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How to address a cover letter without a name?

According to a study, every corporate job opening gets roughly 250 resumes , out of which only 3-4 applicants land an interview.

That means if your cover letter feels generic and lacks personal touch, it may end up in the trash.

However, what if there is a circumstance for addressing a cover letter with no name?

Read on to get an insight into the following FAQs:

  • How do you write a cover letter if you don't know the hiring manager?
  • How to format the cover letter address correctly?
  • Who to write a cover letter to without a contact?
  • Which method of delivering a cover letter is not appropriate?
  • What are the practical ways to find the hiring manager’s name?
  • Additional tips to write a cover letter without name

Whom to Address a Cover Letter To?

Who do you address a cover letter to when there is no name?

To understand how to address a cover letter, you need to know to whom to address it.

A cover letter should be addressed in the following ways:

  • If the hiring manager’s name is given in the job description, you should always address the cover letter to them.
  • If the hiring manager’s email address is not there in the job description, you can address the cover letter to the department manager.

There is no point in sending the cover letter to the CEO or founders because they are not the ones who usually handle the recruitment process.

Also Read: How to address a cover letter?

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name?

A cover letter for a job is not similar to a letter to a friend.

The purpose of a cover is to impress the hiring manager with your professional expertise to score an interview.

But addressing cover letters with no name may get rejected by the recruiters.

We understand how important it is to know how to write a cover letter without a name as per these statistics.

Also Read: How to write a cover letter?

Here are some steps on how to address a cover letter without a name:

1. Address the Cover Letter with “Dear Hiring Manager”

It is the most common way to address a hiring manager with no name and hiring managers prefer this salutation over no salutation at all.

This salutation allows the hiring manager to quickly focus on the main body of the cover letter, instead of rejecting the cover letter right away.

However, the best way to address a cover letter is by personalizing it.

2. Address the Cover Letter to the Team

When in doubt, you can address the whole team so that anyone from the team can receive your cover letter and respond accordingly.

It can be the hiring manager, assistant, or anyone from the department who may interview you during the job application process.

You can phrase it as:

  • Dear Recruiting Team
  • Dear Project Manager Hiring Team
Also Read: What can a cover letter explain that a résumé cannot?

3. Maintain Professional Approach

Maintain a professional approach and avoid informal phrases or words such as "Hello!", "Good Evening/Morning", or "Hi!"

Keep it simple and professional by using the term, "Dear" followed by the designation.

For Example:

  • Dear Hiring Head
  • Dear Recruitment Supervisor

4. Do Not Assume Gender or Marital Status

You often know the hiring manager’s name but do not know their gender or marital status.

Assuming someone's gender may seem disrespectful and unprofessional hence you should avoid making such mistakes by keeping it gender-neutral. Avoid the term "Sir" or "Madam" and simply address the recipient as "Dear (Profile)".

The best way to find the hiring manager’s gender is by doing a quick LinkedIn search.

The LinkedIn profile may contain a profile picture wherein you can determine the hiring manager’s gender.

If the hiring manager’s gender is Male, address the hiring manager with “Mr.”.

  • “Mr. Xavier,”

If the hiring manager is female, it can be confusing.

As you don’t know the marital status, avoid using Miss. or Mrs. to address the hiring manager. Instead, use a generic “Ms..”

  • Dear Ms. Moore
  • Dear Ms. Kyle
  • Dear Mrs. Lane
  • Dear Miss Maximoff
Also Read: How to reach out to recruiters on LinkedIn?

5. Include Job Profile and Professional Titles

Are you asking yourself continuously, “How to address a cover letter without a contact name?”

Here is the answer for you.

Instead of using only “ Dear Hiring Manager ,” include the department name or the title of the person who will be reading the cover letter to make it more specific.

  • Dear Marketing Department,
  • Dear Head of the Sales Department,
  • Dear VP of Marketing

By personalizing the addresses in this way, you can grab the hiring manager’s attention to read your resume.

This shows that you are not throwing a rock blindly. You have done your research and have some idea about the company.

Don’t forget to include the hiring manager’s academic title or professional title in the cover letter address.

These types of hyper-personalization can grab the hiring manager’s attention even more and entice them to read your cover letter.

How to Write the Academic Title in the Cover Letter Address?

You can write the academic title in full form.

  • Dear Doctor Green,
  • Dear Professor Geller,

Alternatively, you can use the abbreviation of the titles as well.

  • Dear Dr. Murphy,
  • Dear Prof. Goodwin,
  • Dear Sgt. Moore,
  • Dear Principle Alan,

Where to Place the Cover Letter Address?

Not just the proper format, but the placement of the cover letter address also plays an important role.

  • The cover letter heading will go at the top.
  • Write the date below the heading.
  • Leave one line space and write the hiring manager’s name.
  • Write the address of the company.
  • Leave one space and then write the position you are applying for.
  • Leave one space and then write the salutation.

Cover letter without name

Best Way to Address a Cover Letter with No Name or Email

Writing an email cover letter address is fundamentally similar but with some tweaks.

If you are sending a digital cover letter, you need to start with a professional subject line.

John Doe: Application for Video Editor Position, Reff: Anthony Moore

Then add your cover letter salutation based on the same rule.

Add a line space and then start your cover letter by adding the necessary information that gives an insight into your professional experience and skills.

Subject Line: John Doe: Application for Project Manager Position, Reff: Charles Moore

Dear Hiring Manager,

I am a 5+ years experienced project management professional…

Appropriate Method of Delivering a Cover Letter

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear Hiring Committee
  • Dear (department name) Hiring Committee
  • Dear Hiring Team
  • To the (department name) Hiring Manager
  • Dear Team (For smaller companies)
  • To the Recruiting Team
Also Read: What are the benefits of using a cover letter builder?

Inappropriate Method of Delivering a Cover Letter

  • Dear Sir or Madam — Ancient salutation does not work anymore
  • To Whom It May Concern — It is not personalized
  • Hello, Hi, or Greetings — Informal salutation
  • Happy Sunday! — Casual salutation
  • Good Morning — Not practical as you have no idea when they will read the letter
Also Read: How to draft a professional message to the hiring manager?

How to Find the Hiring Manager's Name?

How do you write a cover letter if you don't know the name?

Well, you can simply address your cover letter as, "Dear Hiring Manager". But if you feel the need to add the name of the hiring manager then there are ways to do so.

Finding the hiring manager’s name is the best way to address a cover letter.

So, before calling it quits, let us look at some ways to find the hiring manager’s name.

Read the Job Description Thoroughly

Always read the job description carefully!

Usually, the hiring manager’s name or the title of the reporting manager is given in the job description or under the job description.

For instance, “ The digital marketer will report to the Marketing Manager. ”

You can use the title to then find their name on the company website or LinkedIn.

Sometimes the job description includes the hiring manager’s email address.

For Example: “ Send your cover letter and resume to johndoe@hiration[dot]com" .

You can find the hiring manager’s name in the email address.

Visit the Profile of the Job Publisher

Sites like LinkedIn or AngelList have this unique feature to show you the name of the one who posts the job.

You can go to their profile to see if they are the hiring manager and include their name in the cover letter.

Call the Company Front Desk

Calling the company is the easiest way to find the hiring manager's name. But, job candidates reserve it as the last option.

  • Call the company desk
  • Tell them that you are applying for a “vacant position” in their company and would like to know the hiring manager’s name.

Here’s an example of the script:

“ Hi, my name is Alex, and I’m currently applying for the video editor position in your company. Would it be possible for you to provide me the name and email id of the hiring manager so that I can address the cover letter properly?”

Do a Quick LinkedIn Search

According to a study, 87% of recruiters use LinkedIn regularly . That means, if you search for the hiring manager of a certain company on LinkedIn, there is a high chance for you to find their name.

Many job descriptions specifically tell the reporting manager’s title in the job description. Then you need to address the cover letter to the reporting manager.

The process of finding the reporting manager’s name is similar.

  • Go to LinkedIn
  • Search the job title and company name
  • In the search result, you can find the profile of the designated person
  • Sometimes, there might be more than one similar position for a big company so you need to narrow your search by location to find the reporting manager
Also Read : How to Make the Best Use of LinkedIn Search Feature?

