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Free resources, 5 schedule examples from special education classes with free download.

Special education class schedule roundup

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Special education class schedule roundup

Sometimes it helps to have examples of autism daily schedules to work from when setting up your own. So I wanted to share some examples and go over some main strategies I use in organizing the classroom schedule. The download includes 5 special education classes’ schedules and cover all ages from preschool through high school. They are all self-contained classrooms with one that also served as a resource classroom. I have a variety of posts that include tons of information about how to set up all types of special education classes. The best place to start is with the ultimate guide to setting up special education classes.

Steps in Creating the Autism Daily Class Schedule

Everything in setting up the schedule depends on knowing your students.  I review the students’ IEPs and determine what curriculum we need to use.   I use the Teaching Implementation Plan (TIP) for that. From that, I can then have some ideas about how long group activities should be, how many small group or individual instruction is needed, etc.  

Essentially when I set up a schedule I use a grid that has the day broken down into regular increments–usually 15 minutes (the freebie has blank times and 15 minute times set up for you).  I put the students’ names across the top and the times down the left hand side, like the pictures below.  Then, I follow these 5 basic steps when I do a schedule.  

I start with the things I can’t change, like specials times for each student (assuming they are different grades).  Then I schedule the student whose engagement and behavior would be most affected by the order of the schedule (that one that needs a work-break-work-break) type of schedule.  Then I schedule the students who can be more flexible.

5 Special Education Classes Schedules

Below are some schedules to check out.  For each classroom, I’ve written about them in a post to give you more context. I’ve included a link to those posts so you can can read about them there.

Setting Up Special Ed Classes Schedule: Preschool

Preschool Full-Day (Some Part-Day) Autism Daily Schedule

This is a preschool schedule.  The greyed out areas are times when that student is not in the classroom.  In this case they are students who only attended part day.  You can get more details about this special education class schedule HERE .

Elementary Special Education Class Schedule With Inclusion Times

This elementary autism daily schedule was a pretty typical classroom schedule but we were lucky that all the students attended specials together and they were scheduled pretty consistently across the week.  That made it much easier to schedule.   You can read about this special education class schedule here .

Elementary Schedule for a Special ed classroom

Middle School Classroom with 1 Teacher & 1 Paraprofessional

I included 2 middle school schedule because sometimes I think they are more difficult because the way that scheduling in the school is so different.  This one is an example of a class that had 1 teacher and 1 aide, so there is a longer time in leisure after lunch to allow for lunch breaks.   Read more about this special ed classroom schedule here.

Middle School Mixed Classroom Schedule: Two Teachers

This one was a classroom that eventually was divided.  We found we needed to divide our group activities because they were just too large a group to keep everyone’s attention during a full group activity.  Read more about this special education class schedule here.

middle school special education schedule grid with 2 classes combined

High School Life Skills Classroom

This classroom was a self-contained life skills classroom with a teacher and 2 paraprofessionals. I’ll come back and add a link with more information and a link to a floor plan of it when I get it finished. It was set up with 2 portables-an academic portable and a life skills / vocational portable that we used in the afternoon.

Read more about this schedule here.

So, I hope those will give you some ideas about setting up schedules for your classroom and some things to think about while you are sitting by the pool (or the ocean, or the mountains, or teaching ESY). If you are looking for more help with setting up your classroom, come try out the Special Educator Academy Setting Up Your Classroom course with a 7-day free trial here. Or grab one of the resources below for more ideas.

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  • Read more about: Organizing & Setting Up Classrooms , Scheduling

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Teacher Voices

Now is the time for schools to invest in special-education inclusion models that benefit all students

special education inclusion schedules

Kimberly Berry

November 10, 2021.

special education inclusion schedules

Ivan was a fourth grader with big brown eyes, a wide smile and a quiet demeanor who refused to enter my classroom. “Everyone thinks I’m stupid,” he’d say. I’ve changed his name to protect his privacy.

At the time, my school employed a pull-out model for students with disabilities, meaning they were removed from their assigned classrooms to receive specialized services and supports. This left Ivan feeling embarrassed, ostracized and resistant to putting forth academic effort.

One in 8 students in U.S. public schools have an individualized education plan, or IEP, making them eligible for special education services. About 750,000 students with disabilities attend California public schools. Many, like Ivan, do not respond well to being substantially separated from their peers. Research suggests that inclusion models designed to integrate students with and without disabilities into a single learning environment can lead to stronger academic and social outcomes.

At Caliber ChangeMakers Academy — where I have been a program specialist for five of the 10 years I have worked with students with disabilities — we knew an inclusion model was best for Ivan and many others. Yet, we didn’t think we had the tools or resources to make it possible.

We were wrong.

Schools can support students like Ivan — and those of all abilities — to learn from and alongside one another in an inclusive setting without exorbitant costs if they rethink how they allocate resources and develop educators’ confidence and competence in teaching all students in a general education setting.

In 2019, we began intentionally organizing staff, time and money toward inclusion, and we did so without spending more than similar public schools do that don’t focus on inclusion.

Now, with the infusion of federal Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief funding, schools have additional resources to invest in this approach now, in service to longer-term, sustainable change.

The nonprofit Education Resource Strategies studied our school and three others in California that are doing this work without larger investments of resources. Their analysis examines the resource shifts that inclusion-focused schools employ and can be tapped by other schools considering this work, taking a “do now, build toward” approach that addresses student needs and sustains these changes even after the emergency federal funding expires. Many of their recommendations mirror the steps we took to pursue an inclusion model.

It didn’t happen overnight, but three steps were important to our efforts to adopt a more inclusive model for teaching and learning:

  • Shift special education staff into general education classrooms to support targeted group sizes. At Caliber ChangeMakers Academy, special education teachers are departmentalized, each serving as a co-teacher to two general education teachers, leveraging their content expertise to share responsibility for classroom instruction. That means some special education teachers now teach students who are not part of their caseload. That means they are tracking the goals of more students, which also means that young people have more specialty educators working together to support their individual needs.
  • Prioritize connected professional learning around inclusion for all teachers . We adjusted teachers’ schedules to incorporate collaborative time for general education and special education teachers to meet before, during and after lessons to plan engaging, differentiated instruction for all. On the surface, the reduction in individual planning time might be a challenge. However, our teachers have found that they now feel more prepared, effective and connected because they have a partner to turn to for feedback, suggestions and encouragement.
  • Invest in social-emotional and mental health staff to narrow the scope of special education teachers. These staff members work to reduce unnecessary special education referrals and mitigate troubles facing students regardless of their disability status. They also can help address unexpected challenges, meaning special education teachers can spend more time in general education classrooms. A tradeoff we made is to slightly increase class sizes with fewer general administrative and support staff to prioritize hiring experienced social-emotional learning and mental health professionals.

For schools eager to adopt a more inclusive instructional model, now is the time. The emergency federal funding creates unprecedented opportunities for school and system leaders to build research-backed, sustainable inclusion models that can better meet the needs of all students, including students with disabilities.

I’ve seen firsthand that inclusive, diverse classrooms can provide powerful learning opportunities for all students.

As for Ivan, he’s now in eighth grade and thriving in an inclusive, co-teaching classroom. He went from completing almost no academic work independently to completing science lab reports on his own, working in collaborative groups in his English class and declaring that he loves math. Because our school invested in and normalized differentiated supports in an inclusive setting, now Ivan and many other students are getting what they need to be successful academically, socially and emotionally.

Kimberly Berry is a special education program specialist at Caliber ChangeMakers Academy in Vallejo.

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Karina Villalona 2 years ago 2 years ago

I speak as a mom of two kids in co-teaching collaborative classes for their 4 main academic subjects, as well as a former teacher, and a school psychologist for 19 years. I agree with much of what Ms. Berry states. Co-teaching programs can be very successful for both general and special education students if all of the appropriate supports are in place (as listed by Ms. Berry). However, it is important to clarify that this … Read More

I speak as a mom of two kids in co-teaching collaborative classes for their 4 main academic subjects, as well as a former teacher, and a school psychologist for 19 years. I agree with much of what Ms. Berry states. Co-teaching programs can be very successful for both general and special education students if all of the appropriate supports are in place (as listed by Ms. Berry).

However, it is important to clarify that this model is not a panacea. Students with cognitive skills that are far below the average range have also shared how incredibly frustrating being in co-teaching classes can be for them. Even with support from the special education teacher, the pacing for some students is way too fast. In addition, depending on what the student’s specific classification is, co-teaching on its own does not allow an opportunity for remedial instruction.

My daughters are dyslexic. They participate in co-teaching with a lot of support from the special education teacher. They have one period of direct instruction in reading via an Orton-Gillingham based program and one period of Resource Room daily which allows them to work on content from the general education classes that they might need to review, break down or preview.

So, yes, co-teaching can be great for some students when the program is well managed and staffed; however, we cannot ignore the need for small group supports and remedial instruction when necessary.

Craig 2 years ago 2 years ago

Studies cited showing benefits of inclusion model typically suffer from selection bias, and there are no significant data on the effects of inclusion models on neurotypical peers. Does the author of this piece have data showing results that support her claims? Also, what do the teachers in this program have to say about it, in the first person? If this is truly working as presented it will be a game changer.

Monica Saraiya 2 years ago 2 years ago

The inclusion model is not a one size fits all one. Students with significant learning differences do not receive the services that best meet their needs in this model. As with all practices in education, inclusion must be one, but not the only way to service students who need specialized help with their learning.

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Special Educator Survival Guide

education self contained classrooms visual schedules for special ed

Using Schedules in Special Education Classrooms

Imagine using schedules in special education classrooms where every student is engaged, empowered, and knows exactly what to expect throughout the day. Structure, routine, and visual supports play a vital role in creating an inclusive learning environment for students with special needs. In this blog post, we will delve into the powerful tool of visual schedules and how they can transform your special education classroom. Get ready to unlock a world of structure, independence, and success!

education self contained classrooms visual schedules for special ed

I. The Power of Visual Schedules

education self contained classrooms visual schedules for special ed

First and foremost, what are visual schedules?

Visual schedules are visual representations of a sequence of activities or tasks, using pictures, symbols, or words. They provide a clear and concrete way for students to understand what will happen throughout the day. The benefits of using schedules in special education classrooms are numerous. They promote predictability, reduce anxiety, improve transitions, and foster independence and self-regulation skills.

Emily’s Journey to Independence Emily, a student with autism, used to struggle with transitioning between activities and often experienced meltdowns. However, with the introduction of visual schedules in her classroom, she gained a sense of control and independence. By following the schedule, she knew what was coming next and could prepare herself mentally. Emily’s meltdowns decreased significantly, and she began actively participating in class activities.

How do I introduce visual schedules to my students?

