postgraduate Taught and Postgraduate Research students also have the opportunity to learn graduate academic languages free of charge, to support your studies.

  • Graduate School Language Skills

phd creative writing distance learning

I’ve enjoyed studying at the University of Birmingham’s state of the art green campus with its spacious library and welcoming multicultural environment. The close interaction between students and supervisors has kept my research progress on track and constantly improving. Hui-Han

Why study this course?

  • Work with published writers: You will be working with published writers in a thriving research-active environment across a range of disciplines, including poetry; short-story; novel writing; and screen-writing
  • Develop your craft: We also encourage new and diverse forms of writing and aim to develop craft, including research and editing skills, to support your creative project. The course team are experienced in helping you to theorise your approaches to your writing and research processes.
  • Creative community: You will work alongside a community of writers and scholars, which includes active researchers in all areas and disciplines. There are a number of presentations and events staged by the School and by the Creative Writing team, alongside a vibrant arts and writing community in Birmingham and the West Midlands. We encourage our students, at all levels, to be active within the community and to participate in readings, festivals, and events, both regionally and nationally.
  • Preparation for teaching: The research degree is of value for writers who wish to engage with research in academia, for preparation for teaching in Higher Education, and offers dedicated time and support to complete a significant creative project.
  • World-leading research: The University of Birmingham is ranked equal 10th in the UK amongst Russell Group universities in the Research Excellence Framework exercise 2021 according to Times Higher Education

The postgraduate experience

The College of Arts and Law offers excellent support to its postgraduates, from libraries and research spaces, to careers support and funding opportunities. Learn more about your postgraduate experience .

We charge an annual tuition fee. Fees for 2024 entry are as follows:

  • UK: £4,778 full-time; £2,389 part-time *
  • International: £21,840 full-time; £10,920 part-time (distance learning only)

The same fees apply to both campus-based and distance learning study. The distance learning programme also includes one fully-funded visit to campus in the first year of study.

The above fees quoted are for one year only; for those studying over two or more years, tuition fees will also be payable in subsequent years of your programme.

* For UK postgraduate research students the University fee level is set at Research Council rates and as such is subject to change. The final fee will be announced by Research Councils UK in spring 2024.

Eligibility for UK or international fees can be verified with Admissions. Learn more about fees for international students .

Paying your fees

Tuition fees can either be paid in full or by instalments. Learn more about postgraduate tuition fees and funding .

How To Apply

A strong application should include:

  • A detailed description of the creative project (about two pages, with references, where possible, to other supporting texts)
  • A description of the likely critical enquiry (which outlines the links between your creative project and the critical enquiry which will inform the development of the creative project).
  • Examples of creative work (please include examples which are within your discipline, so if you want to write poetry, please include poems, if you want to write a novel, then a section of a novel, etc.,.)
  • A brief statement explaining why you are interested in undertaking research with us at Birmingham. Many projects are achievable without needing a PhD, so it is helpful to see why you are interested in working within academia. It is also useful to see how this new project develops from previous projects, or relates to other creative and critical enquiries. This can be speculative.
  • A decision on whether the period of study is to be full- or part-time (it is possible to adjust this once you are undertaking the research degree). If you are interested in Distance Learning, and if your application is successful, you will be asked to complete a form in which you provide details about your access to other resources and online support. Your supervisor will help you complete this prior to your being officially accepted.

Please note: The PhD is a demanding and rewarding period of advanced creative and academic independent study. It is also a terminal degree, and we require that applicants have either successfully completed a Creative Writing MA, or can demonstrate experience within their discipline. Unlike the MA, the PhD does not typically include group workshops and seminars. A strong application will demonstrate your current ability and experience within your creative discipline (so if you wish to write a film script, but have written novels, you would need some evidence of ability and knowledge in writing for film).

This is a popular course and there is a limited supervisor capacity to support doctoral research students. Our ability to support your research proposal may be dependent on the availability of a supervisor in your area of interest.

Application deadlines

Postgraduate research can start at any time during the year, but it is important to allow time for us to review your application and communicate a decision. If you wish to start in September 2024, we would recommend that you aim to submit your application and supporting documents by 7 May 2024.

If the programme has a Distance learning option then students will usually attend a residential visit in September or January, and those students wishing to attend the September residential are also encouraged to apply by 7 May 2024. The visit will take place at the end of September/beginning of October and you will receive further details once you have accepted your offer.

Six easy steps to apply for a postgraduate research course in the College of Arts and Law

Six steps to apply for our Postgraduate Research courses

Do you have an idea for an interesting research project? You can follow our six easy steps to apply to study for our postgraduate research courses . These include guidance on identifying funding opportunities and writing your research proposal .

Please also see our additional guidance for  applicants to the PhD Distance Learning study mode .

Please note: While our PhD programmes are normally studied in three years full-time or six years part-time, and Masters-level research programmes one year full-time or two years part-time, many programmes have a longer length listed in course or funding applications. This is because the course length is defined as the maximum period of registration, which includes a period of supervised study plus a thesis awaited period. The maximum period of registration for a full-time PhD is four years (three years supervision plus one year thesis awaited). For a full-time Masters-level research programme, it is two years (one year supervision plus one year thesis awaited). For part-time programmes, the periods are double the full-time equivalent.

Making your application

  • How to apply

To apply for a postgraduate research programme, you will need to submit your application and supporting documents online. We have put together some helpful information on the research programme application process and supporting documents on our how to apply page . Please read this information carefully before completing your application.

Our Standard Requirements

The creative and critical elements will entail considered independent research and development. For this reason, we can only consider applications from applicants who have successfully completed an MA in Creative Writing, or candidates who can demonstrate composite professional experience (which includes publishing). This should be clearly demonstrated in your application. For the PhD, you must demonstrate how the research project relates to your current creative practice.

Please note: check the staff profiles prior to application to make sure that your proposal is within an area that we can support. We will be unable to support a research project which falls too far outside of our own field of research and teaching.

For the application we require:

  • a detailed outline describing the planned creative project
  • an outline of the potential critical enquiry and how it relates to the creative project (this can be less detailed than the description of the creative project)
  • a statement about your reasons for considering a research degree
  • examples of creative work
  • a short resume or CV
  • two references from people who are familiar with both your creative and critical abilities

The application will be reviewed by the department in several stages. If there is an interested and available supervisor we will ask you form an interview, which can happen online.

International students

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries - use our handy guide below to see what qualifications we accept from your country.

English language requirements: standard language requirements apply for this course - IELTS 6.5 with no less than 6.0 in any band. If you are made an offer of a place to study and you do not meet the language requirement, you have the option to enrol on our  English for Academic Purposes Presessional Course  - if you successfully complete the course, you will be able to fulfil the language requirement without retaking a language qualification.

International Requirements

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and a Masters degree, with a GPA of 14/20 from a recognised institution to be considered. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of the Licenciado or an equivalent professional title from a recognised Argentinian university, with a promedio of at least 7.5, may be considered for entry to a postgraduate degree programme. Applicants for PhD degrees will normally have a Maestria or equivalent

Applicants who hold a Masters degree will be considered for admission to PhD study.

Holders of a good four-year Diplomstudium/Magister or a Masters degree from a recognised university with a minimum overall grade of 2.5 will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Students with a good 5-year Specialist Diploma or 4-year Bachelor degree from a recognised higher education institution in Azerbaijan, with a minimum GPA of 4/5 or 80% will be considered for entry to postgraduate taught programmes at the University of Birmingham.

For postgraduate research programmes applicants should have a good 5-year Specialist Diploma (completed after 1991), with a minimum grade point average of 4/5 or 80%, from a recognised higher education institution or a Masters or “Magistr Diplomu” or “Kandidat Nauk” from a recognised higher education institution in Azerbaijan.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and a Masters degree, with a GPA of 3.0/4.0 or 75% from a recognised institution to be considered. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and will usually be required to have completed a Masters degree, with a CGPA of 3.0-3.3/4.0 or higher for 2:1 equivalency from a recognised institution to be considered for entry. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Students who hold a Masters degree from the University of Botswana with a minimum GPA of 3.0/4.0 or 3.5/5.0 (70%/B/'very good') will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees.

Please note 4-year bachelor degrees from the University of Botswana are considered equivalent to a Diploma of Higher Education. 5-year bachelor degrees from the University of Botswana are considered equivalent to a British Bachelor (Ordinary) degree.

Students who have completed a Masters degree from a recognised institution will be considered for PhD study.

A Licenciatura or Bacharelado degree from a recognised Brazilian university:

  • A grade of 7.5/10 for entry to programmes with a 2:1 requirement
  • A grade of 6.5/10for entry to programmes with a 2:2 requirement

Holders of a good Bachelors degree with honours (4 to 6 years) from a recognised university with a upper second class grade or higher will be considered for entry to taught postgraduate programmes.  Holders of a good Masters degree from a recognised university will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Holders of a good post-2001 Masters degree from a recognised university will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Students with a minimum average of 14 out of 20 (or 70%) on a 4-year Licence, Bachelor degree or Diplôme d'Etudes Superieures de Commerce (DESC) or Diplôme d'Ingénieur or a Maîtrise will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees.

Holders of a bachelor degree with honours from a recognised Canadian university may be considered for entry to a postgraduate degree programme. A GPA of 3.0/4, 7.0/9 or 75% is usually equivalent to a UK 2.1.

Holders of the Licenciado or equivalent Professional Title from a recognised Chilean university will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees. Applicants for PhD study will preferably hold a Magister degree or equivalent.

Students with a bachelor’s degree (4 years minimum) may be considered for entry to a postgraduate degree programme. However please note that we will only consider students who meet the entry guidance below.  Please note: for the subject areas below we use the Shanghai Ranking 2022 (full table)  ,  Shanghai Ranking 2023 (full table) , and Shanghai Ranking of Chinese Art Universities 2023 .

需要具备学士学位(4年制)的申请人可申请研究生课程。请根据所申请的课程查看相应的入学要求。 请注意,中国院校名单参考 软科中国大学排名2022(总榜) ,  软科中国大学排名2023(总榜) ,以及 软科中国艺术类高校名单2023 。  

Business School    - MSc programmes (excluding MBA)  

商学院硕士课程(MBA除外)入学要求

School of Computer Science – all MSc programmes 计算机学院硕士课程入学要求

College of Social Sciences – courses listed below 社会科学 学院部分硕士课程入学要求 MA Education  (including all pathways) MSc TESOL Education MSc Public Management MA Global Public Policy MA Social Policy MA Sociology Department of Political Science and International Studies  全部硕士课程 International Development Department  全部硕士课程

  All other programmes (including MBA)   所有其他 硕士课程(包括 MBA)入学要求

Please note:

  • Borderline cases: We may consider students with lower average score (within 5%) on a case-by-case basis if you have a relevant degree and very excellent grades in relevant subjects and/or relevant work experience. 如申请人均分低于相应录取要求(5%以内),但具有出色学术背景,优异的专业成绩,以及(或)相关的工作经验,部分课程将有可能单独酌情考虑。
  • Please contact the China Recruitment Team for any questions on the above entry requirements. 如果您对录取要求有疑问,请联系伯明翰大学中国办公室   [email protected]

Holders of the Licenciado/Professional Title from a recognised Colombian university will be considered for our Postgraduate Diploma and Masters degrees. Applicants for PhD degrees will normally have a Maestria or equivalent.

Holders of a good bachelor degree with honours (4 to 6 years) from a recognised university with a upper second class grade or higher will be considered for entry to taught postgraduate programmes.  Holders of a good Masters degree from a recognised university will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Holders of a good Bacclaureus (Bachelors) from a recognised Croatian Higher Education institution with a minimum overall grade of 4.0 out of 5.0, vrlo dobar ‘very good’, or a Masters degree, will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Holders of a Bachelors degree(from the University of the West Indies or the University of Technology) may be considered for entry to a postgraduate degree programme. A Class II Upper Division degree is usually equivalent to a UK 2.1. For further details on particular institutions please refer to the list below.  Applicants for PhD level study will preferably hold a Masters degree or Mphil from the University of the West Indies.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a good Bachelors degree from a recognised institution with a minimum overall grade of 6.5 out of 10, or a GPA of 3 out of 4, and will usually be required to have completed a good Masters degree to be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of a good Bakalár from a recognised Czech Higher Education institution with a minimum overall grade of 1.5, B, velmi dobre ‘very good’ (post-2004) or 2, velmi dobre ‘good’ (pre-2004), or a good post-2002 Magistr (Masters), will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a good Bachelors degree from a recognised institution with a minimum overall grade of 7-10 out of 12 (or 8 out of 13) or higher for 2:1 equivalence and will usually be required to have completed a good Masters/ Magisterkonfereus/Magister Artium degree to be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of the Licenciado or an equivalent professional title from a recognised Ecuadorian university may be considered for entry to a postgraduate degree programme. Grades of 70% or higher can be considered as UK 2.1 equivalent.  Applicants for PhD level study will preferably hold a Magister/Masterado or equivalent qualification, but holders of the Licenciado with excellent grades can be considered.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and a Masters degree, with a GPA of 3.0/4.0 or 75% from a recognised institution. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of a good Bakalaurusekraad from a recognised university with a minimum overall grade of 4/5 or B, or a good one- or two-year Magistrikraad from a recognised university, will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Students who hold a Masters degree with very good grades (grade B, 3.5/4 GPA or 85%) will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees. 

Holders of a good Kandidaatti / Kandidat (old system), a professional title such as Ekonomi, Diplomi-insinööri, Arkkitehti, Lisensiaatti (in Medicine, Dentistry and Vetinary Medicine), or a Maisteri / Magister (new system), Lisensiaatti / Licenciat, Oikeustieteen Kandidaatti / Juris Kandidat (new system) or Proviisori / Provisor from a recognised Finnish Higher Education institution, with a minimum overall grade of 2/3 or 4/5, will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a should hold a Bachelors degree and will usually be required to have completed a Masters/Maîtrise with a minimum overall grade of 13 out of 20, or a Magistère / Diplôme d'Etudes Approfondies / Diplôme d'Etudes Supérieures Specialisées / Mastère Specialis, from a recognised French university or Grande École to be considered for entry. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of a Magister Artium, a Diplom or an Erstes Staatsexamen from a recognised university with a minimum overall grade of 2.5, or a good two-year Lizentiat / Aufbaustudium / Zweites Staatsexamen or a Masters degree from a recognised university, will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Students who hold a Bachelor degree from a recognised institution will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees. Most taught Masters programmes require a minimum of an upper second class degree (2.1) with a minimum GPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or 3.5/5.0 Students who have completed a Masters degree from a recognised institution will be considered for PhD study.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a good four-year Ptychio (Bachelor degree) with a minimum overall grade of 6.5 out of 10, from a recognised Greek university (AEI), and will usually be required to have completed a good Metaptychiako Diploma Eidikefsis (Masters degree) from a recognised institution to be considered for entry. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

4-year Licenciado is deemed equivalent to a UK bachelors degree. A score of 75 or higher from Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (USAC) can be considered comparable to a UK 2.1, 60 is comparable to a UK 2.2.  Private universities have a higher pass mark, so 80 or higher should be considered comparable to a UK 2.1, 70 is comparable to a UK 2.2

The Hong Kong Bachelor degree is considered comparable to British Bachelor degree standard. Students with bachelor degrees awarded by universities in Hong Kong may be considered for entry to one of our postgraduate degree programmes.

Students with Masters degrees may be considered for PhD study.

Holders of a good Alapfokozat / Alapképzés or Egyetemi Oklevel from a recognised university with a minimum overall grade of 3.5, or a good Mesterfokozat (Masters degree) or Egyetemi Doktor (university doctorate), will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and will usually be required to have completed a Masters degree, with a 60% or higher for 2:1 equivalency from a recognised institution to be considered for entry. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of the 4 year Sarjana (S1) from a recognised Indonesian institution will be considered for postgraduate study. Entry requirements vary with a minimum requirement of a GPA of 2.8.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and a Masters degree, with a score of 14/20 or 70% from a recognised institution to be considered. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and will usually be required to have completed a Masters degree from a recognised institution, with 100 out of 110 or higher for 2:1 equivalency from a recognised institution to be considered for entry. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Students who hold the Maitrise, Diplome d'Etude Approfondies, Diplome d'Etude Superieures or Diplome d'Etude Superieures Specialisees will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees (14-15/20 or Bien from a well ranked institution is considered comparable to a UK 2.1, while a score of 12-13/20 or Assez Bien is considered comparable to a UK 2.2).

Students with a Bachelor degree from a recognised university in Japan will be considered for entry to a postgraduate Masters degree provided they achieve a sufficiently high overall score in their first (Bachelor) degree. A GPA of 3.0/4.0 or a B average from a good Japanese university is usually considered equivalent to a UK 2:1.

Students with a Masters degree from a recognised university in Japan will be considered for PhD study. A high overall grade will be necessary to be considered.

Students who have completed their Specialist Diploma Мамаң дипломы/Диплом специалиста) or "Magistr" (Магистр дипломы/Диплом магистра) degree (completed after 1991) from a recognised higher education institution, with a minimum GPA of 2.67/4.00 for courses requiring a UK lower second and 3.00/4.00 for courses requiring a UK upper second class degree, will be considered for entry to postgraduate Masters degrees and, occasionally, directly for PhD degrees.  Holders of a Bachelor "Bakalavr" degree (Бакалавр дипломы/Диплом бакалавра) from a recognised higher education institution, with a minimum GPA of  2.67/4.00 for courses requiring a UK lower second and 3.00/4.00 for courses requiring a UK upper second class degree, may also be considered for entry to taught postgraduate programmes.

Students who hold a Bachelor degree from a recognised institution will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees. Most taught Masters programmes require a minimum of an upper second class degree (2.1) with a minimum GPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or 3.5/50

Holders of a good Postgraduate Diploma (professional programme) from a recognised university or institution of Higher Education, with a minimum overall grade of 7.5 out of 10, or a post-2000 Magistrs, will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and a Masters degree, with a score of 16/20 or 80% from a recognised institution to be considered. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of a Bachelors degree from a recognised university in Libya will be considered for postgraduate study. Holders of a Bachelors degree will normally be expected to have achieved score of 70% for 2:1 equivalency or 65% for 2:2 equivalency. Alternatively students will require a minimum of 3.0/4.0 or BB to be considered.