Network with People

LinkedIn is the best way to find and connect with people who have connections in the company you are applying for. If you can create a good rapport with these professionals, you can ask for a reference.

It is an easy but time-consuming process.

  • Search the company name and see the professionals active on LinkedIn
  • Start engaging with their content and leave thoughtful comments
  • Send them a personalized connection invite after engaging with their content for a couple of days
  • Do not ask for a reference abruptly; instead, start building a rapport with them by sharing helpful industry information, blog, article links, videos, etc.
  • If possible, move the connection offline and meet in person
  • After you develop a good rapport with the professionals, you can ask for a reference or introduce yourself to the hiring manager
Also Read : How to Connect with People on LinkedIn?

Tips for Addressing a Cover Letter with No Name

Always use a formal address in the cover letter.

Whether you know the hiring manager’s name or not, always keep the address formal in the cover letter. Even if the company has an informal culture, do not use any casual address unless you are a part of the organization.

  • Dear Ms. Lane,
  • Dear Prof. Luther,
  • Dear Ms. Ann,
  • Hello Maya,
  • Greetings Max,

Avoid Using “To Whom It May Concern”

This salutation is too generic and does not address anyone at all; however, according to a survey, 17% of hiring managers prefer this salutation over others .

But the problem is 83% of hiring managers don’t prefer it.

So we suggest that you avoid it altogether.

Avoid Addressing the Cover Letter to the Recruiters

A recruiter’s job is to sort the resumes based on skills and experience and pass them to the hiring managers. They don’t generally read the cover letter.

So, it’s a waste of opportunity if you address the cover letter to the recruiter.

Instead, always address the cover letter to the hiring manager.

Ensure That You Are Addressing the Cover Letter to the Right Person

Online information is not updated regularly. Often, the concerned persons leave the job, but their email id is still there on the website.

So, who to address cover letter to if unknown? Or you are unsure? It is best to acresully research the hiring manager’s name and crosscheck if you have any doubts by calling the company directly.

Do Not Mess up the Hiring Manager’s Name

There is a saying that “The first impression is the last impression.”

Try to make an excellent first impression by writing the hiring manager’s name using the correct spelling.

Don’t Stress Too Much

If you have the relevant skills and experience for a job, addressing a cover letter to the wrong person might not be a big deal. So, if you can’t find the hiring manager’s name and wondering how to address a cover letter without a name, just write “Dear Hiring Manager.”

Make Sure the Cover Letter is Short and Easy to Read

You should not make the cover letter more than 400-500 words long. It will make it difficult to read.

A short and crisp cover letter will intrigue the hiring managers as compared to a long one.

Also Read: How long should a cover letter be?

Cover Letter Without Name Sample

Hiration cover letter builder.

Create a polished, professional cover letter in minutes with an AI-powered tool that helps you create a personalized cover letter based on the job description.

It comes with the following features:

  • Option to save unlimited cover letters
  • Intuitive next text suggestion
  • 15+ cover letter designs
  • Full rich-text editor
  • Unlimited PDF downloads
  • 30+ pre-filled cover letter templates
  • 1-click design change
  • A sharable link
  • LIVE cover letter editor

FAQs on "How to Address a Cover Letter Without Name?"

With that, we have answered all of your questions on “how to address a cover letter without a name?”.

Addressing a cover letter to an unknown person should not be difficult if you can keep some points in mind regrading how to go about in this situation. Here are a few FAQs that will help you gain a quick recap:

Q. How to address a cover letter to an unknown person?

A. In cases where you are wondering how to address a cover letter without name, you can opt for "Dear Hiring Manager," or "Dear {Company Name} Recruiting Team,".

Q. Who to address cover letter to with no contact?

A. When addressing a cover letter without a specific contact, it's best to use a generic but professional greeting such as "Dear {Company Name} Recruiting Team" or "Dear Hiring Team." This shows that you have taken the time to tailor your application to the company while acknowledging that you don't have a specific contact person.

Hiration provides you with a personalized 360-degree ChatGPT-powered career service platform for all your professional needs - from building a shortlist-worthy resume and cover letter to optimizing your LinkedIn profile, preparing for interviews, and more!

For any queries or concerns, feel free to drop a mail at support{@}hiration.com

cover letter greeting if you don't know a name

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10 Best Ways To Address A Cover Letter Without A Name

  • Cover Letter Format
  • Salutation and Greeting
  • Who To Address When Unknown
  • How To Start A Cover Letter
  • How To End A Cover Letter
  • Best Cover Letter Font And Size
  • Cover Letter Spacing
  • Cover Letter Length
  • Key Elements Of A Cover Letter
  • How To Write An Address
  • Official Letter Format
  • Cover Letter Opening

Find a Job You Really Want In

Cover letters consume a fair amount of time in the application process, as the more personalized they are, the better. With the majority of the application process being automated and online now, the hiring manager ’s name can end up being an unknown quantity. If you don’t know the hiring manager’s name and don’t know what to do, then this article will help you.

If the hiring manager’s name is unknown, then you have a few options. The best, of course, is to find out what their name is and address the letter to them. But if that all fails, then there are proper ways to address a cover letter to an unknown recipient.

Key Takeaways:

Try to find the name of the person you are addressing using the job listing, company website, or contacting the company.

Don’t assume someone’s martial status and avoid using “Miss” and “Mrs.” whenever possible.

Avoid assuming gender, even if you do know the person’s name.

Use a professional and appropriate greeting and avoid sounding like you would when addressing your friend.

Who to Address Cover Letter To if Unknown

How to address a cover letter if you don’t know the recipient’s name

Why is addressing a cover letter correctly important, how to find out who to address your cover letter to, example cover letter, addressing a cover letter faq, final thoughts, expert opinion.

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There are a few rules to follow when addressing a cover letter: be professional, polite, and concise. That means that even if you don’t know the recipient’s name, you want to maintain the same professional tone in the letter and avoid overly stilted language or being too informal.

Here are some guidelines to follow when addressing a cover letter:

If you can find out the hiring manager’s name, do so. That means that you should spend time looking over the company website, checking LinkedIn profiles, or even calling the company.

Don’t assume the hiring manager’s gender. This is especially true when you don’t know their name. But even if you do find out the person’s name, avoid gendered language until you’re sure how they identify. Some people will put preferred pronouns in email signatures or on their LinkedIn profiles, so it might be a good idea to check.

Maintain a professional tone. There’s a common style and formality to business letters. Make sure that your cover letter has that tone. it’s different than a letter you’d write to a friend, and being too familiar with your writing can be off-putting to hiring managers.

Avoid assuming the person’s title. This applies to both marital status, such as using Mrs. or Miss, but also whether they have a doctorate. In general, unless this is someone you know, avoid using either Mrs. or Miss, because it can cause offense, even if used correctly.

Make sure you include a salutation. Even if you don’t know who you’re addressing, leaving one off entirely can end up either looking like a mistake or that you didn’t personalize the letter at all.

Be as specific as possible. Even if you can’t find out exactly who the hiring manager is, make sure to be specific in your greeting. Use Dear Marketing Hiring Manager rather than just Dear Hiring Manager if you’re applying for a marketing position.

Also, while HR is most often in charge of hiring, it’s best not to just address the HR department unless you know that they’re the ones who’ll be in charge of your application. Not every business has HR take care of all hiring tasks, especially if it’s a smaller company.

Examples of how to address a cover letter:

Dear Sir or Madam

Dear Hiring Manager

Dear Talent Acquisition Team

Dear [Company Name] HR Department

Dear [Company name] Hiring Manager

Dear Human Resources Manager

Dear Human Resources Department

Dear [Company Name] Recruiter

Dear [Department Name] Hiring Manager

Dear [Department Name] Hiring Team

Here are some examples of how NOT to address a cover letter:

Good Morning

To Whom It May Concern

Dear Mrs. Smith

Hi Sebastian!