Introducing visual schedules to students requires a systematic approach. Start by selecting appropriate visuals that represent the activities or tasks. Teach students how to use the schedule by modeling and providing guided practice. Gradually fade support as they become more familiar with the process.

education self contained classrooms visual schedules for special ed

II. Creating a Daily Schedule

Next, let’s explore how to create a daily schedule that meets the unique needs of your students. When designing a daily schedule, several key considerations come into play. It’s important to consider the students’ developmental levels, individual goals, and the classroom’s routines and structure. By creating a well-structured schedule, you provide a framework for students to navigate their day successfully.

Example Visual Schedules for Different Classroom Settings

  • Morning Routine: Arrival, Attendance, Morning Meeting
  • Academic Time: Math, Language Arts, Science
  • Specials: Art, Music, PE
  • Lunch and Recess
  • Independent Workstations: Task Bins, Computer Time
  • Wrap-up: Review, Pack Up, Dismissal
  • Individualized Morning Routine: Personal Care, Sensory Breaks
  • Academic Time: Individualized Instruction, Small Group Work
  • Therapies: Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy
  • Life Skills: Meal Prep, Social Skills
  • Preferred Activities: Choice Time, Reinforcement
  • Math Schedule: Introduction, Guided Practice, Independent Practice
  • Language Arts Schedule: Phonics, Reading Comprehension, Writing
  • Science Schedule: Experiment, Discussion, Reflection

How do I individualize schedules for students with diverse needs?

Individualizing and Using schedules in special education classrooms are crucial to meet the unique needs of each student. Consider their strengths, challenges, and learning preferences. Modify visuals, provide additional supports such as timers or checklists, and include breaks or sensory activities as needed.

III. Implementing Visual Schedules

education self contained classrooms visual schedules for special ed

Furthermore, let’s explore how to effectively using schedules in special education classrooms. Introducing visual schedules to students requires a systematic approach and ongoing support.

Introducing Visual Schedules to Students

Start by explaining the purpose and benefits of the visual schedule to your students. Use simple language and visuals to make it accessible. Engage them in the process by allowing them to choose or create some of the visuals themselves.

Teaching Students to Use Visual Schedules

Provide explicit instruction on how to use the visual schedule. Teach students to navigate the schedule, check off completed tasks, and transition between activities smoothly. Use modeling, role-playing, and reinforcement to promote understanding and independence.

Strategies for Smooth Transitions

Smooth transitions are essential in maintaining the flow of the classroom. Incorporate transition strategies such as using transition cues, providing warnings, and incorporating transition activities or songs. These strategies help students anticipate and adapt to changes successfully.

Mia’s Journey to Organization

Mia, a student with executive functioning difficulties, struggled with transitions and often felt overwhelmed. However, with the implementation of transition strategies and visual supports, Mia gained a sense of organization and control. She became more confident and independent during transitions, which positively impacted her overall engagement and academic performance.

How do I address resistance or challenges when implementing visual schedules?

Some students may resist or face challenges when first introduced to visual schedules. Patience, consistency, and gradual exposure are key. Start with short periods of schedule use and gradually increase as students become more comfortable. Provide positive reinforcement and individualized supports to help them overcome any difficulties.

education self contained classrooms visual schedules for special ed

IV. Enhancing Classroom Environment

Moreover, let’s explore how to enhance the classroom environment using visual schedules. Creating a visually supportive classroom empowers students and promotes their overall success.

Creating Visual Supports:

Tips and Ideas In addition to schedules, consider incorporating visual supports throughout the classroom. Use visual cues for classroom rules, expectations, and procedures. Display anchor charts, labels, and step-by-step visuals to provide additional guidance and promote independence.

Collaborating with Students, Parents, and Support Staff

Involve students, parents, and support staff in the process of designing and implementing visual supports. Share the purpose and benefits of visual schedules, and encourage their input. Collaborating with all stakeholders helps create a consistent and supportive learning environment.

Incorporating Visual Schedules Across Subjects and Activities

Visual schedules can extend beyond daily routines. Incorporate them into specific subjects or activities, such as science experiments, group projects, or art lessons. By providing clear expectations and steps, visual schedules promote comprehension and success in various areas.

Josh’s Confidence Boost Josh, a student with a specific learning disability, often felt overwhelmed during group projects. However, with the use of visual schedules and step-by-step visuals, Josh gained a sense of structure and confidence. The visual supports helped him understand his role, follow the project’s progression, and effectively contribute to the team. As a result, Josh’s participation and self-esteem soared.

How do I adapt visual schedules for students with sensory sensitivities?

For students with sensory sensitivities, consider using visuals that are calming and visually soothing. Use muted colors, incorporate sensory breaks or activities within the schedule, and provide options for individualized supports, such as noise-canceling headphones or fidget tools.

education self contained classrooms visual schedules for special ed

V. Empowering Students for Life

Lastly, let’s explore how using visual schedules in special education classrooms goes beyond academic success and empowers students for life.

Promoting Independence and Self-Advocacy

Visual schedules encourage students to take ownership of their learning and develop self-advocacy skills. As they become proficient in using schedules, they gain confidence in managing their time, tasks, and responsibilities independently.

Generalizing Skills Beyond the Classroom

The skills students develop through visual schedules can extend beyond the classroom setting. Encourage students to use schedules at home, during extracurricular activities, and in other environments. This generalization promotes consistency and reinforces their independence. Check out this blog post for more

Celebrating Successes and Making Adjustments

Acknowledge and celebrate students’ achievements and progress in using visual schedules. Regularly review and update schedules to reflect evolving needs and goals. By making adjustments based on feedback and observation, you ensure that schedules remain effective and meaningful.

How will visual schedules transform your classroom?

Reflect on the potential impact of using schedules in special education classrooms. How can they support your students’ individual needs, foster independence, and create a positive learning environment? Share your thoughts in the comments below!

education self contained classrooms visual schedules for special ed

Ready to unlock the potential of visual schedules in your special education classroom? Connect with Cultivating Exceptional Minds for personalized support and resources to enhance your teaching journey. Don’t forget to check out our Special Education Classroom Schedule Template in the TPT shop , designed to streamline your scheduling process and promote student success. Let’s embark on this transformative adventure together!

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Creating a Special Education Classroom Schedule

  • June 20, 2023
  • Back to School , Classroom Setup , schedule , schedules

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Creating a well-balanced and inclusive classroom schedule is a vital task for special education teachers. The schedule must consider the diverse needs of students, the support provided by paraprofessionals, inclusion classes in other parts of the school, and the successful integration of essential lessons throughout the day. In this blog post, we will explore key considerations and practical tips for designing a classroom schedule that works for everyone. And I’m literally showing you how I use an Excel spreadsheet to create one!

Understanding Your Students’ Needs

Initially, start by gaining a comprehensive understanding of your student’s individual needs, abilities, and learning styles. Consider factors such as attention span, sensory sensitivities, preferred routines, and areas of challenge. This knowledge will enable you to tailor the schedule to address their unique requirements, ensuring an optimal learning experience for all. Most of this if you have new students that you don’t know would come from the individualized education plan (IEP). This means you may find out a student can only work independently for 15 minutes, so you should consider scheduling their time for that long, or be able to provide paraprofessional support to extend that time.

Know the Non-negotiables:

Next, every school has a unique setup and things need to run a certain way. There are parts of a school day that are considered non-negotiables in my opinion. These are things like lunch, recess, specials, and sometimes inclusion classes that are all scheduled outside of your control as the special education teacher. You just have to fit them in and make them work within your own schedule. This is typically where I start to plug those days and times into my schedule because I know I can’t teach anything else then. It usually looks something like this:

special education classroom schedule

With this schedule you can see I put all the things are non-negotiables that typically your principal will assign to your students and staff. This includes arrival, breakfast, lunch, specials, our “earn time” for behavior reinforcement and dismissal. Also, you will note that some students go out for inclusion classes (ELA, Science, and Morning Meeting). These students I will need to remember will not be available for lessons in my classroom at that time, so I have to be cautious of planning any whole group lessons I may want that student to participate in.

Add in Your Whole Group Lessons

Identify the essential lessons that need to be taught and allocate dedicated time slots in the schedule for each subject or skill area. Prioritize core subjects, such as literacy and math , but I also include lessons like morning meeting , afternoon meeting , Ensure a balanced distribution of instructional time throughout the day to maintain students’ engagement and optimize learning outcomes. Let’s take a look at that schedule I started now with the things we have talked about:

special education classroom schedule 1

Now I have added in color coding to help everyone read the schedule easier. If you notice non-negotiables are yellow, and whole group lessons are green.

Consider Individual and Small Group Instruction:

Special education classrooms often require individualized or small-group instruction to meet student’s diverse needs. Allocate specific time slots within the schedule for one-on-one instruction or small group activities. This allows for targeted instruction, differentiated support, and opportunities for peer interaction and collaboration. I always made an effort to meet with each student individually each day if I could. If not, we would do a small group of 2-3 students. Also, I like to have one paraprofessional run a center or station where students can work at. This means we would need to add this to the student’s schedule.

You may also need to collaborate to find times for student-related services (speech therapy, occupational therapy, vision and hearing support, and more). They may need to go on your classroom schedule for push-in or pull-out sessions with a therapist. And finally, add the independent work time that students will do in the classroom on their own!

Let’s see that schedule with all of that now:

special education classroom schedule 2

As you can see here there is a lot more filled into the schedule. Individual and group instruction in the classroom and even small group instruction with therapists for related services have been added. And independent work time for students to complete tasks has been included.

Breaks and Transitions in Your Classroom Schedule!

Don’t forget that during the school day, it is important to build breaks . Students will need downtime and time to transition from one part of their schedule to another. Students may have in their IEPs that they need a certain amount of breaks or breaks at certain times of the day. You will want to put this into your schedule. Also, something to consider is if your student has their own individual visual schedule in the classroom then they will need time to check it between different lessons. Also, students with limited mobility or behavior concerns with transitions may need time and assistance to do this successfully.

I have now added these to the schedule so you can see them. I labeled everything a break in this example. However, for some students, it may be supporting with transitions in our out of the classroom as well.

special education classroom schedule 3

And once you have your schedule made, you can display something like this for the whole class.

special education inclusion schedules

Or you can use individual schedules like these for your students!

special education inclusion schedules

Relflect on Your Classroom Schedule

Schedule regular check-ins and reflection periods to evaluate the effectiveness of your classroom schedule. Monitor students’ engagement, behavior, and progress to identify areas that may require adjustments or additional support. Seek feedback from paraprofessionals, colleagues, and students to gather different perspectives and ensure the schedule’s ongoing effectiveness. Be flexible! The schedule will probably be changing many times in your classroom. Typically, this happened to me if we got new staff or students, had a therapy session that needed to move. Also a student needed more break time than originally anticipated, or an inclusion class time got changed. Designing an inclusive classroom schedule that accommodates the needs of students, paraprofessionals, and essential lessons requires careful consideration and collaboration. Once you have taken into account all the things mentioned in this blog post, you should have a good plan for your classroom schedule.

Need some materials to create your whole class or individual schedules for students? I’ve got you covered here! Click on the image to see more about that product!