Holders of a good pre-2001 Magistras from a recognised university with a minimum overall grade of 8 out of 10, or a good post-2001 Magistras, will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes

Holders of a good Bachelors degree from a recognised Luxembourgish Higher Education institution with a minimum overall grade of 16 out of 20, or a Diplôme d'Études Supérieures Spécialisées (comparable to a UK PGDip) or Masters degree from a recognised Luxembourgish Higher Education institution will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Students who hold a Masters degree will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees (70-74% or A or Marginal Distinction from a well ranked institution is considered comparable to a UK 2.1, while a score of 60-69% or B or Bare Distinction/Credit is considered comparable to a UK 2.2).

Holders of a Bachelors degree from a recognised Malaysian institution (usually achieved with the equivalent of a second class upper or a grade point average minimum of 3.0) will be considered for postgraduate study at Diploma or Masters level.

Holders of a good Bachelors degree from the University of Malta with a minimum grade of 2:1 (Hons), and/or a Masters degree, will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Students who hold a Bachelor degree (Honours) from a recognised institution (including the University of Mauritius) will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees.  Most taught Masters programmes require a minimum of an upper second class degree (2:1).

Students who hold the Licenciado/Professional Titulo from a recognised Mexican university with a promedio of at least 8 will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees.

Students who have completed a Maestria from a recognised institution will be considered for PhD study.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree, licence or Maîtrise and a Masters degree, with a score of 14/20 or 70% from a recognised institution to be considered. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Students with a good four year honours degree from a recognised university will be considered for postgraduate study at the University of Birmingham. PhD applications will be considered on an individual basis.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and will usually be required to have completed a Masters degree, with 60-74% or higher for 2:1 equivalency from a recognised institution to be considered for entry. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of a good Doctoraal from a recognised Dutch university with a minimum overall grade of 7 out of 10, and/or a good Masters degree, will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Students who hold a Bachelor degree (minimum 4 years and/or level 400) from a recognised institution will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees.  Most taught Masters programmes require a minimum of an upper second class degree (2.1) with a minimum GPA of at least 3.0/4.0 or 3.5/5.0

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a good Bachelors degree from a recognised institution with a minimum GPA of B/Very Good or 1.6-2.5 for a 2.1 equivalency, and will usually be required to have completed a good Masters, Mastergrad, Magister. Artium, Sivilingeniør, Candidatus realium or Candidatus philologiae degree to be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and will usually be required to have completed a Masters degree, with a CGPA of 3.0/4 or higher for 2:1 equivalency from a recognised institution to be considered for entry. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of a Bachelors degree from a recognised university in the Palestinian Territories will be considered for postgraduate study. Holders of Bachelors degree will normally be expected to have achieved a GPA of 3/4 or 80% for 2:1 equivalency or a GPA of 2.5/4 or 70% for 2:2 equivalency.    

Holders of the Título de Licenciado /Título de (4-6 years) or an equivalent professional title from a recognised Paraguayan university may be considered for entry to a postgraduate degree programme. Grades of 4/5 or higher can be considered as UK 2.1 equivalent.  The Título Intermedio is a 2-3 year degree and is equivalent to a HNC, it is not suitable for postgraduate entry but holders of this award could be considered for second year undergraduate entry or pre-Masters.  Applicants for PhD level study will preferably hold a Título de Maestría / Magister or equivalent qualification, but holders of the Título/Grado de Licenciado/a with excellent grades can be considered.

Holders of the Licenciado, with at least 13/20 may be considered as UK 2.1 equivalent. The Grado de Bachiller is equivalent to an ordinary degree, so grades of 15+/20 are required.  Applicants for PhD level study will preferably hold a Título de Maestría or equivalent qualification.

Holders of a good pre-2001 Magister from a recognised Polish university with a minimum overall grade of 4 out of 5, dobry ‘good’, and/or a good Swiadectwo Ukonczenia Studiów Podyplomowych (Certificate of Postgraduate Study) or post-2001 Magister from a recognised Polish university with a minimum overall grade of 4.5/4+ out of 5, dobry plus 'better than good', will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Holders of a good Licenciado from a recognised university, or a Diploma de Estudos Superiores Especializados (DESE) from a recognised Polytechnic Institution, with a minimum overall grade of 16 out of 20, and/or a good Mestrado / Mestre (Masters) from a recognised university, will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a good Bachelors degree from a recognised Romanian Higher Education institution with a minimum overall grade of 8 out of 10, and will usually be required to have completed a Masters degree/Diploma de Master/Diploma de Studii Academice Postuniversitare (Postgraduate Diploma - Academic Studies) or Diploma de Studii Postuniversitare de Specializare (Postgraduate Diploma - Specialised Studies) to be considered for entry. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of a good Диплом Специалиста (Specialist Diploma) or Диплом Магистра (Magistr) degree from recognised universities in Russia (minimum GPA of 4.0) will be considered for entry to taught postgraduate programmes/PhD study.

Students who hold a 4-year Bachelor degree with at least 16/20 or 70% will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees.   

Students who hold a Maitrise, Diplome d'Etude Approfondies,Diplome d'Etude Superieures or Diplome d'Etude Superieures Specialisees will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees. A score of 14-15/20 or Bien from a well ranked institution is considered comparable to a UK 2.1, while a score of 12-13/20 or Assez Bien is considered comparable to a UK 2.2

Students who hold a Bachelor (Honours) degree from a recognised institution with a minimum GPA of 3.0/4.0 or 3.5/5.0 (or a score of 60-69% or B+) from a well ranked institution will be considered for most our Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees with a 2:1 requirement.

Students holding a good Bachelors Honours degree will be considered for postgraduate study at Diploma or Masters level.

Holders of a good three-year Bakalár or pre-2002 Magister from a recognised Slovakian Higher Education institution with a minimum overall grade of 1.5, B, Vel’mi dobrý ‘very good’, and/or a good Inžinier or a post-2002 Magister from a recognised Slovakian Higher Education institution will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Holders of a good Diploma o pridobljeni univerzitetni izobrazbi (Bachelors degree), Diplomant (Professionally oriented first degree), Univerzitetni diplomant (Academically oriented first degree) or Visoko Obrazovanja (until 1999) from a recognised Slovenian Higher Education institution with a minimum overall grade of 8.0 out of 10, and/or a good Diploma specializacija (Postgraduate Diploma) or Magister (Masters) will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Students who hold a Bachelor Honours degree (also known as Baccalaureus Honores / Baccalaureus Cum Honoribus) from a recognised institution will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees. Most Masters programmes will require a second class upper (70%) or a distinction (75%).

Holders of a Masters degree will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Holders of a Bachelor degree from a recognised South Korean institution (usually with the equivalent of a second class upper or a grade point average 3.0/4.0 or 3.2/4.5) will be considered for Masters programmes.

Holders of a good Masters degree from a recognised institution will be considered for PhD study on an individual basis.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and will usually be required to have completed a Masters degree, with 7 out of 10 or higher for 2:1 equivalency from a recognised institution to be considered for entry. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and will usually be required to have completed a Masters degree, with 60-74% or a CGPA 3.30/4.0 or higher for 2:1 equivalency from a recognised institution to be considered for entry. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of a good Kandidatexamen (Bachelors degree) or Yrkesexamen (Professional Bachelors degree) from a recognised Swedish Higher Education institution with the majority of subjects with a grade of VG (Val godkänd), and/or a good Magisterexamen (Masters degree), International Masters degree or Licentiatexamen (comparable to a UK Mphil), will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Holders of a good "PostGraduate Certificate" or "PostGraduate Diploma" or a Masters degree from a recognised Swiss higher education institution (with a minimum GPA of 5/6 or 8/10 or 2/5 (gut-bien-bene/good) for a 2.1 equivalence) may be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a Bachelors degree and a Masters degree, with a GPA of 3.0/4.0, 3.5/5 or 75% from a recognised institution to be considered. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

Holders of a good Bachelor degree (from 75% to 85% depending upon the university in Taiwan) from a recognised institution will be considered for postgraduate Masters study. Holders of a good Masters degree from a recognised institution will be considered for PhD study.

Students who hold a Bachelor degree from a recognised institution will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees.  Most taught Masters programmes require a minimum of an upper second class degree (2.1) Students who have completed a Masters degree from a recognised institution will be considered for PhD study.

Holders of a good Masters degree from a recognised institution will be considered for entry to our postgraduate research programmes.

Holders of a good Masters degree or Mphil from a recognised university will be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes.

Students with a Bachelors degree from the following universities may be considered for entry to postgraduate programmes:

  • Ateneo de Manila University - Quezon City
  • De La Salle University - Manila
  • University of Santo Tomas
  • University of the Philippines - Diliman

Students from all other institutions with a Bachelors and a Masters degree or relevant work experience may be considered for postgraduate programmes.

Grading Schemes

1-5 where 1 is the highest 2.1 = 1.75 2.2 = 2.25 

Out of 4.0 where 4 is the highest 2.1 = 3.0 2.2 = 2.5

Letter grades and percentages 2.1 = B / 3.00 / 83% 2.2 = C+ / 2.5 / 77%

Holders of a postdoctoral qualification from a recognised institution will be considered for PhD study.  Students may be considered for PhD study if they have a Masters from one of the above listed universities.

Holders of a Lisans Diplomasi with a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0/4.0 from a recognised university will be considered for postgraduate study at Diploma or Masters level.

Holders of a Yuksek Diplomasi from a recognised university will be considered for PhD study.

Students who hold a Bachelor degree from a recognised institution will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees. Most Masters programmes will require a second class upper (2.1) or GPA of 3.5/5.0

Applicants for postgraduate research programmes should hold a good Bachelors degree / Диплом бакалавра (Dyplom Bakalavra), Диплом спеціаліста (Specialist Diploma) or a Dyplom Magistra from a recognised Ukrainian higher education institution with a minimum GPA of 4.0/5.0, 3.5/4, 8/12 or 80% or higher for 2:1 equivalence and will usually be required to have completed a good Masters degree to be considered for entry to postgraduate research programmes. Applicants with lower grades than this may be considered on an individual basis.

The University will consider students who hold an Honours degree from a recognised institution in the USA with a GPA of:

  • 2.8 GPA (on a 4.0 scale) for entry to programmes with a 2:2 requirement 
  • 3.2 GPA (on a 4.0 scale) for entry to programmes with a 2:1 requirement 

Please note that some subjects which are studied at postgraduate level in the USA, eg. Medicine and Law, are traditionally studied at undergraduate level in the UK.

Holders of the Magistr Diplomi (Master's degree) or Diplomi (Specialist Diploma), awarded by prestigious universities, who have attained high grades in their studies will be considered for postgraduate study.  Holders of the Fanlari Nomzodi (Candidate of Science), where appropriate, will be considered for PhD study.

Holders of the Licenciatura/Título or an equivalent professional title from a recognised Venezuelan university may be considered for entry to a postgraduate degree programme. Scales of 1-5, 1-10 and 1-20 are used, an overall score of 70% or equivalent can be considered equivalent to a UK 2.1.  Applicants for PhD level study will preferably hold a Maestria or equivalent qualification

Holders of a Bachelors degree from a recognised Vietnamese institution (usually achieved with the equivalent of a second class upper or a grade point average minimum GPA of 7.0 and above) will be considered for postgraduate study at Diploma or Masters level.  Holders of a Masters degree (thac si) will be considered for entry to PhD programmes.

Students who hold a Masters degree with a minimum GPA of 3.5/5.0 or a mark of 2.0/2.5 (A) will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees.   

Students who hold a good Bachelor Honours degree will be considered for Postgraduate Diplomas and Masters degrees. 

The Department is home to a number of award-winning writers and our research into the aesthetic, historical and theoretical contexts of literature is complemented by our strong traditions in creative practice as research.

Please contact a staff member working in your area of interest in the first instance: Find a supervisor in Creative Writing .

Your degree will provide excellent preparation for your future career, but this can also be enhanced by a range of employability support services offered by the University and the College of Arts and Law.

The University's Careers Network  provides expert guidance and activities especially for postgraduates, which will help you achieve your career goals. The College of Arts and Law also has a dedicated  careers and employability team  who offer tailored advice and a programme of College-specific careers events.

You will be encouraged to make the most of your postgraduate experience and will have the opportunity to:

  • Receive one-to-one careers advice, including guidance on your job applications, writing your CV and improving your interview technique, whether you are looking for a career inside or outside of academia
  • Meet employers face-to-face at on-campus recruitment fairs and employer presentations
  • Attend an annual programme of careers fairs, skills workshops and conferences, including bespoke events for postgraduates in the College of Arts and Law
  • Take part in a range of activities to demonstrate your knowledge and skills to potential employers and enhance your CV

What’s more, you will be able to access our full range of careers support for up to 2 years after graduation.

Over the past five years, more than 96% of Creative Writing postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation. Postgraduates in the Department of Film and Creative Writing develop a range of skills including: the ability to lead and participate in discussions; critical thinking, and an appreciation of different theoretical contexts; the ability to develop opinions and new ideas; and an aptitude for thinking and working creatively with others. While some graduates go on to careers in related industries - such as writing, media and television - others have used their transferable skills to pursue roles such as advertising, teaching, and in the heritage and cultural sectors.

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Obtaining a doctorate degree in creative writing provides an education specializing in fiction writing techniques and literary analysis. Upon receiving a PhD in Creative Writing, graduates can use the degree to further develop their own creative writing career or teach others the skills and techniques used to write and analyze literature at the high school, college, or university level.

Requirements

Most PhD programs are very selective in choosing which few students will be admitted to study in their program. Candidates should have an excellent mastery of the written word, literary analysis, and familiarity with the liberal arts. Many schools require or prefer that a masterís degree in English or a related subject area be held by the applicant in order to be considered for their degree program.

Multiple letters of recommendation, GRE scores, and writing samples are required by most programs to help determine whether you are right for the rigorous demands of earning a doctorate degree. Academic writing samples are often required in addition to creative writing samples; this gives the office of admissions an idea of both your creative talent and your ability to analyze and critique literary works.

Expectations

Students accepted into a doctoral creative writing program can expect to study for approximately three to five years depending on the program. Students can also expect to have to write a variety of essays, teach classes on writing techniques and literature, complete a comprehensive examination, and compose a dissertation. Courses required often include a combination of literature, writing, and teaching classes.

Online Programs

Online programs exist for the bachelorís degree and masterís degree level of English, literature, and creative writing education. However, those wishing to pursue a PhD in Creative Writing must obtain their degree in person rather than online.

Offline Programs

If you want to obtain your doctorate degree in creative writing, there are numerous universities across the country with creative writing programs to consider. Some programs put a higher emphasis on teaching others how to write, while other programs focus more on your own writing abilities. Here are some of the programs available to those interested in creative writing.

University of Illinois Chicago

The University of Illinois Chicago offers a PhD in Creative Writing geared towards those students who wish to eventually pursue a career in teaching. The program teaches writing skills as well as teaching skills to prepare graduates for work in the academic world. Students will be required to write a creative dissertation, as well as teach creative writing to become educated and prepared for teaching after receiving their degree.

Department of English University of Illinois at Chicago 2027 University Hall 601 S. Morgan St. (M/C 162) Chicago, IL 60607-7120 Phone: 312-413-2200 www.uic.edu

Western Michigan University

Western Michigan University offers a PhD in English with an emphasis in creative writing. Students are required to take two teaching courses and prove their competency in a foreign language, in addition to their literature classes. Students will also take workshops to prepare for their dissertation in their selected area of specialization.

Creative writing students must also participate in doctoral reading programs before taking their doctoral reading exam. Upon passing the doctoral reading examination, students will then be required to write a dissertation. For questions regarding admission to their graduate school, contact the university at the following address or website.

2240 Seibert Administration Building 1903 W Michigan Ave Western Michigan University Kalamazoo MI 49008-5211 Phone: 269-387-2000 www.wmich.edu

University of Cincinnati

The University of Cincinnati offers a PhD in English and Comparative Literature with a focus in creative writing. All doctoral students participate in the departmentís teaching training program which lasts approximately seven months. During the program students will have the opportunity to teach college writing courses. Students may also take courses that specialize in how to teach creative writing. Creative writing students will complete a creative dissertation and analytical essay in order to finish their degree. More information regarding the graduate program can be found by contacting the Department of English or visiting their website.

Department of English College of Arts & Sciences University of Cincinnati PO Box 210069 Cincinnati, OH 45221-0069 Phone: 513-556-3906 www.artsci.uc.edu

University of Utah

The University of Utah offers a PhD in Literature with a creative writing emphasis. Students will learn better creative writing techniques while also learning how to analyze literary works. The PhD is generally for those students wishing to teach at a college or university upon completion.

Students will graduate with the skills to teach not only creative writing, but literature courses as well. Students will learn literary history, attend writing workshops, and complete a prospectus and dissertation. Contact the English Department regarding admission and program requirements.

Department of English Languages & Communication Bldg 255 S Central Campus Drive, Room 3500 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Phone: 801-581-6168 www.hum.utah.edu

University of Denver

A PhD in Creative Writing is offered by the University of Denver. Students better their writing through constant practice and by reading literary works. Four workshops will be completed over the course of the studentís program. Students will not only read works from their genre, but also works dealing with anthropology, philosophy, art history, and other subject areas. Contact the university with any questions regarding their program.

English Department 2000 E. Asbury Denver, CO 80208 Phone: 303-871-2266 www.du.edu

Georgia State University

The PhD in Creative Writing offered by Georgia State University allows students to practice and better their writing abilities while also critiquing and analyzing literature. Unless completed at the MA or MFA level, students must take courses in literary theory, form, and contemporary poetry or fiction craft. All students are also required to complete a dissertation. Questions regarding admission requirements or their program of study can be directed to the Department of English.

Department of English P.O. Box 3970 Atlanta, GA 30302-3970 Phone: 404-413-5800 workshop.gsu.edu

Employment Opportunities

Many graduates immediately begin teaching at the university level and start working towards a tenured position. Work at community colleges and high schools teaching English and creative writing is also a choice for many upon receiving their degree.

Teaching is not the only option for post-grads. Working for magazines, newspapers, and other print or online media is available for creative writers, especially after developing a strong creative writing portfolio. Choosing to be an author or writer can also be composed of freelance work and self-employment. According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, 70% of writers and authors were self-employed in 2008.

Salary Ranges

The salary range for those who obtain a PhD in creative writing varies greatly depending on the position obtained after graduation and the location of the school. According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, teaching at the high school level on average earns $52,200 a year, with those having a doctoral degree potentially earning more. Post-secondary educators earn on average $108,749 as a professor, $76,147 as an associate professor, and $63,827 as an assistant professor.

