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Motorola U: When Training Becomes an Education

  • William Wiggenhorn

At Motorola we require three things of our manufacturing employees. They must have communication and computation skills at the seventh grade level, soon going up to eighth and ninth. They must be able to do basic problem solving—not only as individuals but also as members of a team. And they must accept our definition of […]

At Motorola we require three things of our manufacturing employees. They must have communication and computation skills at the seventh grade level, soon going up to eighth and ninth. They must be able to do basic problem solving—not only as individuals but also as members of a team. And they must accept our definition of work and the workweek: the time it takes to ship perfect product to the customer who’s ordered it. That can mean a workweek of 50 or even 60 hours, but we need people willing to work against quality and output instead of a time clock.

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  • WW William Wiggenhorn is Motorola’s corporate vice president for traning and education and the president of Motorola University.

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Motorola's Six Sigma Journey: In pursuit of perfection

motorola university case study

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Written by Thomas Goodwin of Motorola Mobility

Motorola’s journey to achieve Six Sigma performance began in 1986 when engineer Bill Smith quietly set out to devise a methodology to standardize defect measurement and drive improvements in manufacturing. Developing this new methodology was the first step on our journey and gave us the tools to begin measuring and comparing the quality improvement rates of our business groups. Six Sigma became our performance metric and was reflective of a product or process that has just 3.4 defects per million units or opportunities.

Over the years, we built on this methodology to include the use of statistical tools, and a step-by-step process to drive improvement, innovation and optimization. Through the direction of former CEO Bob Galvin, we made the Six Sigma methodology available to the world. We implemented large-scale training efforts and applied the methodology beyond manufacturing into transactional, support, service and engineering functions. Six Sigma became a collaborative effort between our customers, suppliers and stakeholders and an important tool to engage our employees in a culture of continuous improvement.

Our employees, suppliers and customers quickly discovered this methodology worked and wanted to use it to improve performance. Other companies soon followed suit by adopting their own approach to do the same. The Six Sigma methodology gained a strong following and became widely adopted across numerous industries.

In 2003, Motorola took Six Sigma to the next level by elevating it to a management system and rebranded our efforts as “Digital Six Sigma.”  In this phase, we started with a business-wide balanced scorecard and then determined the activities required to achieve those goals. We assigned our strongest Black and Master Black Belts, based on their change management skills and statistical capabilities, to work on projects with complex problems with an unknown root cause. Each business and functional leader sponsored the efforts and provided the ongoing governance needed to remove barriers and achieve results. The term “Digital” was incorporated to add the requirement that the solutions implemented had to be controlled with a systematic or non-manual control mechanism to ensure that the change was sustainable.

The program further evolved in 2005 when we added Lean concepts to the traditional Six Sigma framework to identify redundancies and reduce costs and cycle time. Our emphasis on reducing waste and non-value added activities was critical in addressing the continuing competitive pressures and increasing our productivity.

In January 2011, Motorola separated into two independent, publicly traded companies: Motorola Mobility and Motorola Solutions. At this point, we had a decision to make – should we continue the use of Six Sigma as a management system, scale it back or discontinue it altogether?  At Motorola Mobility, we chose to take a “back to basics” approach and focus on the essence of Six Sigma – the methodology used to delight our customers by exceeding their expectations and delivering products and services of the highest quality.

SIX SIGMA TRAINING

With that change, the Six Sigma program at Motorola Mobility transformed from a centralized effort with full-time resources to a grassroots effort where individuals use the methodology to solve everyday problems in their functional areas. Fostered by consistent and relevant training, and coupled with mentoring, these individuals have been able to use a range of techniques – from simple graphical tools to more complex analyses.

An example of this recently occurred when a supplier requested to increase the tolerance range for a component in order to meet the capability requirements (Cp/Cpk). The development engineer, who is Green Belt certified, pulled from her Six Sigma experience to examine the data using simple histograms and normal probability plots. Very quickly, she found the data showed a bimodal distribution, resulting in two groups of measurements. In working with the supplier, she discovered that two operators were interpreting the requirement differently. Rather than changing the tolerance range, the supplier followed up with training for the operators and conducted a Measurement System Analysis to validate the measurement technique.

An example of using Lean in the Supply Chain occurred when an inventory management issue at one of our Latin American sites drove the team to construct a Value Stream Map, starting at the shipping dock. The team “walked the process” to create a current-state map, which enabled them to identify opportunities to eliminate non-value added activities. The future-state map removed unnecessary steps, thus reducing rework and simplifying accounting and physical flows.

Looking forward, where will we go next on our Six Sigma journey?  In our never-ending pursuit of perfection, we know we can’t stand still. We will continue to challenge ourselves to evolve how we deploy Six Sigma to best support our business. In fact, we use the approach when considering changes to our methodology. What do our customers want, what data do we have to support the change, how will we know the change was effective?

The quest for perfection will never go away, but how Six Sigma is deployed needs to evolve as the business evolves. At Motorola Mobility, we are very aware of this need. Used in this way, we see the potential for Six Sigma is limitless.

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Chief Learning Officer is a multimedia publication focused on the importance, benefits and advancements of a properly trained workforce.

Corporate U: The History and the Future

Fred Harburg, former CLO and president of Motorola University, shares his thoughts on the future of the corporate university.

May 3, 2018

motorola university case study

Fred Harburg is the former chief learning officer and president of Motorola University, one of the first corporate universities. He was also the senior vice president for leadership and learning at Fidelity Investments and was chief learning officer at Williams Energy. Following, Harburg shares his thoughts on the future of corporate universities.

Chief Learning Officer : How have the fundamentals driving the need for a corporate learning organization changed over the past 30 years?

Coming from Motorola, I was fortunate enough to be a part of the first corporate educational efforts. That was when Paul Galvin, the founder of Motorola, realized that all the people who were assembling the radios and various devices that Motorola was creating at the turn of the century — many of them were illiterate. He said, “that’s going to change.” Not just as a gift, but as a responsibility, we need to make sure that everyone has basic literacy skills in the plants, to be able to live a more fulfilling life. What an inspiring way to start the idea of corporate education. Then his son Bob and grandson Chris carried that tradition on and Motorola arguably became the largest corporate university in the world.

Is the corporate university dead? Have we outlived its usefulness and we’re on to something new? That question probably comes from the legitimate notice that online learning is available from many sources and having a traditional corporate university faculty and staff who do a lot of the training — it’s probably not as attractive as it once was. When I first started in a corporate university it was very common to have a large staff of instructional designers. That doesn’t make a lot of sense because there is such talent available for instructional design at this point on a contractual basis. They’ve continued to refine their capabilities to feel like a part of the organization. The same is true for delivery.

CLO: Is the original model for the corporate university still viable? If not, how does it need to change?

It has always been changing. It wasn’t viable when it was identified. I look back with embarrassment at some of the things I created 30 years ago. Even at the time, it could have been better. If there was a model for the corporate university at the time, we might say it was brick and mortar, instructors, chalk board and flip charts, overhead projectors and transparencies that became power points over time, attendance records, evaluations and smile sheets. If that’s what we were calling the model at the time, which was probably a bad model, clearly that should be gone. But there is an element that should never be done away with and that’s the valuing of people as the most important part of a company and investment in their continuous growth. The extent to which it is done away with is a tragedy, not just for the company that will suffer the consequences of that attitude, but also for our entire society.

CLO: Are corporate universities still strongly aligned with business strategy? Or are they more about employee engagement?  

That’s like asking if I like my daughter or my son better. They’re both absolutely essential. As CLO of many organizations, I was also responsible for the succession planning. You can’t discuss bench of talent that’s available for key roles in the organization without discussing engagement. The regrettable loss of your most talented people is one of the greatest problems that an organization suffers. People are hopefully, as they should be, enlighteningly self-interested. The most talented people are going to move for opportunity first. They are going to be most interested in making full contributions, and the extent to which they are underchallenged is a huge loss. But you want every person to be engaged in an organization. You might call these the two pistons of the engines of the corporate university — the notion of strategic capability development and a tie to the business and customer on one hand, and the cultivation and engagement and full appetite and contribution of the employee in a way that’s satisfying to them and helps the organization flourish.

