• Career Development

How to Include Salary Expectations in a Cover Letter (+ Examples)

how to write salary history in cover letter

11 min read

A woman with long dreadlocks sitting on a grey couch smiling while using her Apple laptop.

Creating the perfect cover letter is one of the most difficult challenges confronting job seekers. That challenge is particularly acute when you’re asked to include information like your anticipated salary requirements. Since you understand that the wrong salary request may reduce your chance of being interviewed, you may struggle to come up with the right number.

The good news is that there are options to help you include salary requirements in your cover letter in a way that won’t get your resume tossed to the side! In this post, we cover:

What is desired salary?

When to include desired salary requirements in a cover letter, how to respond to salary requirements in a cover letter.

How to determine a desired salary to communicate with prospective employers

Desired salary is the salary you’d like to receive in exchange for the work you do for an employer. It’s common for prospective employers to ask you to provide your desired salary on employment applications , in your cover letter, and during job interviews. As such, considering your desired salary early on in the application process will better prepare you for when an employer asks you to provide such information. With that said, having an idea of your desired compensation doesn’t mean you share that information too early in the application process unless you’re asked for it, that is, and ready to do so. 

The first thing to understand is that you don’t want to disclose your salary requirements (or compensation requirements) unless you must. The inclusion of that information can have negative consequences. For example, if your salary requirement is too high, the employer will dismiss your candidacy. On the other hand, if it is too low, you may receive a job offer for a salary that is far less than you deserve.

Still, you will need to include salary requirements in your cover letter if the employer or hiring manager requests it. When job descriptions include specific instructions to provide certain details, you need to follow those directions. Companies that demand desired salary requirements will typically reject your resume during the hiring process if you ignore that instruction. The question is, though, how do you word salary requirements in a cover letter?

If you’re wondering what cover letter salary requirements to include, relax!

There are a number of ways you can handle this challenge. We also have some tips that can help you compose your response to that desired salary question. 

First, though, it’s important to recognize that you can find a whole host of ideas about this topic online. They include everything from helpful sample resumes with salary requirements to salary expectation email sample. We also include some useful examples in our helpful tips section.

Here are the most common tips for including your desired salary expectations in a cover letter:

1. Don’t be direct about your salary requirement, or delay your response 

We don’t recommend this approach, but it does sometimes prove successful: don’t directly answer the question if you’re not ready to answer it. Instead of including desired compensation information in your cover letter, try to downplay its importance.

For example:

“Salary is important, but it’s not the only factor I weigh in my job search efforts. If you conclude that I would be a good fit for the company, I would be more than eager to discuss my desired salary.”

“Salary is a consideration for me, though it’s not the only factor I consider. I would like to learn more about the position and its requirements, as well as the total compensation package, prior to providing my salary expectations.”

As you can see, these are both reasonable responses - but they don’t exactly follow directions. Still, if you’re unsure about the company’s salary policies, are afraid that your expectations might prevent you from getting the job, or you’re unclear of the job requirements and what you believe to be fair because you don’t have enough information, this can be a viable option.

2. Ask questions

This relates a bit to the item above in terms of delaying your response, though it is slightly different in terms of how to do it. You can sometimes stall having to provide salary expectations by asking questions or indicating that you have questions specific to how the organization values the position. Again, this doesn’t exactly follow directions, though it does allow you to find out if your desired salary fits within the budget or range of the position. 

It’s possible that the employer isn’t willing to provide this up front, though in many instances, they will, since it can save both you and the employer a lot of time if you know up front that your desired salary doesn’t fit within the range provided. 

A couple responses that align with this approach might be:

“I’m very interested in the position, though I still have some questions about it and am curious to know how your organization values this position. Can you please provide the salary range for it, so I can ensure that an interview is the best use of our time?”

“I don’t currently have a specific number in mind and would like to better understand how your organization views this position. Are you able to provide budget information for it?”

3. Offer a salary range rather than a hard number

You don’t always have to offer a firm figure for your desired salary. Instead, candidates can include a salary range that allows the employer or hiring manager some latitude with respect to any job and salary offer. For example: 

After reviewing the job posting’s listed responsibilities and considering the true value I can provide to the company, I would ask for an annual salary in the range of $35,000 to $60,000.”

Of course, if you respond with a range, the employer is probably going to try to hire you for the lower amount. Know what you’re worth, but also know what your “walk away” number, or minimum salary, is. 