Writers and Authors

Salaried writers and authors earned on average $57,070 in 2008. Freelance writers’ annual earnings vary greatly depending on the type of freelance work and number of projects completed each year. Many freelance writers have to find income from working another part-time or full-time job.

Employment Outlook

High school teachers.

According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, teaching at the high school level is expected to grow by 13% between 2008 and 2018. An even higher demand for teachers will be seen for high schools in poor and inner-city school districts, since many teachers leave to teach elsewhere after a short period of time in these areas.

The Bureau of Labor and Statistics expects the demand of post-secondary educators to grow by 15% between 2008 and 2018, which is faster than the average growth rate for most positions. This is due to the increased number of students attending community colleges and universities around the country. Tenured positions are still expected to be quite competitive to earn, but part-time and non-tenured positions are expected to grow even faster.

The writing industry is very competitive, and many writers and authors will continue to stay self-employed. However, there is an expected increase of salaried writers and authors by 8% between 2008 and 2018. Companies online are seeing an increased need for writers as more material is needed for websites, so many writers are expected to start writing for online publications.

Top Ranked Doctoral Programs

Search for other great programs, 5 responses to “creative writing”.

Of course it is very interesting that one now can obtain a phd degree from one’s workplace without hampreing the job.But it could have been better if one had had the opportunity of doing an online phd degree.

Will it be possible in future to do an online degree in liberal arts specially in english?It would be very good if one got the chance to do a phd degree the same way.

I am interested in pursuing a ph.d in creative writing and literature—–looking for an accredited online program

I’m interested in pursuing a doctorate degree in Creative Writing. I’m searching for programs on the west coast of the United States.

I have been looking for an online PhD program in Creative Writing and have not found any accredited ones. I don’t understand why this is a area of study with such limited accessibility for online classes. The bulk of the work is reading and documenting and writing which seems to be a perfect fit for an online course. I did find one that sounded perfect AIU…however they are NOT accredited.

I currently have three Masters Degrees and two of them are MFA’s. One in Non-fiction and one in fiction. My fourth Masters degree will be completed in January 2022. It is an MFA in poetry. I have a memoir published and five esssys published. I have another book to be published this November 2021. Lipstick Lesbian.. book of poems (LGBTQ) Could I get any classes waived in a PhD. Creative Writing program?

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Creative Writing (Online) PhD

  • Full-time: 48 months
  • Part-time: 96 months
  • Start date: October 2024, February 2025
  • UK fees: £5,100
  • International fees: £21,500

Research overview

The University of Nottingham is a fantastic place to study creative writing.

We have expertise in poetry and fiction that range from haiku poetry to digital storytelling. In addition, all our lecturers are actively publishing their work and collaborating with cultural institutions across the United Kingdom.

You can also get editing experience through The Letters Page online journal, working with award-winning writer Jon McGregor. 

Hear from our students

Creative Writing PhD student, James Aitcheson, discusses doing a PhD as a published author.

Watch the video >

Course content

A PhD in Creative Writing is mainly made up of independent study, with supervision meetings occurring online (e.g. via Microsoft Teams) and spread throughout the year.

There are no taught credits attached to a PhD, although it is compulsory for full-time students to attend the Arts Faculty Researcher Skills training programme, which is available for online attendance.

Some PhD students also choose to audit masters modules taught by their supervisors where appropriate. This is not compulsory, nor does it involve any formal assessment, and would be limited to modules offered online.

Part-time students

Part-time students are required to take part in all required research training, attend postgraduate seminars where possible, and one postgraduate researcher (PGR) symposium over the period of their registration.

You will complete a written thesis of up to 100,000 words, with expert support and advice from your academic supervisor(s). You will also take a verbal examination called a viva voce, where you explain your project in depth to an examination panel.

A creative writing thesis will mainly consist of your own original creative work. This could be a novel, a manuscript of poems, a collection of short stories, a play, or another form of creative output. Your thesis will also include a critical analysis of your creative work, which you will situate within a theorised or analytical context.

A PhD thesis should not normally exceed 100,000 words in length. It is expected that the creative element would usually comprise 50,000-70,000 words. The critical analysis component will normally be 15,000-30,000 words in length.

What is the thesis pending period?

All periods of registration are followed by a period of writing-up, called the thesis-pending period, when tuition fees are not paid and students are writing up their thesis.

Find out more in the university's Quality Manual .

Progression review

All PhD students take part in progression review assessments to ensure that their project is progressing satisfactorily. A progression review consists usually consists of written reports from both the student and the supervisory team.

All students have an independent assessment interview for their Stage 1 and Stage 2 reviews (end of years 1 and 2 for full-time students, years 2 and 4 for part-time students).

Entry requirements

All candidates are considered on an individual basis and we accept a broad range of qualifications. The entrance requirements below apply to 2024 entry.

Meeting our English language requirements

If you need support to meet the required level, you may be able to attend a presessional English course. Presessional courses teach you academic skills in addition to English language. Our  Centre for English Language Education is accredited by the British Council for the teaching of English in the UK.

If you successfully complete your presessional course to the required level, you can then progress to your degree course. This means that you won't need to retake IELTS or equivalent.

For on-campus presessional English courses, you must take IELTS for UKVI to meet visa regulations. For online presessional courses, see our CELE webpages for guidance.

Visa restrictions

International students must have valid UK immigration permissions for any courses or study period where teaching takes place in the UK. Student route visas can be issued for eligible students studying full-time courses. The University of Nottingham does not sponsor a student visa for students studying part-time courses. The Standard Visitor visa route is not appropriate in all cases. Please contact the university’s Visa and Immigration team if you need advice about your visa options.

We recognise that applicants have a variety of experiences and follow different pathways to postgraduate study.

We treat all applicants with alternative qualifications on an individual basis. We may also consider relevant work experience.

If you are unsure whether your qualifications or work experience are relevant, contact us .

As well as IELTS (listed above), we also accept other English language qualifications .

This includes TOEFL iBT, Pearson PTE, GCSE, IB and O level English.

You will be required to provide a PhD proposal with your application, which will set out the structure of your project.

The basis of a good proposal is usually a set of questions, approaches, and objectives which clearly outline your proposed project and what you want to accomplish. The proposal should also clearly demonstrate how you are going to accomplish this.

A PhD proposal should be a minimum of 1000 words. There is no upward limit for proposals, although successful proposals are often not much longer than about 2000-3000 words. You should consider:

  • The methodologies that you will use in your project (as appropriate)
  • The necessary resources and facilities you will need to carry out your project

In addition, the proposal should outline your reasons (academic and/or personal) for registering for online study rather than by full or part-time on-campus options. In particular, you should make clear how will be able to carry out your project in your chosen location. The proposal must include evidence of:

  • Experience and ability to work independently e.g. papers/presentations at professional and academic conferences or publications in professional journals or previous completion of an independent research project, etc
  • Access to local library facilities (where needed)
  • Access to suitable IT facilities
  • Access to online communications, e.g. Microsoft Teams
  • Access to facilities to support any study-related disability (where appropriate)

It is also helpful to include:

  • A summary of any further research experience, in addition to your academic qualifications. This could include work undertaken at undergraduate or masters level, or outside the educational system
  • The name of the supervisor who may supervise the project (see the full list of supervision areas in the school )

Find out more about how to write a research proposal .

You may find it helpful to get in touch with a member of academic staff about your research proposal before submitting an application. They may be able to help you with your proposal and offer support to find funding opportunities in your area.

Our step-by-step guide contains everything you need to know about applying for postgraduate research.

How to apply.

Additional information for international students

If you are a student from the EU, EEA or Switzerland, you may be asked to complete a fee status questionnaire and your answers will be assessed using guidance issued by the UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) .

These fees are for full-time study. If you are studying part-time, you will be charged a proportion of this fee each year (subject to inflation).

Additional costs

All students will need at least one device to approve security access requests via Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA). We also recommend students have a suitable laptop to work both on and off-campus. For more information, please check the equipment advice .

All students will need at least one device to approve security access requests via Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA). Students must also have a suitable desktop/laptop to carry out their research. For more information, please check the equipment advice .

You'll be able to access many of the books and journal papers you’ll need through our libraries, though you may wish to buy your own copies of core texts. Because some resources may not be available online, the University of Nottingham library offers postal loans for online learners and can scan up to one chapter or article from a book or journal on request. For details on postal loans, see the library website, and for scanning requests, use the dedicated request form .

For students studying elsewhere in the UK, as a University of Nottingham student, you can also access many other university libraries across the country. The SCONUL Access scheme allows you access to the buildings and resources on offer at other UK campuses, so you can study closer to home. For more information on participating libraries and to sign up, check out their main webpage.

Many academic libraries worldwide allow students to become library members. You may need to provide a letter confirming your student status: these can be ordered from the university's online store .

There are many ways to fund your research degree, from scholarships to government loans.

Check our guide to find out more about funding your postgraduate degree.

Regular supervision

You will have a team of at least two supervisors. Full-time students will meet with their supervisory team at least 10 times each year (six times for part-time students).

Your supervisors will help you to realise your research project and to guide you through your research. Many students will also attend conferences and publish papers in conjunction with their supervisors, to gain valuable experience and contacts in the academic community.

Professional development

Research students in the School of English may benefit from:

  • Student-led research seminars and an annual symposium (recorded and/or hybrid for online students)
  • Research networks created by the research centres and individual research projects
  • Research council-funded international research exchange visits with leading universities
  • Co-authorship with members of staff
  • Dedicated staff-postgraduate reading groups
  • Support for participation in international conferences and seminars

Postgraduate seminars and conference attendance

A seminar series is run by and for the postgraduate students in the school during term time, which will be hybrid and/or recorded for online students.

The seminars provide a forum for students to share work in progress with staff and peers, to hear from invited speakers, and to explore key academic and career topics in a supportive atmosphere.

Researcher training and development

The Researcher Academy is the network for researchers, and staff who support them. We work together to promote a healthy research culture, to cultivate researcher excellence, and develop creative partnerships that enable researchers to flourish.

Postgraduate researchers at Nottingham have access to our online Members’ area, which includes a wealth of resources, access to training courses and award-winning postgraduate placements.

Graduate centres

Our graduate centres are dedicated community spaces on campus for postgraduates.

Each space has areas for:

  • socialising
  • computer work
  • kitchen facilities

Student support

You will have access to a range of support services , including:

  • academic and disability support
  • childcare services
  • counselling service
  • faith support
  • financial support
  • mental health and wellbeing support
  • visa and immigration advice
  • welfare support

Students' Union

Our Students' Union represents all students. You can join the Postgraduate Students’ Network or contact the dedicated Postgraduate Officer .

There are also a range of support networks, including groups for:

  • international students
  • black and minority ethnic students
  • students who identify as women
  • students with disabilities
  • LGBT+ students

SU Advice provides free, independent and confidential advice on issues such as accommodation, financial and academic difficulties.

phd creative writing distance learning

Where you will learn

Special collections - english phd online learning.

While many of our Special Collections have been or are being digitised, some of the following offering will only available on-campus and would require visits to Nottingham to access:

  • manuscripts from the 12th-15th centuries and books in Old and Middle English, Old Icelandic, Viking Studies, and runology
  • the English Place-Name Society library and archive
  • Hallward Library's DH Lawrence archive (containing Lawrence family papers, manuscripts, first editions, and books owned by Lawrence)
  • the Cambridge Drama Collection (over 1,500 items including plays and works about the British theatre from 1750-1850)

If your PhD research will require access to these collections, please consult with a potential supervisor about the suitability of the topic for online study. 

Whether you are considering a career in academia, industry or haven't yet decided, we’re here to support you every step of the way.

Expert staff will work with you to explore PhD career options and apply for vacancies, develop your interview skills and meet employers. You can book a one-to-one appointment, take an online course or attend a workshop.

International students who complete an eligible degree programme in the UK on a student visa can apply to stay and work in the UK after their course under the Graduate immigration route . Eligible courses at the University of Nottingham include bachelors, masters and research degrees, and PGCE courses.

Careers advice

Whether you are considering a career in academia, industry or haven't yet decided, we’re here to support you every step of the way.

International students who complete an eligible degree programme in the UK on a student visa can apply to stay and work in the UK after their course under the Graduate immigration route. Eligible courses at the University of Nottingham include bachelors, masters and research degrees, and PGCE courses.

Graduate destinations

This course will develop key transferable skills, including:

  • analysis and problem-solving
  • independent research
  • information gathering and data management
  • construction of logical and persuasive arguments

As a result, our graduates enter a wide range of careers. These include:

  • lecturing, teaching and academic research
  • specialist archive, librarian, heritage and museum work
  • journalism, publishing and research
  • local and central government
  • social policy

100% of postgraduates from the School of English secured graduate level employment or further study within 15 months of graduation. The average annual salary for these graduates was £37,402.*

*HESA Graduate Outcomes 2019/20 data published in 2022 . The Graduate Outcomes % is derived using The Guardian University Guide methodology. The average annual salary is based on data from graduates who completed a full-time postgraduate degree with home fee status and are working full-time within the UK.

Spencer Jordan Creative Writing

Related courses

English (online) phd, applied linguistics (online) phd, applied linguistics and english language teaching (online) phd, research excellence framework.

The University of Nottingham is ranked 7th in the UK for research power, according to analysis by Times Higher Education. The Research Excellence Framework (REF) is a national assessment of the quality of research in UK higher education institutions.

  • We are proud to be in the top 10 UK universities for research into English, while our ranking of 9th by 'research power' reflects our research excellence
  • 90%* of our research is classed as 'world-leading' (4*) or 'internationally excellent' (3*)
  • 100%* of our research is recognised internationally
  • 51% of our research is assessed as 'world-leading' (4*) for its impact**

*According to analysis by Times Higher Education ** According to our own analysis.

This content was last updated on 27 September 2023 . Every effort has been made to ensure that this information is accurate, but changes are likely to occur between the date of publishing and course start date. It is therefore very important to check this website for any updates before you apply.

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phd creative writing distance learning

Department of English » Research » Research Degrees in English and Creative Writing » Creative Writing PhD

The Creative Writing PhD at Manchester Metropolitan University

  • Creative Writing PhD
  • Distance Learning PhD Programmes

Our Creative Writing PhD is a practice based programme taught by teams of published creative writers and highly regarded literary scholars.

Staff have expertise in fiction, poetry, children’s and young adult fiction, creative non-fiction and scriptwriting. 78% of our research has been rated as world-leading or internationally excellent (REF 2014).

Creative PhD Structure

The PhD in Creative Writing (also known as the critical-creative, or practice-based PhD) combines a proposed manuscript (e.g. novel, short story collection, poems, playscript, narrative non-fiction, digital writing) with an element of supporting or contextualising research. The proposed creative manuscript will be volume-length (the natural length of a book, depending on genre). The length of the supporting research will be subject to negotiation with your tutor but would typically be 40,000 words. 

The emphasis is not on creating two separate pieces of work, but on integration. Your dissertation will consist of an interdependent project of contextual and practice-based creative work.

Both sections of the PhD should contain work of 'publishable standard', and the contextual and creative elements must make a new contribution to knowledge.

Full time students are expected to work full-time on their research and should not undertake more than six hours of formal duty or paid work in any given week. However, every attempt will be made to provide you with work experience in your chosen field.

Creative PhD Supervision and Research Training

Typically you will be allocated a team of two or three supervisors; specialists in the area of the creative part of your dissertation and in the critical or contextual component. Your supervisory team may also be a member of staff from another department e.g. History, where appropriate.

This is an independent research programme; there are no timetabled classes or modules, but you will need to attend supervision sessions as negotiated with your supervisors as well as specialist courses in e.g. Research Skills and Ethics Training. The frequency of supervisory sessions may vary depending on the stage of research, and whether you are full or part time, but in general these meetings will take place at least once a month.

Subject specific research training might include:

  • presentation of creative work at a PhD Masterclass Writing Workshop
  • the submission of a treatment to a publisher, attending one of the many professional events hosted by the Manchester Writing School, e.g. the National Creative Writing Industry Day, which features talks by agents, publishers and writers.
  • leading undergraduate creative writing seminars

General research training might take the form of:

  • a series of one-to-one tutorials with a supervisor on the subject of your contextualising critical research, or
  • the presentation of a paper at a relevant academic conference, or
  • the targeting of academic journals with material for publication

There is also a Research Training Programme  covering various aspects of research development and skills.

Staff and Supervisors

Academic and research staff are featured on the staff profiles page for the Department of English

Areas of Particular Supervisory Expertise

These include Poetry, Place Writing, Gothic Fiction and YA/Children’s Fiction.

An Example Doctoral Programme: The PhD in Children’s/YA Fiction

At Manchester Metropolitan we have expertise in both the critical and creative aspects of writing for children and young adults. A highly regarded team of writing professionals to guide you through the process of writing your novel and thesis:

  • Dr Ellie Byrne
  • Dr Chloe Buckley
  • Dr Ginette Carpenter
  • Iris Feindt , Graduate Teaching Assistant
  • Dr Blanka Grzegorczyk
  • Dr Livi Michael
  • Dr Muzna Rahman
  • Alex Wheatle
  • Dr Catherine Wilcox

Resources for Young Adult and Children’s fiction:

  • The Manchester Centre for Youth Studies (MCYS) which produces collaborative and interdisciplinary research into diversity, criminal justice, language and wellbeing;
  • The Manchester Children’s Book Festival (MCBF) with an ongoing programme of events and opportunities to work with children in schools and at festivals;
  • Former Poet Laureate, Professor Carol Ann Duffy DBE , who has written extensively for children.
  • Our Special Collections features a Children’s Book Collection featuring 19th and 20th century children’s book illustrations, and the opportunity to work with the Manchester School of Art who offer courses in Illustration and Animation.

An examination team assesses the PhD thesis and conducts an oral examination (viva) of the student. The examination team consists of one internal examiner and one external examiner.

Opportunities for PhD Students

Wherever possible, we try to offer our PhD students teaching, as it is an important part of professional development. The availability of part time teaching varies from year to year, and all candidates for teaching will be subject to an interview with the relevant Programme Leader. Further opportunities may arise in subject-specific areas, e.g. through the Manchester Children’s Book Festival, for work in schools or at literary events.