CLO: Does the need for a physical space still exist? Could all training be virtual?

Symbolically, there’s a wonderful feeling with the stewardship of morale and the pride that comes from having a physical facility, but I think the vast majority of people would agree that we’ve moved beyond the idea of brick and mortar. We have so many interesting spaces in which to educate and train if we’re going to have face-to-face training, and we should. There are things that happen when people are with each other in a physical space that cannot happen any other way. I’m a huge fan of what Cisco and others have done in terms of telepresence — I think it’s a miracle and saves time and effort — but there’s no substitute for physically being present with other people. I’m not a huge fan of a large brick-and-mortar investment, though there is a need for organizations to have a place where they can bring both large and small groups together. Having multipurpose facilities makes a lot of sense, but the old idea of a brick-and-mortar university is outdated.

CLO: How will technology play into the future of corporate universities?

If we look at history, the use of technology in learning is pretty shameful. I know we’re proud of what we’ve got at this point, but that it took us this long and that we were so clumsy at doing it is a warning about the future. We overpromise and underdeliver when it comes to technology in that we don’t understand the implications of what it will do. There is a great need for a basic understanding for the sociology and psychology that surrounds technology. We’ve focused on the technology and content so much that we’ve ignored the human element of the learning effort. The future of technology is really about the social component, about the human component, and about what works with human beings to help them individually and collectively learn at a more effective rate. I’m hopeful that the future will be more effective and better informed than the past was when we tried to implement learning technology.

A portion of this interview was originally published in the May 2018 issue of  Chief Learning Officer  as a sidebar to “The Future of the Corporate University.”

Ave Rio is an associate editor at  Chief Learning Officer  magazine. She can be reached at [email protected].

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Six Sigma: A Case Study in Motorola

motorola university case study

A Six Sigma Overview

Nowadays, organizations are constantly striving to understand and meet the customer’s expectations by focusing on the quality of the products offered. Luckily, there are many tools and techniques available which enable management to improve the quality of their products and services. Six Sigma has proven to be one of the most successful tools in this regard. 

Six Sigma is a methodology which uses specific principles and mechanisms that ensure excellence within the organization. The ultimate goal of this methodology is to create products or services with less than 3.4 defects per million products or services produced. Witnessing its benefits, many of world’s most famous and successful organizations have decided to implement and integrate Six Sigma principles in their business processes.

The Beginning of Six Sigma

A look back in history indicates that the implementation of Six Sigma principles was pioneered by Motorola Company in 1980s. Motorola has always been a high tech company, offering highly reliable products. However, by 1970, every business in which Motorola was engaged in, was already targeted by Japanese. 

During that time, Motorola, like many other American companies, was struggling to keep up with Japanese competition. Motorola’s customers were unhappy with the product defects and customer support. On the other hand, Japanese had already built an amazing quality standard that many American companies simply could not keep up with. As a result, dealing with severe financial pressure, Motorola had to take action. 

The top management summoned the Motorola engineers and sought to reduce the amount of errors in their products before they were even shipped out of their factories. They combined all the quality management practices known till that time and created a methodology that would be the baseline of Motorola’s quality improvement program. Bill Smith, an engineer and scientist at Motorola, developed a methodology that would reduce the amount of product defects. He created the original statistics and formulas initiated the implementation of Six Sigma methodology. Convinced in the huge success that this methodology would have, he presented the ideas to CEO Bob Galvin. Bob came to recognize this approach as the solution to their quality concerns. They followed the four phase Six Sigma methodology (measure, analyze, improve and control) and started their journey of documenting their key processes, aligning those processes to customer requirements, and installing measurement systems to continually monitor and improve these processes. 

As a result, Motorola’s performance improved instantly. However, even though they were doing well, the analysis revealed that Japanese were still way ahead of them.

Thus, to remain competitive, top management vowed to make improvements in their quality by tenfold over a five-year period. Initially, this seemed to be impossible, but by the end of 1985, everyone in Motorola had started working toward that goal. 

By the end of the five year period, every business in Motorola had reached their targeted scale of improvement. Motorola managers decided to fly to Japan to better evaluate how their competition was doing, and what they found out was mind-blowing. They saw that the Japanese companies were doing 2000 times better than them. This was due to the fact that Japanese had been using similar technologies for a longer period of time. 

The information unveiled in Japan changed the objectives of Motorola again. The executives became even more ambitious, and decided to set a tenfold target one more time, but deadline was set for a two year period now. Motorola goal for 1992 was to have 3.4 defects per million opportunities. 

After implementing Sig Sigma, Motorola realized how important the methodology had been in improving their processes. In fact, they have documented more than $16 billion in saving as a result of Six Sigma adoption. Therefore, they decided to make the methodology public for every company that wanted to adopt it in their processes. Since then, tens of thousands of companies around the world have been considering Six Sigma as a way of doing business. 

Bearing in mind the previous points, it can be concluded that Motorola implementation of Six Sigma has been a stepping stone in the modern times of quality improvement. We may wonder where will the Six Sigma journey lead us to. This path, however, will certainly be challenging while we seek perfection. But the highly satisfied customers, motivated employees, increased benefits, among many other reasons, lead to believe that the employment of Six Sigma as the best business support will never cease to exist.

Author:   Hana Tahiri is the Portfolio Marketing Manager for Quality Management System and Transportation, Telecom and Energy at PECB. She is responsible for continually conducting research and writing articles and marketing materials related to QMS and TTE. If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact her: [email protected] .

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Bob Galvin and Motorola, Inc. (A)

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The Challenge of Organizational Change: How Companies Experience It and Leaders Guide It

  • June 1992 (Revised May 1996)

Xerox Corp.: Leadership Through Quality (C)

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  • The Challenge of Organizational Change: How Companies Experience It and Leaders Guide It  By: R. M. Kanter, B. Stein and T. D. Jick
  • Xerox Corp.: Leadership Through Quality (C)  
  • Xerox Corp.: Leadership Through Quality (B)  

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Six Sigma Case Study: Motorola Pioneers

Motorola was one of the founding organization of Six Sigma as we know it today. We can trace all of Six Sigma’s present-day and past successes back to Motorola’s pioneering work. Without them, we wouldn’t have the essential tools and strategies we used to detect and eliminate defects. Similarly, without their early work developing the methodology, there would be no Belt-based hierarchy, around which Six Sigma pivots. But how did they do it? What were Motorola’s early successes and is Six Sigma still as effective today? Keep reading to learn how they created and first implemented the greatest and most powerful improvement methodology in their work.

The Start of Six Sigma

Back in the seventies, Motorola invested their time primarily in manufacturing Quasar television sets. This was long before the advent of mobile phones, modern computers, the internet, and many of the technologies associated with Motorola. A Japanese company took over control of Motorola’s Quasar factory at the time and began implementing unheard of changes. They set about revamping and restructuring the way factory operations, rebuilding it from the ground up.

Soon, while under new management, Motorola’s Quasar factory began to produce TV sets with one-twentieth the number of defects than before. Simply put, there was something Japanese management brought to the factory that Motorola didn’t. The factory even maintained the same workforce, machinery, and design work. It soon became clear that Motorola management was the problem. It was in the next decade that Motorola knuckled down and started treating quality with the seriousness it deserves. Their then CEO, Bob Galvin, redirected Motorola towards on the quality achieving Six Sigma levels of quality. It was this decision that made Motorola a top quality and profit leader in the business world. Six Sigma was the secret to their success. And it’s just as popular and effective today as it was then!

How Does Motorola Use Six Sigma Today?