4. Tell the employer that your desired salary is flexible

In many instances, you can minimize any misunderstandings by stressing that your desired salary is a flexible issue. You can list a number or range and qualify that salary requirements are negotiable. Alternatively, you can avoid hard numbers and simply say that your salary needs are open to negotiation to fit the company’s needs. It’s always a good idea to acknowledge that your flexibility is based on factors related to the position, non-salary compensation, and other benefits. For example:

“I’m seeking a salary range of $45,000 to $52,000. However, I am open to discussing this and can be flexible based on additional considerations, like benefits and non-salary compensation.”

Key Takeaway

When employers ask for your desired salary, use your cover letter to detail your expectations, and always be sure to note that your salary needs are open for negotiation.

How to determine your salary requirements

Now, it’s clear that you do, in some way, need to respond to a request for salary requirements. However, if the instructions are clear that an actual number is necessary, how do you decide what number or range to provide that you’ll feel good about? 

Below are a few considerations to help you determine what to put for your desired salary.

Refer to what you’re currently making

In very rare instances are people looking for positions where they’d make less than they’re currently making. Some exceptions to this might be if you’re changing careers, looking for a lower-level position, or relocating to a market where there’s a lower cost of living. 

Otherwise, most employers appreciate that you’d like to make what you’re currently making or more to change positions and work for their organization. Regardless, you need to get clear as to whether you’re willing to take an offer that falls below your current salary range, and if not, what minimum salary is acceptable to you for the position you’re applying to. 

Do market research 

You don’t want to just pull numbers out of a hat to offer up to an employer. Do an online search to determine what the average salary range is for the position you’re applying to based on education, experience, location, and job duties. Having data also allows you to back your numbers when you share your desired compensation with the prospective employer. 

Use real data from sites like the Bureau of Labor Statistics , PayScale , or Salary.com to discover salary norms around the country. You can also find up-to-date guides for industry-specific sites, such as RigJobs . Those and other sites can provide some indication of the position’s current value in the marketplace. 

Bear in mind that these are generally loose estimates, and you want to consider the other tips in this section before solidifying a range to provide to employers. 

Determine your worth based on experience, education, and training

Experience, education, and training are key factors in determining salary potential. Suppose you currently receive high marks with a salary that falls in the higher part of a range for your current organization. In that case, you’re in a good position to request a high salary level for your next position. 

In other words, if you offer above-average work, you can request an above-average salary. Bear in mind that when you ask for a higher salary, you need to be able to clarify the value you bring to the organization and back up your request with data and proof of the value you add. 

Consider cost of living metrics

Cost of living is an important factor when considering your salary. If you’re relocating to a new location, take a look at the cost of living for that location compared to your current location. In some instances, the cost of living, or COL, might be notably higher, in which case, you’d likely request a higher salary than what you’re currently making. On the other hand, if the cost of living is notably lower, a lower salary than what you’re currently making might be suitable for you. 

Take into account the total compensation and benefits package

Base salary is indeed an important consideration when considering a new position, though there are several other factors many consider. In addition to the desired salary, items like healthcare benefits, time off, flexible schedules, and bonuses play a role in whether someone accepts or declines a job offer. In fact, it’s not uncommon for employees to accept lower pay for a new position if the benefits are better with the new employer. 

When considering your desired compensation, consider what additional items are essential to you, and prioritize them. Then, compare your list to what the prospective employer offers. From there, adjust your desired salary accordingly.  

Sample cover letter with salary requirements

Dear [List full name of recruiter or hiring authority and their title here],

Please consider my enclosed resume and credentials as my application for the [Title of Position Here] position at [Company Name Here]. A review of my qualifications will showcase years of demonstrated work experience providing exceptional office support and ensuring projects are completed on time and with extreme confidentiality. 

These experiences have enabled me to perform scheduling, reception, meeting planning, accounting, data entry and document preparation, while creating a warm, welcoming environment for clients. I am certain that my motivation, academic experience, bilingualism/multilingualism, administrative expertise and professional demeanor will make me an excellent addition to your team as your [Title of Position Here]. 

Other highlights of my career that succeed expectations of [Company Name Here] would be:

Exceptional academic qualifications, including a [Full Degree name from School].

Remarkable ability to retain a large variety of information and interpret it for various publics.

Fluently utilized various computer software programs to expedite work processes, including Microsoft Office: Access, Excel, Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook.

Exercised strong communication and interpersonal skills to formulate good working relationships with all co-workers, vendors, clients and the public.