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And this bundle has all the things you could need to start the school year including schedule materials! Check out my shop for more resources to support the learners in your classroom!

special education inclusion schedules

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Adjusting schedules should save time, not waste time. ClassMap makes it easy to create and print your student's schedules. 

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special education inclusion schedules

A scheduling tool made for special education teachers

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Plan your weekly and whole class schedule.

Whether your students work on the same stations every day or you need to plan for each individual day, ClassMap has got you covered. 

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Instantly print your schedules.

Based on your schedule, ClassMap will use the icons and colors to  create ALL the pages you will need for your class.

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Customize your stations.

Tailor the schedule specifically to your students needs. Use ClassMap's icons or upload your own . 

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Protect yourself from station overload.

ClassMap helps you detect when you overbook or forget a station  before  your shedule has been laminated.

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Routine Builder

For the students that need additional help learning specific routines or tasks, ClassMap provides a way for you to help them with a step-by-step routine visual schedule.

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Create custom based Boards tailored for your students instead of using generic downloaded templates.

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A Look Inside My Self Contained Class Schedule + Planning

Being a self-contained classroom special education teacher, I often get asked about what my classroom schedule looks like, how I lesson plan for all the different ability levels, and just what one single day in my classroom looks like.

I decided it may be time to share my classroom schedule, and give some pointers on how to make your classroom schedule work for you… no matter setting you work in.

self contained class schedule header

I do want to preface this entire post by saying that every single classroom is different. What works for me, may or may not work for you… and I promise you that my class schedule wasn’t a one time thing. It took me months to refine, and even some days it’s a work in progress.

But hopefully with these tips and tricks, you’ll be able to build a classroom schedule that works for you and meets the needs of all of your students.

Here’s our daily classroom schedule:

7:45-8:00 Arrival / Potty / Breakfast

8:00 – 9:00 Morning Calendar

9:00 – 9:45 Specials (Teacher Planning)

9:45 – 10:20 English Language Arts

10:20 – 10:50 Student Lunch

10:50 – 11:00 Potty

11:00 – 11:45 Computers + iPads (Para Lunch Duty)

11:45 – 12:30 Motor Lab (Para Lunch Duty + Lunch)

12:30 – 12:45 Snack + Potty

12:45 – 1:00 Story Time

1:00 – 2:00 Mathematics

2:00 – 2:45 Inclusion / Science / Social Studies

2:45 – 3:00 Clean Up + Potty + Dismissal

Let’s take a deeper look into each part of the day for a better explanation of what’s going on during each part of our day:

arrival and breakfast

Most of my students arrive on the school bus. Contract time for paras begins at 7:30 and teachers begin at 7:45, so my paras get all of the students off the bus and bring them to the classroom.

Students put their belongings away… backpacks in their cubbies, coats off, lunches out (so we can determine who packed and who will be eating school lunch), and students get their Daily Communication Logs out and put them on the back table.. Students If they had a Reading Toolkit to return, they place it on the back table. Or maybe signed paperwork, order forms, fundraiser packets… you know, all that fun stuff.

We ask each student if they need to use the restroom, as well as use this time to change any diapers or pull-ups.

If a student eats school breakfast, one of us will take the child down to the cafeteria to get breakfast. They eat breakfast in the classroom at their desk.

At 8AM, the school announcements begin. We stand for the Pledge of Allegiance (and the Star Spangled Banner on Friday’s) and listen to the daily announcements. After that, we begin our morning calendar routine.

One special thing about the beginning 15 minutes of the day is I get a moment to say good morning to each child and ask about their night or weekend. It’s our 1:1 time to start out on a positive day.

morning calendar

This hour is probably my favorite part of the entire school day. It’s a section of our schedule that I planned for one time. Yep, once. And it works every single day, it’s a routine the kids know, and it’s something my para could run if I were out for the day.

To read a very in-depth blog post about the entire first hour of our school day, click here .

On Friday mornings, we also do Coffee Cart Friday . We do a modified morning calendar routine on Fridays 🙂

specials

It’s kind of crazy that our class is fortunate enough to all have specials around the same time. And if they don’t (I mean… there are 4 grade levels in our classroom!) they are either in inclusion or in resource.

This is also the time when I take 45-minutes for teacher planning.

special education inclusion schedules

IEP meetings are scheduled during this time as well, as well as other team meetings with admin, etc.

English language arts

ELA is such a short time, but we do SO. MUCH. STUFF. during this time. It’s really all meat and potatoes.

Typically what is looks like is a whole group session at the back table. Whether that’s reading a story together and using a differentiated book companion , or a full on accommodated Guided Reading lesson , we’re all working.

Monday and Tuesday, we start new stories. I use the leveled readers from Reading A-Z. They’re a life saver! To get student reading levels, at the beginning of the year, we conduct the Literacy Assessment to see what students know.

Wednesday and Thursday are used for ELA centers and adapted work binders , quick checks on the stories we read, IEP goal data on specific students, and/or end of the story assessments. It really depends on the student.

Through Monday-Thursday, students are also working on interactive sight word readers .

Friday is for Fun Food Friday .

lunch

Our students eat lunch at this time. They eat lunch in the cafeteria, and both myself and paras attend lunch with our students. We help them eat and monitor our student’s lunch period.

In the past, a few of my higher level students would eat lunch with their inclusion classes.

potty

We take this time to wash our hands and get cleaned up from lunch.

Some school years, our recess also overlaps this time and the beginning of computers in the classroom. But last year, students had recess with their inclusion classrooms, so we did not have a specific recess time.

computers

This time is so important for our class because at this time each day, our paras have Lunch Duty. So it typically looks like just me in the classroom with all of the students. Technology is a great way to occupy all students at once, and have them working on something academic. Especially if a student did not finish their morning work, I can successfully pull that student to finish their work while all other students are occupied.

My second year in the self-contained setting, I won a grant to purchase 4 iPads for the classroom. We use them during this time.

In our classroom, we have 5 iPads and 4 desktop computers for students to use. The most students (so far) that I’ve had is 7 at once. We rotate who uses the desktop computers and iPads.

The first 30ish minutes are for academic purposes. Students need to work on something academic… whether that’s an app or Keyboarding Without Tears ( which is phenomenal by the way! ).

The remaining 15ish minutes are for students to “play games” or watching Daniel Tiger. This remaining time is each child’s reward for completing their morning work and computer work. If a student doesn’t successfully complete all of their morning and computer work, they finish it up during this time.

I guess you could say that this time also works as a huge incentive in our classroom. 🙂

You can see a list of general apps here , and a list of math apps here .

motor lab and sensory time

I think it is imperative that students have time in their day to be kids… and be kids outside of a 15 minute recess. I know some teachers do smaller increments of time spread throughout the school day for sensory integration, so it’s something you make fit into your schedule.

Along with computers, motor lab also serves as a time when I am alone with my students in the classroom while my paras eat lunch or finish up duties.

A few examples of activities students can play with during this time: a sit and spinner, trampoline, dramatic play (dolls, kitchen, stuffed animals…), Legos and blocks, train set, sensory tubs ( water beads , MadMattr or kinetic sand , PlayDoh, etc.), indoor swing , sensory pods, body socks , sensory stepping stones … we have a very wide range of activities students can interact with.

snack and potty

Snack and story time serve as teacher lunch time, so the paras are alone with students at this time.

They use this time for students to eat snack, as well as use the restroom and change any diapers/pull-ups.

story time

Story time is pretty self explanatory. A para or a student will choose a book from the classroom library. I do have a tiered bookshelf for seasonal and monthly-related books that offer great recommendations for students to listen to.

mathematics

Our math block is one hour, give or take a few minutes to wrap up story time or head to inclusion around 2.

In our classroom, it typically looks like all students at the back table working on individualized skills. A few days each week, we will do a whole group lesson on a targeted skill that a majority of my students are working on (like money, addition/subtraction, etc.).

Other than that, it’s highly individualized based on grade level content that needs to be addressed and student IEP goals. Our Math Adapted Work Binder comes in huge handy here.

Read more about differentiating Guided Math here.

inclusion

Many of my students attend inclusion for the social aspect of it and not necessarily for the academics, and myself or a para go to inclusion with our friends. My higher level students who can handle attending the regular ed setting on their own, go by themselves.

Adults document inclusion time using this data sheet on a clipboard. All of my students have a clipboard for this purpose, and you guessed correctly if you guessed color coded clipboards .

So far, it’s worked out well that all of my students attend inclusion for science and social studies at this time. To implement the grade level content on my students’ levels in our classroom, we utilize the Science and Social Studies Adapted Work Binders .

clean up and dismissal

Just like any other classroom, students have to clean up after themselves. They pack their own backpacks, listen for their name to be called to get their Daily Communication Logs , push their chairs in, use the restroom (if needed), and then wait patiently to be dismissed.

We walk to dismissal together and at 3PM, students are dismissed (either to car rider or bus).

And that’s pretty much it!

WHERE DO YOU SHOWCASE YOUR SCHEDULE IN THE CLASSROOM?

The classroom schedule is posted on the front board using a visual schedule . I print, laminate, and add magnets to the back so we can easily switch out parts of our day if needed.

Individualized student visual schedules are posted on their desks (specials only) and on the cabinet doors.

Wondering how to fit everything into your schedule in a self contained special needs classroom? I'm sharing my self contained class schedule and specifics on what each part of our school day looks like. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner.

What questions do you still have about our schedule?

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Back to School Behavior Blog Schedules Simple Classroom

8 Special Education Sample Schedules

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As a special education teacher, I am always curious about sample schedules of other teachers classrooms. In this blog post you will find 7 different sample classroom schedules from special education teaches just like you. Click the links to learn more about each schedule!

Preschool Classroom Schedule

special education inclusion schedules

Andrea Shares her Preschool Classroom Schedule in this blog post. Andrea has 2 half day groups each day.

K-2 Classroom Schedule

Here is part of my K-2 daily schedule.

Michelle shares her K-2 Daily Classroom Schedule in this blog post!

1-4 Classroom Schedule

Slide1.png

Alyssa shares her grades 1-4 daily schedule in this blog post . She also focuses on balancing your daily schedule and fitting in therapies.

K-2 Zoning Plan Schedule

Example of completed zoning plan used for classroom scheduling

Whitney shares a zoning plan schedule for her K-2 classroom inside this blog post and includes a free download for her template!

Multiple Disabilities Classroom Schedule

Image of a schedule for a multiple disabilities classroom.

Stephanie breaks down how to create a schedule for multiple disabilities classrooms step by step inside this blog post.

Middle School Classroom Schedule

Full In-person or Full Distance Learning sample schedule

Tiffany shares her middle school schedule in this blog post.

High School Classroom Schedule

Morning sample High School Classroom Schedule

Kate breaks down every piece of her high school schedule in this blog post !

Schedule Tips for all Levels

special education inclusion schedules

Alyssa shares her favorite scheduling tips for all grade levels in this blog post.

I hope these sample schedules were helpful for you as you build your classroom schedule. I have this classroom schedule template available if you need more help!