The university has a vibrant event-culture in which students are invited to participate. Former Poet Laureate Carol Ann Duffy hosts a series of events at the Royal Exchange Theatre at which selected poetry students read with established poets. And similar events are arranged at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation  where our novel-writing students are invited to read with established novelists.

Fees and Funding

Postgraduate Doctoral loans are available to eligible candidates and further information is available at www.gov.uk/doctoral-loan .

Any current studentships are advertised at www2.mmu.ac.uk/research/research-study/scholarships/

10 scholarships per year are available to non-EU applicants applying for Distance Learning PhD programmes within certain subject areas.  Please see www2.mmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research/distance-learning-research-degrees/ for details.

For more information on fees visit our Postgraduate Research page www2.mmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research/fees/

Manchester Metropolitan University is a member of the North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership Consortium (NWCDTP) offers postgraduate studentships across the full range of arts and humanities including Creative Writing. See www.nwcdtp.ac.uk/prospective-students/ for more information.

Key Contacts

Dr Andrew Moor Research Degrees Co-Ordinator, Department of English 

Dr Nikolai Duffy Research Degrees Co-Ordinator for Creative Writing

Dr Myna Trustram Research Associate

How to Apply

Please look at this website: www2.mmu.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/research/research-degree-list/5047.php and click  ‘How to Apply’ to go to the online application form.

With your application form you will also need to upload:

  • Two recent academic references which have been signed by your referee and provided on headed paper from the relevant institution. They must be saved in a format which prevents alteration of the content e.g. PDFs.
  • A proposal – this should be written using the advice on the application form. You might like to try our online course on ‘How to Write a Research Proposal’ (see below for details).
  • Copies of your Masters and Bachelors degree certificates, including transcripts of your marks or grades if you are applying for a PhD.
  • Copies of any qualification you have in English Language, if English is not your first language.
  • Examples of your work (if requested)
  • A copy of your current passport.

The Admissions process for research degrees at the University includes assessment of your application form along with your supporting documents and an interview with a potential supervisor.  Some applicants may also need to apply for an ATAS certificate (depending on the research subject) and a visa to study in the UK.  You should therefore ensure that you apply with enough time to complete this process. The University has 3 possible start dates for research degrees, which are October, January and April.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why would i do a phd.

Increasingly, a PhD is a requirement for an academic career. As creative writing is a relatively new subject in British higher education, in the past academic staff have secured jobs without having doctorates, but this is changing gradually as more and more people complete PhDs.

The indispensable requirement if you want a permanent university job (as opposed to hourly paid teaching) is that you must be a published creative writer of some substance and reputation. It may be that this and a PhD will become the norm, though a successful writer will always be very attractive to departments.

University teaching may appeal to you if you enjoy your research and practice and want to share your expertise. Writers and artists usually find that university departments are sympathetic environments where their practice is valued as research and may therefore constitute part of their role.

You may also want to do a PhD in order to dedicate a substantial amount of time to your practice and to work with experts in your chosen field.

Finally there may be a particular aspect of your research that you want to pursue, and the university provides the best environment you’re your investigative study.

What qualifications do I need to do a PhD?

Our Creative Writing PhD students come from a variety of backgrounds, nationalities and writing experiences, but successful applicants display writing talent and experience, and the ability to engage critically with the contexts in which they write and their own process.

We would normally expect applicants to hold a first or upper second class honours degree (or equivalent) in a related subject, or a qualification which is regarded by the relevant Faculty Research Degrees committee as equivalent to an honours degree, e.g. professional qualifications. All doctoral candidates are normally expected to have completes a Masters degree successfully in a field relevant to the subject of their research. An MA/MFA in Creative Writing is an advantage, but evidence of creative writing engagement and achievement will be taken into consideration, as well as evidence of an ability to engage in the supporting research. Candidates holding other qualifications will be considered on their merits and in relations to the nature and scope of the proposed programme of work. Professional experience, publications, or other appropriate evidence of accomplishment may also be taken into consideration.

What is the difference between the MFA and the PhD?

On both programmes you will be expected to complete a creative project (novel, poetry collection) that is potentially publishable, but to obtain a PhD you will also be expected to make an original contribution to knowledge in your chosen field. The PhD incorporates an element of critical, theoretical or contextual argument and research which is submitted with the creative writing. At present, in the UK you are more likely to obtain academic work with a PhD. The MFA is allied to the MA, although it can be taken as a separate qualification. The primary requirement for the MFA is the submission of your creative writing.

Why is there so much emphasis on the academic part of the thesis when the creative is 70 – 80% of the project?

Your creative work will be considered when you apply and in your personal statement you should show evidence of relevant experience in your chosen field. The emphasis in the application process on the contextualising research ensures that you have an original contribution to make and that the research is rigorous and well-defined.

What are the starting dates?

The University has 3 possible start dates for research degrees, which are October, January and April.

How fast can I do it?

The minimum time for a full time PhD is three years. Part time is six years.

How long should the completed project be?

A traditional PhD is not usually longer than 80,000 words and a similar limit is suggested for the PhD in Creative Writing. The balance is typically weighted towards the creative work rather than the contextual dissertation, but this may be negotiated with your Director of Studies.

Do I have to do a PhD in one of the specialised areas mentioned above?

No; in fact it is expected that your own creative work will form the basis of your research and if your proposal is accepted, a supervisory team will be allocated accordingly.

Will I be offered teaching while I’m doing my PhD?

Teaching experience is usually available to all Postgraduate Research Students who would like it. It is not usually available during the first year of study (FT) and will depend on what provision is needed on the English BA programme. 

Is there a sample form I can look at?

There are no examples of completed admissions forma available as yet. Please contact Dr Andrew Moor, Research Degrees Co-Ordinator, for a sample pro-forma. [email protected]

Any questions can be directed to  [email protected]

You may also like to try our four week online course on how to write a research degree proposal, aimed at explaining the main components of the written proposal.

You can browse the course by visiting the site collectiveonlinelearning.harts.online/register

If you want to follow the course and receive feedback, register by opening the link in your browser, inputting the password r3Gi5t3R and then completing the registration form - fields marked with a red asterisk are required. Make a note of your username and password - you’ll need them for future logins. 

Once you’ve successfully registered you’ll also be logged into the site - for that first session at least - and can start the course immediately. There is an FAQ's page and a comments form if you need assistance. At the end of the course, if you want to, you can submit your draft proposal for feedback from our research degrees team.

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Online Postgraduate Courses in Creative Writing - 33 Courses

Bath spa university school of creative industries.

Bath Spa University

  • Writing for Young People MA

University of Birmingham Department of Film and Creative Writing

University of Birmingham

  • Creative Writing Doctor of Philosophy - PhD

Bournemouth University Department of Communication and Journalism

Bournemouth University

  • Creative Writing and Publishing MA

University of East Anglia UEA School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing

University of East Anglia UEA

  • Creative Writing Crime Fiction MA

Kingston University Humanities

Kingston University

  • Creative Writing (distance learning) MA

Lancaster University English Literature and Creative Writing

Lancaster University

  • Creative Writing (Distance Learning) MA

Manchester Metropolitan University English

Manchester Metropolitan University

  • Creative Writing MA Master of Fine Arts - MFA (PG)

Central Film School London Film Studies

  • Screenwriting (online) MA

University of Exeter English and Creative Writing

  • Creative Writing Doctor of Philosophy - PhD Master of Philosophy - MPhil

Falmouth University The School of Communication

  • Comedy Writing (Online) MA

University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI) Humanities, Education and Gaelic

  • Orkney and Shetland Studies MLitt

University of Huddersfield Applied Sciences - General (SAPPS)

  • All Doctorates at Huddersfield Doctor of Philosophy - PhD
  • MA by Research at Huddersfield MA (Res)
  • MSc by Research at Huddersfield MSc (Res)

University of Hull Faculty of Arts, Cultures and Education

  • MA Creative Writing (Online) MA

University of Leeds School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies

  • Creative Writing Master of Fine Arts - MFA (PG)

Middlesex University Media

  • Novel Writing (Distance Education) Master of Arts - MA (PG)

Northeastern University London English

  • Contemporary Creative Writing (Online) MA

Open University The Open University

  • Creative Writing (F71) MA

University of York Centre for Lifelong Learning

  • Creative Writing Postgraduate Diploma - PgDip

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phd creative writing distance learning

The Castle Quarter is both a wonderful place to enjoy, with many excellent places to eat and drink, and a wonderful resource for literary studies here at Lancaster. Our students in the Department of English Literature & Creative Writing have many opportunities to make the most of this resource.

phd creative writing distance learning

A PhD is a sign of prestige and gives you structured time to work on a specific project. You might complete yours to progress in your academic career or to support your wider creative role in an area like literacy management or publishing. Either way, you’ll be committed to completing a substantial project and dedicating yourself to becoming an expert in your area of writing.

Our PhD students have published a range of work including:

  • 'The Mountains Sing' – Nguyen Phan Que Mai (finalist of the 2021 Dayton Literary Peace Prize, winner of the 2020 BookBrowse Best Debut Award, winner of the Blogger's Book Prize 2021, winner of the 2021 International Book Awards, winner of the 2021 PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Literary Award, and winner of the 2020 Lannan Literary Award Fellowship)
  • 'Alligator and other stories' by Dima Alzayat (James Tait Black Memorial Prize, finalist; PEN/Robert W. Bingham Award, finalist; Swansea University Dylan Thomas Prize; Short Story Prize, longlist)
  • 'Remembered' by Yvonne Battle-Felton (longlisted for the Women’s Prize for fiction, shortlisted for the Jhalak Prize)
  • 'Abundance: Nature in Recovery' by Karen Lloyd
  • 'Fruit Knife Autopsy' by Warren Mortimer

Many of our PhD students are interested in teaching the next generation of writers. We’ll let you know about opportunities to gain teaching experience while you study with us.

Entry requirements

Academic requirements.

Master's degree or equivalent in English literature or literature in other languages, usually with an average of at least 65% for UK MAs.

2:1 Hons degree (UK or equivalent) in English Literature or related subject, for example literature in other languages

If you have studied outside of the UK, we would advise you to check our list of international qualifications before submitting your application.

Additional Requirements

As part of your application, you also need to provide:

  • A viable research proposal
  • A portfolio of original writing (no more than 15 poems or 30 pages of prose) showing potential for publication

Details of the research areas can be found on the Department’s website . If you are interested in applying for one of our PhD programmes, you may wish to informally contact a potential supervisor for guidance on the proposal prior to submitting your application. Guidance on the structure of the proposal is also available.

English Language Requirements

We may ask you to provide a recognised English language qualification, dependent upon your nationality and where you have studied previously.

We normally require an IELTS (Academic) Test with an overall score of at least 7.0, and a minimum of 6.5 in each element of the test. We also consider other English language qualifications .

If your score is below our requirements, you may be eligible for one of our pre-sessional English language programmes .

Contact: Admissions Team +44 (0) 1524 592032 or email [email protected]

Course structure

You will study a range of modules as part of your course, some examples of which are listed below.

Information contained on the website with respect to modules is correct at the time of publication, but changes may be necessary, for example as a result of student feedback, Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies' (PSRB) requirements, staff changes, and new research. Not all optional modules are available every year.

This module prepares you for your dissertation project and supports the development of the research, scholarly and critical skills that it will require. You will be introduced to the idea of ethical practice and any students working on memoirs or verbatim work will be offered specific guidance. You’ll also explore the ideas, concepts and issues around reflective practice and the vital role of research within creative writing.

We’ll study in a cohesive group, bringing students on combined courses and those following different pathways together to create a wider forum; our discussions will focus on professional practice and research issues.

This module aims to enhance your knowledge of library, archival and online research and develop your understanding of the creative process - taking you from first draft to final submission, including problem-solving strategies for creative blocks or obstacles. The module also places your creative work in the context of a professional literary world.

Indicative study themes:

  • Understanding the Research Context
  • Library, Online and Archival Research
  • Scholarly Conventions
  • Creative and Professional Presentation
  • Research and Reflective Practice
  • The Ethical Researcher

Fees and funding

The tuition fee for students with Home Fee status is set in line with the standard fee stipend provided by the UK Research Councils. The fee stipend for 2024/25 has not yet been set. For reference, the fee stipend for 2023/24 was full-time £4,712 and part-time £2,356.

The International Fee for new entrants in 2024/25 is full-time £21,082 and part-time £10,541.

General fees and funding information

There may be extra costs related to your course for items such as books, stationery, printing, photocopying, binding and general subsistence on trips and visits. Following graduation, you may need to pay a subscription to a professional body for some chosen careers.

Specific additional costs for studying at Lancaster are listed below.

College fees

Lancaster is proud to be one of only a handful of UK universities to have a collegiate system. Every student belongs to a college, and all students pay a small College Membership Fee  which supports the running of college events and activities. Students on some distance-learning courses are not liable to pay a college fee.

For students starting in 2023 and 2024, the fee is £40 for undergraduates and research students and £15 for students on one-year courses. Fees for students starting in 2025 have not yet been set.

Computer equipment and internet access

To support your studies, you will also require access to a computer, along with reliable internet access. You will be able to access a range of software and services from a Windows, Mac, Chromebook or Linux device. For certain degree programmes, you may need a specific device, or we may provide you with a laptop and appropriate software - details of which will be available on relevant programme pages. A dedicated  IT support helpdesk  is available in the event of any problems.

The University provides limited financial support to assist students who do not have the required IT equipment or broadband support in place.

For most taught postgraduate applications there is a non-refundable application fee of £40. We cannot consider applications until this fee has been paid, as advised on our online secure payment system. There is no application fee for postgraduate research applications.

For some of our courses you will need to pay a deposit to accept your offer and secure your place. We will let you know in your offer letter if a deposit is required and you will be given a deadline date when this is due to be paid.

The fee that you pay will depend on whether you are considered to be a home or international student. Read more about how we assign your  fee status .

If you are studying on a programme of more than one year’s duration, the tuition fees for subsequent years of your programme are likely to increase each year. Read more about  fees in subsequent years .

Scholarships and bursaries

You may be eligible for the following funding opportunities, depending on your fee status and course. You will be automatically considered for our main scholarships and bursaries when you apply, so there's nothing extra that you need to do.

Unfortunately no scholarships and bursaries match your selection, but there are more listed on scholarships and bursaries page.

If you're considering postgraduate research you should look at our funded PhD opportunities .

We also have other, more specialised scholarships and bursaries - such as those for students from specific countries.

Browse Lancaster University's scholarships and bursaries .

Similar courses

English literature and creative writing.

  • Creative Writing (Distance Learning) MA
  • Creative Writing (modular) MA
  • Creative Writing with English Literary Studies MA
  • English Literary Research MA
  • English Literary Studies MA
  • English Literary Studies with Creative Writing MA
  • English Literature PhD
  • English Literature and Creative Writing PhD
  • Gender Studies and English MA

Important Information

The information on this site relates primarily to 2024/2025 entry to the University and every effort has been taken to ensure the information is correct at the time of publication.

The University will use all reasonable effort to deliver the courses as described, but the University reserves the right to make changes to advertised courses. In exceptional circumstances that are beyond the University’s reasonable control (Force Majeure Events), we may need to amend the programmes and provision advertised. In this event, the University will take reasonable steps to minimise the disruption to your studies. If a course is withdrawn or if there are any fundamental changes to your course, we will give you reasonable notice and you will be entitled to request that you are considered for an alternative course or withdraw your application. You are advised to revisit our website for up-to-date course information before you submit your application.

More information on limits to the University’s liability can be found in our legal information .

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We believe in the importance of a strong and productive partnership between our students and staff. In order to ensure your time at Lancaster is a positive experience we have worked with the Students’ Union to articulate this relationship and the standards to which the University and its students aspire. View our Charter and other policies .

phd creative writing distance learning

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Creative Writing

PhD, MPhil Creative Writing

A postgraduate research qualification in Creative Writing consists of an original body of work - normally a novel, or a collection of poetry/short stories - with an accompanying critical element. The critical element will place the creative work in an informed and theorised analytical context.

The total assessed word count will be 25,000 words for the MPhil and 80,000 words for the PhD (or equivalent for poetry). The proportion of the creative to the critical work will be agreed by the supervisory team, but in total will usually consist of around 65-70% of creative text and 30-35% of critical text.

All postgraduate research students are supervised by two academics, one of whom will normally be a creative writing academic and the other from English Literature or a related discipline relevant to the creative and critical work. As with the traditional research degrees, the final submission will be expected to make 'a substantial and original contribution to knowledge'. For Creative Writing, this means a body of work that contributes in individual, significant and demonstrable ways to current discourses in literature.

The relation to such discourses will be articulated in the creative work and conceptualised and explored in the critical element; both are intended to address the same research questions, generating dynamic interplay between creative and critical practice.

Programme structure

MPhil: a standalone, one-year (full-time) research degree. Students will undertake their own research or creative project, concluding with the submission of a 25,000-word dissertation/project (normally 17,000-18,000 words of creative writing and 7,000-8,000 of critical writing). Students may have the option to audit units from our taught master's programmes if they are relevant to their research.

PhD: a research project undertaken across four years (full-time, minimum period of study three years), culminating in an 80,000-word thesis/project (normally 50,000 words of creative work - often an extract from a longer project - and 30,000 words of a critical investigation). As well as having the option to audit taught units where appropriate, there may be the potential for PhD students to teach units themselves from their second year of study onwards.

The MPhil and PhD can be studied via distance learning.

World-leading research

The University of Bristol is ranked fifth for research in the UK ( Times Higher Education ).

94% of our research assessed as world-leading or internationally excellent.

Entry requirements

MPhil: An upper second-class degree or international equivalent. Please note, acceptance will also depend on evidence of your readiness to pursue a research degree and previous study or achievement in Creative Writing.

PhD: A master's qualification, or be working towards a master's qualification, or international equivalent. Applicants without a master's qualification may be considered on an exceptional basis, provided they hold a first-class undergraduate degree (or international equivalent). Applicants with a non-traditional background may be considered provided they can demonstrate substantial equivalent and relevant experience that has prepared them to undertake their proposed course of study. Acceptance will also depend on previous study or achievement in Creative Writing.

See international equivalent qualifications on the International Office website.

Read the programme admissions statement for important information on entry requirements, the application process and supporting documents required.

If English is not your first language, you will need to reach the requirements outlined in our  profile level A.

Further information about  English language requirements and profile levels .

