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The Evolution of Kilian Jornet

Kilian jornet’s mindset and approach to sport is changing the game for the better.

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After Kilian Jornet won the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc (UTMB) for a record-tying fourth time on August 27, it was easy to assume that running 100 miles is something that comes easy to him.

It doesn’t, but it would be easy to think that because, well, it sure looked that way.

While the 34-year-old who hails from the Catalan region of Spain has long ago established himself as the G.O.A.T. of ultra-distance trail running in the mountains, he’s as human as each of the other 2,300 runners who toed the line at this year’s UTMB. Like his fellow competitors, Jornet felt fatigue in his legs from grinding through the 171.5km (106.5-mile) course and its 33,000 feet of elevation gain. He said he had difficulty breathing when he ran too fast or climbed too abruptly, likely the lingering effects of having just overcome Covid-19 earlier in the month.

And, like everyone else, he had to fight off low moments of mental torment, and maybe even a tiny trace of self-doubt—remember, he’s human—as American rival Jim Walmsley opened up a big lead on him over the Grand Col Ferret as the course passed from Italy to Switzerland.

But what sets Jornet apart, and what has always distinguished him as an athlete, is a unique combination of physical ability, smart racing strategy and a deep connection to the mountains that allows him to move joyfully, patiently and, at times, seemingly with relative ease amid the physical anguish that comes with running such a grueling race.

But make no mistake, he suffered enroute to winning UTMB in a course-record 19 hours, 49 minutes, even if he made it look easy overcoming Walmsley and dispatching competent French contender Mathieu Blanchard.

“Since the start there has not been a single moment in which I didn’t suffer,” Jornet said after the race. “I knew that I needed to keep my intensity under a certain threshold where it can be heavy for the lungs, but it was no problem. But muscularly it was very hard from the start of the race.”

Jornet is human, even if it took a debilitating illness to show it. But as he turned in yet another masterwork performance on the world’s biggest stage, Jornet gave glimpses of what has made him so otherworldly for so long. Perhaps surprisingly, superior physicality is only a small part of it.

Kilian Jornet Night UTMB

Patience and Respect

Having already won UTMB three times and Hardrock a record-tying five times—most recently just six weeks earlier—Jornet had nothing to prove in Chamonix. In fact, if he had never toed the line or for that matter retires from competition, his legacy of epic race victories and Fastest Known Time (FKT) records on some of the most difficult trails and biggest mountains around the world would stand the test of time.

But that brings up another element that makes Jornet great is that he has always run as if he had nothing to prove. Sure, he’s a competitive athlete, but his focus seems to be more about immersing in the zest of competition and the life-affirming bliss he’s always felt in the mountains.

For Jornet, the destination truly is the journey, not the outcome. That adventure-oriented focus was something he learned in his youth growing up in the high-alpine environment of the Cap de Rec mountain refuge in the Spanish Pyrenees, where his dad was a mountain guide and his mom was a ski instructor. He climbed his first peak at age 3 and started competing in ski mountaineering races at 12.

Along the way, he developed a grounded sense of presence in the mountains that has allowed him to remain calm and bide his time in ultra-distance races—especially more rugged mountain races like UTMB and Hardrock. Instead of going all-out from the front, he typically follows a more fluid strategy of just staying in contact with the lead group and letting the race play out a bit as the terrain dictates before becoming hyper-competitive.

Contrast that to Walmsley, who has been hellbent on becoming the first American man to win the race with a front-running mentality, countryman Zach Miller, who returned after injuries and Covid-19 kept him away from continuing the same pursuit for three years, and the hard-charging Blanchard, who was eager to steal the show and make a name for himself in front of a supportive mostly French crowd after a robust third-place finish in 2021.

Even when Jornet was younger, he ran with maturity and wisdom beyond his years, always earnestly clinging to the premise that the experience of racing—and sharing it with his competitors, not to mention spectators and volunteers when possible—is always more important than the actual race itself.