Provided the highest level of customer service while greeting visitors, communicating with them via telephone and promptly assisting with their needs.

Experienced leading employees, striving to elevate individuals to their greatest potential.

My desired salary for the position is based on the posted job description, my research, and prior salary history. Given the position’s nature and my skills and potential value for the company, I would ask for a salary in the $60,000 to $70,000 range. Of course, the actual salary is open for negotiation, depending on other relevant factors including potential bonus opportunities, career advancement opportunities, or additional benefits.  

My resume will provide additional details concerning my accomplishments. I welcome the opportunity for an interview to discuss the performance you can expect from me.

[Your name]

[Your contact information]

Desired salary: the bottom line

The bottom line is simple: don’t ignore requests from employers for desired salary information. Instead, use your cover letter to convey that information, and try to do it in a way that won’t leave your resume out in the cold. Demonstrate your flexibility and openness to negotiation, even when you’ve listed a clear salary expectation. 

That’s the best way to ensure that your stated salary needs don’t prevent you from getting the interview you deserve.

Does your resume clearly represent the value you add to an organization and the salary you’re worth? Why not submit it for a free resume review and find out?

This article was originally written by Leo Bastone and has been updated by Ronda Suder.

Recommended reading:

How to Write the Best Career Change Cover Letter (+ Examples)

How To Include Willingness to Relocate On Your Resume

Should You Include Salary Requirements on a Resume?

Ronda Suder, Professional Writer

With a drive to foster safety and expand possibilities through writing, performing, and working with others, Ronda brings 25 years of combined experience in HR, recruiting, career advice, communications, mental and behavioral health, and storytelling to her work. She’s a certified career coach and holds a Master’s in Human Resources, a Master’s in Film and Media Production, and a Master’s in Counseling and Development. As a writer, she’s covered topics ranging from finance and rock mining to leadership and internet technology, with a passion for career advice and mental-health-related topics. When she’s not at her computer, Ronda enjoys connecting with others, personal growth and development, spending time with her beloved pooch, and entertainment through movies, television, acting, and other artistic endeavors. You can connect with Ronda on  LinkedIn  and through her  website .

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2 Sample Salary History Templates for Job Seekers

Many companies will ask you to include salary history on your job application. Though not the most ethical practice , you can do nothing but follow their directives ( unless you want to risk that they won’t invite you for an interview, for not following instructions, or for submitting an incomplete job application ).

You can either include the information directly on your resume (at the end of the document, in a special section), or you can create a separate page for the salary history, and submit it together with your resume and cover letter . We prepared for you a standard template as well as some more creative forms of demonstrating how much you have earned in various stages of your career.

Table of Contents

Two things to remember regarding your salary history

Before you start to copy, paste, and enter information into our layout, try to remember a couple of things:

  • You should be honest with them . The amount of money you earned before has nothing to do with the salary you can get in your new job. It is not uncommon to see someone earning $50,000 annually, though they were earning just $30,000 a year ago. Such things do happen and there is no reason why it could not happen to you as well.
  • Employers should feel that the salary is not the most important thing for you . You should somehow mention it either on your cover letter, or on your resume. At least you should not mention anything that would indicate that money play the prime in your mind, and you do not think about anything else when choosing your job.

Okay, let’s have a look at the templates!

Template of a simple salary history list, attached to your job application

Your Name Your Address Your Cell Phone Number Your Email

Salary History

Position 1 (the most recent) Name of the employer (address or website can be included, looks more genuine) Duration Annual Salary

Position 2 Name of the employer Duration Annual salary

Martin Jones 3333/222 Kensignton Road, 12021 New York City, NY 339494993284 [email protected] Salary history Marketing Manager ATCT Ltd. (atctltd.com) 12/3/08 – Present Annual Salary: $45,000

This is the most simple salary history template that provides an employer with all information they may need. However, if you want to be more creative , or if you are applying for a position where attention to detail matters , you can use a different template, sharing more details with the employers. For example:

Marketing Manager ATCT Ltd. (atctltd.com) 12/3/08 – Present Starting annual salary: $38,000 Current annual salary: $45,000 Reason for raise : Achievements in marketing department Reference: Martin Eagelson, Marketing Director, 0029339293

Special Tip : You can download the template in PDF, and directly fill in your details:

how to write salary history in cover letter

Mentioning salary directly on your resume -good, or bad practice?