For Six Sigma, quality is about helping an organization increase profit. In Six Sigma, quality is a value contributed by a productive enterprise or activity. Motorola uses Six Sigma to maintain high efficiency by eliminating waste and defect as they discover them. This may be on a production line or even in administration.

Six Sigma aims to improve quality by minimizing variation and (overlapping with Lean) reducing waste. This helped Motorola improved its products and services, producing them faster and for less. In basic terms, Six Sigma’s goals are preventing defect, reducing cycle time, and minimizing costs. Six Sigma’s effectiveness comes from its ability to identify and eliminate waste costs, i.e. those that provide no value for customers.

Unlike Motorola, companies that eschew or dismiss Six Sigma ideas tend to have extremely costly operating processes. For those operating at low sigma, the cost of (poor) quality tends to be high, often spending 25%-40% of their revenues addressing issues. Companies operating at Six Sigma, however, typically expend less than 5% to fix problems. The dollar cost of this gap is often considerably large. This has cost companies like General Electric between $8 billion and $12 billion annually. Motorola, however, has enjoyed and still enjoys the benefits of Six Sigma. As one of its leading pioneers, they have perfected it over the years. Their success is not surprising.

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Princeton University Case Study

'instead of call takers looking at a location ‘circle’ they are looking at pinpoint location accuracy.', princeton university: enhancing campus safety with pinpoint accuracy.

Like many other Ivy League schools, Princeton University buildings do not have precise street addresses, names at the top of the buildings or numbers over each door. Buildings are marked by a small plaque placed at the front. This can make it difficult to navigate the campus and distinguish one building from another. Over the years, the university has built detailed maps and online apps to help people navigate the campus. But when placing a call to 9-1-1, the lack of building markings can pose location challenges for callers, call takers and first responders.

motorola university case study

Customer Profile

Princeton university.

Founded in 1746, located in New Jersey. The 500-acre campus is home to nearly 15,000 students, faculty and staff. It brings close to 850,000 visitors to the region each year.

Campus Safety Technology Evolution

The university’s Public Safety Department is investing in technology that supports community caretaking – ensuring the safety of students, staff, employees, visitors and buildings.

As the campus changed to a VoIP-based phone system, they also sought to replace their current call management system and needed a solution that would easily integrate with existing technologies as well as pave the way to preparing for Next Generation    9-1-1.

Accurate location of 9-1-1 callers was an important requirement which led to selecting CallWorks CallStation with RapidSOS.

motorola university case study

The Challenge

Locating callers needing help from the emergency center had always been a challenge. The callers are on a cell phone and had no idea where they were and could only describe their location as being in a large stone building near another large stone building.

motorola university case study

The Solution

The university selected CallWorks CallStation with RapidSOS, that easily integrated the university’s detailed campus mapping information.

motorola university case study

The Benefits

Dispatchers can quickly view the precise caller location to direct emergency personnel more accurately for a faster response.

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99 million people included in largest global vaccine safety study

19 February 2024

Health and medicine , Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences

The Global Vaccine Data Network, hosted at the University of Auckland, utilises vast data sets to detect potential vaccine safety signals

Global Vaccine Data Network co-director Dr Helen Petousis-Harris: Latest study uses vast data sets to ensure vaccine safety.

The Global Vaccine Data Network (GVDN) assessed 13 neurological, blood, and heart related medical conditions to see if there was a greater risk of them occurring after receiving a Covid-19 vaccine in the latest of eight studies in the Global COVID Vaccine Safety (GCoVS) Project.

Recently published in the journal Vaccine , this observed versus expected rates study included 99 million people (over 23 million person-years of follow-up) from 10 collaborator sites across eight countries. The study identified the pre-established safety signals for myocarditis (inflammation of the heart muscle) and pericarditis (inflammation of the thin sac covering the heart) after mRNA vaccines, and Guillain-Barré syndrome (muscle weakness and changed sensation (feeling)), and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (type of blood clot in the brain) after viral vector vaccines.

Possible safety signals for transverse myelitis (inflammation of part of the spinal cord) after viral vector vaccines and acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (inflammation and swelling in the brain and spinal cord) after viral vector and mRNA vaccines were identified.

So far, these findings were further investigated by the GVDN site in Victoria, Australia. Their study and results are described in the accompanying paper. Results are available for public review on GVDN’s interactive data dashboards.

Observed versus expected analyses are used to detect potential vaccine safety signals. These studies look at all people who received a vaccine and examine if there is a greater risk for developing a medical condition in various time periods after getting a vaccine compared with a period before the vaccine became available.

Lead author Kristýna Faksová of the Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark, remarked that use of a common protocol and aggregation of the data through the GVDN makes studies like this possible. “The size of the population in this study increased the possibility of identifying rare potential vaccine safety signals,” she explains. “Single sites or regions are unlikely to have a large enough population to detect very rare signals.”

By making the data dashboards publicly available, we are able to support greater transparency, and stronger communications to the health sector and public.

Associate Professor Helen Petousis-Harris Co-Director, Global Vaccine Data Network hosted at University of Auckland

GVDN Co-Director Dr Steven Black said, “GVDN supports a coordinated global effort to assess vaccine safety and effectiveness so that vaccine questions can be addressed in a more rapid, efficient, and cost-effective manner. We have a number of studies underway to build upon our understanding of vaccines and how we understand vaccine safety using big data.”

GVDN Co-Director Dr. Helen Petousis-Harris said, “By making the data dashboards publicly available, we are able to support greater transparency, and stronger communications to the health sector and public.”

The GCoVS Project was made possible with support by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to allow the comparison of the safety of vaccines across diverse global populations.

About the Global Data Vaccine Network

Established in 2019 and with data sourced from millions of individuals across six continents, the GVDN collaborates with renowned research institutions, policy makers, and vaccine related organisations to establish a harmonised and evidence-based approach to vaccine safety and effectiveness.

The GVDN is supported by the Global Coordinating Centre based at Auckland UniServices Ltd, a not-for-profit, stand-alone company that provides support to researchers and is wholly owned by the University of Auckland. Aiming to gain a comprehensive understanding of vaccine safety and effectiveness profiles, the GVDN strives to create a safer immunisation landscape that empowers decision making for the global community. For further information, visit globalvaccinedatanetwork.org.

Disclaimer: This news release summarises the key findings of the GVDN observed versus expected study. To view the full publication in Vaccine, visit doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2024.01.100.

This project is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award totalling US$10,108,491 with 100 percent funded by CDC/HHS. The contents are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, CDC/HHS, or the U.S. Government. For more information, please visit cdc.gov

Media enquiries: gvdn@auckland.ac.nz and communications@uniservices.co.nz

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Motorola sees 44% lift in Gen Z sales in just one month 

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About Motorola

Motorola created the mobile communications industry. They invented most of the protocols and technologies that make mobile communications possible, including the first mobile phone, the first base station, and most everything in between.

Today, they are combining that pioneering spirit with a renewed commitment to consumers. That’s why their phones run on Android, the world's most popular operating system. Android brings the openness that shaped the Internet to the mobile world. That’s also why they are dedicated to bringing consumers around the world great value through devices that don’t compromise on quality, experiences or style.

UNiDAYS x Morotola Case Study

The Challenge

Motorola Mobility, a leading producer of smartphones and accessories, sought to increase its mobile market share with digitally savvy Gen Z college and university students in the US. Recognizing that Gen Zers present a huge opportunity for both immediate revenue and long-term brand growth, the company sought to drive awareness and purchase intent for its most innovative products and accessories.

  • Build brand affinity through Gen Z college students
  • Increase traffic to e-commerce site
  • Increase sales by 30%

The Solution

Motorola partnered with UNiDAYS to create a customised Gen Z marketing strategy by:

  • Leveraging UNiDAYS'  Student Verification  to create a Gen Z student segmentation strategy.
  • Launching a  Student Incentive Program   delivered via UNiDAYS' private, members-only network. 
  • Determine the right mix of  Advertising Solutions   to reach Gen Z using UNiDAYS' first party data with personalised localised messaging.