When Walmsley built a big lead with a strong power-hiking surge up the Grand Col Ferret, Jornet was seemingly content, at that moment, to ease through the highest point of the course, chatting at times with volunteers, fans and videographers in French, Spanish or English as he had done at times earlier in the race. In previous UTMB races, he’s burst ahead on the switchbacks up Grand Col Ferret and other steep climbs on that course, only to stop on top and wait for his competitors to catch up while gazing at the stars or picking mushrooms with children.

“At Hardrock this year, when I saw him on top of Grant Swamp Pass, he stopped in the middle of the race just to chat with me because we hadn’t seen each other in a while,” Miller says. “That’s just the way Kilian is.”

Kilian Jornet HOKA tunnel

A Versatile Mountain Athlete

Jornet has a much more diverse set of athletic skills and abilities than most ultrarunners. In addition to winning ultras, Jornet was a multiple world champion in ski mountaineering and SkyRunning in his twenties. He also set a host of new speed ascent marks and roundtrips on Mt. Kilimanjaro (Tanzania), Aconcagua (Argentina), Mont Blanc (France) and the Matterhorn (Switzerland). Although he missed in his attempt to set a new FKT on 29,032-foot Mt. Everest in 2017, he actually summited the world’s highest mountain twice in six days without supplemental oxygen.

When he was a few years younger, he set a new record on the 171-mile Tahoe Rim Trail in California and Nevada and posted the fastest-ever time up the steep, rocky 1.3-mile Mt. Sanitas Trail in Boulder, Colorado.

“Kilian is a beast,” says Francois D’Haene, the other four-time UTMB winner who last year became the first to win Hardrock and UTMB in the same summer. “When it comes to Vertical K races and distances from 40K to 100K, I think there is no competition between us. He’s faster than me and stronger than me, especially on technical terrain.”

Aside from long-and-rugged Hardrock and UTMB, Jornet won the shorter and much faster 42km Zegama Alpine Marathon in Spain and placed fifth in the 31km Sierre-Zinal village-to-village race in Switzerland in August. A lot of it has to do with the fact that he still trains in much of the same fashion as he did as a kid, often focusing more on fun, hard, playful days of adventure on foot or on skis as much as he does structured high-performance workouts.

“Kilian is unique in the range that he can cover,” Miller says. “As a runner, his ability to switch back and forth from something like Zegama to Hardrock to Sierre-Zinal to UTMB is just incredible. And because of that ability, I think he’s a bit of a mad scientist when it comes to training. He kind of turns himself into a guinea pig and trains in ways other guys might not be willing to for fear of overtraining.”

All of that translated into Jornet’s ability to win this year’s UTMB despite trailing Walmsley by about 15 minutes at the 126km aid station at Champex. When the surging Blanchard caught him and quickly left the aid station, Jornet’s competitiveness and mountain practicality started to fire up. They passed Walmsley and gapped him and then ran stride for stride over the ensuing 2,300-foot climb from the village of Trient down into the ski town of Valloricine. Kilian knew Blanchard would be faster on the downhills, so he used his strength and climbing ability to surge on the long uphills.

Finally, after leaving the 153km aid station at the same moment as Blanchard, Jornet surged on a gently sloped 4km section of trail to the base of the final 2,600-foot climb up Tête aux Vents. Blanchard got a first-hand view of the master at work and all he could do was watch him run away to victory and hold on for second place.

“Running from Champex with Mathieu, I knew I was stronger going up but that he was catching on the downhills,” said Jornet, who has lived in Norway for the past several years with his wife, Emelie Forsberg, and their two young children. “Once we got to Valloricine, the strategy was to push very hard up the final climb to Tête aux Vents and then manage the lead. I had about an 8-minute lead and I was feeling comfortable with it, but in a ultra race you never know, many things can happen.”