Hey Sales Team

Addressing a cover letter correctly shows professionalism, diligence, and politeness. All of these are good for an employee to have and show you to be someone that’s worth investing further time in. While finding the proper person to address can be a chore, it helps you in several ways because:

Hiring managers get myriad applications. Remember that you aren’t the only one applying for a job. While you want to make your application stand out from the crowd if you can, you don’t want to stand out in a negative way — that’ll ensure you don’t get the job.

Individual people ultimately decide who gets hired. While the application process can feel faceless, formless, and impersonal, there are actual people at these companies that sort through resumes . And people form first impressions.

It shows that you’re willing to go the extra mile. Think about what the admired traits are in employees. If you’re willing to put in the additional effort or work to get a superior result, then that’s the sort of employee companies want to have to work for them.

It’s less impersonal. Of course the hiring process is somewhat impersonal. You’re petitioning people you don’t know and that don’t know you. But if you address a letter to Dear Hiring Manager, it doesn’t have the same effect as addressing it directly to the person.

Despite the importance of properly addressing a cover letter, not every company makes it easy for applicants to do. If the hiring manager’s name isn’t immediately apparent, then there are some other options open to you before addressing the cover letter to an unknown recipient.

Check the job listing. One simple way is to look at the application and double-check that the hiring manager’s name isn’t on the main listing. Sometimes the information isn’t on the application, but rather on the job listing. If it isn’t there you will then have to start doing a little bit more investigative work.

Check LinkedIn. You can check on LinkedIn and on the company’s website to find the hiring manager’s name. If nothing shows up, then you will have to start contacting someone at the company to find out.

Contact the company. Now, this does not mean you should contact some random person at the company who lists the company’s name on their profile. Find the contact information for the HR department, for someone who works in HR, or for the head of the department you are trying to work in and ask them if they know the name of the hiring manager for your application.

Sometimes, they will not give this information, simply so that the hiring manager can stay anonymous and not get a billion emails from applicants. This situation is more likely to happen with massive companies like Google or Apple.

If they give you a name, use it. If they don’t, then you will have to then move on to the next step of figuring out how to address a cover letter to an unknown person.

How to write a cover letter

Dear Sales Team Hiring Manager, As a fan of XYZ Inc.’s impressive technology products, I was ecstatic to see an opening for a Junior Sales Representative . After reading the job description, I am confident that I’m the right person for the job. With 4 years of experience selling cloud computing products and services, I would bring a unique perspective to the role. In my current role as a Sales Representative at ABC Corp., I’ve created technology presentations for all my clients, driving interest in new product sales and subscriptions by 84% year-over-year. Additionally, I’ve reduced the cost of customer acquisition by over 15% and consistently topped sales quotas by over 20% since starting at ABC. I know XYZ has amazing products and services that I would be honored to promote and sell. With my background in cloud computing, I would be able to hit the ground running and communicate your product’s benefits to customers. Please contact me if you have any further questions about my application or resume. I look forward to speaking with the Sales Team more about the role in an interview. Thank you for your time and consideration. Sincerely, Malia Freeman [email protected] 555-777-9999

How do you address a cover letter to an unknown recipient?

Address your cover letter to “Hiring Manager” or “[Department Name] Hiring Manager.” Always do whatever you can to try to find the name of the person you’re addressing, but if you can’t, address it to the generic position or team you’re trying to get in contact with.

Is To Whom It May Concern rude?

Yes, To Whom It May Concern can be considered rude. Not everyone will agree that it’s rude, but many people do find it rude, or at least impersonal and lazy on a cover letter, so it’s best to avoid this greeting

Is it okay to use Dear Hiring Manager?

Yes, it is okay to use Dear Hiring Manager as a cover letter greeting. It’s always best to address your cover letter to someone by name if you can find it, but many times you can’t. In this case, “Dear Hiring Manager,” is an appropriate greeting.

Who is the best person to address a cover letter to?

The best person to address a cover letter to would be the hiring manager. This should be their first and last name if you know it, but “dear hiring manager” is acceptable if you are unsure of their name.

The rule of thumb was to use titles such as Mr. or Ms. However, it’s also important not to assume the hiring manager’s gender. If you don’t know the person’s preferred pronouns, then it’s best to just use their full name.

If you don’t know the recipient’s name, how would you close the letter?

Sincerely or Regards are considered formal, professional closings for letters. If you’re writing a cover letter to someone you don’t know, it’s best to remain professional and polite. A sign-off such as best wishes will likely come off as too familiar.

If you are applying for a job and writing a cover letter, make sure you take the time to look over all the details in the cover letter. Not taking the time to look for the recipient of a cover letter or using a professional greeting will look lazy. ​ Your greeting is a small part of the cover letter. However, it’s one of the most important pieces because it’s the first thing the hiring managers will read. Using an appropriate generic greeting will set the tone for your cover letter, making you sound professional and willing to put in the effort to make your cover letter flawless. ​ Now that you know how to address a cover letter if the reader is the recipient is unknown, check out our other articles about cover letters and the job application process.

Applying for jobs can be stressful and tedious, but taking the time to learn tips on how to improve your application will help put you one step closer to landing your dream job .

Georgetown – Writing Cover Letters for Government

  • Who To Address Cover Letter To If Unknown

cover letter greeting if you don't know a name

Vimari Roman Career Strategist Coach Be Productive Coaching

My recommendation is to always send a customized cover letter when applying for any job and when in doubt, address your letter to the hiring team using “Dear Hiring Team.” In most cases the application will end up on a recruiter’s or an HR Business Partner’s desk, and if they like your cover letter and resume, then they will pass it on to the hiring manager or the hiring team. By addressing your letter to the “team” you’ve got everyone covered and they will all feel as if the letter was written directly to them.

Expert Tip To Find Contact Infoformation

cover letter greeting if you don't know a name

Sally Mikhail Founder of Recruit Petra LLC

Use LinkedIn to find out who to address your cover letter to you with a search of company personnel on the company careers page . However, if you are sending out a cover letter to an unknown hiring influence, you can address it to “Dear Hiring Team” or “Dear Hiring Manager.”

Who To Address Cover Letter To If Unknown Tip

cover letter greeting if you don't know a name

Chelsea Jay Certified Resume Writer and Career Coach

Make sure that you review the company’s “About Me” or “Staff” to view their leaders which often lists direct managers, HR professionals, and executive leadership staff. If you know what department you’ll be working for, I recommend addressing the leader of that department. If the website is for a larger organization and does not list individual staff, I recommend utilizing LinkedIn. You can do a quick company search and find employees who are currently working there. You may even find the original posting with the hiring manager’s name attached.

If you cannot find the hiring manager’s name based on the posting, I recommend taking time to learn more about the specific department you’ll be working in. For example, if you discover that you’ll be working in the Communications department, the next step would be to learn about the specific team you’ll be part of. If you find out that it is the Public Affairs team, I encourage you to address “Public Affairs Team” at the beginning of your cover letter.

If you’re up for a bolder approach that is sure to get attention, address someone on the executive leadership team. I recommend addressing the President or Vice President of the organization (they should be easy to find since they are often the “face” of the organization). Of course, address them with a salutation along with their first name, last name, and title. In the beginning of the cover letter make sure to distinguish what department and position you are applying for. For example, Dear Mr. John Smith, President.

As an applicant, your goal is to stand out and showcase that you are informed and willing to go the extra mile (by doing research!).

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Heidi Cope is a former writer for the Zippia Career Advice blog. Her writing focused primarily on Zippia's suite of rankings and general career advice. After leaving Zippia, Heidi joined The Mighty as a writer and editor, among other positions. She received her BS from UNC Charlotte in German Studies.

Matt Warzel a President of a resume writing firm (MJW Careers, LLC) with 15+ years of recruitment, outplacement, career coaching and resume writing experience. Matt is also a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Certified Internet Recruiter (CIR) with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Marketing Focus) from John Carroll University.

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Status.net

How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name (Exact Examples)

By Status.net Editorial Team on December 25, 2023 — 11 minutes to read

Addressing the recipient without knowing their name might seem complicated, but there are ways to navigate this situation. Let’s take a look at a few strategies to make your cover letter feel personalized even when you don’t have a specific name to address.