Some job seekers prefer to include information about their salaries directly on their resume, in the working experience section . However, we do not recommend you to follow this procedure .

It may give the employer a false impression that the salary is the most important thing for you, and therefore you mention it on your resume (so the employers can see how much you earned, and they won’t offer you less).

As a rule of a thumb you should avoid talking (or writing) about your salary, unless they explicitly ask you to talk about it.

Conclusion and next steps

Just like your past failures in job interviews have nothing to do with your chances to succeed in the next meeting with the employer, the salary you got in your last job has nothing to do with the salary you will get in your next one.

Do not make things even more complicated as they already are . If employer asks you to include salary history on your resume, follow their instructions. Use one of our templates, and do not worry much about the numbers.

Write the truth, show them your cards, and get ready for the interview– the ultimate challenge . We at Interview Penguin would love to help you with your interview preparation:

  • Fifteen most common interview questions – Test the waters, learn what matters for the interviewers and how to answer the most common questions.
  • How to nail an interview – Ten tips that should help you to nail your job interview.
  • Salary negotiation tips – Basic rules you should remember when negotiating a salary in a job interview.
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How to write a Salary History: All You Need To Know

With the information in this article, you can easily, and quickly understand how to write a salary history as a professional.

When looking for a new job , you may be asked to provide a salary history. Some employers ask for this information in the job application, while others ask about salary during the interview process, before making an official job offer.

Regardless of when an employer asks for your salary history, you must be prepared to address the issue. You can also visit some official salary calculators online for a free custom pay range based on your location, industry, and experience. Here are some tips on how to share your salary history with potential employers, as well as a salary history template to help you format your answer.

Also Check: Customer Support Manager at Interswitch Group

Table of Contents

What is your salary history?

A salary history is a document that presents an employee’s past earnings. Some employers ask candidates to provide them with a salary history list when they apply for a job. Others may request it as part of the interview process when you are definitely in dispute about the job. A salary history generally includes the name of each company, the title, and the salary and benefits package the candidate has received in the past.

Salary history is different from a salary requirement, which is the pay a candidate expects for a new job.

Is it legal for employers to request a salary history?

Some cities and states have passed laws that prohibit employers from asking applicants for salary information or setting conditions regarding such inquiries. Legislators in these jurisdictions believe that putting information on past wages in the hands of employers perpetuates wage inequality, as historically many women have been underpaid compared to men in similar positions.

The AAUW reports that 15 states and territories have restrictions restricting inquiries from all employers regarding salary history, including the following: Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Vermont, and Washington.1

Several others, including Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, have provisions regarding candidates for state agency jobs.

Additionally, the cities of San Francisco, New York , Kansas City, Cincinnati, Toledo, and Philadelphia, as well as the counties of St. Louis, Missouri, and Albany, New York, have regulations that restrict the practice of inquiring about employee salary history. most employers. Several other municipalities, including Chicago, Atlanta, Pittsburgh, Salt Lake City, New Orleans, and Louisville, prohibit city agencies from inquiring about the salary history of job applicants.

Check with your state department of labor for the latest laws in your area.

Additionally, some employers, including Amazon, Facebook, and Google, have banned interview questions related to salary history.

Also Check: How To Calculate Net Sales

How to write a salary history: How to provide your salary history

What is the best way to provide your salary history? You can list your salary history in your cover letter without detailing.

For example, you might say, “I’m currently winning in my mid-fifties.” That gives you some flexibility when it comes to discussing compensation if you receive a job offer.

If you are concerned that your salary is high enough to put you out of competition for the position, what you might want to do instead is include a salary range rather than a specific amount. For example, you could say “My salary range is $ 40,000 to $ 50,000.” Below is an example of a cover letter with a salary range.

Also Check: UPS recruits Business Development Executive – Sales

Or, your salary history can be listed on a separate salary history page and attached to your resume and cover letter.

Why do employers ask for a salary history?

When an employer asks you to share your salaries from previous positions, it is likely for the same reasons that they might ask you for your salary expectations. These reasons generally include the following:

They want to determine its market value. Your salary history, specifically the salary you earned in your most recent position, is one factor an employer can use to gauge your level of experience and the value you will bring as an employee. They want to make sure your expectations are aligned with your budget for the position. If your most recent salary is significantly higher than an employer’s if you are prepared to offer it, this is an indication that you may be too qualified for the position.

They want to make sure they are offering a fair amount for the position. For example, if most job applicants provide recent salary history that far exceeds what was budgeted for the position, they may need to increase their offer or adjust the job description to target younger professionals.