Kilian Jornet and Mathieu Blanchard

A Transcendent Athlete

At some point a conversation about Jornet should transcend trail running and include the similarities he shares with other great athletes who have had a similarly dominant presence in other sports. And yes, that means Tom Brady, Michael Jordan, Lindsay Vonn, Eddie Merckx, Michael Phelps, Ann Trason, Lynn Hill, Kelly Slater and Eliud Kipchoge.

Why not? Like each of those all-time athletes, Jornet has consistently risen to the occasion at the biggest moments of his career, not only because he physically outclasses the competition, but also because his intellectual prowess as an athlete and his ability to outthink, outwit and outlast them. It’s not that he wins everything—although he’s won the vast majority of his races since winning UTMB as a 20-year-old in 2008—it’s more that he’s been competing at the highest level for 15 years and hasn’t regressed and has rarely had bad days.

In 2017, he had a rough go of it in the UTMB and finished second to D’Haene and in 2018 he dropped out after inflammation and pain caused by a pre-race bee sting made it difficult to keep running.

“Even his bad races he performs well, and I think that’s what makes Kilian special,” says Walmsley, who finished fourth at UTMB this year. “Whether it’s a bad moment or a bad race, he’s always still competing at a really high level. I have raced him twice at UTMB and both times I have thought I have found a crack, but I haven’t been able to hold onto it.”

Until recently, Jornet might have been viewed solely for his athletic. But with his bold move this year to break away from longtime sponsor Salomon and begin a new environmentally friendly trail running shoe brand called NNormal (with Spanish footwear brand Camper), he’s not only begun to hone his entrepreneurial spirit in the world of business but also to make an impact as the environmental steward he’s always been.

It’s a path only a handful of high-level outdoor athletes achieved success at after making their mark in their sport disciplines, most notably Yvon Chouinard, a climber, surfer and kayaker who founded Patagonia in 1970.

Jornet ran all of his races this year in the same model of NNormal shoes that will be available at running shops and online this fall. It’s a uniquely designed shoe that’s balanced under the midfoot to promote midfoot and forefoot running gaits, but with enough cushioning to run with a heel-striking stride, especially on downhill sections of a trail. A thin polyurethane plate provides protection from rocks and some energy return, while a proprietary version of a Vibram Litebase Megagrip outsole serves up secure traction.

That all might sound pretty standard, but Jornet really wants his NNormal shoes to stand out for their durability. He and his colleagues have gone to great lengths to source long-lasting components, but they’ve also designed the shoe to be deconstructed so it will be easy to re-sole, repair or recycle it after hundreds of miles of wear and tear. It’s all part of NNormal’s No Trace philosophy that is all aimed at transparently designing gear with the smallest carbon footprint possible.

“There are a lot of good guys in the sport, but in [my] mind, Kilian is the king of the sport,” says Miller, who was the fifth finisher at UTMB this year. “He sets the tone for the entire sport and [is] a great representative of the sport.”

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Becoming the All-Terrain Human

reading text a biography of kilian jornet

By Christopher Solomon

  • March 20, 2013

Kilian Jornet Burgada is the most dominating endurance athlete of his generation. In just eight years, Jornet has won more than 80 races, claimed some 16 titles and set at least a dozen speed records, many of them in distances that would require the rest of us to purchase an airplane ticket. He has run across entire landmasses­ (Corsica) and mountain ranges (the Pyrenees), nearly without pause. He regularly runs all day eating only wild berries and drinking only from streams. On summer mornings he will set off from his apartment door at the foot of Mont Blanc and run nearly two and a half vertical miles up to Europe’s roof — over cracked glaciers, past Gore-Tex’d climbers, into the thin air at 15,781 feet — and back home again in less than seven hours, a trip that mountaineers can spend days to complete. A few years ago Jornet ran the 165-mile Tahoe Rim Trail and stopped just twice to sleep on the ground for a total of about 90 minutes. In the middle of the night he took a wrong turn, which added perhaps six miles to his run. He still finished in 38 hours 32 minutes, beating the record of Tim Twietmeyer, a legend in the world of ultrarunning, by more than seven hours. When he reached the finish line, he looked as if he’d just won the local turkey trot.