The Results

As a result of UNiDAYS’ extensive promotion efforts, Motorola successfully engaged Gen Z college students across all UNiDAYS’ channels: mobile app, desktop, social, & email. They saw a dramatic 44% lift in sales with Gen Z college and university students in the US, month over month, from May 2018 to June 2018.

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Public relations class at alvernia university uses taylor swift as real-life case study.

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This year's Super Bowl was the most-watched television event ever. According to Nielsen, more than 123 million viewers tuned in.

Some credit a Berks County native for driving up the ratings. Now, a Susquehanna Valley university is spending the semester studying the so-called Taylor Swift effect.

As a professor at Alvernia University in Reading, Dr. Jodi Radosh works to prepare her students for careers in public relations.

"You want to know how to use and leverage social media and mass media, and you also want to know about crisis communication," she said.

This semester, Radosh wanted to offer her students a real-life case study.

"How can we make this current? How can we make this relevant? And I was, like, you know what? Taylor Swift is definitely the princess of promotion and publicity," she said.

"This class is just so interesting," senior Madison Pertl said.

Pertl is a digital media market major.

"I was kind of interested to see how she would pull Taylor Swift into a public relations class, but I feel like she's done it really well just using that public relations lens and showing us how Taylor Swift utilizes public relations in her everyday life," she said.

Radosh's class is not the only one being offered at Alvernia that focuses on Swift.

"There's another professor who's also a Swiftie, and she's one of our literature professors. She's taking Taylor Swift's music and using it as a lens to learn the basics of literature," Radosh said.

Radosh believes Swift's secrets to success can work for her students as well.

"These are really important public relations skills. I think they're going to absolutely take these skills and use them when they go into PR themselves," she said.

Radosh interviewed Taylor Swift when the singer was growing up in Berks County. Radosh recalls Swift telling her that one day, she was going to be a big star.

Taylor Swift wears TNT bracelet at AFC Championship game

  • Six Sigma - Introduction

The Motorola Six Sigma Story

No understanding of Six Sigma is complete without truly understanding where it came from - Motorola . The backdrop of the story shows how Six Sigma implementations changed the way Multi-National Corporations conducted operations worldwide.

It started in 1981. Motorola like most American companies was reeling under the threat of Japanese competition. Recovering from World War-2, the Japanese had built such a remarkable quality initiative that they were way ahead of any American company and were undercutting them on prices causing grave losses in terms of profitability and market share. Motorola was compelled into action. But the management at Motorola made an ambitious plan. They decided to give the Japanese a taste of their own medicine and beat them at their own game i.e quality.

For this reason, the management summoned the top engineers in Motorola and told them to combine all the best quality management practises known till that time and make an aggregated methodology which would be the base of Motorola’s competitive quality improvement program. Thus was developed the first Six Sigma program.

Motorola immediately took up a loft goal. They already were a respected manufacturing firm and had stringent quality measures. However, analysis had revealed that they were lagging way behind the Japanese and to be competitive they had to improve their quality goals by a 1000% in five years. Thus an ambitious goal of a 10:1 quality improvement came into picture.

Most experts thought it was suicidal for Motorola to attempt to do so, especially given the fact that Motorola was making huge investments in the quality initiative. Media criticised Motorola for using shareholder funds for goals that can be compared to fantasies. However the management did not pay heed. At the end of 5 years, almost every business unit functioning inside Motorola Inc. had achieved the 10:1 goal, boosting the morale of the workforce and silencing the critics.

However, Motorola realised that the Japanese were once again way ahead of them. This is because the Japanese had also launched a similar program. Even though their program was not as good as Motorola, they were ahead because of their previous lead. The Motorola Management became even more ambitious and launched another 1000% improvement drive. This time the goal had to be achieved in two years. The stream of criticisms started once again as to how success had shot to Motorola’s head and how the management was pursuing impossible programs. But to everyone’s surprise Motorola had triumphed once again.

Thus a third program was launched with the same 1000% or 10: 1 improvement in quality program. This time, when the program ended in 1991, Motorola failed. They reached a target of 8:1 when measured on a company wide basis even though some individual units had met the target.

When all these results were done Motorola had achieved a target of 800:1 improvement in their quality. Even the critics were full of applauses. Motorola had defeated the Japanese threat and Six Sigma became the biggest buzzword on the management scene with companies left, right and centre jumping to implement it, trying to reap the same benefits that Motorola did.

This is how Six Sigma was born!

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The article is Written By “Prachi Juneja” and Reviewed By Management Study Guide Content Team . MSG Content Team comprises experienced Faculty Member, Professionals and Subject Matter Experts. We are a ISO 2001:2015 Certified Education Provider . To Know more, click on About Us . The use of this material is free for learning and education purpose. Please reference authorship of content used, including link(s) to ManagementStudyGuide.com and the content page url.
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Motorola’s Case Study

Introduction.

Motorola is a Chicago based firm that was started in 1928 as the Galvin Manufacturing Corporation. It is a top producer of handheld cell phones and markets wireless web devices. In 2003, phone gadgets contributed to 40% of the revenue and 60% of Motorola’s operating profits. Motorola is good in communication and technology creativity.

This has been possible through its strong branding and technological innovation. The firm strives to achieve breakthroughs in technology and to emerge at the top of its competitors (Hitt, Ireland, & Hoskisson, 2010). This paper seeks to explain the SWOT analyses of Motorola incorporation, as well as merits and demerits of Motorola’s strategies. Additionally, the essay identifies the levels of strategy in a firm and issues in business administration.

Salient opportunities and threats that exist in Motorola’s external environment

The external environment analysis helps an organization to know if its resources are enough to thrive among its competitors. Opportunities are favorable external environmental factors while threats are unfavorable external environmental factors. Brand is an important opportunity for Motorola.

Its brands are strategically located in the telecommunications market. This increases the chances of customers seeing and buying its products. Additionally, the firm has strong marketing and promotional tactics. It uses various marketing devices such as print media and TV. As a result, it is able to inform millions of customers about its products.

Another opportunity is strong ability and readiness to take risks. For instance, through creation of new products that enables Motorola to achieve a competitive advantage. The innovation of new products brings differentiation to Motorola therefore reducing the prices of its products. Some products like Telco TV have helped the firm to be better placed in the market.

The corporation has also been winning different contracts that enable it to supply its products in large volumes for a long period of time. This has also helped to boost its sales as well as performance. These opportunities have enabled the firm to grow and establish itself internationally. For instance, it has entered other markets like Taiwan and United Kingdom.

The main threat that Motorola faces is competition from new and foreign firms. For instance, in 2003, Japanese, Korean and Chinese businesses were entering the market to produce and supply cell phones. Their products were cheaper and of higher quality as compared to Motorola’s.

This threatened Motorola’s profit margins such that they were almost reaching one percent (Hitt et al., 2010). Additionally, the firm does not enjoy government protection against entry of foreign businesses in to the market. As a result, foreign market players have entered the market and are almost replacing Motorola.

Another threat is barrier to trade in some foreign markets. For instance, Motorola has been facing difficulties in penetrating Japan. Considering that Japan has already entered Motorola’s market, then blocking Motorola from entering Japan seems unfair. The other threat is from Sagem, which achieved the top most market position in France.

It has been difficult for Motorola to surpass Sagem’s performance as it is a very strong company. Its products are of high quality and affordable. Motorola also faces threat from environmental, health and safety rules. For instance, it is required to ensure that the environment is kept clean during its production process.

The costs associated with this are high and they affect the overall profits and performance of the firm. The credit ratings in the market are unfavorable to the company. High credit ratings mean that the company is charged more interest on loans. As a result, this cost is passed over to the consumer therefore reducing the competitive advantage over the other market players.