Fees and funding

Fees are subject to an annual review. For programmes that last longer than one year, please budget for up to an 8% increase in fees each year.

More about tuition fees, living costs and financial support .

Alumni discount

University of Bristol students and graduates can benefit from a 25% reduction in tuition fees for postgraduate study.  Check your eligibility for an alumni discount.

Funding for 2024/25

The University of Bristol is part of the South, West and Wales Doctoral Training Partnership (SWW DTP), which will be offering studentships for September 2024.

For information on other funding opportunities, including University-funded studentships, please see the Faculty of Arts funding pages .

Further information on funding for prospective UK and international postgraduate students.

Career prospects

People who are awarded a Creative Writing PhD have gone on to a variety of careers. Many are published writers who also teach, either in the academy or in community settings. The intensive training in examining texts is transferable to roles in publishing, broadcasting and media. Others organise literary and other cultural events or work in research. Like many creative people, graduates of this type of degree often have portfolio careers, where they work between several roles and their writing is one of several simultaneous ways in which they are employed.

Meet our supervisors

The following list shows potential supervisors for this programme. Visit their profiles for details of their research and expertise.

Research groups

  • Creative Writing and Critical Practice
  • Faculty of Arts Creative Writing Research Cluster
  • Brigstow Institute
  • Centre for Material Texts

How to apply

Apply via our online application system. For further information, please see the guidance for how to apply on our webpages.

January 2024 start: 1 December 2023 September 2024 start: 1 August 2024 January 2025 start: 1 December 2024

The deadlines for funding applications fall well in advance of these dates. Preliminary contact with staff from the department is welcome at any time of the year. We strongly encourage prospective applicants to contact us early, before submitting an application.

Faculty of Arts Postgraduate Research Admissions

Faculty of Arts

School of Humanities

Department of English

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Find out about the bristol doctoral college.

The University of Manchester

Alternatively, use our A–Z index

Attend an open day

Discover more about the Centre for New Writing

PhD Creative Writing / Overview

Year of entry: 2024

  • View full page
  • Bachelor's (Honours) degree at 2:1 or above (or overseas equivalent)
  • Master's degree in a relevant subject – with an overall average of 70% or above

Full entry requirements

Apply online

Please ensure you include all  required supporting documents at the time of submission, as incomplete applications may not be considered. 

Application Deadlines 

For consideration in internal funding competitions, you must submit your completed application by  12 January 2024. 

If you are applying for or have secured external funding (for example, from an employer or government) or are self–funding, you must submit your application before the below deadlines to be considered. You will not be able to apply after these dates have passed. 

  • For September 2024 entry:  30 June 2024 
  • For January 2025 entry:  30 September 2024 

Programme options

Programme description.

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Our PhD Creative Writing programme gives you the opportunity to work on a significant piece of creative writing while developing your research skills.

You will benefit from creative supervision by an experienced poet or fiction writer and draw on the range of expertise within the University to find a supervisor for your critical element. 

There are two elements to the programme. The first is a creative element that can be a novel or a collection of short stories of up to 100,000 words, or a book-length collection of poetry of up to 60 poems.

The PhD also has a critical element, which is a piece of literary or cultural criticism of 30,000 to 50,000 words maximum.

Find out what it's like to study at Manchester by visiting us on one of our  open days.

For entry in the academic year beginning September 2024, the tuition fees are as follows:

  • PhD (full-time) UK students (per annum): £4,786 International, including EU, students (per annum): £21,500
  • PhD (part-time) UK students (per annum): £2,393

Further information for EU students can be found on our dedicated EU page.

Please note for the majority of projects where experimentation requires further resource: higher fee bands (where quoted) will be charged rather than the base rate for supervision, administration and computational costs. The fees quoted above will be fully inclusive and, therefore, you will not be required to pay any additional bench fees or administration costs.

All fees for entry will be subject to yearly review and incremental rises per annum are also likely over the duration of the course for UK/EU students (fees are typically fixed for International students, for the course duration at the year of entry). Always contact the department if you are unsure which fee applies to your project.

Read more about  postgraduate fees .

Scholarships/sponsorships

There are a range of scholarships, studentships and awards to support both UK and overseas postgraduate researchers, details of which can be found via the links below.

To apply University of Manchester funding, you must indicate in your application the competitions for which you wish to be considered. The deadline for most internal competitions, including AHRC NWCDTP and School of Arts, Languages and Cultures studentships is 12 January 2024. 

All external funding competitions have a specified deadline for submitting the funding application form and a separate (earlier) deadline for submitting the online programme application form, both of which will be stated in the funding competition details below.

For more information about funding, visit our funding page to browse for scholarships, studentships and awards you may be eligible for.  

  • AHRC North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership (NWCDTP) PhD Studentships 2024 Entry
  • School of Arts, Languages and Cultures PhD Studentships 2024 Entry
  • China Scholarship Council - The University of Manchester (CSC-UoM) Joint Scholarship Programme 2024 Entry
  • Trudeau Doctoral Scholarships 2024 Entry
  • Commonwealth PhD Scholarships (High Income Countries)
  • Humanities Doctoral Academy Humanitarian Scholarship 2024 Entry
  • Commonwealth PhD Scholarships (Least Developed Countries and Fragile States)
  • School of Arts, Languages and Cultures New Generation PhD Studentships
  • President's Doctoral Scholar (PDS) Awards 2024 Entry

Contact details

See: About us

Programmes in related subject areas

Use the links below to view lists of programmes in related subject areas.

  • English Literature, American Studies and Creative Writing

Regulated by the Office for Students

The University of Manchester is regulated by the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS aims to help students succeed in Higher Education by ensuring they receive excellent information and guidance, get high quality education that prepares them for the future and by protecting their interests. More information can be found at the OfS website .

You can find regulations and policies relating to student life at The University of Manchester, including our Degree Regulations and Complaints Procedure, on our regulations website .

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Creative writing

The Creative Writing discipline supports practice-based and critical research and PhD study focused on creative writing. This research activity is associated with the discipline's Contemporary Cultures of Writing Research Group. The core activity in this type of PhD study is the creation of a book-length work of literature (or script equivalent) and an accompanying critical reflective thesis, which elucidates the research and creative strategies involved in making the work. In this way the essence of the Creative Writing PhD is research through creative practice. The final creative work emerges from and embodies the research questions, and the decisions and discoveries made while producing the work. We welcome applications from candidates suitably qualified and with appropriate writing experience and ability.

We expect well-structured proposals which set out specific research questions and clearly outline creative and critical approaches. A substantial writing sample is also required.

Entry requirements

Minimum 2:1 undergraduate degree (or equivalent) and a strong academic and creative record, usually evidenced by an MA in Creative Writing and relevant publications. If you are not a UK citizen, you may need to prove your knowledge of English . 

Potential research projects

  • Fiction – novel and short stories
  • Creative Nonfiction – including life writing
  • Script for stage, radio or screen

Current/recent research projects

  • The Longest Fight: a novel and Getting into the Ring: an investigation of archetypes of the boxing hero, the creative influences of boxing reportage, and the role of personal memories in historical fiction.
  • Freethinkers, a novel, and Inventing history: how do research, imagination and memory fuse creatively in the writing of an historical novel?
  • Darkness Is Never Absolute: Ekphrasis of the Formless and Near-Black Paintings.
  • The Other Mothers: Exploring adoption, surrogacy and egg donation through life writing.
  • The Electric: A novel and critical commentary investigating narrative disruption in sign language, cinemagoing, and trauma.
  • Longing to belong: an investigation into the potential for alternative storytelling techniques.
  • A Sudden Light: a practice-led exploration of the significance and potential of the contemporary timeslip novel.

Potential supervisors

  • Dr Emily Bullock
  • Dr Siobhan Campbell
  • Dr Donall Mac Cathmhaoill
  • Dr Fiona Doloughan
  • Dr Edward Hogan
  • Dr Lania Knight
  • Dr Derek Neale
  • Dr Heather Richardson
  • Dr Samuel Sargeant
  • Dr Emma Sweeney
  • Dr Jane Yeh

Some of our research students are funded via the Open-Oxford-Cambridge AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership ; others are self-funded.

For detailed information about fees and funding, visit  Fees and studentships .

To see current funded studentship vacancies across all research areas, see  Current studentships .

  • Creative Writing at The Open University
  • Recent and current creative writing PhD students
  • The Contemporary Cultures of Writing Research Group

Book spines

Get in touch

If you have an enquiry specific to this research topic, please contact:

Dr Molly Ziegler / Dr Ed Hogan Email: FASS-EnglishCreativeWriting-Enquiries Phone: +44 (0)1908 652092

If you’re interested in applying for this research topic, please take a look at the application process .

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College of Arts and Sciences » Academic Units » English » Creative Writing » Graduate Program » PhD in Creative Writing

PhD in Creative Writing

Program overview.

The PhD in Creative Writing and Literature is a four-year course of study. Following two years of course work that includes workshop, forms classes, pedagogical training, literature, and theory, students take exams in two areas, one that examines texts through the lens of craft and another that examines them through the lens of literary history and theory. Recent examples of the genre area include Comic Fiction, History of the Love Lyric, and Fantasy; recent examples of the scholarly area include History of the Novel, 20th Century American Poetry, and Modern & Contemporary British Fiction. In the first two years, students take three courses per semester; the teaching load throughout the program is one class per semester. Every PhD student has the opportunity to teach creative writing, with many also teaching literature classes. Most students are funded by teaching, with two or three at a time funded by editorial work at  The Cincinnati Review or Acre Books, and others funded in their dissertation year by college- or university-level fellowships. Fifth-year support, while not guaranteed, has generally been available to interested students in the form of student lecturerships, which carry a 2-2 load. The Creative Writing PhD at the University of Cincinnati has maintained over the last decade more than a 75% placement rate into full-time academic jobs for its doctoral graduates. Two-thirds of these positions are tenure-track.

Application Information

  • Exam Areas and Committee
  • Doctoral Candidacy Form
  • Foreign Language
  • Exam Procedures
  • Dissertations
  • Applying for Fifth-Year Funding
  • Working for The Cincinnati Review
  • Teaching Opportunities
  • All Creative Writing Graduate Courses
  • Archive of Technique & Form Courses

Creative Writing and Literature Master’s Degree Program

Online Courses

11 out of 12 total courses

On-Campus Experience

One 1- or 3-week residency in summer

$3,220 per course

Unlock your creative potential and hone your unique voice.

Build a strong foundation in literary criticism and writing across multiple genres — including fiction, nonfiction, and drama — in our live online writing and literature program with an in-person writers’ residency at Harvard.

Program Overview

Through the master’s degree in creative writing and literature, you’ll hone your skills as a storyteller — crafting publishable original scripts, novels, and stories.

In small, workshop-style classes, you’ll master key elements of narrative craft, including characterization, story and plot structure, point of view, dialogue, and description. And you’ll learn to approach literary works as both a writer and scholar by developing skills in critical analysis.

Program Benefits

Instructors who are published authors of drama, fiction, and nonfiction

A community of writers who support your growth in live online classes

Writer's residency with agent & editor networking opportunities

Personalized academic and career advising

Thesis or capstone options that lead to publishable creative work

Harvard Alumni Association membership upon graduation

Customizable Course Curriculum

As you work through the program’s courses, you’ll enhance your creative writing skills and knowledge of literary concepts and strategies. You’ll practice the art of revision to hone your voice as a writer in courses like Writing the Short Personal Essay and Writing Flash Fiction.

Within the creative writing and literature program, you will choose between a thesis or capstone track. You’ll also experience the convenience of online learning and the immersive benefits of learning in person.

11 Online Courses

  • Primarily synchronous
  • Fall, spring, January, and summer options

Writers’ Residency

A 1- or 3-week summer master class taught by a notable instructor, followed by an agents-and-editors weekend

Thesis or Capstone Track

  • Thesis: features a 9-month independent creative project with a faculty advisor
  • Capstone: includes crafting a fiction or nonfiction manuscript in a classroom community

The path to your degree begins before you apply to the program.

First, you’ll register for and complete 2 required courses, earning at least a B in each. These foundational courses are investments in your studies and count toward your degree, helping ensure success in the program.

Getting Started

We invite you to explore degree requirements, confirm your initial eligibility, and learn more about our unique “earn your way in” admissions process.

A Faculty of Creative Writing Experts

Studying at Harvard Extension School means learning from the world’s best. Our instructors are renowned academics in literary analysis, storytelling, manuscript writing, and more. They bring a genuine passion for teaching, with students giving our faculty an average rating of 4.7 out of 5.

Bryan Delaney

Playwright and Screenwriter

Talaya Adrienne Delaney

Lecturer in Extension, Harvard University

Elisabeth Sharp McKetta

Our community at a glance.

80% of our creative writing and literature students are enrolled in our master’s degree program for either personal enrichment or to make a career change. Most (74%) are employed full time while pursuing their degree and work across a variety of industries.

Download: Creative Writing & Literature Master's Degree Fact Sheet

Average Age

Course Taken Each Semester

Work Full Time

Would Recommend the Program

Professional Experience in the Field

Pursued for Personal Enrichment

Career Opportunities & Alumni Outcomes

Graduates of our Creative Writing and Literature Master’s Program have writing, research, and communication jobs in the fields of publishing, advertising/marketing, fundraising, secondary and higher education, and more.

Some alumni continue their educational journeys and pursue further studies in other nationally ranked degree programs, including those at Boston University, Brandeis University, University of Pennsylvania, and Cambridge University.

Our alumni hold titles as:

  • Marketing Manager
  • Director of Publishing
  • Senior Research Writer

Our alumni work at a variety of leading organizations, including:

  • Little, Brown & Company
  • New York University (NYU)
  • Bentley Publishers

Career Advising and Mentorship

Whatever your career goals, we’re here to support you. Harvard’s Mignone Center for Career Success offers career advising, employment opportunities, Harvard alumni mentor connections, and career fairs like the annual on-campus Harvard Humanities, Media, Marketing, and Creative Careers Expo.

Your Harvard University Degree

Upon successful completion of the required curriculum, you will earn the Master of Liberal Arts (ALM) in Extension Studies, Field: Creative Writing and Literature.

Expand Your Connections: the Harvard Alumni Network

As a graduate, you’ll become a member of the worldwide Harvard Alumni Association (400,000+ members) and Harvard Extension Alumni Association (29,000+ members).

Harvard is closer than one might think. You can be anywhere and still be part of this world.

Tuition & Financial Aid

Affordability is core to our mission. When compared to our continuing education peers, it’s a fraction of the cost.

After admission, you may qualify for financial aid . Typically, eligible students receive grant funds to cover a portion of tuition costs each term, in addition to federal financial aid options.

What can you do with a master’s degree in creative writing and literature?

A master’s degree in creative writing and literature prepares you for a variety of career paths in writing, literature, and communication — it’s up to you to decide where your interests will take you.

You could become a professional writer, editor, literary agent, marketing copywriter, or communications specialist.

You could also go the academic route and bring your knowledge to the classroom to teach creative writing or literature courses.

Is a degree in creative writing and literature worth it?

The value you find in our Creative Writing and Literature Master’s Degree Program will depend on your unique goals, interests, and circumstances.

The curriculum provides a range of courses that allow you to graduate with knowledge and skills transferable to various industries and careers.

How long does completing the creative writing and literature graduate program take?

Program length is ordinarily anywhere between 2 and 5 years. It depends on your preferred pace and the number of courses you want to take each semester.

For an accelerated journey, we offer year round study, where you can take courses in fall, January, spring, and summer.

While we don’t require you to register for a certain number of courses each semester, you cannot take longer than 5 years to complete the degree.

What skills do you need prior to applying for the creative writing and literature degree program?

Harvard Extension School does not require any specific skills prior to applying, but in general, it’s helpful to have solid reading, writing, communication, and critical thinking skills if you are considering a creative writing and literature master’s degree.

Initial eligibility requirements can be found on our creative writing and literature master’s degree requirements page .

Harvard Division of Continuing Education

The Division of Continuing Education (DCE) at Harvard University is dedicated to bringing rigorous academics and innovative teaching capabilities to those seeking to improve their lives through education. We make Harvard education accessible to lifelong learners from high school to retirement.

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Postgraduate study

Creative Writing PhD

Awards: PhD

Study modes: Full-time, Part-time

Funding opportunities

Programme website: Creative Writing

Join our mailing list

Join our mailing list to be kept up-to-date about our next postgraduate recruitment event. We anticipate registration opening in early March.

Research profile

The PhD in Creative Writing offers committed and talented writers the opportunity to study Creative Writing at the highest level.

Supported by an expert supervisory team you will work independently towards the production of a substantial, publishable piece of creative writing, accompanied by a sustained exercise in critical study.

The academic staff you will be working with are all active researchers or authors, including well-published and prize-winning writers of poetry, prose, fiction and drama. They include:

  • Dr Jane Alexander - Fiction
  • Dr Lynda Clark - Fiction
  • Dr Patrick Errington - Poetry
  • Dr Miriam Gamble - Poetry
  • Dr Alan Gillis - Poetry
  • Nicola McCartney - Drama
  • Dr Jane McKie - Poetry
  • Dr Allyson Stack - Fiction
  • Kim Sherwood - Fiction
  • Alice Thompson - Fiction

Find out more about the programme and our team

Training and support

We encourage you to share your research and learn from the work of others through a programme of seminars and visiting speakers.

We have an in-house Writer-in-Residence, annual writing prizes, and a range of opportunities to learn from experts in the publishing industry.

We also offer access to opportunities provided by the Sottish Graduate School for Arts & Humanities.

Our postgraduate journal, Forum, is a valuable conduit for research findings and provides an opportunity to gain editorial experience.

  • Forum: postgraduate journal of culture and the arts

A UNESCO World City of Literature, Edinburgh is a remarkable place to study, write, publish, discuss and perform prose, poetry and drama.

Take a PhD with us and you will be based in the School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures (LLC) in the historic centre of this world-leading festival city.

Our buildings are close to:

  • National Library of Scotland (where collections include the Bute Collection of early modern English drama and the John Murray Archive)
  • Edinburgh Central Library
  • Scottish Poetry Library
  • Scottish Storytelling Centre
  • Writers’ Museum
  • Traverse Theatre

We have strong links with the Edinburgh International Book Festival, which annually welcomes around 1,000 authors to our literary city.

There are lots of opportunities to write and share your work, from Forum to The Selkie, which was founded by Creative Writing students in 2018 to showcase work by people who self-identify as underrepresented.