Come winter, when most elite ultrarunners keep running, Jornet puts away his trail-running shoes for six months and takes up ski-mountaineering racing, which basically amounts to running up and around large mountains on alpine skis. In this sport too, Jornet reigns supreme: he has been the overall World Cup champion three of the last four winters.

So what’s next when you’re 25 and every one of the races on the wish list you drew up as a youngster has been won and crossed out? You dream up a new challenge. Last year Jornet began what he calls the Summits of My Life project , a four-year effort to set speed records climbing and descending some of the world’s most well known peaks, from the Matterhorn this summer to Mount Everest in 2015. In doing so, he joins a cadre of alpinists like Ueli Steck from Switzerland and Chad Kellogg from the United States who are racing up peaks and redefining what’s possible. In a way, Jornet says, all of his racing has been preparation for greater trials. This month, he is in the Himalayas with a couple of veteran alpinists. They plan to climb and ski the south face of a peak that hasn’t been skied before in winter.

But bigger challenges bring bigger risks. Less than a year ago, Jornet watched as his hero and friend Stéphane Brosse died in the mountains. Since then, he has asked himself, How much is it worth sacrificing to do what you love?

Chamonix, France, is a resort town wedged into a narrow valley at the foot of Mont Blanc, just over an hour’s drive southeast of Geneva. For those who adore high mountains, the place is hallowed. The Rue du Docteur Paccard is named for one of the first men to ascend Mont Blanc, in 1786; millionaires are tolerated, but mountain men are revered. The valley is Jornet’s home for the few months each year when he is not traveling. I met him there on a stormy morning in December, when he drove his dented Peugeot van into a parking lot at the edge of town, stepped out and offered a shy handshake. He is slight and unremarkable in the deceptive way of a Tour de France cyclist — he’s 5-foot-6 and 125 pounds — with the burnished complexion of years spent above the tree line and a thatch of black hair that, when sprung from a ski hat, has a slightly blendered look.

As we drove to and from Valle d’Aosta in Italy, where he would train that day, Jornet told me in soft-spoken English (one of five languages­ he speaks) how he first stunned the small world of elite ultrarunning. It happened at the Ultra-Trail du Mont-Blanc in Chamonix, the most competitive ultrarunning event outside the United States. (An “ultra” is any race longer than a marathon.) In 2008, when he was 20, Jornet defeated a field that included Scott Jurek, perhaps the sport’s most well known star, while setting a record for the 104-mile course around the Mont Blanc massif (which happens to include 31,500 feet of uphill climbing, or the equivalent of 25 trips to the top of the Empire State Building). “It was a revelation and a coronation at once,” Runner’s World magazine later wrote. Then Jornet won again the next year (and again in 2011).

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Kilian Jornet climbing the Grands Montets

  • ADVENTURERS OF THE YEAR

Sky Runner Kilian Jornet

A prolific mountain athlete takes his sport to the vertical realm.

UPDATE: The votes are in—more than 75,000 of them, more than ever before—and we have a winner. Kilian Jornet is our 2014 People's Choice Adventurer of the Year. Discover what motivates Jornet in this video , then see his love for the mountains in an Instagram photo gallery .

Clothed in a T-shirt and a pair of running shorts, Catalan Kilian Jornet, 26, bounded up the last few meters of the 14,692-foot Matterhorn before tapping the metal cross that garnishes the summit, turning around, and tracing the fixed lines down the Matterhorn’s rocky Lion’s Ridge with astounding speed and agility. For the last few meters of his descent, he was joined, in a gesture of support, by his childhood hero, champion sky runner Bruno Brunod. Since he began racing as a sky runner at age 17, Jornet had dreamed of beating Brunod’s 1995 speed record on the peak.