Motorola’s most prominent strengths and weaknesses

Strengths are internal favorable environmental factors while weaknesses are internal unfavorable factors of a business. Motorola’s strength is that it is a prominent company in provision of wireless handsets, communication devices and the single provider of iDEN network.

Motorola is a leading and strong market player. For example, it acquired and managed Kreaatel therefore gaining higher chances of entering European and North American markets. The other strength is the ability to manufacture large volumes of mobile handsets at a given time. This enables it to meet the market demand with ease. It is also able to enjoy economies of scale that come with large scale production. Additionally, it is able to surpass its competitors by ensuring that its products are readily available.

Motorola’s weakness is that the general quality of its business operations makes customers unsatisfied. This is because at times, the products happen to have defects which make them to function improperly. Therefore, the customers tend to opt for other technological devices which can function smoothly. Another weakness is that their employees are less skilled and trained. They also lack motivation.

They offer substandard services to the consumers because they may not know how to manufacture and operate the mobile handsets. This has reduced quality, customers and sales of Motorola’s products around the world. Another threat is weak profitability.

Motorola’s profits and market share have been dropping because of the weaknesses and threats it has been facing. This requires that the company adopts different strategies in order to regain its market position.

Advantages and disadvantages associated with each of Motorola’s strategic options

Motorola’s strategic plans have been made using intangible and tangible facilities. The intangible facilities are employees who aim at achieving the firm’s goals and experts who possess technological creativity. The tangible facilities are the products such as telephone handsets.

These intangible and tangible facilities enable the company to produce, market, sell and obtain income from its produce. However, this strategy is disadvantageous because there are many IT firms using it. Therefore, Motorola needs to identify and advance other tactics that will enable it to achieve competitive advantage.

Another Motorola’s strategy is the implementation of the new WiMaX expertise. This is an essential strategy for Motorola given that WiMaX has several advantages. It can take the place of many telecommunication facilities and cellular telephone networks. It can also provide internet facilities to Motorola products.

For instance, Motorola has installed WiMax in to its cell phones therefore making it an international performer in technological innovation. Introduction of WiMaX has made other big providers of communication devices to be on toes in order to offer similar facilities.

For instance, Nokia and Cisco Systems are aiming at providing WiMaX services to the mobile industry. However, the strategy of using WiMaX is disadvantageous. For example, there is increased competition since other mobile technology companies are starting to provide the same services.

Additionally, the costs required to use WiMaX are getting lower as more manufacturers turn up. This has increased supply and lowered selling price therefore affecting Motorola’s profits.

How the corporation’s strategy and organizational structure can be designed to solve the company’s strategic issues

There is stiff competition in the technology market. Therefore, Motorola is expected to fight for its place in order to endure and achieve competitive advantage above its competitors. It can do this by differentiation of its products and provision of competitive prices to its customers.

Since there are upcoming and innovative telecommunications providers, it is important that Motorola improves its strategies (Hitt et al., 2010). In order to remain competitive, Motorola can identify and implement different products that have not yet been launched by its competitors. Additionally, it can adopt bargaining power by purchasing its production materials at affordable price. For example, it can buy in large volumes in order to obtain discounts.

This way, it can be able to sell its mobile handsets at a price lower than its competitors. Motorola should also strive to create more products. Since the costs of producing digital products are reducing, customers and demand are also increasing. These customers aim at obtaining variety of products for comparison purposes. They also expect to buy quality products. This should motivate Motorola to increase its production capacity, create new products and advance its technology in order to take advantage of increasing demand.

How Motorola should proceed

In order to improve its strategic planning, Motorola should be highly innovative. This is in order to ensure that plans with the right procedures, mechanisms and technology are introduced. As a result, the future product needs of consumers can be met. The technological plans initiated by Motorola Corporation will need a mechanism of checks and balances which will remove market surprises and errors.

Road mapping is a strategic plan that Motorola can adopt because it can make the company to be different from its competitors. This road map offers a general procedure and database for every Motorola company to follow. This enables the companies to be in a position to advance, build and share their products, missions, visions and strategies with the whole corporation.

Additionally, it is possible to centrally solve issues that are facing various sections therefore reducing problem solving procedures and time. Road mapping can also provide strategic planning which creates a competitive advantage.

Various levels and types of strategy in a firm

Business level strategies are methods that firms use to carry out several operational roles. These strategies are used in order to assign duties and guidelines for proprietors, managers and employees. Some of these strategies are: coordination of unit functions, utilization of labor, development of competitive advantages, identification of market gaps and monitoring of product plans.

Issues in business administration

Human resource issues: These are matters or problems that face the employees. Some of them are: guaranteeing of open communications, balancing of stress and the labor force, setting up of responsibilities and conflict resolution (Bishop, 1991, p. 6).

Structural issues: These are basically the factors affecting the organizational structure. Some of them include competition, characteristics of customers and suppliers and the technological and regulatory environment. Although these issues can affect business, it is important to converse with the administration before changing the organizational structure (Bishop, 1991, p. 7).

Policy and Procedural Issues: This is mainly the authority that is either granted or earned by the employees or owners of a business. Authority entails application of control within a firm. For instance, there are procedures for approving and delegating of responsibilities and authority.

An organization can use Management by Objective (MBO) to coordinate and allocate authority and duties. Current Operating Reports should be made in order to give management and employees an updated schedule of expected goals and objectives (Bishop, 1991, p. 8-10).

Risk management issues: This involves identifying and solving uncertain factors that can affect the profitability or goals of an organization. It is the role of management to weigh the consequences of these concerns on the whole business. Some of these issues are: asset theft, computer offenses, scams and breach of laws (Bishop, 1991, p. 10).

Motorola Incorporation has various opportunities and strengths that allow it to establish a stable market position. Its opportunities are strong marketing and promotional tactics, strong brands which are strategically located, creative technological advances, different contract awards and strong ability and readiness to take risks. Its strengths are the ability to manufacture in large volumes and becoming a leading and strong market player.

On the other hand, Motorola faces threats from its competitors such as Japanese and Korean cell phone manufacturers. They sell related telecommunications devices and sell them at a lower-cost price. The other threat is barrier to trade in foreign markets as well as environmental, health and safety rules. High credit ratings deny Motorola the chance to borrow capital at an affordable rate.

As a result of these threats, Motorola has initiated competitive techniques such as WiMaX technology which has enabled it to attain a competitive advantage. There are various business level strategies that have been initiated in order to assign duties and guidelines for proprietors, managers and employees. There are also issues affecting business administration. These are human resource issues, structural issues, policy and procedural issues as well as risk management issues.

Bishop, J. (1991). Management Issues for the Growing Business: Emerging Business series . Web.

Hitt, M., Ireland, R., & Hoskisson, R. (2010). Competitiveness and Globalization, Concepts: Strategic Management Series.Concepts. Connecticut, U.S.: Cengage Learning.

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IvyPanda. (2019, May 28). Motorola’s. https://ivypanda.com/essays/motorolas-case-study/

"Motorola’s." IvyPanda , 28 May 2019, ivypanda.com/essays/motorolas-case-study/.

IvyPanda . (2019) 'Motorola’s'. 28 May.

IvyPanda . 2019. "Motorola’s." May 28, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/motorolas-case-study/.

1. IvyPanda . "Motorola’s." May 28, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/motorolas-case-study/.

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IvyPanda . "Motorola’s." May 28, 2019. https://ivypanda.com/essays/motorolas-case-study/.