Be Professional and Engaging

Using general salutations like “To Whom It May Concern” or “Dear Sir/Madam” can make your cover letter feel impersonal. Instead, opt for a more engaging opener such as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear [Company Name] Team.” This type of greeting acknowledges the company and shows that you have researched the team you are addressing.

Focus on the Position and Company

Make sure to tailor the content of your cover letter to the job you are applying for by highlighting relevant qualifications, experience, and skills. Share specific examples of your successes that align with the responsibilities of the position. Mention the company’s values, goals, or recent successes to demonstrate how your values align with theirs. This can effectively showcase your interest and commitment to the role.

Use LinkedIn and Company Website Research

If you cannot find the hiring manager’s name in the job posting, you can turn to LinkedIn or the company website for clues. Search for professionals working in human resources or hiring roles at the company. If you find a specific contact, address your letter to that person while using their full name and title. Otherwise, continue with a professional and engaging salutation as mentioned earlier.

Here are two examples of how to start a cover letter without a name:

Dear Hiring Manager, As a passionate marketer with five years of experience, I am excited to apply for the Marketing Manager position at (…) Company. Achieving a 30% increase in leads generated through my previous campaigns, I am eager to contribute to the growth of your marketing department.
Dear ABC Inc. Team, With a strong background in project management and a proven track record of implementing cost-saving strategies, I am confident in my ability to excel as the Senior Project Manager at ABC Inc. Your company’s commitment to sustainable practices aligns with my values and I am thrilled to be considered for this opportunity.

By applying these strategies, you can create an impactful and personalized cover letter, even without knowing the recipient’s name. This attention to detail can set you apart from other applicants and leave a positive impression with your prospective employer.

How to Find the Hiring Manager’s Name

Sometimes locating the hiring manager’s name can be tricky, but there are several ways to find it. Let’s go through a few methods to help you address your cover letter without a name.

Using LinkedIn

LinkedIn is a great resource for finding the hiring manager’s name. Here’s how you can use it:

  • Visit the company’s LinkedIn page.
  • Click on the “People” tab to browse through the employees.
  • Use the search bar and enter keywords such as “recruiter,” “hiring manager,” or the department you’re applying to.
  • Check the found profiles, and try to identify the right person responsible for hiring in your desired role.

Make sure to double-check that the person is currently working in the company to avoid using outdated information.

Checking Company Website

Another way to find the hiring manager’s name is by checking the company website:

  • Locate the “About Us” or “Team” page, where you might find a list of employees along with their titles and roles.
  • Look for a person who has a recruiting or hiring-related title within the department you’re targeting with your application.
  • If you cannot find the necessary information on the website, try checking a company’s press releases or blog. Sometimes they include names of important team members.

Making a Phone Call

When all else fails, you’re left with one more option – making a phone call.

  • Call the company’s main line and politely ask the receptionist for the name of the hiring manager or the person responsible for recruitment in the department you’re interested in.
  • Be prepared to provide the job title and a job reference number (if available) to help the receptionist find the right person.

Finding the hiring manager’s name isn’t always possible. If you cannot locate it, don’t worry. Addressing your cover letter as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To Whom It May Concern” is still better than not sending a cover letter at all.

How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: Sample Phrases

Starting with job title.

When you cannot find the recipient’s name, use their job title to address the cover letter. This shows that you can connect and direct your message to the relevant person. Here are some examples:

  • Dear Hiring Manager, – This is a common and universally understood phrase for addressing a cover letter without a name.
  • Dear [Job Title], – Use the specific job position that the recipient holds, for instance, Dear Marketing Director .
  • To the [Job Title] Selection Committee, – This approach can be useful when applying for a role advertised by a team or committee that will handle the hiring process, such as To the Scholarship Selection Committee .

Referring to Department

Another approach is to address the cover letter to the department that the position is within. This helps to direct your message to the appropriate team or group. Here are some examples:

  • Dear [Department] Team, – Mention the department you are applying for, such as Dear HR Team, or Dear Sales Team .
  • Greetings, [Department] Department, – Use the department name to address the letter, like Greetings, IT Department .
  • To Whom It May Concern in the [Department], – This is a formal alternative when you don’t know the recipient or department’s name, for example, To Whom It May Concern in the Finance Department .

Using these approaches will ensure that your cover letter appears professional and well-directed, even when you don’t have the exact name of the recipient. Focus on the content and the skills you bring to the position to make the best impression on the reader.

Crafting Content for Cover Letters

When you’re unsure of the recipient’s name, you might feel a little lost on how to address your cover letter. Don’t worry. You can still create an engaging and professional cover letter that gets the job done. Here are some tips and examples to help you craft the perfect content for an anonymous cover letter.

Start with a professional, yet friendly, greeting. If you don’t know the hiring manager’s name, use a general opening line such as “Dear Hiring Manager” or “To Whom It May Concern” . These greetings are widely accepted and show respect towards the person receiving the letter.

Next, dive into your strengths, skills, and achievements. Mention the qualifications that make you a strong candidate for the position. Share relevant accomplishments from your previous roles, such as leading a successful project or boosting sales. Be specific when describing your skills and use quantifiable results when possible. For example:

“During my time at Company (…), I managed a team of 10 and successfully increased sales by 25% within six months.”

Show enthusiasm for the job and demonstrate your knowledge of the company. Research the organization’s goals, values, and recent projects, then incorporate this information into your cover letter. This will help you tailor your letter to the company’s needs and show that you’d be a good fit for their culture. You could say something like:

“As a long-time admirer of your company’s commitment to sustainability, I’m excited about the opportunity to contribute to the upcoming eco-conscious product line.”

Close your cover letter with a strong call-to-action. Express your interest in further discussing your qualifications and offer your availability for an interview. Thank the hiring manager for considering your application and include your contact information. A sample closing paragraph could look like this:

“I’m eager to discuss how my expertise in digital marketing could contribute to the success of your team. Thank you for considering my application. You can reach me at (555) 555-5555 or [email protected] to schedule a conversation.”

Keep your cover letter concise and focused on your unique selling points. Even without knowing the recipient’s name, following these guidelines will allow you to create a memorable and attention-grabbing cover letter that leaves a lasting impression on potential employers.

Tips on Prefix Usage

When you’re addressing a cover letter without a specific name, it’s good to think about the appropriate prefix to use. Here are some tips to help you choose the right one:

First, consider using a general and gender-neutral prefix like Dear Hiring Manager . It will work well if you don’t know the recipient’s name or aren’t aware of their gender. This is a widely accepted way to address a cover letter without a specific name.

For example:

Dear Hiring Manager, I came across your job posting for a Graphic Designer, and I am excited to apply for the role.

If you happen to know the job title of the person who will read your cover letter, you can use it. This shows that you have put effort into researching the company and position.

Dear Marketing Director, I am writing to express my interest in the open Digital Marketing Specialist position at your company.

In some cases, you might know the name of the department that the job is in. In this case, you can address your cover letter to the entire department.

Dear Finance Team, I was thrilled to see an opening for a Financial Analyst at your company and would like to apply for the position.

When you’re unable to find any specific details or when addressing a larger company, you can opt for a broad salutation like To Whom It May Concern . Just be aware that it may come off as impersonal, so it’s best to use this as a last resort.

To Whom It May Concern, I am submitting my application for the Content Writer position posted on your careers website.

The key is to maintain a professional tone throughout your cover letter. Regardless of which prefix you choose, always customize your content to suit the specific job and company you’re applying to. By doing so, you demonstrate a genuine interest in the role and leave a positive impression on the hiring manager.

Common Mistakes to Avoid

Sending a cover letter without addressing it to a specific person can be a pitfall. It might make the recipient feel unimportant or signal that you didn’t do your research. To make your application stand out, be mindful of these common mistakes:

  • Not being specific about the role: Your cover letter should not only address the person but also the specific role you’re applying for. Tailor your letter according to the job and the company. For instance, instead of writing “I wish to apply for the marketing position”, be more specific like “I am interested in applying for the Digital Marketing Specialist role at [CompanyName].”
  • Focusing too much on yourself: Although your achievements are important, the cover letter should focus on how your skills can benefit the company. Frame your accomplishments in a way that highlights the value you can bring to the organization.
  • Being overly formal or stiff: While it’s important to maintain a professional tone, being too formal might come across as insincere or impersonal. Use a friendly tone and avoid jargon or buzzwords to keep your cover letter genuine and relatable.
  • Spelling errors and typos: Even the smallest of typos can create a negative impression. Double-check your cover letter to make sure there are no mistakes. Keep an eye out for incorrect spellings, especially when addressing the recipient.