"Bruno was a big inspiration," Jornet says, "When I started, he was winning everything. And in Europe, [the Matterhorn] is a very symbolic mountain."

On August 21, 2013, Jornet sprinted out of the crowd of spectators gathered in Breuil-Cervinia to begin his attempt, and ran up and down the mountain’s 8,100 vertical feet, beating Brunod's longstanding record by 22 minutes. Jornet's time: 2 hours and 52 minutes. The push typically takes climbers around 12 hours.

Jornet did not invent "sky running," a cross between mountaineering and trail running that involves ascending technical terrain at a runner’s pace. The sport dates back to Italian mountaineer Marino Giacometti's speed records in the Italian Alps in the early '90s. Jornet has, however, taken sky running into the public eye with his unprecedented streak of breaking records and winning races. In the past three years alone, he set a new speed record on Mount Kilimanjaro, and, six weeks before his Matterhorn record, he completed a speed ascent and descent of Mont Blanc, an elevation change of 12,378 feet, in 4 hours and 57 minutes.

"Trail runners have always searched out mountains. There has been a shift in the sport, however, as sky running illuminated a desire that many have to push beyond the defined single-track, upwards into the craggy rock," says American ultra-runner Hal Koerner. "Kilian’s worldly ascents have definitely highlighted and helped to kick-start the new trend but, more importantly, I think the proficiency of his prolificacy and vice versa has caused many to rethink what is possible."

Jornet grew up in Cap del Rec, small ski village in the Catalan Pyrenees, where his father worked as a mountain guide and his mother as a schoolteacher. Jornet and his sister commuted to school by skis during the winters and by bicycle during the summers. "But it wasn’t that far away," Jornet is quick to add, by which he means "maybe one hour" each way. Jornet couldn't help but turn out to be an endurance athlete in the mountains.

"I always joke with my sister that we didn’t have a chance to do something else because we were always in the mountains," he says.

Jornet began racing in ski mountaineering at age 13. He did well in youth competitions but clearly remembers the moment when, during the 2004 International Ski Mountaineering World Championship, he found himself unexpectedly in the lead alongside four of his idols. He discovered he might have a talent for racing.

"What happened here? Why did they stop? Why are they waiting?” Jornet remembers thinking. “I did not understand that I was at the same level that they were."

Jornet won that race, and went on to win too many championships and break too many records to list concisely, not only in ski mountaineering, but in trail running, ultra running, and sky running. This coming year, Jornet will race in sky running, ski mountaineering, and trail running, and if conditions allow, he plans to spend time in the mountains of Colorado and Wyoming, and to challenge the speed records on Denali and Aconcagua.

When asked what type of athlete he considers himself, Jornet responds simply: "I am a person that loves mountains. I can go with skis when there's snow, and I can go running when it's summer. Doing all this stuff—it's the possibility to live in the mountains and to live my passion. It doesn’t really matter if I win or whether I finish last. It’s important maybe for me, but it really doesn’t matter."

—Fitz Cahall

THE INTERVIEW

Adventure: of the races you’ve won and the records you’ve broken, do you have an accomplishment you’re most proud of.

Kilian Jornet: The Matterhorn record I did this year and the first World Cup in Ski Mountaineering that I won when I was young. When you go to a race you know you’re going to win, when you win, you are proud of yourself, but it’s not that strong [of a] feeling. But in a race that you didn't know you're going to do [well in] and you do, there’s an explosion of endorphins, and that’s what it was like.

A: Do you ever have moments when you’re running or racing when you want to stop? That you don’t enjoy what you’re doing?

KJ: In long races, you want to stop all the time. You think, "Okay, I’m going to go to the next aid station, and then I’m going to stop," because you have pain everywhere, and you want to just stop the pain. We are a bit masochistic or a bit stupid.

Then there are days that you are training and the conditions are hard and you don’t want to continue, but it’s these days that are going to make you stronger. It’s not always good days. You need to have the shadow to be in the sun.