Around the city, you’ll find library readings and bookshop launches, spoken word gigs, cabaret nights and poetry slams, including events run by celebrated publishing outlets, from Canongate and Polygon / Birlinn to Luath Press, 404 Ink, Taproot Press and Mariscat.

You will have access to the University’s many literary treasures, which include:

  • William Drummond library
  • Lewis Grassic Gibbon library
  • Hugh MacDiarmid library
  • Norman MacCaig library
  • W.H. Auden collection
  • Corson collection
  • works by and about Sir Walter Scott
  • Ramage collection of poetry pamphlets

The Centre for Research Collections also holds a truly exceptional collection of early Shakespeare quartos and other early modern printed plays. These have been put together by the 19th century Shakespearean James Halliwell-Phillipps, the correspondence of Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle (the focus of one of the major editorial projects in Victorian studies of the last half-century), and the extensive Laing collection of medieval and early modern manuscripts.

You will also have access to letters and papers by - and relating to - authors including:

  • Christopher Isherwood
  • Rudyard Kipling
  • John Middleton Murry
  • Walter de la Mare
  • George Mackay Brown
  • Compton Mackenzie

Many of the University's Special Collections are digitised and available online from our excellent Resource Centre, Computing Labs, and dedicated PhD study space in the School of Literatures, Languages and Cultures (LLC).

Look inside the PhD study space in LLC

Entry requirements

These entry requirements are for the 2024/25 academic year and requirements for future academic years may differ. Entry requirements for the 2025/26 academic year will be published on 1 Oct 2024.

A UK masters degree, or its international equivalent, in creative writing, normally with distinction.

We may also consider your application if you have equivalent qualifications or experience. For additional information please refer to the pre-application guidance in the 'How to apply' section.

International qualifications

Check whether your international qualifications meet our general entry requirements:

  • Entry requirements by country
  • English language requirements

Regardless of your nationality or country of residence, you must demonstrate a level of English language competency at a level that will enable you to succeed in your studies.

English language tests

We accept the following English language qualifications at the grades specified:

  • IELTS Academic: total 7.0 with at least 6.5 in each component.
  • TOEFL-iBT (including Home Edition): total 100 with at least 23 in each component. We do not accept TOEFL MyBest Score to meet our English language requirements.
  • C1 Advanced ( CAE ) / C2 Proficiency ( CPE ): total 185 with at least 176 in each component.
  • Trinity ISE : ISE III with passes in all four components.
  • PTE Academic: total 70 with at least 62 in each component.

Your English language qualification must be no more than three and a half years old from the start date of the programme you are applying to study, unless you are using IELTS , TOEFL, Trinity ISE or PTE , in which case it must be no more than two years old.

Degrees taught and assessed in English

We also accept an undergraduate or postgraduate degree that has been taught and assessed in English in a majority English speaking country, as defined by UK Visas and Immigration:

  • UKVI list of majority English speaking countries

We also accept a degree that has been taught and assessed in English from a university on our list of approved universities in non-majority English speaking countries (non-MESC).

  • Approved universities in non-MESC

If you are not a national of a majority English speaking country, then your degree must be no more than three and a half years old at the beginning of your programme of study.

Find out more about our language requirements:

Fees and costs

Scholarships and funding, featured funding.

There are a number of scholarship schemes available to eligible candidates on this PhD programme, including awards from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Please be advised that many scholarships have more than one application stage, and early deadlines.

  • Find out more about scholarships in literatures, languages and cultures

Other funding opportunities

Search for scholarships and funding opportunities:

  • Search for funding

Further information

  • Phone: +44 (0)131 650 4086
  • Contact: [email protected]
  • School of Literatures, Languages & Cultures
  • 50 George Square
  • Central Campus
  • Programme: Creative Writing
  • School: Literatures, Languages & Cultures
  • College: Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

Select your programme and preferred start date to begin your application.

PhD Creative Writing - 3 Years (Full-time)

Phd creative writing - 6 years (part-time), application deadlines.

Due to high demand, the school operates a number of selection deadlines. We will make a small number of offers to the most outstanding candidates on an ongoing basis, but hold the majority of applications until the next published selection deadline when we will offer a proportion of the places available to applicants selected through a competitive process.

Deadlines for applicants applying to study in 2024/25:

  • How to apply

You must submit two references with your application.

  • Pre-application guidance

Before you formally apply for this PhD, you should look at the pre-application information and guidance on the programme website.

This will help you decide if this programme is right for you, and help us gain a clearer picture of what you hope to achieve.

The guidance details the writing samples you should send us as part of your application (either fiction or poetry, along with a shorter sample of your academic writing).

It will also give you practical advice for writing your project summary – one of the most important parts of your application.

Find out more about the general application process for postgraduate programmes:

PhD with Creative Writing Concentration

The PhD with Creative Writing Concentration is an accelerated program that demands students work to a strict timeline and meet all deadlines. In particular, we advise that planning and work on the creative dissertation begin well before the end of classes (which is usually the end of your second Spring semester).

Degree Requirements:

  • 33 hours of graduate coursework beyond the MFA (additional courses may be required by the admission Committee on an individual basis), plus at least 21 hours dissertation credit
  • Successful completion of 2-step qualifying procedures
  • Completed dissertation and successful oral defense of the dissertation

Coursework Requirements:

  • 6 hours of coursework in literature before 1800
  • 6 hours of coursework in literature after 1800
  • 6 hours of creative writing workshop
  • may include up to 6 hours of Form, Craft, & Influence
  • may include up to 6 hours of graduate coursework in relevant academic disciplines outside the English Department, up to 3 of which can be taken as independent study or as directed reading

Forming a Committee

Students in the PhD with Creative Writing Concentration should assemble a committee with five members (composed of two creative writing faculty, two research faculty, and a fifth committee member who is UM faculty not affiliated with the English department). The student and his or her Ph.D. committee are expected to design an individual program of study which contributes significantly to the student’s familiarity with the practice of creative writing as well as the broad scope of literary history; including areas such as theory, methodology, criticism, canonicity, and the reciprocities between literature and culture. The responsibilities of the Ph.D. committee include setting, administering, and evaluating the Candidacy Examination and admitting the student to candidacy; supervising and approving dissertation work; conducting and evaluating the oral dissertation defense; and recommending the conferral of the Ph.D. degree. Students typically form their thesis/dissertation committee no later than the end of their second fall semester, although the extradepartmental member can be added as late as the prospectus stage.

Qualifying Procedure: Step 1

The qualifying procedure consists of two steps: an oral comprehensive exam and a prospectus. Both steps should be complete by no later than the end of the first semester following completion of coursework (usually the Fall semester of the third year).

This oral comprehensive exam must be formally scheduled with the graduate school ( here ), and is based on a field list covering 30–40 works from a historically diverse range of texts in one of four possible topic areas: American literature, British literature, World literature, or a custom topic. Your chosen texts should be drawn from the longer existing lists on historical periods (Medieval, Early American, 19 th Century British, etc.) found on the Degree Requirements page for the literary-critical PhD (found here ). Your list can be more heavily weighted towards a particular period, but must draw at least 20% of its titles from both pre- and post-1800 literature. Your list must be approved by your committee before you proceed; students interested in pursuing a custom topic list must also first consult with their committee in order to ensure their project can only be properly served by such a custom topic list.

Oral exams typically last 60 to 90 minutes. The Graduate Committee recommends that candidate bring to the exam two mock syllabi—one for an introductory survey of historical field and one a course on a more focused special topic—and that these documents provide the foundation for the opening discussion. A failed oral may be retaken once; a second failure will result in dismissal from the program.

Qualifying Procedure: Step 2

The prospectus consists of an annotated book list geared toward their Creative Dissertation, and serves as part of the preparation for the Critical Introduction component of the Dissertation process.  For the PhD in English with a Creative Writing Concentration the expectation is that the list will therefore represent formative/vital works (around 30, with at least 5 critical/theoretical texts) for the candidate in terms of their own development and potential as a creative writer.  The candidate is at this point declaring a specific creative writing genre for their dissertation: Fiction, Poetry, or Creative Non-Fiction . Completed prospectus should be submitted to the full dissertation committee (i.e. including extra-departmental member) for approval. There is no defense of the prospectus in the PhD-CWC program. Following the successful oral exam and approval of the prospectus, the chair of the student’s committee should email the graduate school ( gchool@olemiss.edu ) a PDF of the prospectus and a completed form GS5.1: Admission to Doctorate Degree.

Dissertation

Following completion of the qualifying procedure, you will prepare the dissertation, a book-length work that makes an original and significant contribution in your chosen genre accompanied by a 20–40 page critical introduction. As a general guideline, book-length will be understood as around 150–200+ pages for a novel, short story collection, or creative non-fiction work, or 48+ pages for a poetry collection. This is only a guideline and the dissertation committee can agree to different requirements as desired. In the introduction, the candidate will critically consider their work and its place in the overall canon of literary work in that genre.  The introduction will use standard scholarly practices to cite works when applicable, and demonstrate graduate-level competency in literary analysis techniques.  The introduction will allow the candidate to contextualize their work and discuss their aspirations, influences, and difficulties encountered in the process of writing the dissertation document.  The works listed on the prospectus will serve as the foundation for this discussion and individual works will be cited when appropriate.

You should remain in close contact with your chair throughout this process, submitting drafts for feedback and discussing your progress towards completion. It is also a good idea to remain in regular contact with your larger committee. When your dissertation is complete and approved by your chair, you will schedule an oral defense with your dissertation committee, and submit your dissertation to them no less than two weeks prior to the defense date. Don’t forget to submit the GS7 form (Authorization for Final Oral Exam) to the graduate school at least two weeks before your defense.

Postgraduate

Application for PhD in English with Creative Writing (Distance Learning)

When would you like to start this programme.

  • 2024 April, full-time (Distance Learning)
  • 2024 April, part-time (Distance Learning, 72 months)
  • 2024 September, full-time (Distance Learning)
  • 2024 September, part-time (Distance Learning, 72 months)
  • 2025 April, full-time (Distance Learning)
  • 2025 April, part-time (Distance Learning, 72 months)

Have the following documents ready

You will need to upload the following documents when you apply:

  • Academic transcript
  • Research proposal or outline of academic interests
  • Specified written work
  • Second piece of written work

You can also choose to upload:

  • Your CV (curriculum vitae)
  • Copy of a language certificate
  • Personal statement

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University of Louisiana at Lafayette

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Doctoral concentration in creative writing, creative writing at ul.

[Audience at Vi Khi Nao reading at Beausoleil Books

The UL Lafayette Creative Writing Program invites you to join our close, energetic community of faculty and students.

Generalist Program

Our Ph.D. in English is unique in that it is a generalist program. That means you as a student gain broad expertise in a variety of creative writing genres: fiction, poetry, drama, and creative non-fiction. It also means that you’ll strengthen your understanding of literature, and develop solid pedagogical practice by instructing undergraduate courses in rhetoric and composition. There will also be opportunities to teach creative writing, literature, and design your own special topics courses.

The generalist program ensures graduates concentrating in Creative Writing who opt for academic positions are qualified to teach in several areas. Graduates who choose careers outside of the academy will have experience managing a classroom while teaching and designing their own courses.

Opportunities

Assistantships are available in the Ernest J. Gaines Center, the Paul and Lulu Hilliard University Art Museum, and within the English Department. Graduate teaching assistantships give you the chance to teach first-year writing, sophomore literature survey courses, a creative writing workshop, and a literature course of your own design. Three-year university fellowships with lighter teaching loads are also available.

You will be able to gain professional development experience through working on the University-supported in-house print journal The Southwestern Review, and our online literary journal Rougarou. Students also read at our Thursday Night Reading Series (TNRS) , and often attend the annual Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP) conference where our graduate creative writers host an annual off-site reading. Creative writers also have the opportunity to present their work at the Global Souths conference we put on each year through a creative plenary and creative panels.

In addition to our great faculty, and writer-in-residence, the UL Lafayette Creative Writing Program is enhanced by the Deep South Reading Series . Recent guests include: Maurice Carlos Ruffin, Katie Jean Shinkle, Terese Svoboda, Rodrigo Toscano, Asiya Wadud, Matthew Salesses, Vi Khi Nao, Clemonce Heard, and Wandeka Gayle.

Apply to Write with Us

In addition to the PhD in English application requirements, the department requires a creative writing portfolio. You should submit a creative writing sample of 15-20 pages as part of their application directly to the Graduate Coordinator for Incoming Students, Dr. Leah Orr at [email protected] . PDFs are preferred. Please specify the genre: Fiction, Poetry, Drama, Creative Nonfiction, or Hybrid work.

Read more info about applying.

Resources and Links

  • Apply today to write with us at UL!
  • Read about our current and past Writers-in-Residence.
  • Have questions about our program? Contact our graduate coordinator at [email protected].
  • See what jobs our students have landed.
  • View our comprehensive English Graduate Student Handbook .
  • Check out recent news and events for the UL Lafayette CWP.
  • View Creative Writing PhD Requirements and Courses .
  • Follow the UL Lafayette CWP on Facebook , Twitter , and Instagram .

The English Department’s Thursday Night Reading Series (TNRS) features weekly readings of original poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, drama, and experimental works from UL graduate students and faculty. Watch the video to see our graduate students share their work and  visit the TNRS Facebook page to learn more.

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Creative Writing PhD

Postgraduate degree

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Entry requirements.

Our Creative Writing PhD students come from a variety of academic backgrounds, nationalities, and writing experiences, but what successful applicants have in common is enormous writing talent and potential, and the commitment and ability to engage critically with the contexts in which they write, and the processes and techniques they employ.

This Creative Writing PhD has a reputation as one of the UK’s leading doctoral programmes.

  • Taught by teams of published creative writers and literary scholars.
  • Staff have expertise in fiction, poetry, writing for young people, narrative non-fiction and scriptwriting.
  • Speakers at our annual series of Open Lectures and Readings include PhD students and contemporary writers.

The PhD in Creative Writing combines a proposed manuscript (e.g. novel, short story collection, poems, playscript, narrative non-fiction, digital writing) with an element of supporting or contextualising research. The proposed creative manuscript will be volume length (the natural length of a book, depending on genre). The supporting research will be 20,000 words.

A large number of our graduates have successful careers as writers and many have secured academic jobs. We encourage our students to publish and offer an exciting variety of research training opportunities through our campus-based and international low-residency streams.

We receive a large number of applications for the PhD in Creative Writing, and are extremely selective in our recruitment. Criteria for selection include the viability of the proposal, the strength of the creative writing sample, the applicant’s academic and creative writing experience and achievements, and the ability of the University to support the applicant with appropriate supervision and resources. Applicants for this programme will normally hold a first or upper second class honours degree (or equivalent), as well as an MA in Creative Writing with Distinction (or comparable achievement).

Find out more about our Creative Writing department

PhD structure

The emphasis is not on creating two separate pieces of work, but on integration, on purposeful exploration through practice: an interdependent programme of contextual and practice-based creative work.

Both sections of the PhD must contain work of publishable quality. In the case of the contextualising research, this might mean some of the material could be turned into an article for an academic journal, but this element of the PhD must contain original, rigorous research. Together - taken as a whole - the contextual and creative elements must make a new contribution to knowledge.

This is an independent research programme; there are no timetabled modules but you’ll need to attend supervision sessions as negotiated with your supervisors as well as monthly specialist PhD in Creative Writing forums. The frequency of supervisory sessions may vary depending on the stage of research, and whether you are full or part time, but in general these meetings would take place every couple of weeks.

There are also research training events throughout the year that will aid in your research, as well as specialist PhD in Creative Writing forums that meet eight times a year.

Paid employment Full time students are expected to work full-time on their research and should not undertake more than six hours of formal duty or paid work in any given week.

Part time students are expected to be working on their research for half of the working week but there are no specific restrictions on paid employment.

Students will, however, need to find ways to negotiate the balance between their study and their employment as they are likely to run into difficulty if they do not give the research as much time as it requires.

Together, the student and the supervisory team negotiate a series of assignments and activities that help to advance the student’s own work while at the same time equipping him or her with the knowledge and techniques they need to complete their PhD research.

Examples of activities might include a student’s presentation of their creative writing at a PhD Master Class Writing Workshop, the submission of a treatment to a publisher, attendance of professional events hosted by the University (for example, talks by agents, publishers and writers) or leading some undergraduate creative writing seminars.

Research training might take the form of a series of one-to-one tutorials with a supervisor on the subject of their contextualising critical research, for example on narrative theory, or the presentation of a paper at a relevant academic conference, or the targeting of academic journals with material for publication.

Each student, upon enrolment, has an individual meeting with the University’s Tutor Librarian to discuss his or her research needs. The Library and Information Service offers training in the use of their resources and on research methods and management. The University has excellent electronic resources and search engines, and is constantly updating and increasing this provision.

The Graduate College provides a series of generic training workshops for students (e.g. The Research Plan, The Viva, IT skills) and staff development workshops (e.g. The Progression Assessment Process, Appointing Examination teams).

An examination team assesses the PhD thesis and conducts an oral examination (viva) of the student. The examination team consists of one internal examiner and one external examiner (two external examiners if the candidate has a relationship with the University beyond their PhD work, for instance through regular hourly paid teaching during the twelve months before examination paperwork is submitted).

Opportunities

Wherever possible, we try to offer our PhD students teaching, as it is an important part of professional development. However, we do not like to do so until the second year of PhD research, when the research and writing are established. The availability of part time teaching varies from year to year, and all candidates for teaching will be subject to an interview with the relevant Subject Leader.

As far as getting academic posts is concerned, a PhD will be a requirement for some and will always help. As the subject is relatively new in British higher education, quite a few people have secured jobs without having doctorates, but this may change gradually as more and more people complete PhDs.

The indispensable requirement if you want a permanent university job (as opposed to hourly paid teaching), is that you must be a published creative writer of some substance and reputation. It may well be that this AND the PhD will become the norm, though a successful enough writer will always be very attractive to departments.

An understanding of how university departments work, and the other administrative responsibilities associated with a lectureship, will also help. A PhD in Creative Writing should offer you this kind of professional development training.

The School hosts an annual series of Open Lectures and Readings. Speakers include PhD students as well as contemporary writers. Previous guests have included Les Murray, Helen Dunmore, DBC Pierre, Toby Litt, Mimi Khalvati and Kathleen Jamie.

Our first cohort for the Low Residency PhD in Creative Writing began their studies in October 2012 and we have been welcoming new cohorts annually since then.