The goal of your cover letter is to make a personal connection and showcase how you are a great fit for the company. Taking the time to address your letter properly, proofread for errors, and customize your content demonstrates your attention to detail and commitment to the position.

Frequently Asked Questions

How can i properly address a cover letter when the recipient’s name is unknown.

If you don’t know the recipient’s name, consider using a general salutation instead. For example, “Dear Hiring Manager” or “Dear Recruitment Team” acknowledges the recipient without using a specific name. You can also research the company’s website or LinkedIn to try to find the appropriate contact person.

What alternatives are there to ‘To Whom It May Concern’?

There are several alternatives to ‘To Whom It May Concern’ that can help make your cover letter stand out:

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • Dear [Company] Team
  • Dear [Department or Job Title] Hiring Team
  • Dear [Company] Recruitment Team

How do I determine the appropriate salutation for my cover letter?

To determine the right salutation for your cover letter, do a bit of research on the company or organization you’re targeting. This may help you uncover the specific department or hiring manager’s name. If not, use one of the general salutations mentioned earlier to address your cover letter in a more personalized manner.

What are examples of cover letter openings without using names?

Here are some examples of cover letter openings without using specific names:

  • “Dear Hiring Manager, I am excited to submit my application for the [Job Title] position at [Company].”
  • “Dear [Department or Job Title] Hiring Team, As a passionate professional with experience in [Industry], I am eager to contribute to [Company] as a [Job Title].”
  • “Dear [Company] Team, I recently came across the [Job Title] opening at [Company], and I am confident that my skills and experience make me a strong candidate.”

How can I avoid common mistakes when addressing cover letters without names?

To avoid mistakes when addressing cover letters without names, follow these tips:

  • Do thorough research on the company and the job posting
  • Be concise and professional in your language
  • Use an appropriate general salutation if you can’t find a specific name
  • Double-check for spelling and grammatical errors before sending the cover letter
  • Avoid using outdated or overused phrases, such as ‘To Whom It May Concern’ or ‘Dear Sir/Madam’

By following these guidelines, you can create a strong and effective cover letter that stands out to hiring managers, even if you don’t have a specific name to address.

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How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: 5 Best Salutations

Cover letters can be a bit of an art form when they include the proper salutation to their recipient. Since you’re creating your own cover letter and don’t have a name to address it to, you might feel a little stuck.

Don’t worry; there are plenty of ways to still address your cover letter appropriately, even if you don’t have this information readily available.

Let’s take a look at five different ways on how to address a cover letter without a name.

How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: 5 Best Salutations

Table of Contents

5 Popular Ways to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

How long a cover letter should be is important somehow. What matters is that it is addressed directly to someone specific, such as Dear Mr. Jones or Dear Recruiter.

If there is no name in the email asking you to submit your cover letter, then try these five ways on how to address a cover letter without a name:

List of salutations when you don't know the name

1. To the Hiring Manager

If you don’t know who will be reading your cover letter, it’s best to start with To the hiring manager and follow that up with a more personal introduction. These words should sound professional so that they’re easy for whoever is reading them to digest while they’re reviewing your resume/cover letter.

For example:

To the Hiring Manager: I am writing to you because I am interested in the position of __. I have seen that you are looking for candidates and my qualifications seem to be a good fit. I believe that I have what it takes to do this job well. Please find my CV attached for your review and consideration. Thank you so much for your time, and looking forward to your response. If you have any questions about anything, please feel free to contact me at __. I’m happy to answer any questions and provide additional information as needed.

2. Dear Hiring Manager

It is important to address the cover letter recipient with a formal greeting. And when making cover letters, the most commonly used term is Dear, which is often used before the recipient’s name.

Since this is a formal greeting, any titles that follow should use this style. If possible, avoid salutations that are gender specific. Also, avoid informal salutations, such as those that include the words Hi and Hello.

It is important that you specify what kind of work experience you have in the cover letter and why this job is right for you. Let the Hiring Manager know that they can reach out to you anytime during their application process if they want to talk more about it.

Lastly, make sure that you end your cover letter properly.

Dear Hiring Manager, I hope you’re having a great day! I’m writing in response to your recent posting. My name is __, and I’m excited about the possibility of working with you. I noticed that the company is looking for someone who has experience in __ , and I would love to share my qualifications with you. Feel free to contact me at _ so we can talk more about it. Thank you for your time, and have a great day!

3. Dear [Company Name]

There are a lot of reasons why you might not have a name in your cover letter. Maybe you’re applying for a job, and the company hasn’t been formally named yet, or maybe you’ve applied to an organization that doesn’t use names in their communications.

Whatever the reason, it can be tricky to address your cover letter without a name. But that doesn’t have to be a cause of headaches. In such a case, use Dear Company Name.

  • Are Cover Letters Necessary?
  • How Long Should a Cover Letter Be?

This option is the best way to go if the company has already publicly announced its name. For example, you can say, “Dear Google”.

For example: Dear Google, I’m writing this cover letter to apply for the __ role. [Add career highlights and other relevant experiences.] Please feel free to reach out to me with any questions that you may have. Enjoy the rest of the day!

Hello is one of the most common ways to address a cover letter without a name. If you are making your cover letter formal, use Dear Hiring Manager, but if you are using a more casual tone, try something like Hello.

If you know who will be reviewing your application, it’s also appropriate to use their name in the salutation.

For example: Hello Hiring Manager, My name is __. I hope you’re doing well. I was reading your job listing and noticed that you’re looking for someone to fill the position of (job title). I’m very interested in this opportunity because __. Thank you for taking the time to read my cover letter, and I’d love to learn more about your company, so feel free to reach out if there’s anything else you need from me!

5. Dear Sir or Madam

Finding the right words when creating a cover letter you will send to an unknown person or company is always difficult. But there are many ways to address your cover letter that will have your potential employer reading it and considering you for the position. Dear Sir or Madam is just one example.

The use of Dear is typically seen as a more formal way to address your cover letter, and Sir or Madam is used when you don’t know the gender of the person reading your correspondence. When in doubt, stick with these two options for addressing a cover letter without knowing the recipient’s name.

However, this is only ideal if you know the gender of the hiring manager but don’t know their name. If you are not sure whether the hiring manager is he or she, consider using a gender-neutral salutation.

Dear Sir/Madam, I hope this letter finds you well. I am writing to apply for the __ position you recently posted on the __ job site. I am confident that my knowledge, skills, and experience would be an asset to your awesome team. I am enclosing my resume/CV for your consideration. Thank you very much for taking the time to read my letter and considering me for this opportunity.

Other Salutations to Use When You Don’t Have a Name

There are many different ways to start a cover letter , but if you don’t have the name of the person you are addressing, then it can be difficult to come up with a good opening.

The most common way to address someone in a cover letter is by using their title and last name. If this isn’t possible, there are other ways that you can use as well. One way is to start off with any of the salutations mentioned above. Another option is to start off with these options:

  • Dear Hiring Committee
  • Dear [Department Name] Hiring Team
  • To the Recruiting Team
  • Dear Recruiting Team
  • Dear Human Resources Manager
  • Dear [Title of the Person You Would Be Reporting to]
  • Dear [Company Name] Recruiter
  • Dear [Position Title] Recruiting Manager
  • To the [Department Name of the Position You Are Applying for]
  • Dear Hiring Manager or Interviewer
  • Dear Hiring Manager of Company X
  • Dear Person in Charge of Hiring

Tips to Find the Names of Employers and Hiring Managers

A cover letter may seem like a small part of the hiring process, but it has an enormous impact on whether or not your resume will even be opened by the company you’re applying to.