  • Nat Geo Expeditions

A: Are there any moments like that that really stand out to you?

KJ: Last year, we did a ski crossing of Mont Blanc, and I lost my friend Stéphane [Brosse]. We were together, and he just broke through the snow [a cornice] and fell for 600 meters. So, you think about whether or not this thing we do is good, or makes sense. And then, you realize that we all know the risk and we all accept the risk. It’s not like we are playing football and the worst thing that can happen is we break a knee. We are mountaineering. We know that the mountains are dangerous. We need to accept that it’s risky. We don’t want to die, but we need to know that we can.

A: On September 7, 2013, you and Emelie Forsberg called for a rescue partway up the Frendo Spur Route on Mont Blanc. The incident stirred up controversy over the style in which you climb mountains without traditional mountaineering equipment and safety gear. Are you concerned that people will follow your example in the mountains and get in over their heads?

KJ: That day we called because I was anticipating having more problems. There are things that we cannot do for ourselves. It’s important to be humble, and just to call for help before having big[ger] problems.

I always try to say, "We are not an example." If I see a video of Alex Honnold soloing in Yosemite, I'm not going to go to Yosemite tomorrow to do that. I think it’s very important to know the person that’s inside, and to really think if it’s possible or not.

A: What do you say to people who are getting started in the sport of sky running?

KJ: More people are going to the mountains. We are in a land that’s really beautiful, and can give us a lot, but we need to know that we are really fragile animals. Compared to the others, we are really nothing. We are good for the brain, but as for the body, we are really fragile. So, just think about that.

Related Topics

  • ADVENTURERS
  • TRAIL RUNNING

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reading text a biography of kilian jornet

Read a biography of mountain runner Kilian Jornet, who climbed Everest in a day, to practice and improve your reading skills.
Definition-

Are you a proficient (CEFR level C1) English learner? You can practise reading in this part to improve your comprehension of lengthy, complicated books that cover a wide range of topics, some of which may be unfamiliar. Specialized articles, biographies, and summaries are examples of texts.

What likely comes to mind when you think of mountain climbers conquering Mount Everest are groups of climbers being led to the summit by Sherpa guides while carrying oxygen masks, supplies, and tents. You'd be mostly correct because 97% of climbers utilise oxygen to reach Everest's summit, which is 8,850 metres above sea level. At 3,500 metres, the majority of people experience breathlessness because to the thin air at high altitudes, and the vast majority of climbers utilise oxygen above 7,000 metres. A normal climbing party will consist of 8 to 15 individuals, with almost as many guides, and they will spend weeks ascending the mountain after arriving at Base Camp.

But without an oxygen mask or fixed ropes, ultramarathon and mountain runner Kilian Jornet Burgada scaled the summit by himself in May 2017. 

Oh, and it was completed in 26 hours. 

with foodborne illness. 

Then, five days later, he repeated the feat in just 17 hours. 

Kilian, who was born in 1987, has spent his entire life preparing for Everest. Since he was raised at the ski resort of Lles de Cerdanya in the Pyrenees, 2,000 metres above sea level in Catalonia, northeastern Spain, that truly does mean his entire life.Kilian was on skis while most kids his age were learning to walk. He completed a five-hour hike with his mother at the age of one and a half, fully on his own. When he conquered his first peak and took part in his first cross-country ski event at the age of three, he further distanced himself from his contemporaries. He had conquered a 4,000-foot mountain by the age of seven, and at eleven he completed a 42-day Pyrenees trek.

He claims that he began to "take it seriously" when he was 13 years old. He trained with the Ski Mountaineering Technical Centre (CTEMC) in Catalonia, competed, and worked with a coach. At age 18, he began to train alone for ski mountaineering and trail running, with only a few weeks off every year. He may put in up to 1,140 hours of endurance training annually, in addition to strength and technical sessions, race-specific training, and other activities. He prepared by ascending the mountain ten times until he knew every aspect of it, even where the sun would be shining at each time of the day, for his record-breaking ascent and descent of the Matterhorn.