Want to see inside other teachers classroom layouts? I share 9 classroom setups in this blog post.

special education inclusion schedules

I teach all about building your daily schedules inside Simple Self-Contained Setup 101, join the waitlist here.

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Learn more about  Simple Self-Contained Setup 101®: the bingeable online course made specifically for self-contained special educators!  Reduce overwhelm and anxiety during back-to-school season with the proven methods I teach you in this course! Click  here  to learn more and join the waitlist now!

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Simple Visual Schedules: EDITABLE

Related Posts:

Morning-Schedule

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Hello! I was not able to click the the Zone Planning post, can you help? Thanks!

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Hi Alyssa! I absolutely L❤️VE your website and all your resources! I’m moderate/severe SPED and Virtual…I teach first-8th grade! Can you help?

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10 types of Visual Schedules for Special Education

  • February 2022
  • Schedules , Visual Supports

10 types of visual schedules for special education classrooms

Using Visual Schedules:

Using the right type of visual schedule s can, quite honestly, make or break your classroom.  Students crave routine, especially those that are on the Autism spectrum.  They need to know what is coming next and visual schedules can help provide this much-needed structure.

Some teachers will argue that kids don't need a schedule, but I will disagree every time.

Even grown adults , that are typically developing, need and want visual schedules.  Whether is a list on my phone or a pacing checklist that I made for vacation, these types of schedules ensure that I do every step and don't forget anything.

visual schedules in the special education classroom

Different Types Of Schedules:

There are so many different types of schedules out there.  They come in many different variations, you just need to pick the one that best meets the needs of your students.  And remember, you don't have to pick just one specific type for your entire classroom.  Choose the visual schedule that matches the student's needs.

I will go over the top 10 types of visual schedules that I have used in my classroom. 

1. Object Schedules:

First then board to be used as a schedule

2. first/then boards:

special education inclusion schedules

3. Picture Schedule:

Written visual schedule for students with special needs

4. Written Schedule:

special education inclusion schedules

5. Binder Schedule:

6. checklist schedules:, 7. real photo schedule, 8. mini-schedules.

visual aids for special education

9. Mobile Schedule (schedule on their phone)

10. traveling schedule:.

The important thing to remember is that not every student in the classroom needs a matchy-matchy, cute picture schedule.  Individualize the schedules.  Hey, maybe every student has a different schedule.  Now that would be great!

10 types of visual schedules for special education classrooms

I am a High School, self-contained Autism teacher from Central New York, who is passionate about individualizing student learning. I am a mommy of three, lover of all things Disney, married to my best friend and addicted to chocolate!! I hope that you find great ideas and inspiration here, so welcome!!

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August 9, 2021 ·

How To Create Your Master Schedule for Special Education

Classroom Structure · Back to School · Helpful Tips · Routines

Creating a master schedule can seem like a daunting task, especially in self-contained special education classrooms. Many teachers are responsible for multiple subjects across the day. The big question is: how do you do it all? I’m going to give you some quick tips when it comes to creating a master schedule! 

What Content in my Master schedule?

A teacher first needs to know what content areas they will be teaching. When you start a new school year, ask your administration if you are responsible for all academic content or just a few subjects. Your school may have multiple teachers that rotate through content areas. 

If you’re like me, you teach it all! From life skills and academics to grooming and self care. Not to mention we also work on vocational skills, independence and communication skills! Just thinking about creating your master schedule for all those areas makes a teacher tired!

Answer the following question and write it down:

  • What content areas will I need to teach in my master schedule?

Schedule Considerations

Next, a teacher needs to look at the student’s required classes and activities when they create their master schedule in special education. Consider when the students have lunch, specials, related services, etc. Many of those times are not flexible and need to be consistent every day or throughout the weeks. Once you have an idea of what the schedule has, you can plug in content areas throughout the day. 

Answer the following questions and write it down:

  • When do my students have lunch each day?
  • When do my students have specials or electives in their master schedule?
  • Do I have my related service minutes, when are those? (If you don’t have those yet, you can put in your content, but know your student may miss part or all of that activity each week)

Content Considerations

In my district, we have a requirement for the amount of time a student needs Reading and Math instruction in their day. You may also find this information on each student’s Additional Services and Placement pages in their Individual Learning Plan (IEP). Make sure to include all required content in your master schedule.

For example, my students are required to receive 90 minutes of reading instruction daily and 45 minutes of math instruction daily. Legally, I need to make sure that throughout the day, those minutes are met. 

  • How long am I required to teach Reading? Math? Community Trips? Life Skills? Science? Cooking? Vocational Skills? Any other content area?

Lunches and Breaks

Master Schedule consideration: Take some time to consider a reasonable lunch break for your assistant(s), I typically start the lunch time around 10:45 and end lunch by 1:00. In my district, paraprofessionals get 30 minute lunch breaks and two 15 minute breaks. I try to space out the paraprofessional breaks as well. Aides get one 15 minute break before 10:30 and one 15 minute break after their lunch but at least an hour before the end of the school day. 

Work with your aides when setting up their lunch and breaks. This will help them feel included in the process. Previously, I had an assistant that liked to call her family on the other side of the world, so she needed time to do that with the time difference. I respected that and let her choose an appropriate break to accommodate that. This needs to be in the master schedule.

  • What time would be reasonable to take lunch breaks?
  • Is there a time during the lunch time that I need my assistants to support? (Student lunch times, specials)?
  • When can my paraprofessionals take breaks?

Pockets of Time

Teachers need to create a master schedule in special education, but you need to look for pockets of time! Once you have all of that information, you should be able to start plugging in academic and functional content into your schedule. This can also be flexible! I know that by 2:00, my students have a difficult time focusing, so I try to frontload my day with as much academic content as possible. 

Also, you need to consider the time increments that you want your classes to be. I typically do 15 minute increments so that bathroom breaks and hygiene times can easily be embedded. 

Here is an example of what my master schedule has looked like in past years:

master schedule Heather used when in the classroom

In a couple weeks, I’ll have another post about how to decide the type of delivery of instruction when lesson planning! Hope you have learned how to create your master schedule for special education!

If you’re looking for how to create a scope and sequence, read this post!

Want to include stations and centers in your classroom? I got the post for you right here !

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How To Create a Master Schedule

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Life Skills Idea List

Thinking about life skills for special ed students is one of the most important parts of our job as special education teachers.

Functional life skills activities are especially important at this age because our students are getting older and we want them to be valuable and independent members of society when they are finished with school.

Want a life skills idea guide done for you for free? Put in your info below and I’ll send it to you!

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Special Education Classroom Schedule

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Creating an effective special education classroom schedule can be a challenge for teachers and administrators. It needs to provide the best support for students while being flexible enough to accommodate changes in the classroom.

ClickUp's Special Education Classroom Schedule Template is designed to make this easier than ever. With this template you can:

  • Easily create and share daily schedules with students, parents, and staff
  • Organize activities, accommodations, and resources in one place
  • Integrate with other tools like Google Calendar to keep everyone in sync

No matter how complex your special education classroom may be, ClickUp's template will help you create a schedule that works for everyone.

Creating an effective special education classroom schedule can be a challenge, but it's worth the effort. A good template can help:

  • Organize the classroom efficiently, minimizing distractions and disruptions
  • Provide a framework for teachers to plan and deliver instruction
  • Ensure that instructional objectives are met in a timely manner
  • Allow for flexibility and spontaneity when needed

ClickUp's Special Education Classroom Schedule Template is designed to help you manage students, classrooms, lessons, and activities. This List template includes:

  • Custom Statuses: Create tasks with custom statuses such as Cancelled, Complete, and To Do, to keep track of the progress of each class and activity
  • Custom Fields: Categorize tasks and add attributes such as Category to manage your special education classroom schedule
  • Custom Views: Open 4 different views in different ClickUp configurations, such as All Classes Activities, Special Education Class Notes, Class Schedule, and Getting Started Guide so that you can quickly access the information you need
  • Project Management: Improve special education class management with tagging, nested subtasks, multiple assignees, and priority labels

Creating a special education classroom schedule can be a daunting task, but by breaking it down into the steps outlined below, you’ll be well on your way to creating a schedule that works for you and your students.

It's important to decide on what you want to accomplish with your special education classroom schedule. Do you want to establish an optimal learning environment for your students? Improve communication between teachers and parents? Make sure that all necessary support services are being provided? Knowing what your goals are will help you focus on the tasks that need to be done.

Use a Doc in ClickUp to brainstorm ideas for your goals and collect feedback from your team.

Create a calendar with the dates and times for all of the classes, activities, and meetings that need to be scheduled.

Use Calendar view in ClickUp to create and track a schedule for all your classes and activities.

Now, it's time to allocate the necessary resources for each activity. This includes teachers, support staff, materials, and any other resources that may be needed.

Use tasks in ClickUp to create resource categories and assign the required resources for each activity.

Once the resources are allocated, assign tasks to the appropriate team members. This includes tasks such as lesson planning, preparing materials, and providing support to students.

Set tasks in ClickUp to assign specific duties to each team member.

It’s important to keep an eye on the progress of the tasks to ensure that everything is running smoothly and that all deadlines are being met.

Use Gantt charts in ClickUp to monitor progress and make sure that tasks are completed in a timely manner.

If you find that tasks are not being completed on time, it may be necessary to make adjustments to the schedule. This can include adding or removing activities, reassigning tasks, or changing the dates or times of activities.

Set up Automations in ClickUp to adjust the schedule as needed.

Educators/Teachers can use this Special Education Classroom Schedule Template to help everyone stay on the same page when it comes to planning activities and managing student schedules.

First, hit “Add Template” to sign up for ClickUp and add the template to your Workspace. Make sure you designate which Space or location in your Workspace you’d like this template applied.

Next, invite relevant members or guests to your Workspace to start collaborating.

add new template customization

Now you can take advantage of the full potential of this template to create a successful special education classroom:

  • Use the All Classes Activities View to save and organize activities for all classes
  • The Special Education Class Notes View will help you keep track of important notes and information about each class
  • The Class Schedule View will give you a space to plan out a schedule for each class
  • The Getting Started Guide View will help you set up a plan for success and ensure that you never miss an important task
  • Organize tasks into three different statuses: Cancelled, Complete, and To Do to keep track of progress
  • Update statuses as you progress through tasks to keep stakeholders informed of progress
  • Monitor and analyze tasks to ensure maximum productivity

Get Started with Our Special Education Classroom Schedule Template Today

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Q&A: How inclusion in education has evolved

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What is the Salamanca Statement on Inclusion in Education?

The  Salamanca Statement on Inclusion in Education was adopted at the joint UNESCO and Ministry of Education of Spain World Conference on Special Needs Education held in Salamanca, Spain, in 1994. The Statement and its accompanying framework for action represent a worldwide consensus on future directions for the education of children with special needs. It is considered as having provided the impetus for inclusive education worldwide. 