Application timescale

Each year, the application cycle for recruiting the next low residency cohort opens in January and closes at the end of May. Interviews of shortlisted applicants then take place via Skype during late June or early July. The final decision on all shortlisted applicants is made in late July or early August. Successful applicants begin on 1 October of the year in which they apply.

Programme arrangements

You’ll work with a team of two supervisors. These staff members will be announced closer to the time that the successful applicants begin their study.

There will be one residency period each year. It will last for ten days, and will coincide with the Bath Literature Festival that usually takes place in May. During your residency periods, you’ll work intensively at Bath Spa with your supervisors and other students, attending workshops and training events. Residency activities will largely be based at our Corsham Court campus, though some will take place at Newton Park and in Bath itself.

The programme is intensive. You’ll have video tutorials every two to three weeks over the academic year, in which your work will be regularly discussed. Six times a year you’ll have major submission points.

You’ll engage with other students and staff. The cohort model aims to encourage a sense of community, and to give support and feedback on a regular basis. You’ll also participate in our monthly PhD forums via video link. As far as possible, the aim is to integrate our campus based and low residency streams of the PhD programme.

You’ll be subject to the same processes and quality check-points of enrolment, registration, annual monitoring, progression assessment, and viva as all of the University’s PhD students.

PhD timescale for submission: minimum of two years

The Low Residency PhD in Creative Writing programme is for full time International students only . It’s a structured programme for students who are strongly motivated to complete within a carefully circumscribed timescale, and have a clear idea of exactly what their PhD research and manuscript will entail.

You may work with extra intensity and submit your PhD after a minimum of two years. Indeed, the programme is designed to enable you to do this, though it also allows for students who may need more time. The time scale of your doctoral programme will be negotiated between you and your supervisors, and will depend upon your progress.

Please refer to our Postgraduate Fees page for further information.

We offer a PhD by Publication route for writers with a substantial publishing record (this could be fiction, non-fiction, poetry or screenplays). 

The PhD by Publication is no less rigorous than the traditional route. No prior connection with the University is required, but the candidate must be an active researcher who has developed their skills to doctoral level.

They must demonstrate, through a critical commentary and either an extensive portfolio of creative work or publications, an independent and original contribution to knowledge. Research outputs may have been produced inside or outside academia, but must be available in the public domain.

Please note that there may be specific deadlines for application , and it is your responsibility to be aware of and adhere to these.

Visit the SWW DTP website  for more information. Bath Spa University is a member of this AHRC funded Consortium.

Creative Writing  is one of the subjects covered by the partnership.

These studentships are open applicants from the UK and EU. Further information about eligibility can be found on the SWW DTP website.

Some additional advice for DTP applicants/remarks about the DTP follows here.

You'll need to identify two supervisors from two different DTP institutions, who, together, will provide the expertise you need to support your research. It will be helpful for you to go through the members of staff in the appropriate disciplines to identify potential supervisors, and to write to them with to see if they would be willing to be involved, should your application to the DTP succeed.

The process of application is different depending on whether you apply to the DTP or make an application directly to Bath Spa. For a Bath Spa only application, we assess the materials and then consider how best we can support the students with supervisors.

For the DTP, because the different institutions can combine to offer so much, we like applicants to consider as imaginatively as possible how they might benefit from this. We want DTP applicants to feel free to envisage how this can work. So look at our profiles in the Creative Writing and English department, and at those of the other members of the Consortium, and think about who your dream team might be.

If you're not successful with the DTP, and wish to apply to Bath Spa for a self-funded place, then write to our Graduate School letting us know. You're required to apply to Bath Spa at the same time as the DTP. After the DTP process, we will then assess your application for a Bath Spa place if you would like us to do so.

Adobe Creative Campus

Develop a wealth of indispensable digital skills that you can take into your future career. One of only three Adobe Creative Campuses in the UK, we provide all Bath Spa students with access to the full Adobe Creative Suite , giving you the tools to communicate creatively, whatever your course or chosen professional field.   

Research environment

Our Creative Writing PhD students constitute a writing and research community. The School’s Research Centre for Creative Writing sponsors a range of events and activities, some specially arranged for PhD students, and most of which are open to them to attend. These activities include a strand of events at the annual Bath Literature Festival; a Poetry Series; an exchange programme with Columbia College, Chicago; and a series of visits in which literary agents, published writers of all genres, and editors present talks and answer questions.

The Programme Leader for the PhD in Creative Writing organises training events exclusively for Creative Writing PhD students and their supervisors.

Specialised research training is given through a programme of Writing Workshop Forums and Master Classes in which students take it in turns to have their writing workshopped by other Creative Writing PhD students, supervisors, and a published writer from outside the institution. Writers who have led Master Classes include the literary agent and novelist Anna Davis; the novelist Maggie Gee; the novelist Mo Hayder; the poet and scriptwriter Michelene Wandor; the poet, memoirist and novelist John Burnside; the literary agent Will Francis; the literary agent Euan Thorneycroft; and the novelist Christopher Nicholson.

All enrolled and registered Creative Writing PhD students are expected to participate in these Master Classes and Forums.

Our monthly PhD in Creative Writing Forums are an important strand in our continuous provision of specialist research training for Creative Writing PhD students, and an opportunity to develop further our postgraduate community. Here, the focus is on an extract from the contextualising research or the creative manuscript of the student’s PhD work; in either case, many of the same workshop principles and methods we use in the creative writing workshop operate.

These forums are convened by the PhD in Creative Writing programme leader. Guest supervisors and other colleagues, as well as PhD students, participate. The forums benefit students who may be at quite different points in their work: from a student working on their first chapter, to a student who needs feedback on the final draft of their introduction or abstract before submission.

Unless you have applied and been accepted onto the low residency, full time programme, it is important that you live within reasonable travel distance of the University. Although it is not a ‘taught’ degree in the sense of regularly occurring modules or classes, the PhD in Creative Writing is not a distance-learning programme; it is a residency-based PhD.

Staff and supervisors

Dr Tracy Brain, Programme Leader, PhD in Creative Writing [email protected] Phone: +44 (0)1225 875653

Professor John Strachan, Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Research and Enterprise), Head of the Graduate College [email protected] Phone: +44 (0)1225 876292

Our students work closely with a team of two or three supervisors - a mixture of accomplished creative writers and literary scholars. The different strengths of your supervisors will come into play with the different aspects of your research. One may have a strong role in supporting your work on your creative manuscripts, for instance, while the other possesses expertise in your area of critical research.

Among your supervisors will be a Director of Studies, upon whom the administrative load of your PhD work will fall. He or she completes, assembles and submits the paperwork that accompanies your research plan; completes the annual monitoring report on your progress that is submitted to the School each May; and organises your progression assessment, PhD submission, examination panel and viva.

Please note that the Director of Studies does not have more or less input into your research and writing than your other supervisors.

It is not necessary to discuss your proposal with Bath Spa University staff before applying as part of what we are looking for is an applicant's ability to conceptualise, research and rationalise both components of their PhD. However, you are very welcome to contact Creative Writing staff in advance of applying, and/or to address any specific questions​ relating to DTP ​funding or potential supervision to the programme leader (Tracy Brain).

On receipt of your proposal, appropriate supervisors will be selected carefully by the Head of Department for Creative Writing in consultation with the Dean of the College, the Programme Leader for the PhD in Creative Writing, and other Heads of Department.

We only accept students for whom we can provide appropriate supervision; the final decision on which staff will work with a given student is a matter for the Subject Leader and Dean of the College.

Creative Writing and Publishing Staff

phd creative writing distance learning

Gavin James Bower

phd creative writing distance learning

John Strachan

phd creative writing distance learning

Tim Liardet

phd creative writing distance learning

Lucy English

Gerard Woodward

phd creative writing distance learning

Nathan Filer

Professor Philip Hensher speaking at an event holding a microphone

Philip Hensher

phd creative writing distance learning

Jason Bennett

phd creative writing distance learning

Robin Mukherjee

phd creative writing distance learning

Steve Hollyman

phd creative writing distance learning

Kate Pullinger

phd creative writing distance learning

Tracy Brain

Richard Kerridge

Richard Kerridge

Interested in applying?

We would normally expect applicants for this programme to hold a first or upper second class honours degree (or equivalent), as well as an MA in Creative Writing with Distinction (or comparable achievement, such as an MFA in which the applicant averages A/A+). We certainly expect evidence of an exceptional level of creative writing achievements and experience, as well as the ability to engage in the supporting research.

Applications are considered by at least two specialists in the applicant’s proposed area, who then decide if the applicant should be called to interview. If the applicant is called to interview, a panel of three interviewers is assembled, consisting of a chair, a potential Director of Studies who is an expert in the proposed field/genre, and an academic member of staff from another subject area.

Begin your application or find out more on our how to apply page. Low residency applications (international students only) can also be completed online .

Your research proposal (2 single-spaced, or 4 double-spaced pages) should give a clear account of the proposed creative manuscript, the proposed contextualising research, and the integral relationship between these two strands. Your writing sample should be in two parts. The first part (6 double-spaced pages) should demonstrate the best example you have of your ability to write in your proposed PhD genre. The second part (4 double-spaced pages) should demonstrate your critical ability.

You can get in touch with ou r Graduate College at [email protected] .

Admissions service Phone: +44 (0)1225 876180 Email:  [email protected]

Academic representative:  Dr Tracy Brain Phone: +44 (0)1225 875653 Email:  [email protected]

Website feedback to [email protected]

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PhD Postgraduate Research in Creative Writing

University of east anglia uea.

  • 3 years Full time degree: £4,712 per year (UK)
  • 6 years Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

Creative Writing, PhD

Swansea university, phd in creative writing and english literature, manchester metropolitan university.

  • 3 years Full time degree: £4,850 per year (UK)
  • 6 years Part time degree

Creative and Critical Writing PhD

Bangor university.

  • 2 years Full time degree: £4,712 per year (UK)
  • 5 years Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

Creative Writing PhD

Anglia ruskin university.

  • 2.5 years Full time degree: £4,712 per year (UK)
  • 3 years Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)
  • 3.5 years Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

Drama and Theatre Studies Practice-Based PhD (through Playwriting or Performance)

University of birmingham.

  • 3 years Distance without attendance degree: £2,389 per year (UK)
  • 3 years Full time degree: £4,778 per year (UK)

Journalism, Communication & Creative Writing PhDs and MPhils

University of portsmouth, university of surrey.

  • 4 years Full time degree: £4,712 per year (UK)
  • 8 years Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

PhD English and Creative Writing

University of roehampton.

  • 4 years Full time degree: £4,711 per year (UK)
  • 7 years Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

Aberystwyth University

Text, practice and research - phd, university of kent, phd theatre studies (playwriting), university of essex.

  • 4 years Full time degree: £9,375 per year (UK)
  • Literature - Research- Core
  • Dissertation
  • View all modules

University of Hull

English phd,mphil - life writing, university of leicester.

  • 4 years Distance without attendance degree: £5,913 per year (UK)
  • 3 years Full time degree: £4,786 per year (UK)
  • 6 years Part time degree: £2,393 per year (UK)

Creative Writing MPhil, PhD

Newcastle university.

  • 36 months Full time degree: £4,712 per year (UK)
  • 72 months Part time degree: £2,356 per year (UK)

University of Nottingham

  • 48 months Online/Distance degree: £5,100 per year (UK)
  • 96 months Online/Distance degree

University of Plymouth

  • 3 years Full time degree: £4,500 per year (UK)
  • 4 years Part time degree: £3,030 per year (UK)
  • GSRCWRI1 Research Creative Writing- Core
  • Research Skills in the Arts, Humanities & Business- Core
  • GSRCWRI2 Research Creative Writing- Core
  • GSRCWRI3 Research Creative Writing- Core
  • GSRCWRI4 Research Creative Writing- Core

PhD/ MPhil/ MRes Creative Writing

University of strathclyde, brunel university london.

  • 3 years Full time degree

PhD Creative Practice, History and Theory

University of central lancashire.

  • 3 years Full time degree: £5,000 per year (UK)
  • 6 years Part time degree: £2,500 per year (UK)

1-20 of 50 courses

About PhD Degrees in Creative Writing

Creative writing extends beyond the boundaries of normal professional journalism or academic forms of literature. It is often associated with fiction and poetry, but primarily emphasises narrative craft, character development, and the use of traditional literary forms.

A PhD level exploration of creative writing is a three-year full-time programme, where candidates delve into the complexities of literary expression, developing their own research and create projects with the goal of making an original contribution to the field.

There are more than fifty creative writing PhD programmes in the UK, and these give candidates a platform to fully immerse themselves in their ideas and take their work to the next level.

What to expect

A PhD in creative writing offers the time and space to develop personal creative methods, combined with advanced workshops, critical seminars, and guest lectures from working authors. Under an academic mentor's supervision, candidates typically work towards completing a novel, poetry collection or screenplay.

Postgraduate programmes such as these often foster a supportive community of writers and scholars, and collaboration with peers is encouraged. Graduates can expect to emerge as confident and aspirational authors, with a developed style and professional aspiration, prepared for careers in writing, publishing, academia, or other creative industries. The degree provides a pathway for making significant contributions to the world of literature through original and innovative creative works.

Course type:

  • Distance learning PhD
  • Full time PhD
  • Part time PhD

Qualification:

Universities:.

  • University of West London
  • Cardiff University
  • University of Suffolk
  • University of Buckingham
  • University of Aberdeen
  • The University of Edinburgh
  • King's College London, University of London
  • University of Sussex
  • University of Gloucestershire
  • Bath Spa University
  • University of Lincoln
  • Keele University
  • University of York
  • University of Manchester
  • Lancaster University
  • University of Liverpool
  • University of Hertfordshire
  • University of Bristol
  • Leeds Beckett University
  • Goldsmiths, University of London

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Creative Writing MA (Distance Learning)

Home > Postgraduate study > Postgraduate courses > Creative Writing MA (Distance Learning)

Creative Writing MA (Distance Learning)

Why choose this course.

The Creative Writing MA (Distance Learning) offers you the chance to study with a range of well-established and award-winning writers in a dynamic writing environment, but without having to relocate or give up current commitments. Taught in our virtual forums and classrooms, modules can be accessed at a time of the week to suit your schedule.

You will learn in workshops, one-to-one or in small groups, with support from practising and published writers and fellow students. Our award-winning former creative writing students include Booker-shortlisted Oyinkan Braithwaite, Joe Pierson, who won the Bridport Prize, Stefan Mohammed, awarded the Dylan Thomas Prize, Bafta-winner, Sarah Woolner, the acclaimed poet Dom Bury and celebrated novelist Faiqa Mansab. 

The non-compulsory campus days give you a chance to visit the campus and attend a relevant lecture, as well as to meet fellow workshop students. Those travelling longer distances who wish to stay longer and explore the cultural opportunities that London offers, or simply to write, are also welcome to attend events taking place on campus for the rest of the week, featuring staff, writers in residences, students and guests.

Curtis Brown Agent's Choice competition

All successful applicants who take up their place with us in September will be entered into our competition to have a consultation with Annabel White , an agent at top London literary agency Curtis Brown.

So make sure the creative work you submit with your application is your very best - it might win you a meeting with a literary agent.

Reasons to choose Kingston University

  • Delivered by Distance Learning, this Creative Writing MA helps you to develop the craft of creative writing, either on a general level or through specialising in your chosen genre. Taught in virtual forums and classrooms, your studies can suit your schedule, and you will not have to relocate or give up your job.
  • The creative dissertation and critical essay give you the chance to further specialise. You also explore writing in a range of forms and styles and take a module exploring critical theory and experimental/avant-garde writing.
  • You will become part of Kingston's thriving community, with events such as readings, lectures from published authors, editors and agents, masterclasses and enriching discussions.
  • You will have the opportunity to contribute to Kingston University's publication, Ripple, which includes fiction, poetry, reviews and creative non-fiction and is edited by students on the course.
  • You'll study in workshops, learning one-on-one or in small groups with experts in your chosen area. The course is taught by a combination of:
  • appointed staff - many are published authors or active researchers, which keeps your learning dynamic.
  • peer review - giving you the chance to discuss your own and other students' work in a mutually-supportive environment.

The Art School Experience

As part of  Kingston School of Art , students on this course benefit from joining a creative community where collaborative working and critical practice are encouraged.

Our  workshops and studios  are open to all disciplines, enabling students and staff to work together, share ideas and explore multi-disciplinary making.

Two students collaborate on a design project.

What our students say

In this video, one of our creative writing alumna and a current student discuss why they chose the course, what they enjoyed about it and why they'd recommend it to future applicants.

What you will study

The Creative Writing MA (Distance Learning) follows the same course structure as the successful and popular Creative Writing MA. You'll be taught through individual tutorials, streamed lectures and readings held at or sponsored by the University.

The Writers' Workshop module will encourage you to develop your writing 'voice' through engagement with fellow students across a range of genres (in fiction or creative non-fiction), while the Special Study module enables you to specialise in one genre, such as fiction, non-fiction, poetry or drama.

You will learn the elements of fiction, poetry and drama as well as studying relevant critical theory and trying out your own fictional experiments in the Critical Challenges module. You'll take part in online masterclasses and put all you have learned into practice in the dissertation module. It is possible to use both workshop modules and the dissertation together to work towards a substantial part of a longer piece such as a novel.

This Creative Writing MA will give you the knowledge and confidence to enter the cultural debate and to begin to identify outlets for your own writing.

Full-time students can attend two campus days, scheduled annually, usually in November and February.

Part-time students normally attend the November campus day in the first year and the February campus day in the second year.

Full-time students take two 30-credit modules each semester, including a Special Study workshop on a particular genre e.g. poetry, drama or fiction, in the second semester. You'll participate in general workshops, reading sessions and tutorials with your assigned dissertation supervisor throughout the course.

You may then choose to complete a 15,000-word 60-credit dissertation accompanied by a 3,000-word critical review, for which you'll receive one-to-one supervision as you work towards a September completion.

Core modules

Creative writing dissertation.

This module focuses on your own creative writing and research into your chosen form or genre, developed in consultation with your supervisor. You learn via one-to-one tutorials with your personal supervisor. You produce two pieces of writing:

  • a creative dissertation – a portion of a novel, a body of poetry, a play screenplay or other creative form of no more than 15,000 words; and
  • a critical essay of approximately 3,000 words – considering the relationships between your own writing and the literary contexts/theoretical concerns that inform published writing in your chosen genre or form.