Kilian Jornet seems practically superhuman despite barely getting seven hours of sleep per night. His resting heartbeat, which is 33 beats per minute as opposed to the normal man's 60 or an athlete's 40, is incredibly low. He also breathes more effectively than the normal person, inhaling more oxygen with each breath, and recovers from activity considerably more quickly thanks to his body's rapid breakdown of lactic acid, the acid in muscles that causes discomfort after exercise.

All of this is attributable to his upbringing in the mountains and to genetics, but it is his exceptional mental toughness that makes him stand out. He frequently sets tests for himself to see how long he can withstand trying circumstances in order to properly comprehend what his body and mind are capable of. For instance, he barely avoided renal failure after a 100-kilometer run in temperatures of about 40°C despite only consuming 3.5 litres of water. 

To detail all the competitions, prizes, and mountains he has scaled would require a book. And even here, Kilian's accomplishments are above average because he manages to find time to blog about his job and has written three books, including Run or Die and The Invisible Border.

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IMAGES

  1. A biography of Kilian Jornet-CEFR C1 writing

    reading text a biography of kilian jornet

  2. C1 reading.docx

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  3. Interview de Kilian Jornet, champion du monde de skyrunning

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  4. SOLUTION: A biography of kilian jornet

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  1. A biography of Kilian Jornet

    [Link to the practice will be added later]00:00 When you picture ...00:46 But ultra-distance ...01:09 Born in 1987, Kilian ...01:56 He was 13 when ...02:44 S...

  2. The Evolution of Kilian Jornet

    When he was a few years younger, he set a new record on the 171-mile Tahoe Rim Trail in California and Nevada and posted the fastest-ever time up the steep, rocky 1.3-mile Mt. Sanitas Trail in Boulder, Colorado. "Kilian is a beast," says Francois D'Haene, the other four-time UTMB winner who last year became the first to win Hardrock and ...

  3. Kílian Jornet: How he climbed Everest twice in six days

    Of course, Jornet is not most people. And four days later, he summited Everest again, this time in 17 hours, just fractionally outside the record. On his descent, he blacked out, and came round to ...

  4. Kílian Jornet Burgada

    Biography Cap de Rec mountain hut where Jornet grew up. Jornet was born in Sabadell, Catalonia, Spain near Barcelona. He grew up in Refugi de Cap de Rec, a mountain hut at 2000 meters in the Pyrenees at the cross-country Lles ski resort in Lles de Cerdanya, where his father was a hut keeper and mountain guide. At the age of three he climbed Tuc de Molières, a three-thousander in the Pyrenees.

  5. This Mountain Runner Scaled Everest Twice in Under a Week

    March 1, 2018. • 9 min read. Kilian Jornet arrived to Everest base camp with the goal of setting a Fastest Known Time (FKT) for a roundtrip ascent of the world's tallest mountain from the ...

  6. Becoming the All-Terrain Human

    Kilian Jornet Burgada is the most dominating endurance athlete of his generation. In just eight years, Jornet has won more than 80 races, claimed some 16 titles and set at least a dozen speed ...

  7. A Biography of Kilian Jornet

    A biography of Kilian Jornet - Free download as Text File (.txt), PDF File (.pdf) or read online for free. Kilian Jornet Burgada is an ultra-distance and mountain runner known for his record-breaking ascents of Mount Everest. In 2017, he climbed Everest alone and without oxygen in just 26 hours while suffering from food poisoning, and then climbed it again five days later in only 17 hours.

  8. Kilian Jornet

    Clothed in a T-shirt and a pair of running shorts, Catalan Kilian Jornet, 26, bounded up the last few meters of the 14,692-foot Matterhorn before tapping the metal cross that garnishes the summit ...