One way to ensure your cover letter isn’t ignored is by addressing it properly, which can be difficult if you don’t know to whom you’re writing it!

To help you figure out the name of the cover letter’s recipient , here are some tips:

Tip #1: Check the company’s website.

If you know the company’s name and they have a website with contact information, that’s usually the best place to start.

Tip #2: Review job listing sites.

If you’re applying through an online job application site like Indeed, then there will be an option to check to whom the cover letter will be sent. The job posting usually provides you with the names of employers or hiring managers.

Tip #3: Use LinkedIn.

The easiest way to find out the name of the Hiring Manager is to check LinkedIn. The job posting usually includes information about the Hiring Manager. Visit the profile, where it’ll list their current position as well as past positions on their profile page.

Tip #4: Check the job description.

Check the job description to find the name of potential hiring managers. Sometimes, it’s just there. All you need to do is read through the job posting.

Tip #5: Search social media.

You can probably find the names of recruiters on social media. See Facebook or Twitter for any information you can use in writing the cover letter.

How to Make the Perfect Cover Letter

When sending your cover letter without the name, you must be sure that you are addressing the person who is in charge of hiring. Avoid using To Whom It May Concern at all costs. If it is unavoidable, aim to get personal as soon as possible. If you’re emailing a large company, mention specific people you have spoken with over email or via social media in your letter.

To make the perfect cover letter , use an online cover letter maker. This is the best and easiest way to address your cover letter without knowing the name of the company.

The cover letter maker will have all of your information and personalize it for you. Plus, it will give tips on what to include in your cover letter. An online cover letter maker will walk you through each step and ensure that your cover letter looks professional.

You can also get help from other people who are reviewing cover letters if you need more advice on how to approach this. They will know everything about how these companies operate and be able to provide insight into what might work for them.

Final Thoughts

Writing a cover letter can seem like one of the most time-consuming and overwhelming parts of your job search, especially when you don’t know who the person you’re writing to is. However, cover letters are necessary.

If you don’t know the name of the person you’re writing to, that doesn’t mean you should throw in the towel and not write one at all, though. These five ways on how to address a cover letter without a name will ensure that your application still gets noticed.

10 thoughts on “ How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: 5 Best Salutations ”

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I guess you can get some more tips from our complete guide “How to Write a Cover Letter” https://resumekit.com/blog/how-to-write-a-cover-letter/

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How to Choose the Right Greeting for Your Cover Letter

cover letter greeting if you don't know a name

Cover Letter Greetings to Avoid

When you have a contact person.

  • When You Don't Have a Contact Person

Examples of General Salutations

  • When to Use 'Dear' in a Cover Letter
  • Writing a Cover Letter Salutation

Concluding Your Letter

Cover letter example, sending your letter.

Hilary Allison / The Balance 

A salutation is the greeting at the beginning of a cover letter that is included with a resume when applying for a job. When you're  writing a cover letter  or sending an  email message  to apply for a job, it's important to include an appropriate greeting at the beginning to set the tone for your letter, which should be professional and appropriate.

The greeting is the first thing the recipient will see  when they read your cover letter . Therefore, it's important for you to convey the appropriate level of familiarity and respect.

Using casual greetings, such as “Hello” and “Hi” can make your letter seem unprofessional. Reserve these casual greetings for personal email and refrain from using them in your cover letter unless you are very familiar with the recipient. Such greetings are simply too informal—not the most professional way to begin the conversation if you’re looking to land a job.

“Hi” is appropriate only in casual email correspondence with people you personally know well. For example, if you're checking in with a close friend to find out if they've heard of a job opening at their company. "Hello" is appropriate only in email correspondence. It should be used primarily for people you know well but can be used in very casual circumstances.

Beginning your correspondence “To Whom It May Concern,” on the other hand, may seem too impersonal and make the hiring manager believe you do not care enough to find out whom you should be addressing. The only time to use " To Whom It May Concern " as a cover letter greeting is when you simply cannot find out the specific person to whom you are writing.

You should, of course, make every effort to find the name of a contact in the specific department in which you are interested. When making an inquiry  with a company for unadvertised openings, this greeting may be most appropriate.

The following is a list of letter salutation examples that are appropriate for cover letters and other employment-related correspondence when you have the name of a contact.

  • Dear Mr. Jones
  • Dear Ms. Brown
  • Dear Riley Doe
  • Dear Dr. Haven
  • Dear Professor Lawrence

When You Don't Have a Contact Person

If this information was not provided in the job announcement and you cannot find it on the company’s web site, then you may be able to call the company, ask to be forwarded to their Human Resources department (if they have one), explain that you will be applying for a job there, and ask for the name of their hiring manager.

Always make every effort to find a contact name to use in your letter. It leaves a good impression on the hiring manager if you have taken the time to use their name, especially if you needed to work a little to find it.

LinkedIn is also a great tool to find out the name of the hiring manager. You can do a search for the company you are applying to with one or two keywords that would describe the person hiring for the position. Scroll down the list until you find the person who fits the criteria. This approach may help you pinpoint the appropriate contact person.

Many companies don't list a contact person when they post jobs, because they have a team of hiring staff who sort through cover letters and resumes before passing them to the hiring manager for the appropriate department. They prefer to leave the hiring manager anonymous until he or she contacts you for an interview.

An organization may also not want to disclose who the hiring manager is to avoid emails and phone calls from applicants, particularly if they anticipate receiving a large number of applications from potential job candidates. So, don't worry if you can't find someone to address your letter to. It will be forwarded to the correct department and recipient.

If you don't have a contact person at the company, either leave off the salutation from your cover letter and start with the first paragraph  of your letter or, better yet, use a general salutation.

When using a general salutation, capitalize the nouns.

  • Dear Hiring Manager
  • To Whom It May Concern
  • Dear Human Resources Manager
  • Dear Sir or Madam
  • Dear [Company Name] Recruiter

When to Use 'Dear' in a Cover Letter

It is appropriate to use “Dear” in most circumstances, such as when the potential employer is someone you know well, or they are a business acquaintance. Follow these tips on choosing the right greeting:

  • For people who you know well on a first-name basis, it's okay to use their first name only. For a business acquaintance or associate, use their first name if you met them more than once and addressed them by their first name.
  • For potential employers, use Mr., Ms. or Dr., unless you have been instructed otherwise. Even if you know a woman is married, it is safer to use “Ms.” as opposed to “Mrs.,” as the latter may be offensive in certain circumstances.
  • If you are unsure of the appropriate greeting, play it safe and use Mr./Ms./Dr. [last name] or Mr./Ms./Dr. [first name, last name].

How to Write a Cover Letter Salutation

Standard business correspondence formatting requires that, after providing your own contact information and the date of your letter, you then write down your contact person’s name, the company’s name, and the company’s address.

The formal salutation/greeting comes next: “Dear [Contact Person’s name].” If you have a contact person for your letter, include their personal title and name in the salutation (i.e. "Dear Mr. Franklin"). If you are unsure of the reader's gender, simply state their full name and avoid the personal title (i.e. "Dear Jamie Smith"). Follow the salutation with a colon or comma, leave one line blank, and then start the first paragraph of your letter on the following line.

Your letter greeting has the potential to improve your chances of getting an interview. To enhance your candidacy, make sure your  cover letter  maintains a professional appearance and offers relevant information, including your qualifications for the position. Choose the appropriate closing and always thank the reader for their time and consideration.

This is a cover letter salutation example. Download the salutation cover letter template (compatible with Google Docs and Word Online) or see below for more examples.

Cover Letter With Salutation Example (Text Version)

Alex Applicant 123 Main Street Anytown, CA 12345 555-555-5555 alex.applicant@email.com

September 1, 2018

Brett Lee Nurse Manager St. Ansgar Hospital 123 Business Rd. Business City, NY 54321

Dear Mr. Lee:

I am writing to apply for the position of nursing attendant, as advertised on the St. Ansgar Hospital website. As a trained nursing assistant who is fulfilled by working with patients and staff, and by helping people, I would be a great asset to your nursing staff.