Your supervisor must agree in advance the final structure, approximate word length and for presentation conventions of these pieces.

Special Study: Workshops in Popular Genre Writing

This online workshop module will be devoted to the creative writing of students all working in the same form and genre of their choice.  It will enable students to develop drafts in their chosen form and genre, and to master its specific codes and conventions. Draft work to be reviewed may include, for example, poetry, prose fiction, non-fiction, writing for the stage, or screenwriting, perhaps in a choice of genres such as crime writing, fantasy fiction, writing for children, historical fiction, science fiction, romance and autobiography. Students will be advised how best to strengthen their knowledge of that form or genre in order to reflect critically and constructively on their own writing.  Attention will then be given to the production of a substantial piece or a collection of pieces of creative writing that reflects their knowledge of and engagement with their chosen form or genre.

Writing the Contemporary

This module provides the opportunity to examine ways in which reading is essential to writing practice and teaches you to apply literary techniques and strategies from contemporary fiction, life writing and poetry texts to your own work. You will develop the concept of ‘reading as a writer' in order to explore how contemporary concerns are brought to the fore by artistic strategies, and examine how an understanding of these can provide models for your own creative practice. You will submit work including a reflective reading journal as well as a creative piece in a genre of your choice.

Writers' Workshop

This is a workshop-based online module in which students will present and discuss their own work and that of their peers within a group of students writing in a variety of genres and forms. The draft work presented in the module will normally include forms such as poetry, prose fiction, non-fiction, writing for the stage or screenwriting, in a variety of genres, but it may also include genres such as science fiction, romance, crime fiction, writing for children, historical fictional, and autobiography. Students will develop a strong knowledge of the writing workshop ethos, its requirements and etiquette as mutual practical criticism of peer writing will be accompanied by discussion of the scope or constraints of the various genres as well as the implications of working in various forms. Attention will be paid to the relevant components of good writing: appropriate use of language, narrative pace, dialogue, expression, characterisation and mood.

Critical Challenges for Creative Writers

The module is designed to introduce students to some issues of critical and literary theory. The module is also designed to make students more aware of how their work impacts upon wider literary, cultural, political and philosophical issues. Awareness of these theories and of some of the issues surrounding the production and reception of literary texts will stimulate them, encouraging creative and conceptual thinking. The module will explore debates about literature and the practice of creative writing through readings of essays and texts that are relevant to criticism and theory. The academic component of the assessment will support the creative work with the objective that students will also have to demonstrate critical, academic, analytical skills.

Entry requirements

Typical offer.

We normally expect applicants to have:

  • A second class degree or above, or equivalent, in creative writing, English literature, literature and language, drama or theatre studies or a humanities subject.
  • Applicants with academic qualifications in other subjects, or relevant work experience, will be considered on an individual basis.
  • A demonstrable interest in creative writing.

You may also submit a sample of creative writing (maximum of 3,000 words) and a personal statement (maximum of 1,000 words) to support your application for this course.

International

All non-UK applicants must meet our English language requirements. For this course it is Academic IELTS of 6.5 overall with 5.5 in all elements. Please make sure you read our full guidance about English language requirements , which includes details of other qualifications we'll consider.

Applicants from one of the recognised majority English speaking countries (MESCs) do not need to meet these requirements.

Country-specific information

You will find more information on country specific entry requirements in the International section of our website.

Find your country:

  • Middle East

Teaching and assessment

Continuous assessments in individual accredited modules plus assessment of final dissertation.

Guided independent study (self-managed time)

When not attending timetabled sessions, you will be expected to continue learning independently through self-study. This typically involves reading and analysing articles, regulations, policy documents and key texts, documenting individual projects, preparing coursework assignments and completing your PEDRs, etc.

Your independent learning is supported by a range of excellent facilities including online resources, the library and CANVAS, the University's online virtual learning platform.

Support for postgraduate students

At Kingston University, we know that postgraduate students have particular needs and therefore we have a range of support available to help you during your time here.

Your workload

Year 1: 5% of your time is spent in timetabled learning and teaching activity.

  • Scheduled learning and teaching: 93 hours

Guided independent study (self-managed time): 1,707 hours

For part time students

  • Scheduled learning and teaching: 44 hours
  • Guided independent study (self-managed time): 556 hours
  • Scheduled learning and teaching: 49 hours
  • Guided independent study (self-managed time): 1,151 hours

Contact hours may vary depending on your modules.

Full time - Year 1

Part time - year 1, part time - year 2.

  • Guided independent study (self-managed time): 1707 hours
  • Guided independent study (self-managed time): 1151 hours

How you will be assessed

Assessment typically comprises portfolios and a dissertation.

The approximate percentage for how you will be assessed on this course in each full time or part time year:

Type of assessment

  • Coursework: 100%

Feedback summary

We aim to provide feedback on assessments within 20 working days.

Class sizes

Class sizes are kept small for this course and usually limited to 10. However this can vary by module and academic year.

Who teaches this course?

This course is delivered by Kingston School of Art. As a student on this course, you will benefit from a lively study environment, thanks to the wide range of postgraduate courses on offer. The combination of academics and practitioners makes it a unique environment in which to further your studies and your career.

The University provides a vibrant and forward-thinking environment for study with:

  • courses designed in collaboration with industry professionals  –  enabling you to keep right up to date with the latest developments in the creative and professional writing environment;
  • established connections with the London arts and media scene  –  with a range of guest speakers, professors and lecturers visiting the University; and
  • committed and enthusiastic staff  –  many of whom are expert practitioners as well as leading academics and researchers.
  • opportunity to contribute to Kingston University's publications, such as Ripple. They include fiction, poetry, reviews and creative non-fiction and are edited by postgraduate creative writing students.

Postgraduate students may also contribute to the teaching of seminars under the supervision of the module leader.

phd creative writing distance learning

Dr Wendy Vaizey

Course leader.

phd creative writing distance learning

Mr Oludiran Adebayo

phd creative writing distance learning

Mr Steven J. Fowler

phd creative writing distance learning

Dr Marina Lambrou

Fees for this course, 2023/24 fees for this course, home 2023/24.

  • full time £9,860
  • part time £5,423

International 2023/24

  • full time £16,200
  • part time £8,910

2022/23 fees for this course

Home 2022/23.

  • MA full time £9,620
  • MA part time £5,291

International 2022/23

  • MA full time £15,800
  • MA part time £8,690

Tuition fee information for future course years

If you start your second year straight after Year 1, you will pay the same fee for both years.

If you take a break before starting your second year, or if you repeat modules from Year 1 in Year 2, the fee for your second year may increase.

Postgraduate loans

If you are a UK student, resident in England and are aged under the age of 60, you will be able to apply for a loan to study for a postgraduate degree. For more information, read the postgraduate loan information on the government's website .

Funding and bursaries

Bursaries are available from the School of Arts, Culture and Communications for students working on the Kingston University Press (KUP), Ripple magazine or other related activities (find out more and apply after you have enrolled).

Additional costs

Depending on the programme of study, there may be extra costs that are not covered by tuition fees which students will need to consider when planning their studies. Tuition fees cover the cost of your teaching, assessment and operating University facilities such as the library, access to shared IT equipment and other support services. Accommodation and living costs are not included in our fees. 

Where a course has additional expenses, we make every effort to highlight them. These may include optional field trips, materials (e.g. art, design, engineering), security checks such as DBS, uniforms, specialist clothing or professional memberships.

Our libraries are a valuable resource with an extensive collection of books and journals as well as first-class facilities and IT equipment. You may prefer to buy your own copy of key textbooks, this can cost between £50 and £250 per year.

Computer equipment

There are open-access networked computers available across the University, plus laptops available to loan . You may find it useful to have your own PC, laptop or tablet which you can use around campus and in halls of residences. Free WiFi is available on each of the campuses. You may wish to purchase your own computer, which can cost £100 to £3,000 depending on your course requirements.

Photocopying and printing

In the majority of cases written coursework can be submitted online. There may be instances when you will be required to submit work in a printed format. Printing, binding and photocopying costs are not included in your tuition fees, this may cost up to £100 per year.

Travel costs are not included in your tuition fees but we do have a free intersite bus service which links the campuses, Surbiton train station, Kingston upon Thames train station, Norbiton train station and halls of residence.

After you graduate

Some of our departmental graduates have achieved notable successes, having published short stories and novels which were started as part of their degree, and attracted good literary agents, for example:

  • Oyinkan Braithwaite 's novel,  My Sister the Serial Killer , reviewed by The New Yorker and BBC Radio 4's Open Book and Front Row, has won the Crime and Thriller book of the year at the British Book Awards; Oyinkan is the first black woman to do so.  
  • Grainne Murphy has recently signed a two-book deal with Legend Press. Her debut novel,  Where the Edge Is , was published in September 2020, with The Ghostlights to be published in 2021. 
  • Ben Halls ' debut  The Quarry  was book of the day in The Guardian in March 2020. 
  • Amy Clarke has signed a two-book deal.  Like Clockwork  is a psychological suspense novel about a true-crime podcast host who's obsessively trying to solve the decades-old cold case of a notorious Minnesotan serial killer whose victims were each one year younger than the last. It is due to be published in March/April 2021 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, with a second book to follow. 
  • A story Seraphina Madsen wrote for the MA Critical Challenges module was published in the UK's pre-eminent literary journal, The White Review, and secured her an agent and a book deal. 
  • Stevan Alcock is another MA student whose debut novel – workshopped on our MA – was published by 4th Estate.  
  • Hannah Vincent is a former MFA student with novels out with Myriad Editions and Salt. 
  • Myriad Editions also run a writing competition each year aimed at finding new writers, with MFA student Karly Stilling winning in 2015. This year the award was won by another current Kingston student, Sylvia Carr . Former MA (now PhD student) Joseph Pierson was a recent runner-up. 
  • Julia Lewis is a former MFA student and experimental poet who has gone on to publish a wide range of work. She also rewrote MA tutor James Miller's novel Lost Boys as a collection of experimental poetry. 
  • Stefan Mohamed won the Dylan Thomas Prize and has gone to have a successful career as a writer of YA fiction. 
  • MA student Vicky Newham signed a two book deal for her crime series. Vicky is on the Daggers longlist for the best crime novel by a first-time author. 
  • Faiqa Mansab published her debut novel  This House of Clay and Water in Pakistan and India to great acclaim and it  has been optioned by the talented Sheherzade Sheikh for screen adaptation. 
  • Other successes include Susie Lynes and Lauren Forry . 
  • Other former students have gone on to work in editorial posts in the publishing industry.

Why I chose Kingston

What our students and graduates say

Initially, it was a bit daunting returning to university as a mature student (in my early 50s) but as there were quite a number of us older students we soon formed a little group and in fact became quite good friends. The thing I possibly enjoyed most about Kingston was the number of workshops on offer pretty much throughout my time there. I found myself signing up for everything, from fiction to thriller to life writing courses. I just loved the vibe of being in that academic and literary environment. It was a huge privilege being able to attend workshops, free of charge, presented by some of the most esteemed literary personalities. In addition, there were publishing events that put us in direct contact with editors, agents and publishers. Weekly events hosted by Kingston Writing School were also hugely inspiring. Listening to authors relating their journeys about the long road from writing to being published was hugely encouraging and something I rarely missed.

The actual MA course and the various modules we had to complete pushed me beyond my comfort zone, particularly in poetry, which is something I'd never had a penchant for. But, thanks to my accomplished lecturers, I ended up enjoying every single one of them.

However, it was one of the extra-curricular workshops that inspired my book, Secrets of a Stewardess . The memoir/life writing workshop was hosted by John Man, author of more than 13 books. I was convinced that I was in the wrong class as I felt that I had absolutely no story to tell, but he somehow managed to coax out of me my years as an airline stewardess in the ‘80s. I also wrote a children's book (which was signed up by an agent) while I was at Kingston University, but used the memoir as part of my dissertation.

I can honestly say that completing my MA in Creative Writing at Kingston University and then being published is one of the most rewarding things I have done. It taught me that you are never too old to achieve your goals - you just need to set them and then work towards them. Studying creative writing gave me the confidence to believe that I actually could write and the whole support system offered at Kingston University, finally helped me to get published.

Secrets of a Stewardess has been published by The History Press who has done an outstanding job of marketing it. WHS Smith Travel bought 2,500 copies upfront; I have been interviewed on BBC Radio 4; I have featured on BBC World Services', The Conversation; I have been interviewed live on Talk Radio Europe; I have had a feature in The Daily Mail newspaper; I have been interviewed and photographed by The Sun newspaper and I featured in Prima magazine's August edition.

Gretchen Ryan

Links with business and industry

A range of additional events and lectures will enhance your studies and add an extra perspective to your learning. Activities for this course include:

Masterclasses

Live online masterclasses in each teaching block with distinguished professors and researchers such as Hanif Kureishi and Paul Bailey.

Distance Learning students who attend Campus Days are able to attend events and readings with publishing specialists and professionals that take place on these days. These have included agents such as Briony Woods, Jemima Hunt and others.

Overseas student visiting for Campus Days who wish to stay for a few days longer will find other lectures and events of interest to attend.

Students within reach of London are also welcome to attend events on campus such as talks from writer and film director Shelagh McLeod, Influx Press editor Sanya Semakula and writers Michael Hughes, Catherine McNamara and Susan Lynes.

Guest lectures

Weekly guest lectures by leading journalists including:

  • Samira Ahmed , an award-winning journalist with 20 years' experience in print and broadcast;
  • David Jenkins , editor of Little White Lies, a bi-monthly movie magazine powered by illustration;
  • Richard Moynihan , Head of digital journalism, The Telegraph and
  • Alex Stedman , fashion blogger at The Frugality and former style editor at Red magazine.

Regular readings through Writers' Centre Kingston, which offers an annual programme of events from talks to workshops and festivals, hosted and curated in partnership with institutions local to Kingston University and in London, from The Rose Theatre to the Rich Mix Cultural Foundation, from the Museum of Futures to Kingston First.

Lunchtime lectures

Frequent philosophy lunchtime lectures which focus on a major figure in the history of Western philosophy, introducing students to that thinker's work, usually through the discussion of one of her or his emblematic works. There are also weekly Journalism lunchtime lectures with a range of industry experts.

Ripple magazine

The literary magazine Ripple is edited by MA students, providing a platform for the publication of creative work; and a chance to get hands-on experience of the publishing process.

Research areas

Research in English literature and creative writing at Kingston University covers the following areas:

  • 19th and 20th century British and American fiction;
  • fictions of globalisation;
  • gothic writing;
  • travel writing;
  • women's writing from the 18th century to the present;
  • New Woman and fin de siècle fictions;
  • Shakespeare;
  • literature of the English Reformation period;
  • postcolonial studies;
  • theories of gender;
  • life writing and trauma;

It focuses around the following research initiatives:

  • Iris Murdoch Studies - research on the Iris Murdoch archives acquired by Kingston University in 2003/04).
  • Life Narratives Research Group - bringing together best practice from all genres of life narrative work.
  • Cultural Histories at Kingston - centred around the concept of the 'cultural text', the group includes scholars from the fields of literature, film, media, history, music, dance, performance, and journalism.
  • Writers' Centre Kingston - a literary cultural centre dedicated to creative writing in all its forms, with an annual programme of events, talks, workshops and festivals.
  • Race/Gender Matters - captures and concentrates research on theoretical, critical and creative engagements with the materiality of race, gender and language.

We also hold regular seminars and host presentations by visiting speakers.

Course changes and regulations

The information on this page reflects the currently intended course structure and module details. To improve your student experience and the quality of your degree, we may review and change the material information of this course.  Course changes explained .

Programme Specifications for the course are published ahead of each academic year.

Regulations governing this course  can be found on our website.

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    $3,220 per course Unlock your creative potential and hone your unique voice. Build a strong foundation in literary criticism and writing across multiple genres — including fiction, nonfiction, and drama — in our live online writing and literature program with an in-person writer's residency at Harvard. Program Overview

  16. Creative Writing PhD

    2. 30 April 2024. 14 June 2024. This article was published on 11 Oct, 2023. Study PhD in Creative Writing at the University of Edinburgh. Through our postgraduate degree programme you will work towards creating a publishable piece of creative writing, accompanied by a sustained exercise in critical study. Find out more here.

  17. 8 Online PhDs in Creative Writing by universities in United Kingdom

    Distance or online learning is a mode of study that allows students to study most or all of a course without attending at a campus-based institution. Distance can refer to both material and interaction. Distance learning provides access to learning when the source of information and the learners are separated by time and distance, or both.

  18. PhD with Creative Writing Concentration

    C128 Bondurant Hall. 662-915-7439. [email protected]. . . . Expand your knowledge and skills by earning a PhD with Creative Writing Concentration from the University of Mississippi. Learn more about our degree program now.

  19. Course Search

    Application for PhD in English with Creative Writing (Distance Learning) When would you like to start this programme? 2024 April, full-time (Distance Learning) 2024 April, part-time (Distance Learning, 72 months) 2024 September, full-time (Distance Learning) 2024 September, part-time (Distance Learning, 72 months)

  20. Doctoral Concentration in Creative Writing

    Apply to Write with Us. In addition to the PhD in English application requirements, the department requires a creative writing portfolio. You should submit a creative writing sample of 15-20 pages as part of their application directly to the Graduate Coordinator for Incoming Students, Dr. Leah Orr at [email protected]. PDFs are preferred.

  21. PhD Creative Writing

    Our creative writing PhD has a reputation as one of the country's leading doctoral programmes. ... the PhD in Creative Writing is not a distance-learning programme; it is a residency-based PhD. Staff and supervisors. Key contacts. Dr Tracy Brain, Programme Leader, PhD in Creative Writing

  22. PhD Degrees in Creative Writing

    Find PhD Degrees in Creative Writing using the UK's most comprehensive search engine for postgraduates. ... 3 years Distance without attendance degree: £2,389 per year (UK) 3 years Full time degree: £4,778 per year (UK) ... Distance learning PhD; Full time PhD; Part time PhD; Qualification: Doctorate; Location: Birmingham; Brighton; Bristol;

  23. Creative Writing MA (Distance Learning)

    Delivered by Distance Learning, this Creative Writing MA helps you to develop the craft of creative writing, either on a general level or through specialising in your chosen genre. Taught in virtual forums and classrooms, your studies can suit your schedule, and you will not have to relocate or give up your job.