  9. A Biography of Kilian Jornet

    LearnEnglish - Free download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Kilian Jornet is an ultra-distance and mountain runner known for his record-breaking ascents of Mount Everest and other mountains. In 2017, he climbed Everest alone in 26 hours without oxygen or fixed ropes, and then did it again 5 days later in only 17 hours while suffering from food poisoning.

  10. A biography of Kilian Jornet-CEFR C1 writing

    And even here, Kilian's accomplishments are above average because he manages to find time to blog about his job and has written three books, including Run or Die and The Invisible Border. ‍ Conclusion-Each lesson includes a model text with writing tips, and tasks to test your understanding and practice various writing skills. Begin right away.

  11. READING A Biography of Kilian Jornet

    READING a Biography of Kilian Jornet - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Scribd is the world's largest social reading and publishing site.

  12. A biography of kilian jornet Flashcards

    A biography of kilian jornet. STUDY. Flashcards. Learn. Write. Spell. Test. PLAY. Match. Gravity. Created by. b1_Lidya_Paradisa. 1911401080_lidya paradisa_Assignment 2. Terms in this set (20) terminate. Read a biography of mountain runner Kilian Jornet, who climbed Everest in a day, to practise and improve your reading skills. terse. concise ...

  13. LearnEnglish-Reading-C1-A-biography-of-Kilian-Jornet.pdf

    But ultra-distance and mountain runner Kilian Jornet Burgada ascended the mountain in May 2017 alone, without an oxygen mask or fixed ropes for climbing. Oh, and he did it in 26 hours. With food poisoning. And then, five days later, he did it again, this time in only 17 hours.

  14. Learn English Reading C1 A biography of Kilian Jornet

    Reading: C. A biography of Kilian Jornet. Read a biography of mountain runner Kilian Jornet, who climbed Everest in a day, to practise and improve your reading skills. Before reading. Do the preparation task first. Then read the text and do the exercises. Preparation task. Match the definitions (a-h) with the vocabulary (1-8). Vocabulary ...

  15. A biography of Kilian Jornet (1)

    A biography of Kilian Jornet (1) - Free download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free.

  16. Learnenglish reading c1 a biography of kilian jornet

    Read a biography of mountain runner Kilian Jornet, who climbed Everest in a day, to practiseDo the preparation task first. Then read the text and do the exercises. ... Then read the text and do the exercises. Post a Question. Provide details on what you need help with along with a budget and time limit. Questions are posted anonymously and can ...

  17. Portfolio

    But ultra-distance and mountain runner Kilian Jornet Burgada ascended the mountain in May 2017 alone, without an oxygen mask or fixed ropes for climbing. Oh, and he did it in 26 hours. With food poisoning. And then, five days later, he did it again, this time in only 17 hours. Born in 1987, Kilian has been training for Everest his whole life ...

  18. LearnEnglish-Reading-C1-A-biography-of-Kilian-Jornet.docx

    Reading: C1 A biography of Kilian Jornet Read a biography of mountain runner Kilian Jornet, who climbed Everest in a day, to practise and improve your reading skills. Before reading Do the preparation task first. Then read the text and do the exercises. Preparation task

  19. A Biography of Kilian Jornet

    A Biography of Kilian Jornet - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. Scribd is the world's largest social reading and publishing site.

  20. READING-C1-A BIOGRAPHY OF KILLIAN JORNET-word

    READING-C1-A BIOGRAPHY OF KILLIAN JORNET-word - Free download as Word Doc (.doc / .docx), PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free.

  21. LearnEnglish-Reading-C1-A-biography-of-Kilian-Jornet.pdf

    LearnEnglish-Reading-C1-A-biography-of-Kilian-Jornet.pdf -... Pages 4. Identified Q&As 7. Solutions available. Total views 1. Primeasia University. A EN. A EN ENGLISH CO. BarristerWorld13464. 2/13/2024. View full document.