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Home » Management Case Studies » Case Study of Motorola: Brand Revitalization Through Design

Case Study of Motorola: Brand Revitalization Through Design

When Motorola released its earnings report for the second quarter ending June 2005, analyst and competitors alike were stumped. The company posted revenues of $8.83 billion up from $7.4 billion a year ago and earnings of $993 million against a $203 million loss a year ago. Selling 34 million handsets, the cell phone unit accounted for 55% of the quarterly revenue and $ 498 million in operating earnings. Motorola’s market share increased to 18.1%, a gain of 3.3%, establishing itself firmly as the second largest manufacturer behind Nokia (33% market share). This was an impressive turnaround for a company that had seen market share decline from a high of 51% during 1996 to a low of 13% in 2004 pushing it behind the market leader Nokia and the South Korean rival Samsung.

Case Study of Motorola

A key contributor to Motorola’s turnaround was the RAZR V3 (Razr), the thinnest phone ever developed. This ultra-slim and ultra sleek clamshell (flip-phone), which resembled a metal credit card when folded in two, won the coveted Gold Award for 2005 at the annual Industrial Design Excellence Award.

Motorola’s Journey through the Decades

From 1980s to 2000s Headquartered in Libertyville, Chicago, Motorola as founded in 1928 by Paul Galvin. Initially known as Galvin Manufacturing, the company created the world’s first commercially successful car radio in 1930. This was followed by walkie-talkie in World War II, the car phone and the pager in 1940 and 1950s. Throughout the 1960 and the 1970, Motorola focused its research on developing a hand held communication device for the masses. Motorola launched its first cellular phone, the “DynaTac” , in 1983. A decade later, engineers at Motorola successfully launched “Star Tac”. This was the first clamshell and was known as the wearable phone. It transformed Motorola into a trendsetter. By, 1995, the company became the undisputed leader of the global call phone market with a 54% share.

Around the same period, competitors such as Ericsson and Nokia brought digital technology to the US. This technology helped these companies incorporate features like better voice quality and greater data storage into their cellular handsets. Unlike its competitors, Motorola refrained from incorporating digital technology in its products. It continued with Star Tac and concentrated on the European and Asian markets rather than its main market, the US. Motorola’s cell phones were perceived as clunky, non-user friendly and expensive by the market.

Motorola’s market share declined further in 2002 and 2003 when, due to problems in its supply chain management, the company could not fulfill the demand for colour and camera phones, ceding holiday sales to Nokia and Samsung. Motorola’s lackluster performance helped Samsung to increase share 13% in 2003 from 7% in 2001.

Designing the Razr

After the loss that Motorola suffered in 2001, Galvin hired Mike Zafirovski, a 24 year GE veteran, to reignite handset sales. Understanding the importance of design, Zafirovski brought in outside talent such as Tim Parsey a former Apple executive, Jim Wicks , who had spent a decade at Sony’s innovation centre, to head the design centre at Motorola. By 2003, the design team at Motorola added 120 new members. Motorola produced some hit cell phones such as the V70 ( which was a keyhole shaped phone, which opened with a swivel like blade knife) among others.

However, Razr was different. Not only did it sport a unique design, but also became a major commercial hit. Contrary to the prevailing trend, the Razr as created from the designers’ wish list without much market research input going into its development.

Major innovations in design and engineering were undertaken for developing the Razr. To make the phone as thin as possible, designer used metal alloys such as aluminum and magnesium, for the phone instead of the commonly used plastic. However, the thinness resulted in increased fragility. Therefore, the outer casing was made of anodized aluminum to enable the phone to withstand daily wear and tear. The use of metal alloy made the phone extremely light weight 100gms. But since the phone was a clamshell design were foldable, the depth of the model depended on the thickness of the keypad. With the conventional raised keys, the thickness of the Razr would have increased dramatically.

To solve this problem, engineers successfully designed the first ever touchpad to be used in a cell phone as the input device. The touchpad was made from a single flat sheet of magnesium and the keys were chemically etched on the surface. The keys were then separated and by thin silicon strips and a blue backlight were used to illuminate the numbers and symbols. This revolutionary keypad was thus wafer- thin and futuristic looking with only one-third the thickness of the conventional keypads. As a result, the phone was less than 14mm thick when closed.

For the first time in Motorola’s history, a high-end fashion phone reached completion within 10 months, two months quicker than the normal cycle. After the initial rounds of testing, the Razr was declared fully functional by June 2004, and launched in the market in the fall of the same year.

Marketing the Razr

The Razr was the first product from Motorola to deliver on the fashion-meets functionality promise. For the Razr’s advertising campaign, Geoffrey Frost, spot term “transformer” opened in a dark room with a brunette watching a home video on her flat TV. After a while, all the consumer electronic gizmos turned into squares and coalesce into one slim and sleek Moto Razr phone.

For the Asia Pacific region Motorola bypassed the traditional approach and teamed up with BBC to produce short vignettes to sharpen the cool association of the Razr.

In rare show of marketing aggressiveness, Motorola also succeeded in signing Maria Sharapova for the Razr endorsement, which was her first worldwide sponsorship deal. She created the buzz around the Razr and worked with the company on different design ideas helping designers to figure out what was cool.

With the phone’s popularity skyrocketing, T-mobile also came on-board, announcing the availability of the Razr at its retail outlets by July 2005.

Future Strategy and Challenges

With this new design, Motorola was trying to create “wickedly cool and compelling” products, which were further demarcated by using 4-letter words. The family- based design strategy led to the development of common platforms for manufacturing cell phones, which resulted in increased standardization of parts, reduced manufacturing costs and increased turnaround times. This also aided in streamlining the supply chain with the company reducing the number of suppliers from 44000 in 2001 to 36,000 in 2005, and the number of suppliers from 44,000 in 2001 to 36,000 in 2005 and the number of components it bought for its cell phones from a high of 300,000 in 2001 to 100,000 in 2005 with the further aim of reducing it to 25,000 by the mid 2006. The effort of the company were paying off 14,000 in 2001 to 36,000 in 2005 and the number of components it bought for its cell phones from a high of 300,000 in 2001 to 100,000 in 2005 with the further aim of reducing it to 25,000 by the mid 2006. The efforts of the company were paying off as profit margin increased from 4% a year ago to 10% in the 2nd quarter of 2005.

Case Study Analysis

Reviving a brand is not just feasible; it may very well be a more attractive strategy than launching a new brand. The case study Motorola brand revitalization discusses at length about how the once a market leader brand in its product category lost its entire market to its competitors. Then how the brand made a roaring come back and was able to achieve the market position which it used to lead.

Reasons for Brand Revitalization

  • Declining market share: In the year 1983 Motorola launched its first cellular phone, the ‘Dynastic’. By the year 1995 the company became the undisputed leader of the global cell phone market with a 54% share. However, around the same period such as Ericsson and Nokia brought digital technology to the US. This technology helped these companies incorporate features like better voice quality and greater data storage into their cellular handsets. Unlike its competitors, Motorola refrained from incorporating digital technology in its products. It continued with its existing models and concentrated on the European and Asian markets rather than its main market, the US. Making use of this opportunity, Nokia introduced “candy bar phones” with easy-to use scrollable menus, replaceable covers and changeable ring tones, which become the rage with the young and fashion conscious cell phones users.
  • Declining sales: Motorola market share declined further in 2002 and 2003 when, due to problems in supply chain management, the company could not fulfill the demand for colour and camera phones, ceding holiday sales to Nokia and Samsung. Motorola lackluster performance helped the Samsung increase its worldwide share to 13% in 2003 from 7% in 2001 cementing its number three position. Samsung inched ever closer to Motorola due to its emphasis on manufacturing user friendly and innovatively designed cell phones and in the 3rd quarter of 2004, with a market share of 13.8%, moved ahead of Motorola to become the number two player in the cell phone industry.