The Salamanca Statement emphasized the principle of inclusive education, which advocates for the education of all children, regardless of their physical, intellectual, social, emotional, linguistic, or other conditions, in schools. It called on governments to adopt inclusive policies and stressed the importance of adapting teaching methods, curricula and environments to accommodate the needs of all students. It highlighted the need for adequate training and support for teachers to enable them to address the diverse needs of students effectively and emphasized the importance of collaboration among governments, non-governmental organizations, communities and families to promote inclusive education.

What has happened since the adoption of this Statement?

Since the Salamanca Statement, efforts for inclusive education have continued. The Sustainable Development Goals adopted in 2015 and specifically Goal 4 recognizes the urgent need to provide equitable and inclusive quality education for all learners from the early years through compulsory schooling, technical and vocational education and training, higher education and lifelong learning. It calls on governments to step up efforts to achieve inclusion in education with special emphasis on the role of civil society and the involvement of marginalized groups. It was further highlighted at the United Nations  Transforming Education Summit (TES) in 2022, which recalled the baseline of the Sustainable Development Goal – leave no one behind.

Many countries have enacted laws and policies to promote inclusive education. Of the 133 national commitments to transform education made by countries at the TES, 87% recognized the importance of ensuring more inclusive education systems that cater for the needs of the most vulnerable learners and communities. 

Despite progress since the Salamanca Statement, deep disparities remain. Millions of children and youth are still denied their right to education . Over 7 million refugee children are not enrolled in school. Poverty, geographical location, gender, language, disability, ethnicity, migration or displacement status continue to dictate and limit education opportunities. 

There has been a gradual shift in attitudes towards inclusion in education. More stakeholders, including educators, policymakers, parents and communities are recognizing the value of inclusive education in promoting diversity, equity and social cohesion.  Data shows that when children have at least one sensory difficulty, they are less likely to complete primary school than children who have no sensory difficulties. 

What are the positive trends to ensure inclusion in education?

There is growing emphasis on providing teachers with training and professional development opportunities to effectively support inclusive practices in the classroom. Educators are learning strategies for differentiating instruction, fostering inclusive classroom environments and collaborating with special education professionals and support staff. However, around 40% of countries still do not provide teacher training on inclusion . 

The development and integration of assistive technologies have expanded opportunities for students with disabilities to access educational materials and participate in learning activities alongside their peers. Yet,  laws in 25% of countries make provisions for educating children with disabilities in separate settings, rising to over 40% in Asia and in Latin America and the Caribbean .

There is increasing recognition of the intersectionality of identities and experiences among students. Inclusive education efforts are evolving to address the unique needs and challenges faced by students who belong to multiple marginalized groups, such as students with disabilities who are also from minority ethnic or linguistic backgrounds.  In at least 20 countries, hardly any poor, rural young woman complete upper secondary school.

Overall, the evolution of inclusion in education since the Salamanca Statement and the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals in 2015 reflect a growing commitment to creating equitable, diverse and inclusive learning environments where every learner matters, and matters equally. Barriers to inclusion include poor attitudes, inaccessible and unsafe learning environments, rigid curriculum, ineffective teacher training, lack of knowledge of the language of instruction, socio-economic barriers to education, and lack of political will and funding. 

How is UNESCO supporting inclusion in education?

UNESCO plays a significant role in promoting inclusive education around the world through various initiatives, programmes and advocacy efforts. UNESCO supports governments to adopt inclusive education frameworks, provides technical assistance and builds capacity among governments, education stakeholders and institutions to develop inclusive education systems. The Global Education Monitoring Report’s  SCOPE and VIEW databases track indicators related to access, participation, quality and equity in education, including the inclusion of marginalized and vulnerable populations.  

More work remains to be done. UNESCO calls on governments and partners to support inclusive education by:

  • Targeting financial support to disadvantaged groups and eliminate direct and indirect schools fees in basic education; 
  • providing programmes and avenues for re-entry into the education system, equivalency programmes, programmes for continuous learning and lifelong learning, both in formal and non-formal education systems; 
  • forging a holistic approach to education from early childhood onwards to incorporate the concerns of marginalized and excluded groups in all levels of education and in all areas of education;
  • developing capacities for policy-making and system management to support strategies towards inclusive quality education; and 
  • undertaking research on inclusive policies and quality learning enhancement to build good practice based on the evidence of what works.

More information

  • UNESCO inclusion in education  
  • Celebrating inclusion in education: 30th Anniversary of Salamanca Statement
  • Celebrating inclusion in education: Global Inclusive Schools' Forum  
  • SDG4 mid-term progress review: progress since 2015 has been far too slow  
  • 2020 GEM Report on inclusion in education : All means All
  • Regional Report on inclusion in education: 2020 Latin America and the Caribbean report
  • Regional Report on inclusion in education: 2021 Central and Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia
  • PEER country profiles on inclusion in education
  • Right from the start: build inclusive societies through inclusive early childhood education
  • How committed? Unlocking financing for equity in education
  • Inclusive teaching: preparing all teachers to teach all students
  • Access the  SCOPE website  
  • Explore the  VIEW website  

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Providing technical support and professional development to school staff who serve students with disabilities.

We promote inclusion and believe that all children and youth with disabilities can be educated in the general education environment alongside nondisabled peers. All students with and without disabilities can engage in learning and benefit from meaningful instruction, have friends and be full members of their school communities.

The Division of Special Education offers a variety of resources for districts implementing programs for students with varying abilities. Our department values all learners, infants to adult transition, and works through a lens of access, equity and inclusion. Learn more about the different types of support available to you and your teams, and visit our Special Education Canvas Resource page for more materials.

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Our team has experienced staff ready to tackle any issue related to special education and the IEP process. Services including: consultation, data interpretation, program planning and staff trainings on everything from Alternative Dispute Resolution to Writing a Legally Defensible IEP. Whatever your needs, contact our team today, for a student-centered solution.

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The LACOE Vision Services Program offers a full range of vision services from contracts for Teachers of the Visually Impaired and Braille Translations. Contact Nic Frank for all your VI needs.

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Are you ready to move your program, school or district to an inclusive model? Research shows inclusion for all students, regardless of disability, is a benefit for everyone. We have a range of services wherever you are on the inclusion spectrum.

As classrooms move towards more inclusive practices, general education teachers can be supported by becoming proficient in Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and foundational literacy. We can connect your team to the right resources and training.

Additionally LACOE has compiled several resources to support inclusive early childhood education (Inclusive ECE) expansion. Learn more about this ongoing work.

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Our team has a menu of training for all your needs. If we don’t already have it, we can make it. Training can be held in-person or virtually. We are proud to offer topics like:

·      AB1172 (Required for NPS staff)

·      New & Returning Para-educators.

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Are you engaged in an IEP conflict or have issues with a service provider or vendor? We have student-centered problem-solving services to help. Contact us for ADR or Mediation Services.

Access curricular and program development materials and resources on our team's Canvas webpage .

Contact Your SELPA

SELPAs ensure that educational programs and services are provided to meet the needs of students with disabilities. A SELPA may include one school district or multiple districts, which are organized by geographic region and pool resources to provide for all the special education service needs of students residing within the region. LACOE operates its own SELPA to serve students with disabilities in its Juvenile Court Schools, Alternative Education programs, International Polytechnic (iPoly) High School, the Los Angeles County High School for the Arts and certain charter schools.

Click here to access the LACOE Schools SELPA

Click here for contact information for other selpas in los angeles county., request student records.

LACOE maintains Juvenile Court and Community Schools (JCCS) inactive student records at one location for the purpose of filing transcript and records requests, monitoring and maintaining inactive stored files. In addition, LACOE-authored Charters (ONLY) that have closed have sent their records to LACOE for storage. 

Review guidelines for requesting LACOE student records.

Grant projects, special education resource lead (serl).

The LACOE Special Education Resource Lead (SERL)  grant team is honored to partner with CDE and CCEE. 

Our goal is to build capacity  by  providing supports for systemic, continuous improvement to  County Offices of Education (COE) and Local Educational Agencies (LEA) for the inclusion of students with the most significant support needs .

For contact and detailed grant project information, please click HERE .

CONNECT WITH US

Jovan Jacobs, Ed.D.  Director Jacobs_Jovan@lacoe.edu

Tristin Eros Division Secretary  eros_tristin@lacoe.edu Karen Voigt Administrative Assistant voigt_karen@lacoe.edu DIFFERENTIATED ASSISTANCE (DA)

Matthew Roper Coordinator II Roper_Matthew@lacoe.edu

Susan Turner-McMullen Coordinator III TurnerMcMullen_Susan@lacoe.edu

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Ann Lim Coordinator II Lim_Ann@lacoe.edu 

INCLUSIVE EARLY EDUCATION EXPANSION PROGRAM (IEEEP)

Gloria Brennick, Ed.D. Coordinator II brennick_gloria@lacoe.edu

Thitaporn Acosta Senior Program Specialist Acosta_Thitaporn@lacoe.edu Katherine Jaimez Senior Program Specialist Jaimez_Katherine@lacoe.edu

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Marcia Reily, Ed.D. Coordinator III Reily_Marcia@lacoe.edu

Kristen Danhour Standke Senior Program Specialist danhour_kristen@lacoe.edu

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Nic Frank Coordinator III  frank_nic@lacoe.edu

Nicole Abshear Teacher of the Visually Impaired abshear_nicole@lacoe.edu

Yvette Casas Teacher of the Visually Impaired Casas_Yvette@lacoe.edu

Kathryn Fazzi Orientation & Mobility Teacher fazzi_kathryn@lacoe.edu

Maria Javier Teacher of the Visually Impaired  javier_maria@lacoe.edu

Gayané Grigoryan Braille Transcriber grigoryan_gayane@lacoe.edu

Adriana Munoz Braille Transcriber munoz_adriana@lacoe.edu

Division of Special Education Special_Education@lacoe.edu (562) 803-8300 Follow us on Facebook!

special education inclusion schedules

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  • v.64(Suppl 1); 2021 Apr

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Children with intellectual disabilities: Support in inclusive practice

Y. afanasyeva.

1 Institute Of Special Education And Psychology Institute Of System Projects Institute Of Lifelong Learning Directorate Of Educational Programs Institute Of Education Content, Methods And Technology, Moscow City University, Moscow, Russian Federation

M. Bratkova

2 Department Of Rehabilitation, Clinical and Research Institute of Emergency Pediatric Surgery and Trauma (CRIEPST), Moscow, Russian Federation

3 Psychiatric Research Group, N.N.Burdenko National Medical Research Center of Neurosurgery, Moscow, Russian Federation

Introduction

The inclusion process allows children with special educational needs to be included in a normative environment. A large group consists of children with intellectual disabilities and behavioral disorders, hey need medical and pedagogical rehabilitation due to their low learning ability, neurotic disorders, and mental distortion.

Study of psychophysical characteristics of children with intellectual disability and behavioral disorders.

140 children with intellectual disabilities who have impairments in the neuro-psychological sphere (2017-2020 г.г.). Methods: medical and pedagogical, observation, examination, assessment.