What is the best way to write and share my salary history?

There are three ways you can choose to communicate your salary history based on how much you want to share, how much detail the employer asks for, and what part of the process you are asked to provide this information.

Here are the three ways you can choose to handle the request:

Use general terms. Instead of including an exact amount, you could provide a general number. Example: “My current salary is in the mid-sixties.” Use a range. If your salary has increased during your time in your current role, you can choose to provide a rank or starting salary and the current salary. In addition to complying with the employer’s request, it also illustrates that you provided enough value to earn a raise. Example: “I started my role with $ 55,000 and my current salary is $ 72,000.”

Please provide an exact number. You can choose to provide your exact salary or round to the nearest whole number. For example, if you are making $ 84,650, you might want to round to $ 85,000. Example: “My current salary is $ 85,000.”

If you are earning additional compensation in addition to your base salary, such as regular bonuses or commissions, please also provide this information. If your additional compensation varies, include an average.

Example: “I currently earn a base salary of $ 60,000 plus an average quarterly bonus of $ 2,500.”

You may be asked to provide a salary history list or a salary history template to complete. In this case, list your highest gross annual salary for each position. Your gross annual salary is the total amount of money you earned in a year in a position before taxes.

How to write an example salary history:

Social Media Manager ABC Company Start date: present Annual Salary: I started my role at $ 45,000 and my current salary is $ 60,000.

Social media coordinator XYZ Company Start date – Last date Annual salary: $ 40,000

Digital Marketing Specialist 123 Company Start date – Last date Annual salary: $ 35,000

If the employer has not requested your desired salary, you can choose to include it in your salary history.

Example: “I currently earn $ 70,000 and am looking for a position that pays between $ 75,000 and $ 80,000.”

Finally, remember to provide your total annual salary before taxes. Giving your amount after-tax can give the impression that you are being paid a lower salary, which could make it difficult to negotiate the higher amount you want.

Providing your current salary to your next potential employer does not mean that this will be your salary at your next job, nor does it eliminate the option to bargain for a higher amount. Employers understand that many job seekers are looking to increase their income when they move to a new job, especially if the new role comes with additional challenges or more responsibilities than your current job.

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how to write salary history in cover letter

  • Career Guide

How to write salary history

This is how you can list your salary history on your resume (+ template).

When you apply to a company, they may ask you to include salary history in your application. In order to receive an invitation to interview, you should comply with this request.

two person are reviewing the salary history

It’s best to include this information directly on your resume or – in a few cases – create an extra page with the salary history and send it to the potential employer along with your cover letter and resume. In this article, we’ll go into detail about how you can proceed when asked for your salary history, several ways and examples to write it all down, and conclude with a sample template!

What should you say when asked for a salary history?

If you are requested to attach your salary history to your resume, always be honest. This is because potential employers might also inquire about your salary from previous employers. However, you are not required to disclose your previous salary. You can also decide not to disclose your entire salary history, but you can instead use phrases such as “I currently earn $85,000 and would like to discuss with you what I am aiming for in my next position.”

How is the salary history different from a salary requirement?

A salary demand is the amount of compensation that a person requests for accepting a potential job. It may be based on past salary history, work experience, skills, or industry. Sometimes an employer will ask you to provide a salary history instead of – or in addition to – your compensation request. The salary history is a paragraph that lists your past earnings. The difference between these two statements is that the salary history indicates what you actually earned in your previous job. Your salary requirement indicates what you would like to earn in your next job.

Is it legal for employers to ask about salary?

In some cities and states, employers are prohibited from asking job applicants about salary or are allowed only with restrictions. These include: Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Vermont, and Washington. Tip : You might have to do some research on your city before including your salary information on your resume.

Why do prospective employers ask for a salary history?

The reasons why they want to know the salary are generally the following:

  • They want to determine your market value. This will allow the employer to better assess your experience and the value you bring to the table.
  • They want to make sure your expectations match their budget for the position. You may be overqualified if your last salary is significantly higher than what your new employer can pay.
  • The employer wants to set a reasonable amount for the position. If many applicants quote more than the employer originally estimated, they may need to increase their offer.

a man making salary history

💡 Tips for writing your salary history

Before you include your annual salary for the position in your job application, you may want to consider these tips:

➜ You do not have to provide exact figures – a range will suffice.

Companies ask for salary history to know approximately how much you have earned and to determine if it is possible for the company to pay you that amount or more.