Strategies For Brand Revitalization

  • Change in the leadership: In January 2004, the board of directors appointed Edward Zander (Zander), who had spent 15 years at Sun Microsystems as the new CEO of Motorola. Only a few weeks later, when Zander came across the Razr, which was still under development, he saw sure-shot success, an iconic product, and put the phone’s development on the fast track. The management made many changes within the firm. By 2003 the design team at Motorola added 120 new members including sociologist, psychologist, engineers, graphics designers and software and color specialists. The company opened new design centers in many countries.
  • Product innovation : Major innovations in designing and engineering were undertaken for developing the Razr. To make the phone as thin as possible, designers used metal alloys such as aluminum and magnesium, for phone instead of the commonly used plastic. However thinness resulted in fragility. Therefore, outer casing was made of anodized aluminum to enable the phone to withstand daily wear and tear. The use of metal alloys made the phone extremely light weight at 100 grams. Since the phone was a clamshell, there was another dilemma that the designer had to solve. As the clamshell designs were foldable, the depth of the model depended on the thickness of the keypad. With the conventional raised keys, the thickness of the Razr would have increased dramatically. To solve this problem, engineers successfully designed the first ever touchpad to be used in a cell phone as the input device. The touch pad was made from a single flat sheet of magnesium and the keys were chemically etched on the surface. The keys were then separated by thin silicon strips and blue backlight was used to illuminate the numbers and symbols. The revolutionary keypad was wafer-thin and futuristic looking with only one-third of the conventional keypads. As a result, the phone was less then 14mm thick when closed. The other technological innovations which were incorporated changes made were Bluetooth technology, built-in camera, MP3 ring tones, and dual LCD screen (one internal and another external) along with having excellent voice quality. It was first quad band phone. For the first time in Motorola history, a high end fashion phone reached completion within ten months, two month quicker than the normal cycle. The phone was launched in the market in the fall of the year 2004.
  • Awareness of changes to consumers: Motorola succeeded in signing Maria Sharapova (Wimbledon champion in 2004) for the Razr endorsement, which was her first worldwide sponsorship deal. She helped create the buzz around the Razr. By June 2005, the company released special-edition black colored Razr phones for the top 25 Academy Awards (acting and directing) nominees with plans to launch the pink Razr by the of 2005, followed by an entire range in rainbow colors in 2006.

With the phone’s popularity skyrocketing, T-Mobile also came on-board announcing the availability of the Razr at its retail outlets by July 2005. Building on the Razr, the company unveiled the new design strategy for its upcoming products. The company posted revenues of $8.83 billion (as against Wall Street’s estimate of $8.3 to $8.5 billion) up from $7.4 billion a year ago and earnings of $993 million against a $203 million loss a year ago. Selling 34 million handsets for the quarter as against Wall Street’s estimate of 31 million handsets, the cell phone unit accounted for 55% of the quarterly revenues and $498 million in operating earnings. Motorola market share increased to 18.1%, a gain of 3.3%, establishing itself firmly as the second largest cell phone manufacturer behind Nokia (33% market share). This was an impressive turnaround for a company that had seen its market share decline from a high of 51% during 1996 to a low of 13% in 2004 pushing it behind the market leader Nokia and Samsung.

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Princeton University Case Study

'instead of call takers looking at a location ‘circle’ they are looking at pinpoint location accuracy.', princeton university: enhancing campus safety with pinpoint accuracy.

Like many other Ivy League schools, Princeton University buildings do not have precise street addresses, names at the top of the buildings or numbers over each door. Buildings are marked by a small plaque placed at the front. This can make it difficult to navigate the campus and distinguish one building from another. Over the years, the university has built detailed maps and online apps to help people navigate the campus. But when placing a call to 9-1-1, the lack of building markings can pose location challenges for callers, call takers and first responders.

motorola university case study

Customer Profile

Princeton university.

Founded in 1746, located in New Jersey. The 500-acre campus is home to nearly 15,000 students, faculty and staff. It brings close to 850,000 visitors to the region each year.

Campus Safety Technology Evolution

The university’s Public Safety Department is investing in technology that supports community caretaking – ensuring the safety of students, staff, employees, visitors and buildings.

As the campus changed to a VoIP-based phone system, they also sought to replace their current call management system and needed a solution that would easily integrate with existing technologies as well as pave the way to preparing for Next Generation    9-1-1.

Accurate location of 9-1-1 callers was an important requirement which led to selecting CallWorks CallStation with RapidSOS.

motorola university case study

The Challenge

Locating callers needing help from the emergency center had always been a challenge. The callers are on a cell phone and had no idea where they were and could only describe their location as being in a large stone building near another large stone building.

motorola university case study

The Solution

The university selected CallWorks CallStation with RapidSOS, that easily integrated the university’s detailed campus mapping information.

motorola university case study

The Benefits

Dispatchers can quickly view the precise caller location to direct emergency personnel more accurately for a faster response.

Download The Full Case Study

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motorola university case study

Woman found dead on UGA campus identified as Augusta University nursing student, officials say

ATLANTA, Ga. (Atlanta News First) - Authorities are investigating a woman’s death on the University of Georgia’s campus after she didn’t return from a morning run, the school announced Thursday afternoon.

Augusta University confirmed the victim was a student at the College of Nursing campus in Athens.

UGA police said they received a call just after noon from a person who was concerned for their friend, who had not come back from a run at the intramural fields. About 20 minutes later, police found the person in a forested area behind Lake Herrick with “visible injuries.” Officers tried to give emergency aid, but the person was pronounced dead at the scene.

“Me and my roommate, like pretty much everyone I know, we park over there. Me and my boyfriend go on runs over there all the time,” said UGA student Izzy Whitesides.

“It’s really beautiful and peaceful and now I feel like it’s tainted. It’s like scary a little bit,” said UGA student Alena Wiggins.

The school said in a letter to students that “foul play is suspected,” adding that the “safety and welfare of our campus community is our top concern.”

“The fact that the person hasn’t been caught yet is really scary. like hence why I had somebody come walk me back to my car. Yeah, it’s just scary that it’s probably of malicious intent,” said Whitesides.

At a Thursday night press conference, UGA police did not release the woman’s identity.

>> WATCH FULL PRESS CONFERENCE:

UGA Police Chief Jeffery Clark said the woman was not a UGA student. Clark said he is urging the public to avoid the general area where the body was found while police investigate.

Clark said there is not a suspect but police are “actively investigating the case.”

“There is no immediate danger at this time,” Clark said. “My investigators will be working this case day and night, and they will be looking at every camera that we have.”

“This is a tragic day,” Clark said.

All classes at UGA have been canceled until Monday. The Augusta University College of Nursing canceled classes on Friday.

>> ATLANTA NEWS FIRST CHOPPER VIDEO:

UGA is asking the community to stay away from the area while campus police, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation and the Athens-Clarke County Police Department investigate.

The school also mentioned a second death on the campus just hours earlier. A student died Wednesday night in Brumby Hall, they said, calling this a “traumatic time for our University.”

“And as we continue to mourn that tragic loss of life, today’s devastating news will uniquely test the resolve of our campus community, particularly our students,” they wrote. The university did not say how the student died.

Clark said at the Thursday press conference that the two deaths are not connected.

Police ask anyone with information about the incident to call the UGA Police Department at (706) 542-2200.

The University of Georgia offers 24/7 mental health crisis support to all students. They should call 706-542-2273 to speak with someone.

This story is developing. Check back with Atlanta News First for updates and sign up for news alerts .

Copyright 2024 WANF. All rights reserved.

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Podcast: Is taking A-Level Geography worth it?

UCL Research Fellow Abbie Chapman answers the question 'Is taking A-Level Geography worth it?' She tells ATE podcast host Roberta Livingston about her experience.

Building of Slade School of Fine

22 February 2024

Image credit: UCL Imagestore

ROBERTA LIVINGSTON

Hello and welcome to Ask The Expert, where you ask the questions and UCL’s finest experts answer them. I’m your host Roberta Livingston, a schools engagement assistant at UCL East. In this episode we hear from Abbie Chapman. A research fellow at UCL who did a PhD in Deep Sea Ecology. Abbie is going to be answering the question ‘Is taking A-Level Geography worth it?’ Let’s hear what Abbie has to say.