Variants of the child’s psychophysical development: Option 1. (75%): children with a predominance of violations in behavior, emotional and volitional sphere. There is aggressiveness, inconsistency and impulsiveness of actions, lack of distance with an adult, and difficulties in complying with accepted norms and rules. Option 2 (25%): children with the following manifestations: timidity, tearfulness, distrust, fears, lack of initiative. All children have difficulty sleeping, eating disorders, and frequent psychosomatic illnesses.

Conclusions

Children with intellectual disabilities in an inclusive practice need comprehensive assistance, taking into account different variants of their psychophysical characteristics. The studied children were found to have neurotic and neurosis-like disorders, as well as pathological personality development. All children have: low performance, lability of the nervous system, lack of voluntary regulation, impaired activity, learning difficulties. There are behavioral and mental disorders that require medical, psychological and pedagogical rehabilitation.

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Mailing Address: College of Education, Health and Human Sciences University of Idaho 875 Perimeter Drive Moscow, Idaho 83844-3082

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Aleksandra Hollingshead

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Aleksandra Hollingshead

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Curriculum and Instruction

  • Ed.D Emphasis Special Education, University of Cincinnati 2013
  • M.Ed. Emphasis Mild/Moderate and Moderate/Severe Intervention Specialist, K-12, Antioch University McGregor 2008
  • M.A. Emphasis Political Science, Silesian University, Poland 2003
  • B.A. Emphasis Political Science and Philosophy, Silesian University, Poland 2003
  • EDSP 300: Educating for Exceptionalities
  • EDSP 548: Curriculum and Instruction in Special Education
  • EDSP 504: Evidence Based Practices
  • EDSP 504: Orientation to Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • EDSP 423: Collaboration

Awards and Honors

Excellence in Outreach and Engagement Award nomination, University of Idaho, 2017

Hoffman Teaching Excellence Award nomination, University of Idaho, 2017

Hoffman Teaching Excellence Award nomination, University of Idaho, 2016

Excellence in Outreach and Engagement Award nomination, University of Idaho, 2016

The Darwin T. Turner Scholars Program, Faculty Recognition Award, University of Cincinnati, 2013

Outstanding Doctoral Student Award, University of Cincinnati, 2013

Aleksandra Hollingshead is an associate professor of special education at the University of Idaho. Dr. Hollingshead also serves as a part-time Associate Dean at the College of Education, Health and Human Sciences and a program coordinator for special education. She received her doctorate in special education from the University of Cincinnati in 2013. Dr. Hollingshead was born in Poland and moved to the United States in 2003. Dr. Hollingshead earned her master degree in special education and worked as an intervention specialist with students with severe autism and significant behavior challenges. Dr. Hollingshead’s main research interests include academic engagement of students with autism and severe disabilities, as well as topics related to instructional and assistive technology. Dr. Hollingshead examines student engagement through a lens of Universal Design for Learning framework. Dr. Hollingshead serves as a board of directors member for the Education Northwest and the REL Northwest. She also serves as an associate editor for the FOCUS on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities journal .

Outreach Projects

SIT-STEM project, Principal Investigator Moscow, Idaho, Collaborate with Dr. Wappett and Ms. Carson on educational outreach to a special education classroom. We will conduct technology needs assessment, purchase and incorporate instructional and assistive technology, collect data, conduct intervention-based single subject studies. October, 2013 - August 2014

Outreach Service

Popular Press

  • Halas, M. (06.13.2016). American students taught English at a local high school. Zycie Bytomskie, a local Polish newspaper.
  • Halas, M. (06.02.2014). American professor from Bytom . Zycie Bytomskie, a local Polish newspaper.
  • Nowacka-Goik, M. (05.30.2014). “Smoleniaczka” from America” . Dziennik Zachodni, a regional Polish newspaper.
  • College of Education January 2014 Newsletter. Alex Hollingshead spent part of her winter break in Poland, where she is planning a faculty-led study abroad opportunity for students .
  • Engaging special education teachers from rural areas: A virtual community of practice to share technology implementation ideas. Funded by the Doceo Center for Innovation and Learning, University of Idaho .
  • Systematic Integration of Technology for STEM Support in a Special Education Classroom (SIT STEM) — outreach project in Moscow City Schools. Funded by the Doceo Center for Innovation and Learning, University of Idaho .
  • Chapman, E., Hollingshead, A., & Taylor, A. (November, 2020) Keeping it accessible; keeping it inclusive. CETL  professional development workshop for faculty at the University of Idaho , Moscow, ID.
  • Chapman, E., Hollingshead, A., & Taylor, A. (July, 2020). Making HyFlex, online, and other classes accessible and inclusive. CETL professional development workshop for faculty at the University of Idaho, Moscow, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. (October, 2019). Unpacking UNIVERSAL in Universal Design for Learning for students with most complex learning needs. Infinitec webinar series , Chicago, IL.
  • Hollingshead, A. (October, 2019). Unpacking DESIGN in Universal Design for Learning for students with most complex learning needs. Infinitec webinar series , Chicago, IL.
  • Hollingshead, A. (November, 2019). Unpacking LEARNING in Universal Design for Learning for students with most complex learning needs. Infinitec webinar series , Chicago, IL.
  • Hollingshead, A. (September, 2018). Facilitating inclusion using the UDL framework. A professional development workshop for teaching staff, Moscow School District , Moscow, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. (August, 2018). Facilitating inclusion using the UDL framework. A professional development workshop for special education staff, Kellogg, Wallace , Mullan, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. (February, 2018). Creating inclusive learning experiences through UDL. A professional development workshop for faculty at the University of Idaho , Moscow, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. (January, 2018). Creating inclusive learning experiences through UDL. A professional development workshop for faculty at the University of Idaho , Moscow, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. (March, 2017). Universal Design for Learning and student engagement.  A professional development workshop for faculty at the University of Idaho , Moscow, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. (December, 2016). Universal design for learning and student engagement. An invited workshop for special education teachers in Lake Pend Orielle School District , Sandpoint, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. (December, 2016). Visual supports in the classroom. An invited workshop for teachers and paraprofessionals in Moscow School District , Moscow, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. (October, 2016). Universal design for learning and student engagement. An invited workshop for Region 1 and Region 2 special education directors ¸ Coeur d’Alene, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. (October, 2016). Universal design for learning and student engagement. An invited workshop for special education teachers in Kellogg, Mullan, and Wallace school districts .  Kellogg, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. (September, 2016). Multiple means of engagement. A state-wide UDL symposium , Coeur d’Alene, ID.
  • Hollingshead, A. & Barrio, B. (August, 2015). Setting up for a successful school year: Strategies for behavior management. A professional development workshop for paraprofessionals from rural areas- project funded by the WSU and U of I Colleges of Education Faculty Funding .
  • Hollingshead, A. & Barrio, B. (April, 2015). Strategies for meaningful inclusion and collaboration: How to facilitate social acceptance of students with disabilities. A professional development workshop for paraprofessionals from rural areas- project funded by the WSU and U of I Colleges of Education Faculty Funding .
  • Hollingshead, A. & Barrio, B. (January, 2015). The principles of structured teaching to support behavior management, communication, and small group instruction. A professional development workshop for paraprofessionals from rural areas- project funded by the WSU and U of I Colleges of Education Faculty Funding .
  • Hollingshead, A. & Barrio, B. (November, 2014). Assistive technology supports and evidence-based practices for students with learning disabilities, autism, and intellectual disabilities. A professional development workshop for paraprofessionals from rural areas- project funded by the WSU and U of I Colleges of Education Faculty Funding .

Research Projects

Funded projects:

Current ($5500)

  • Hollingshead, A. (Awarded $1500, January, 2021). Exploring Universal Design for Learning Framework in an Online Class. Teaching Innovation Program. Center on Teaching and Learning, University of Idaho.
  • Scheef, A., & Hollingshead A. (Awarded $4000, September, 2019). Vandal QUEST: Inclusive postsecondary opportunities at the University of Idaho. Steppingstones, Inc.
  • Hollingshead, A. & Haltinner, K. (Awarded $4998, summer 2017). Cultural competency and Universal Design for Learning: Providing relevant instruction to all students. College of Education and College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences Funding, University of Idaho .

Completed ($56,027.14)

  • Hollingshead, A. & Haltinner, K. (Awarded $4998, summer 2017). Cultural competency and Universal Design for Learning: Providing relevant instruction to all students. College of Education and College of Letters, Arts, and Social Sciences Funding, University of Idaho.
  • Hollingshead, A. (Awarded $2000, December 2013). It is More than Pierogies: Engaging students in exploration of diversity Through Teaching and Sightseeing in Poland. International Programs, University of Idaho.
  • Hollingshead, A. (Awarded $18,544.41, September 2014). Engaging special education teachers from rural areas: A virtual community of practice to share technology implementation ideas. Doceo Center for Innovation & Learning, University of Idaho.
  • Barrio, B., & Hollingshead, A. (Awarded $5000, May 2014). Reaching out to paraprofessionals: Engaging professional development in rural communities. Washington State University College of Education Faculty Funding.
  • Hollingshead, A. & Barrio, B. (Awarded $5000, May 2014). Reaching out to paraprofessionals: Engaging professional development in rural communities. University of Idaho College of Education Faculty Funding.
  • Hollingshead, A., Carson, J., Wappett, M. (Awarded $15,000, October 2013). Systematic Integration of Technology for STEM Support in a Special Education Classroom (SIT STEM). Doceo Center for Innovation and Learning, University of Idaho.
  • Hollingshead, A., & Servilio, K. (Awarded $1,500, November 2013). Partnerships that Enhance Practice (PEP). A mini grant funded by the Teacher Education Division of CEC.
  • Carnahan, C., Williamson, P., Hollingshead, A., Snyder, K., & Tan, C. (Awarded, $2000, April 2012). What’s the difference? Evaluating iPads, Laptops, and Traditional Books to promote engagement and learning for individuals with autism spectrum disorders. College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services Instructional Research and Development Technology Grant, University of Cincinnati.
  • Carnahan, C., Williamson, P., Snyder, K., Hollingshead, A., & Li, X. (Awarded $1985, April 2012). Virtual coaching: A new model of providing support to pre-service teachers in the field. College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services Instructional Research and Development Technology Grant, University of Cincinnati.
  • Hollingshead, A. (Awarded $2000, December 2013). It is More than Pierogies: Engaging students in exploration of diversity Through Teaching and Sightseeing in Poland. International Programs, University of Idaho .
  • Hollingshead, A. (Awarded $18,544.41, September 2014). Engaging special education teachers from rural areas: A virtual community of practice to share technology implementation ideas. Doceo Center for Innovation & Learning, University of Idaho .
  • Barrio, B., & Hollingshead, A. (Awarded $5000, May 2014). Reaching out to paraprofessionals: Engaging professional development in rural communities. Washington State University College of Education Faculty Funding .
  • Hollingshead, A. & Barrio, B. (Awarded $5000, May 2014). Reaching out to paraprofessionals: Engaging professional development in rural communities. University of Idaho College of Education Faculty Funding .
  • Hollingshead, A., Carson, J., Wappett, M. (Awarded $15,000, October 2013). Systematic Integration of Technology for STEM Support in a Special Education Classroom (SIT STEM). Doceo Center for Innovation and Learning, University of Idaho .
  • Hollingshead, A., & Servilio, K. (Awarded $1,500, November 2013). Partnerships that Enhance Practice (PEP). A mini grant funded by the Teacher Education Division of CEC .
  • Carnahan, C., Williamson, P., Hollingshead, A., Snyder, K., & Tan, C. (Awarded, $2000, April 2012). What’s the difference? Evaluating iPads, Laptops, and Traditional Books to promote engagement and learning for individuals with autism spectrum disorders. College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services Instructional Research and Development Technology Grant, University of Cincinnati .
  • Carnahan, C., Williamson, P., Snyder, K., Hollingshead, A., & Li, X. (Awarded $1985, April 2012). Virtual coaching: A new model of providing support to pre-service teachers in the field. College of Education, Criminal Justice, and Human Services Instructional Research and Development Technology Grant, University of Cincinnati .