I completed my nurse assistant program in June of 20XX, and I also have a nurse attendant certificate from the state of New York. I have been working part-time at Dr. Ellen Mueller’s primary care office in Smithtown, NY, for the past year, so I am experienced in working with patients. In addition, I am diligent about my responsibilities, and I have a flexible schedule which enables me to work almost any hours that you need.

I’ve attached my resume so that you can review my education and experience. I hope to hear from you soon. Thank you very much for your time and consideration.

Respectfully,

Signature (hard copy letter)

Alex Applicant

When you are sending your letter via email, include the reason you are writing in the subject line of your message:

Subject: First Name Last Name – Nurse Attendant Position

List yourcontact information in your signature, rather than in the body of the letter:

FirstName LastName Your Email Your Phone Number

Cover Letter Greeting: 20 Examples

What is a cover letter greeting.

A cover letter greeting is the opening line that addresses the hiring manager or recruiter who is reviewing your application. It is usually the first thing they read and sets the tone for the rest of your cover letter. A cover letter greeting should be professional, respectful, and tailored to the specific company and job you are applying for.

A strong cover letter greeting is important because it can make a lasting impression on the hiring manager or recruiter. It shows that you have done your research on the company and are genuinely interested in the job. A strong cover letter greeting can also help you stand out from the competition and increase your chances of getting an interview. It sets the tone for the rest of your cover letter and can make a positive first impression that can carry throughout the entire application process.

Why a Strong Cover Letter Greeting Matters

A strong cover letter greeting matters for several reasons.

First, it helps you stand out from the competition. When hiring managers or recruiters are reviewing hundreds of applications, a personalized and well-written greeting can catch their attention and make them more interested in reading the rest of your cover letter.

Second, a strong cover letter greeting shows interest and research in the company. It demonstrates that you have taken the time to learn about the company and the job you are applying for, and that you are genuinely interested in working there. This can make a positive impression and increase your chances of getting an interview.

Finally, a strong cover letter greeting sets a positive tone for the rest of the cover letter. It can make the hiring manager or recruiter more receptive to the information you are presenting and create a positive impression of you as a candidate.

Overall, a strong cover letter greeting is an important part of your application that can make a big difference in your job search.

Tips for Writing a Strong Cover Letter Greeting

When it comes to writing a cover letter greeting, there are a few tips to keep in mind to ensure that you make a great first impression. Here are some tips for writing a strong cover letter greeting:

Use the hiring manager's name if possible

If you have access to the name of the hiring manager, it's always best to use it. This shows that you've done your research and taken the time to personalize your cover letter. It also helps to create a connection between you and the hiring manager right from the start.

Use a general salutation if you don't know the name

If you don't know the name of the hiring manager, it's still important to address your cover letter to someone specific. In this case, you can use a general salutation such as "Dear Hiring Manager" or "Dear Recruiter." Avoid using generic greetings like "To Whom It May Concern" as they can come across as impersonal and lazy.

Be professional and respectful

No matter who you're addressing in your cover letter greeting, it's important to be professional and respectful. This means using appropriate titles and avoiding informal language or slang. Your cover letter is a representation of you and your professionalism, so make sure that your greeting reflects that.

Keep it short and to the point

Your cover letter greeting should be brief and to the point. It's important to grab the reader's attention right away, but you don't want to take up too much space or waste their time. Aim for a greeting that is no more than one or two sentences long.

20 Cover Letter Greeting Examples

When addressing the hiring manager directly, using their name can make a great impression. It shows that you took the time to research and personalize your cover letter. Here are some examples:

  • Greeting: Dear [Hiring Manager's Name],
  • Strengths: This greeting is tailored to the specific recipient, which is always a good idea. It also uses the hiring manager's name, which shows respect.
  • Weaknesses: This greeting is a bit formal, which may not be appropriate for all companies.
  • Greeting: Dear [Company Name] Recruiter,
  • Strengths: This greeting is general, but it's still professional and respectful. It's also a good idea to use the company name in the greeting, as this shows that you've done your research.
  • Weaknesses: This greeting doesn't use the hiring manager's name, which could be seen as a missed opportunity.
  • Greeting: Dear [Job Title] Hiring Manager,
  • Strengths: This greeting is specific to the job you're applying for, which is a good way to show that you're interested in the position. It also uses the hiring manager's title, which shows respect.
  • Greeting: Dear [Department Name] Team,
  • Strengths: This greeting is general, but it's still professional and respectful. It's also a good idea to use the department name in the greeting, as this shows that you're familiar with the company's structure.
  • Weaknesses: This greeting doesn't use the hiring manager's name or title, which could be seen as a missed opportunity.
  • Greeting: Hello [Hiring Manager's Name],
  • Strengths: This greeting is informal, but it's still professional and respectful. It's also a good way to show that you're friendly and approachable.
  • Weaknesses: This greeting may not be appropriate for all companies, especially those that are more formal.
  • Greeting: Good morning [Hiring Manager's Name],
  • Strengths: This greeting is informal, but it's still professional and respectful. It's also a good way to show that you're aware of the time of day.
  • Greeting: Nice to meet you, [Hiring Manager's Name],
  • Strengths: This greeting is informal, but it's still professional and respectful. It's also a good way to show that you're excited about the opportunity.
  • Greeting: Greetings [Hiring Manager's Name],
  • Greeting: Hi [Hiring Manager's Name],
  • Greeting: Hi there, [Hiring Manager's Name],
  • Greeting: Howdy [Hiring Manager's Name],
  • Weaknesses: This greeting may not be appropriate for all companies, especially those that are more formal. The greeting should be clear, concise, and polite. It should also be tailored to the specific recipient. If you know the name of the hiring manager, use it. If you don't, you can use a general salutation, such as "Dear Hiring Manager" or "Dear [Company Name] Recruiter."
  • Greeting: It's a pleasure to meet you, [Hiring Manager's Name],
  • Greeting: To Whom It May Concern,
  • Strengths: This greeting is general, but it's still professional and respectful. It's also a good way to show that you're not sure who the hiring manager is.
  • Greeting: Dear Sir or Madam,
  • Weaknesses: This greeting is a bit outdated and may not be appropriate for all companies.
  • Greeting: Gentlemen,
  • Strengths: This greeting is traditional and respectful. It's also a good way to show that you're addressing a group of men.
  • Weaknesses: This greeting is outdated and may not be appropriate for all companies.
  • Greeting: Ladies,
  • Strengths: This greeting is traditional and respectful. It's also a good way to show that you're addressing a group of women.
  • Greeting: Dear Hiring Team,
  • Strengths: This greeting is general, but it's still professional and respectful. It's also a good way to show that you're addressing the entire hiring team.
  • Greeting: Dear [Hiring Manager's Title],
  • Strengths: This greeting is specific to the hiring manager's title, which shows respect. It's also a good way to show that you've done your research.
  • Greeting: Dear [Hiring Manager's First Name],
  • Strengths: This greeting is specific to the hiring manager's first name, which shows familiarity. It's also a good way to show that you've done your research.
  • Greeting: Dear [Hiring Manager's First Name][hiring manager's last name],
  • Strengths: This greeting is specific to the hiring manager's first and last name, which shows familiarity. It's also a good way to show that you've done your research.

A strong cover letter greeting can make a big difference in getting noticed by potential employers. By using the tips outlined in this article, you can create a greeting that shows your interest and sets a positive tone for the rest of your cover letter. Remember to be professional, respectful, and keep it concise. Take the time to research the company and hiring manager to address them by name when possible. By following these tips, you can improve your chances of standing out and landing your dream job.

  • Resume and Cover Letter
  • The Do's and Don'ts of Cover...

The Do's and Don'ts of Cover Letter Salutations

3 min read · Updated on October 19, 2021

TopResume Editor

Greet your future employer the proper way with these cover letter do's and don'ts.

When you're applying for a job, the best-case scenario is that you know who is supposed to receive and review your application. If that's the case, you should always address your cover letter to that individual by full name, first and last. You don't need to add in a relevant title if that's the case. "Dear John Doe," is just fine. Indeed, it's better to leave out titles in your cover letter salutations since you don't want to make assumptions about gender. The name "Terry" could refer easily to a man or a woman, for example. What if you don't know the person's name though? How should you address your letter and ensure that it is polite and gets to the right person?