ABBIE CHAPMAN:

I’m Abbie Chapman, I’m a research fellow at University College London and all that means is that I did a Phd so a longer period of study that was quite specialised, I did that in deep sea ecology actually so I studied life on the sea floor in the bottom of the oceans, where there’s no light. But when I joined UCL, I started researching life on land. And so what I look at now is I spend time mostly on the computer mapping and modelling. So I’m using coding languages, but also other computer programmes. And to look at effectively what the impacts of our food systems are on biodiversity, so the wildlife around us. Particularly in South Africa, India and the UK, but also other countries, I'm compiling to now as well.

So yeah. You're asking is a level geography worth it? Well, my biassed first answer would be yes, definitely, but I'm aware that the answer to this actually really varies depending on who you are and what you want to do and what you love. So the first question I'll be asking you to ask yourself is what do you actually love and enjoy? The reason I say that is because at the end of the day, it sounds really obvious, but you're going to be sitting in the classroom sitting, listening to lessons, reading things, doing the homework, doing your exams, and it's going to be on a certain subject. And it'll be really much, much easier for you to commit yourself to that, to motivate yourself for that, if you actually enjoy it. So I would really think about that before choosing your A levels because there's a lot of advice that goes around about what's the best a level and what's what's not such a good a level. And I have to be honest, in my experience, since all those conversations happened to me too. It's actually not been so important. In the end. I think a lot of the advice I got at school sometimes was a bit biassed towards what would look good at a university, but I'm not entirely sure that's always the best advice. I would, I think mostly about what you enjoy and what you might want to do in the future.

One thing I would flag is if you have a really specific career in mind now some people do. I didn't, but some people do. I would just maybe investigate if you want. If you have courses that you would need to do at a university or a college after your A levels, that would maybe you to start that career. They want specific subjects. Make sure you're doing those. So for instance, if you wanted to be a medical doctor or a vet or a dentist, and there are other careers too, where there's to be important to consider, just make sure you've got a levels that align for that, because maybe geography won't fit by the time you've got the sciences, they might be asking for, for instance, if you don't have a specific career in mind, geography can be really, really even even better than other subjects for a specific reason, really. And that it's sort of more than one subject captured in in geography.

So under geography you have a really rare opportunity to study a real breadth of areas or fields as they sometimes call it university. So universities split things into social sciences and life sciences, but what they're actually talking about there is things that you cover in geography. So in your social sciences, you'll be considering things like how people are living, how cities are built, which communities are more vulnerable in the world, how developing, how developing nations are developing and how they're moving forward in things like agriculture and things like urbanisation.

You'll also look at economics. You'll consider things like development are considered under that, but you'll also look at the impacts of different industries on different groups of people and then under life and physical and even chemical sciences, you do things like bits of geology. They won't be called this. They'll be called geography at school, but they'll be split when you go to university. So you do things like geology and study rock formations. You might study a bit of oceanography, actually, you'll learn about coastal erosion, but if you went to university to study oceanography, you'd learn about that process too.

So your rocks, your volcanoes, your coasts, your rivers, your flooding, that's often what people think of with geography. That's physical geography. There's also the human geography side that you tend to cover in A level geography as well. So you're you're getting a real breadth of understanding. And I also want a flag. I was, I was on a workshop recently with the British Ecological Society. They were asking us to try and make sure how we can capture climate change and what we need to know about climate change in the school curriculum. And when we were doing this, we actually found that most of the climate change science, most of the most up to date research on climate change is taught under geography. A level isn't actually captured so much under biology like they thought it might be, and so if you're interested in climate change and how the world's responding to it, how ecological communities say the wildlife's responding to it, you might find you get to do a bit of that under geography as well.

So I'd always say I'd also say if you find you started an A level like geography and you weren't so sure it was for you longer term, you didn't want to do geography at university or something like that. I mean, it opens up other doors. So I did it and then I actually did do geography at university because I did really enjoy it. But I did end up also doing oceanography because the university I was at was offering that as something I could do alongside. So I got to study the oceans as well as the land and which I particularly enjoyed. And a lot of the people I worked with left to completely different careers as well. It's a really good one for getting into teaching. I find a lot of a lot of my friends and stuff doing that, but others work. For big companies, so some of them work using the mapping skills they developed in geography at university. So basically decide where for instance, you could decide where the next big supermarket is going to be, or where this town needs to be, and considering how it's going to impact nature, how it's going to impact people, and where then next based place to use some land is.

It's becoming a really important subject and really important skill sets that you learn through it for the future of land use in the UK, for instance, or across the world. So I'd say if you if you're thinking thanks to geography about how the world works across space in different subjects in different fields, you're getting what are called interdisciplinary skills and you might not have come across this word yet, but I promise you it's a word you'll see a lot in the future. They want people these days in many jobs.That don't just think about one really narrow subject. You can be really passionate about, really one narrow subject, but it's really helpful if you can talk to people who are passionate about other ones too.

And that might sound really simple, but it can actually be really quite a difficult thing to do if you're not used to having to learn terminology from other subjects, or having to think in different ways and geography prepares you really quite well for that. And also, if you're into things like I was describing, you'll learn something called geographic information systems. That's something you learn at university level, probably not so much during an A level unless you want to explore it all. That means is you're doing some nice mapping really. So you're mapping out different things and seeing what overlaps with what, what's causing problems for what. Where can things go? Where can rivers flow? Where might flooding happen? There's lots of opportunities that are made possible by maps.

And I'd also say that I think part of the was I was looking at the curriculum now because I'm aware that I went a while ago and I didn't want to be misgiving, misleading information. And I noticed there still seems to be an aspect of field work which is great to see. Yes, you might get muddy or you might choose a city based project and not get to say muddy. But field work is brilliant for your CV regardless of what you want to do next because it if you didn't know this already and you're thinking of how to write  a CV for the future, it's an example of teamwork.

For example, you can organise yourself and to be honest it gives the really impression that you probably have a really good attitude and say putting field work on your CV. As always, I believe going to be a really good thing that employers in all sorts of industries. And academia and other types of jobs are going to really appreciate. So I'd also say bear that in mind. So yeah, putting your wellies on or donning your clipboard to go on and interview some people is always going to be well worth doing. So do enjoy that part of your project if you do decide to take the geography a level as well.

And so there you have it! For Abbie taking A-Level Geography was worth it as it opened up many doors for her including the opportunity to study Oceanography. A-Level Geography is almost like a gateway to specific subjects that are available at UCL and other universities so if for instance you wanted to study Geology, taking A-Level Geography would be a requirement. 

And that is the end of this episode, I hope it was helpful! If you wish to submit your own question for an expert to answer just type in Ask The Expert UCL on your search engine and our website should be the first to pop up.

Til next time! Thank you.

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Case Western Reserve University

Learn about your study abroad options

You may have heard that 1 in 3 Case Western Reserve University students study abroad, but you may have no idea where to start the process, or what the differences are between the opportunities available to you.

This info session will provide an overview of the different types of study abroad programs, their costs, benefits and more.

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    Motorola considers education to be an employee right as well as a responsibility, and every Motorola employee must complete at least 40 hours of training a year. This usually takes place at Motorola University, which is probably the best known and most widely benchmarked corporate university in the world. Not only employees, but also Motorola ...

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  28. Podcast: Is taking A-Level Geography worth it?

    They won't be called this. They'll be called geography at school, but they'll be split when you go to university. So you do things like geology and study rock formations. You might study a bit of oceanography, actually, you'll learn about coastal erosion, but if you went to university to study oceanography, you'd learn about that process too.

  29. Learn about your study abroad options

    You may have heard that 1 in 3 Case Western Reserve University students study abroad, but you may have no idea where to start the process, or what the differences are between the opportunities available to you. This info session will provide an overview of the different types of study abroad programs, their costs, benefits and more.