Selected Publications

(see the CV for a full list)

Peer Reviewed/Evaluated

  • Hollingshead, A. (2021). Designing engaging online environment: Universal Design for Learning principles. Research Anthology on Developing Effective Online Learning Courses. IGI Global. (p. 516-530).
  • Hollingshead, A. , Lowrey, K. A., & Howery, K. (2020). Universal design for learning: When policy changes before evidence. Educational Policy. Online first
  • Scheef, A., Hollingshead, A. , & Barrio, B. (2020). Supporting students with intellectual disability in postsecondary education. Journal of College Student Development. 61(4), 528-531.
  • Hollingshead, A. , & Carr-Chellman, D. (2019). Engaging learners in online environments utilizing Universal Design for Learning principles. E-Learn . ( https://elearnmag.acm.org/archive.cfm?aid=3310383 )
  • Hollingshead, A. , Williamson, P., & Carnahan, C. (2018). Cognitive and emotional engagement for students with severe intellectual disability defined by the scholars with expertise in the field. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities , 43(4), 269-284.
  • Hollingshead, A. (2018). Designing engaging online environment: Universal Design for Learning principles. In K. L. Milheim (Ed.). Cultivating Diverse Online Classrooms through Effective Instructional Design.   Hershey, PA: IGI Global.
  • Hall, C., Hollingshead, A. , & Christman, J. (in press, 2017). Implementing video modeling to improve transitions within activities in inclusive classrooms. Intervention in School and Clinic .
  • Lowrey, K. A., Hollingshead, A. , Howery, K. & Bishop, J. (in press, 2017). More than one way: Stories of UDL, inclusive classrooms, and students with intellectual disability. Research and Practice for Persons with Severe Disabilities .

Lowrey, K. A., Hollingshead, A. & Howery, K. (2017). A closer look: Examining teachers’ language around UDL, inclusive classrooms, and intellectual disability. Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities , 55(1), 15-24.

Hollingshead, A. , Carnahan, C., Lowrey, K. A., & Snyder, K. (2017). Engagement for students with severe cognitive disabilities: The need for a common definition in education. Inclusion , 5(1), 1-15.

Barrio, B. L., Miller, D., Hsaio, Y-J., Dunn, M., Petersen, S., Hollingshead, A. , & Banks, S.  (2017). Cultural considerations for the Individualized Education Programming. Intervention in School and Clinic , 1-6 (online first).

Servilio, K., Hollingshead, A. , & Hott, B. (2016). Partnerships enhancing practice: A preliminary model of technology-based peer-to-peer evaluations of teaching in higher education. Journal of Special Education and Technology , 1-13 (online first).

Hollingshead, A. , Kroeger, S., Altus, J., & Trytten- Brubaker, J. (2016). A case study of positive behavior supports-based interventions in a seventh grade urban classroom. Preventing School Failure 60(4),1-8.

Hollingshead, A. , Wappett, M., & Erickson, N. (2015). Examining the effectiveness of technology-based intervention on student engagement and products of learning in an Earth science class. DADD Online Journal 2(1), 146-156.

Klein, E., & Hollingshead, A. (2015). Collaboration between special and physical education: The benefits of a healthy lifestyle for all students.  TEACHING Exceptional Children , 47(3), 163-171.

Hollingshead, A. & Streagle, K. (2015). Modeling Universal Design for Learning Principles in a College Classroom: A Means to Engage Pre-service Teachers.  UDL-IRN monograph . 117-122.

Carnahan C., Williamson, P., Hollingshead, A. , & Israel, M. (2012). Using technology to support balanced literacy instruction for students with significant disabilities.  TEACHING Exceptional Children , 45(1), 20-29.

Carnahan, C., Basham, J., Christman, J, & Hollingshead, A. (2012). Overcoming challenges: Going mobile with your own video models.   TEACHING Exceptional Children , 45(2), 50-59. 

Refereed/Adjudicated

Hollingshead, A. (2020). How education leaders can support students with autism during school closures. REL Northwest blog , https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/northwest/blog/support-students-with-autism.asp .

Hall, C., Mullins, R., Hollingshead, A. , Dousay, T. (2019). Boosting communication: Using point of view (POV) video for students with disabilities as a powerful communication piece with parents. Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp.241-244), Las Vegas, NV. Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) . Retrieved April 12, 2019 from https://www.learntechlib.org/p/208465 .

Hollingshead, A. & Barrio, B. (2019). Working with paraprofessionals to support students with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. In J. Shurr,  Jimenez, B., & E. Bouck, (Eds.). Evidence Based Practices for Students with Intellectual Disability and Autism Spectrum Disorder. (47-71). Arlington, VA: Council for Exceptional Children.

Hollingshead, A. (October 13, 2016). Article misrepresents universal design for learning framework. A letter to the editor of The Chronicle of Higher Education .  http://www.chronicle.com/blogs/letters/article-misrepresents-universal-design-for-learning-framework/

Klein, E. & Hollingshead, A. (2016). Planning physical education within Universal Design for Learning framework to ensure quality instruction for all students. SHAPE Idaho: A Journal for Idaho’s Health and Physical Educators, Coaches, & Recreation Directors , Winter 2016, 14-18.

Hollingshead, A. (2013). Teaching math content to students with significant disabilities: A textbox. In B. Billingsley, M. Brownell, M. Israel, & M. Kamman, (2013).  The Beginning Special Education Teacher’s Survival Guide . (p. 264-284). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Hollingshead, A. (2013). Teaching academic content to students with significant disabilities: A textbox. In In B. Billingsley, M. Brownell, M. Israel, & M. Kamman, (2013).  The Beginning Special Education Teacher’s Survival Guide . (p. 285-302). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Hollingshead, A. (2010).  Use of visual schedules for students with autism- a case study.  ABA India  1(2), 1-4.

  • Aleksandra Hollingshead CV docx

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Annual Carey Summit 2024

Diversity at carey, schedule of events.

Event Speakers

The 2024 Annual Carey Summit builds on the precedent of the DEIB Summits of the last few years and holistically includes diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging in all of its discussions and elements. It provides opportunities for the business and education communities to engage with and learn from leaders across industries who are committed to principles of diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging. 

The Carey Annual Summit is open to the entire Johns Hopkins University and Medicine community and regional employers.

This year’s summit is virtual except for the opening luncheon, which is hybrid. You will find the Zoom links for each presentation in the session schedule. Register here for in-person luncheon and panel

Register here for virtual panel  

At Carey Business School, diversity and inclusion are not just initiatives or a task force. They are baked into everything we do. And we embrace and continue to build a diverse student body, staff, and faculty because we believe our differences can be a powerful force for good. While we are proud of our commitment to underserved populations, we know there is still much more to do.

Centers and Labs: Carey’s Center for Innovative Leadership, Human Capital Development Lab, and Center for Digital Health and Artificial Intelligence

SESSION TYPE: Hybrid panel

WELCOME:  Dean Alex Triantis

PANELISTS: Mike Doyle, Executive Director, Center for Innovative Leadership Rick Smith, Director, Human Capital Development Lab Ritu Agarwal, Director, Center for Digital Health and Artificial Intelligence

MODERATOR:   James Calvin, Associate Dean, Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging

Cultural Resilience While Living Our Values

DESCRIPTION: Feeling the pull between upholding your values and adapting to change? This session dives deep into navigating this complex terrain. Hear from diverse voices exploring how individuals and organizations maintain their cultural core while facing challenges and shifting social dynamics. Interactive discussions will unveil practical strategies for successful collaborations, preserving heritage, embracing inclusivity, bridging diverse identities, and nurturing cultural integrity in future generations.

PANELISTS: Florizelle Liser, Executive Director, Council for Africa Business Gebreyes Kulleni, MD, Director, Deloitte Health Equity Institute Ahizechukwu Eke, MBChB, PhD, MPH,   Associate Professor of Gynecology & Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Johns Hopkins Hospital

Register for this session

Health Care: Living Our Values in Research, Teaching, and Service

SESSION TYPE: Panel

DESCRIPTION: This panel includes researchers, educators, and practitioners who are Carey faculty, adjunct faculty-alumni, and active collaborators with Carey faculty from other Johns Hopkins University divisions.  We will discuss teaching, research, and practice of health care management focusing on how our work serves to relentlessly advance diverse leaders, to collaboratively lead diverse teams, and to create a sense of belonging by demonstrating unwavering humanity for diverse populations learning about, providing care in, making policy in, and leading in health care or healthcare-adjacent organizations. 

PANELISTS: Lauren Hines Stacey Lee, Professor Lindsay Thompson, Professor Samantha Winters; Hossein Zare

MODERATOR:   Kevin Frick, Professor, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Allyship = Leadership

SESSION TYPE: Talk

DESCRIPTION: Linking gender equity to leadership is vital. To create a culture in which men can be allies, it’s essential to reframe gender equality as a leadership challenge instead of a “women’s issue.” Forward-leaning and successful organizations cultivate a culture of allyship and equip everyone to succeed and thrive as allies for gender equity broadly. It is imperative that leaders create a work environment that supports allyship itself — a workplace where curiosity, courage, confidence, caring, and commitment are valued traits. In this environment, men can support each other on the path to becoming an ally — acknowledging mistakes, holding each other accountable, and maintaining a learning orientation along the way. Leveraging some of our own research, this panel will discuss the benefits, challenges, examples and personal experiences with allyship in the workplace—and at home.