There are several acceptable greetings you can use. The majority of people use "Dear Hiring Manager." This is a good salutation for a couple of reasons. It isn't gender-specific, which eliminates that issue, and it also doesn't sound awkward. It's a simple, clear phrase. It also makes it obvious who you're trying to reach. You're looking to get your letter to the person who can give you a job. It clarifies the letter's purpose right off the top.

Another phrase that is commonly used is "To whom it may concern." There's nothing wrong with this phrase, although it is somewhat inferior to "Dear Hiring Manager." Why is it inferior? It's an awkward greeting. For one thing, while "whom" may be grammatically proper, how many of us actually use the word "whom" in conversation? For another thing, it isn't clear about your purpose. When you write "Dear Hiring Manager," in your cover letter salutations, that shows that you believe the Hiring Manager should be concerned about your letter. If you write "To whom it may concern," you're inviting ambiguity. What if it doesn't concern anybody? You've hardly made a case for anyone bothering with your letter. These are all subtle nuances. Again, you can use this phrase. It's just better to use "Dear Hiring Manager."

One more acceptable phrase to use in your cover letter salutations is "Dear Sir or Madam." This phrase accounts for either gender, which is good, although it does sound awkward since it makes a big affair out of doing so. "Dear Hiring Manager" is a bit less ungainly in this sense. There is also something old fashioned sounding about saying "Dear Sir or Madam." You could look at this as a good thing (it shows you have proper manners and respect) or a bad thing (it could imply you're a bit outmoded). It's again a fine greeting, but you can see how "Dear Hiring Manager" might still be the better choice.

In terms of punctuation, it doesn't really matter what you use in your cover letter salutations. A comma, a semi-colon or a colon is just fine; this bit is pretty irrelevant. With several good greetings to choose from, don't leave your greeting line blank. A blank greeting line communicates nothing, though it may make a hiring manager think that you're lazy, rude, or simply incompetent. If you can't make up your mind, always just default to "Dear Hiring Manager."

Follow these cover letter do's and don'ts and you'll set yourself up for greater success in landing an interview.

Related Articles:

What to Say in a Cover Letter: 5 Things You Should Include

How to Maximize Your Resume Action Words to Wow the Employer

Resume Spelling and Accent Explained

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  1. How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name in 5 Steps

    One common way to address the cover letter without a name is by using "Hiring Manager." This is a universal title that can represent anyone who hires people, even if hiring manager isn't their official title. Using the salutation "Dear Hiring Manager" is the optimal choice for many hiring professionals when a name is unavailable.

  2. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

    How do you address a cover letter when you don't know the hiring manager's name? Powered by AI and the LinkedIn community 1 Do some research 2 Use a professional greeting 3...

  3. 20 Examples Of How To Address a Cover Letter to an Unknown Recipient

    Utilize professional networking platforms like LinkedIn to find the recipient. LinkedIn is a powerful tool for job seekers. Try searching for employees at the company with relevant titles, then check their profiles for clues about their role in the hiring process.

  4. How to Address a Cover Letter Without Name: 2023 Guide (10 ...

    10 May 2023 How to Address a Cover Letter Without Name: 2023 Guide (10+ Examples) 27 min read Table of contents Click here to directly go to the complete cover letter without name sample How to address a cover letter without a name?

  5. 10 Best Ways To Address A Cover Letter Without A Name

    There are a few rules to follow when addressing a cover letter: be professional, polite, and concise. That means that even if you don't know the recipient's name, you want to maintain the same professional tone in the letter and avoid overly stilted language or being too informal. Here are some guidelines to follow when addressing a cover letter:

  6. How To Address a Cover Letter Without a Name (Exact Examples)

    Here are two examples of how to start a cover letter without a name: Example 1: Dear Hiring Manager, As a passionate marketer with five years of experience, I am excited to apply for the Marketing Manager position at (…) Company.

  7. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name (5 Salutations)

    Table of Contents 5 Popular Ways to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name 1. To the Hiring Manager 2. Dear Hiring Manager 3. Dear [Company Name] 4. Hello 5. Dear Sir or Madam Other Salutations to Use When You Don't Have a Name Tips to Find the Names of Employers and Hiring Managers How to Make the Perfect Cover Letter Final Thoughts

  8. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name: Tips and Examples

    1 Do some research 2 Use a generic salutation 3 Avoid using names you are not sure about 4 Be respectful and courteous A cover letter is your chance to make a good impression on a potential...

  9. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

    1. Do your research How you address a cover letter can be challenging, especially if you don't have a contact name or you don't know whether the person is male or female. A personalized salutation helps differentiate you from other candidates, which is the main goal of your cover letter.

  10. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

    When you don't know the hiring manager's name, one option is to simply address them by their title, like this: Dear Hiring Manager This salutation is better than a generic "hello" and makes you come across as professional and polite.

  11. Cover Letter Salutation: 15+ Examples of Greetings

    1. Make sure your contact information is formatted correctly Check to make sure all of the information above your salutation is correct and uses proper cover letter format. If your cover letter is badly formatted or doesn't look professional, hiring managers might not give it a second glance.

  12. How to Address a Cover Letter with No Name

    Whether or not you know whom to address with your letter, keep your greeting formal— even if the company has a more laid-back culture. Use Dear rather than Hello or Hi, and use a comma or colon, never an exclamation point. Don't stress about it. Incorrectly addressing your cover letter is not going to cost you the job if you're a ...

  13. How To Address a Cover Letter

    If you know the name of the person you're sending your cover letter to, address the letter to them using either their full name or 'Mr.' or 'Ms.' followed by their first and last name. If they have a professional or academic title, use that in place of 'Mr.' or Ms.'. If you don't have the recipient's name, use a general ...

  14. How to Address a Cover Letter Without a Name

    How do you address a cover letter when you don't know the hiring manager's name? Powered by AI and the LinkedIn community 1 Do some research 2 Use a generic salutation 3 Customize...

  15. How to Choose the Right Greeting for Your Cover Letter

    The only time to use "To Whom It May Concern" as a cover letter greeting is when you simply cannot find out the specific person to whom you are writing. You should, of course, make every effort to find the name of a contact in the specific department in which you are interested.

  16. Cover Letter Greeting: 20 Examples

    A cover letter greeting is the opening line that addresses the hiring manager or recruiter who is reviewing your application. It is usually the first thing they read and sets the tone for the rest of your cover letter. ... If you don't know the name of the hiring manager, it's still important to address your cover letter to someone specific. In ...

  17. Cover Letter Salutation: Tips and Examples

    A cover letter salutation is the greeting that you use at the start of a cover letter. When you are writing a professional cover letter to include with your resume for a job application, the salutation you use should be a formal one. Since it is the first thing the recipient sees when they read the cover letter, it should be appropriately respectful and use the correct title and name.

  18. How to Address Your Cover Letter in 2023

    The 3 Rules of Addressing Your Cover Letter in 2023 by Lily Zhang Updated 3/30/2023 eclipse_images/Getty Images You've finally sat down to write that cover letter (good for you!), but immediately you run into a roadblock: How do you even start the darn thing? Who do you address it to? Should you use Mr. or Ms.? Do you include a first name?

  19. Cover Letter Do's and Don'ts

    When you're applying for a job, the best-case scenario is that you know who is supposed to receive and review your application. If that's the case, you should always address your cover letter to that individual by full name, first and last. You don't need to add in a relevant title if that's the case. "Dear John Doe," is just fine.

  20. How to Address a Cover Letter in 2020

    Use a Generic Greeting. In the event that you don't know - and can't find - the name of the hiring manager, it's best to use a generic salutation. ... Cover Letter Salutation With Only Last Name. There are times when it's only possible to locate the last name of the hiring manager at a company. In these situations, it's ok to ...

  21. How to address a cover letter (With examples)

    Related: 7 Powerful Ways To Start a Cover Letter (With Examples) 2. Research the company to find the name of the recruitment manager. If it's not listed in the job description, in some cases, you can discover the name of whom to address your cover letter to by performing some simple research on the company and job.