PANELISTS: LaToya Fendrick, Academic Advisor Dylan Rasnick, Student Services Administrator Sunny Roy, MBA/MPH candidate Colleen Stuart, Associate Professor

MODERATOR: David Smith, Associate Professor

Charting a Purpose-Driven Path: Women’s Leadership in Shaping the Future

DESCRIPTION: Amidst a rapidly evolving business landscape, women leaders are at the forefront of integrating core values into corporate strategy, fostering cultures of inclusivity, and driving sustainable growth. This session delves into the narratives of visionary women who leverage their unique perspectives and values to navigate challenges, inspire innovation, and make impactful decisions. By highlighting the intersections between personal values, professional integrity, and leadership excellence, we aim to inspire attendees to embrace their authenticity as a powerful tool for transformation and success. Through real-life examples and actionable insights, participants will be equipped to lead with purpose and influence positive change in their organizations and communities.

AI: Living Our Values in Research, Teaching, and Service

DESCRIPTION: The concept and logical framework of artificial intelligence emerged early in the 20th century and for decades developed in specialized applications such as banking, gaming, and defense.  It wasn’t until computers and software became powerful, nimble and relatively cheap that AI really took off in every sector of society to reach the mass consumption market and permeate every aspect of our lives. The innovative arc of AI possibilities can be dazzling, but it also raises ethical questions such as transparency, embedded bias, and privacy rights.  The reputational branding for us as an academic community is anchored in the integrity, transparency, and impartiality of the knowledge we generate, apply, and teach. How does AI challenge our values? How do we live our values in our research, teaching, and service to society? This panel of experts shares their experience of grappling with these questions.

PANELISTS:   Javad Abed, Assistant Professor  Cassandra Chambers, Assistant Professor Kathleen Day, Lecturer,  Tinglong Dai, Professor  Gordon Gao, Professor ; Sudip Gupta, Associate Professor

MODERATOR:   Lindsay Thompson, Professor

Collaborative Leadership: Fostering Psychological Safety for Inclusive Leadership

DESCRIPTION: In an era where organizations face unprecedented challenges, the need for inclusive leadership has never been more crucial. This session will explore the pivotal role of psychological safety in cultivating environments that support and promote organizational values, specifically focusing on inclusion. 

PRESENTER:   Sacha Thompson

DEIB Summit Team

Office of admissions.

  • Executive Education
  • About Carey Business School
  • Women's Leadership Initiative

IMAGES

  1. 5 Schedule Examples From Special Education Classes With Free Download

    special education inclusion schedules

  2. Scheduling in the Special Education Classroom

    special education inclusion schedules

  3. How to Make the Special Ed Classroom Schedule (Ep 43)

    special education inclusion schedules

  4. 5 Schedule Examples From Special Education Classes With Free Download

    special education inclusion schedules

  5. 5 Schedule Examples From Special Education Classes With Free Download

    special education inclusion schedules

  6. 5 Schedule Examples From Special Education Classes With Free Download

    special education inclusion schedules

VIDEO

  1. SSEPTSA General Meeting 01.15.24

  2. Lunch & Learn: Inclusion Academy

  3. Implementation & Strategies for Inclusion in Society & School |Creating an Incl. Educ. |B.Ed 2nd yr

  4. Bill would track diversity education at Indiana colleges and universities

  5. INCLUSIÓN

  6. Inclusion of Students with Specific Learning Disabilities in Higher Education

COMMENTS

  1. Creating Your Class Schedule for SPED

    5. Now that you've created a basic classroom schedule that includes adult lunch and duty times, and you have regular ed's schedules, you're ready to create individual student schedules. My two suggestions: • Create the schedule in Excel. I dislike Excel for everything except creating a schedule because it's easy to manipulate and edit ...

  2. 5 Schedule Examples From Special Education Classes With Free Download

    The download includes 5 special education classes' schedules and cover all ages from preschool through high school. They are all self-contained classrooms with one that also served as a resource classroom. I have a variety of posts that include tons of information about how to set up all types of special education classes.

  3. Now is the time for schools to invest in special-education inclusion

    Prioritize connected professional learning around inclusion for all teachers. We adjusted teachers' schedules to incorporate collaborative time for general education and special education teachers to meet before, during and after lessons to plan engaging, differentiated instruction for all.

  4. Using Schedules in Special Education Classrooms

    Imagine using schedules in special education classrooms where every student is engaged, empowered, and knows exactly what to expect throughout the day. Structure, routine, and visual supports play a vital role in creating an inclusive learning environment for students with special needs. In this blog post, we will delve into the powerful tool ...

  5. Creating a Special Education Classroom Schedule

    Sharing is caring! Creating a well-balanced and inclusive classroom schedule is a vital task for special education teachers. The schedule must consider the diverse needs of students, the support provided by paraprofessionals, inclusion classes in other parts of the school, and the successful integration of essential lessons throughout the day.

  6. PDF Scheduling for Co-Teaching and Other Inclusive Practices

    special education teacher should be considered eligible to teach in a co-taught class. 4. When two teachers are sharing a class it is called a "co-taught" class. The terms" inclusion class" or "inclusion teachers" are not appropriate. 5. No more than 40% of any one general education class should be populated with students who have IEPs.

  7. ClassMap

    A scheduling tool made for special education teachers Plan your weekly and whole class schedule. Whether your students work on the same stations every day or you need to plan for each individual day, ClassMap has got you covered.

  8. A Look Inside My Self Contained Class Schedule + Planning

    I'm sharing my self contained class schedule and specifics on what each part of our school day looks like. Blog post at Mrs. D's Corner. ... Being a self-contained classroom special education teacher, I often get asked about what my classroom schedule looks like, how I lesson plan for all the different ability levels, and just what one single ...

  9. Simply Special Ed

    If you are a special education teacher looking for some sample schedules to organize your classroom, you will love this webpage from Simply Special Ed. You will find 8 different examples of how to plan your day, week, and month, as well as tips and tricks to make your scheduling easier. Whether you teach self-contained, resource, or inclusion, you will find a schedule that suits your needs and ...

  10. Creating an Inclusive Classroom in Special Education

    At UT Permian Basin, you can earn a Master of Arts in Special Education in as little as 12 months and advance in a growing field of advocates, educators, and specialists. Learn more about UT Permian Basin's online MA in special education program. Classroom inclusion for special needs provides improved learning environments for students with ...

  11. Special Education Classroom Daily Schedule Templates

    Daily Plans and Schedule - Days of Week Excel. Planning Sheet Student Schedule Adult Roles Sample. Student Schedule for a Classroom of 8. To Do Blank Checklist. Lunch Recess Color Coded. Staff Schedule 3 Column. Sample 8 period blocks. 8 period horizontal day color coded 8 period horizontal template adult schedule. Time periods vertical sample.

  12. PDF Inclusionary Practices & Systems MASTER SCHEDULES

    schedule to support an inclusive culture with a rigorous, accessible, and equitable instructional program driven by special education services. Staff devised a master schedule that would support success (intervention) blocks, co-teaching, and common planning times for grade-level teams with special education teachers.

  13. 10 types of Visual Schedules for Special Education

    Choose the visual schedule that matches the student's needs. I will go over the top 10 types of visual schedules that I have used in my classroom. 1. Object Schedules: Object schedules are just that; schedules made with objects. These types of schedules are used for the visually impaired.

  14. How To Create Your Master Schedule for Special Education

    Master Schedule consideration: Take some time to consider a reasonable lunch break for your assistant (s), I typically start the lunch time around 10:45 and end lunch by 1:00. In my district, paraprofessionals get 30 minute lunch breaks and two 15 minute breaks. I try to space out the paraprofessional breaks as well.

  15. The Impact of Visual Schedules for Students With Disabilities: A

    The Impact of Visual Schedules for Students With Disabilities: A ... Follow this and additional works at: https://spark.bethel.edu/etd Part of the Special Education and Teaching Commons Recommended Citation McDonald, K. L. (2021). ... It has been accepted for inclusion in All Electronic Theses and Dissertations by an authorized administrator of ...

  16. Events

    CEC offers a variety of live and pre-recorded online events that let you learn on your own schedule. Online Learning Each year at the CEC Convention & Expo, thousands of special education professionals from around the world come together to learn, share, grow, and connect.

  17. Special Education Classroom Schedule

    ClickUp's Special Education Classroom Schedule Template is designed to help you manage students, classrooms, lessons, and activities. This List template includes: Custom Statuses: Create tasks with custom statuses such as Cancelled, Complete, and To Do, to keep track of the progress of each class and activity.

  18. Q&A: How inclusion in education has evolved

    The Salamanca Statement on Inclusion in Education was adopted at the joint UNESCO and Ministry of Education of Spain World Conference on Special Needs Education held in Salamanca, Spain, in 1994. The Statement and its accompanying framework for action represent a worldwide consensus on future directions for the education of children with special needs.

  19. Special Education & Inclusion

    The LACOE Special Education Resource Lead (SERL) grant team is honored to partner with CDE and CCEE. Our goal is to build capacity by providing supports for systemic, continuous improvement to County Offices of Education (COE) and Local Educational Agencies (LEA) for the inclusion of students with the most significant support needs.

  20. PDF Meaningful Inclusion for Students With Disabilities

    four critical elements of inclusion as defined in the Utah State Board of Education Special Education Rules (USBE). These elements are essential to an education system that has been intentionally designed to accept and promote the meaningful participation of students with disabilities going through the K-12 system. Practiced together, these

  21. Children with intellectual disabilities: Support in inclusive practice

    The inclusion process allows children with special educational needs to be included in a normative environment. A large group consists of children with intellectual disabilities and behavioral disorders, hey need medical and pedagogical rehabilitation due to their low learning ability, neurotic disorders, and mental distortion.

  22. special education inclusion weekly schedule

    Browse special education inclusion weekly schedule resources on Teachers Pay Teachers, a marketplace trusted by millions of teachers for original educational resources.

  23. (PDF) Training of pedagogical personnel for inclusive education

    with special educational needs for inclusive education as teachers of a general education school [2 , 6, 13 - 16] , as well as special ed ucators and psychologists [1, 3, 17].

  24. Sustainability

    One of the significant factors in the sustainability of education is the development of inclusive education. An inclusive educational space implies openness and accessibility of education for students, regardless of their educational needs. Inclusive education also means a partnership between students and teachers. A teacher is a living person whose socio-emotional skills and professional ...

  25. Aleksandra Hollingshead-EHHS-University of Idaho

    An invited workshop for special education teachers in Lake Pend Orielle School District, Sandpoint, ID. Hollingshead, A. (December, 2016). ... & Snyder, K. (2017). Engagement for students with severe cognitive disabilities: The need for a common definition in education. Inclusion, 5(1), ... Use of visual schedules for students with autism- a ...

  26. Special Education

    Special Education Directors, The ADE/ESS Secondary Transition Team is excited to announce a virtual professional learning opportunity on Wednesday, September 29, 2021 from 2:30-3:30 p.m. for school administrators, school counselors, Career and Technical Education (CTE) staff, and special education staff. Please share with any other ...

  27. Annual Carey Summit 2024

    March 21, 2024, 02:34 pm | The 2024 Annual Carey Summit builds on the precedent of the DEIB Summits of the last few years and holistically includes diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging in all of its discussions and elements. It provides opportunities for the business and education communities to engage with and learn from leaders across industries who are committed to principles of ...