➜ Do not state your monthly salary, but your annual salary.

State your annual remuneration which is available to you before taxes.

➜ Mention your salary history only briefly.

It’s best to include the salary history on your resume under Work Experience . A short paragraph on how much you earned is sufficient.

➜ Mention the benefits you received in addition to your previous salary.

If you received any perks in previous positions, such as insurance, paid vacation, work from home, or transportation to and from work, you should mention it.

➜ Do not re-state your salary history.

If you have already mentioned your salary history in your cover letter, do not mention it again in your resume. Tip : Always include the remuneration history on your resume and not the cover letter.

➜ Do not include salary history on a separate sheet.

This is a very important tip : It may prove detrimental if you include your salary history separately. That’s because the recruiter might notice the document right away and look at it first – and if you’ve been paid too much, you’re immediately out of the game. Without the HR department having taken a single look at your qualifications.

How do you write salary?

Now that you know the best ways to include your salary history in a resume, there are several steps on how to include salary as a candidate to the employer:

1. Specify a range

It’s best to give a general range for your most recent jobs, which can be rounded up to the nearest $5,000 or $10,000.

2. Choose cover letter or resume

You can include salary history in the cover letter or resume. In the cover letter, you should include it at the end of the letter. In the resume, you can include it in a section under Work Experience .

3. Include a note about your flexibility

Are you willing to accept a little less for certain benefits? Point out that you would first like to talk about the job as a whole and that your previous pay is not set in stone.

bill from the bank

4. State the salary range on your resume wisely

Only include a salary range if the company specifically requests it. Otherwise, you don’t have to talk about salary history in your resume.

5. Be sure to provide full disclosure

Show the progression of your salary for each position by providing a starting pay and a final pay. This way, you also show how your wage has evolved.

💡 Tips on how much of your salary history you want to share with your prospective employer

  • Use general terms, such as “My current salary is in the mid-seventies.”
  • Show that you have accomplished enough to earn a raise by citing a compensation increase over the course of your current or previous job: “I started my job at $50,000 and now make $70,000.”
  • Include anything you received in addition to your base pay, such as tips or regular bonuses. Example: “I currently earn a base salary of $70,000 plus an average quarterly bonus of $3,500.”

Salary history example

If the employer requires you to include a remuneration statement, you could – for example – present the salary like this:

Digital Marketing Manager

  • Start Date: …
  • End Date: …
  • Annual Salary: $45,000

Social Media Coordinator

  • Annual Salary: $50,000

woman looks at her laptop

Salary history template

A salary history includes your job title, the name of each company you worked for, and the gross pay you earned while working for that employer. You can therefore present annual salary this way:

First name, last name

Street, house number

City, state, postal code

Marketing Manager

Los Angeles, CA

06/19 – Current

Annual Salary: $68,000 plus benefits.

Marketing Coordinator

12/15 – 06/19

Annual Salary: $52,000 plus benefits

Social Media Assistant

Atlanta, GA

06/12 – 12/15

Annual Salary: $31,000 plus benefits

Different companies pay attention to different elements on a resume. Some companies look at salary history and compensation expectations, while others don’t focus on that as much. Therefore, find out what you need to include in your resume. If your resume is incomplete and not detailed enough, it will be rejected immediately. Always remember that the pay you received in your last job doesn’t have to have anything to do with the salary you will get in your next job. As mentioned earlier, many employers just want to get an idea of what you are currently worth on the market and if they even have the budget to hire you.

dollar banknote

Frequently asked questions about Salary History

The salary history should be included on your resume – but only, for example, if someone at the company you are applying to asks for it.

You don’t want to state exactly what you earn. The pay you provide in your application should be a range.

We advise you not to mention your salary history directly (unless you are asked about it). This is because it could give employers the impression that money is the most important thing to you in a job.

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How to Write Salary Requirements in a Job Application

The negative effects of quitting a job, when asked what is your desired salary on a job application what should i put.

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When applying for a job, many employers request that you include a salary history. This information helps the employer determine whether or not you are likely to be satisfied with the pay being offered for the position. It also helps him to determine how much pay to offer you, should he decide to hire you. Offering too many details about salary history can hinder your ability to negotiate a higher salary. However, if salary negotiation is not a concern, feel free to be as detailed as possible with your history.

Don't ignore the request for a salary history. Many employers specifically state in the job posting that if you neglect to follow instructions your application/resume will not be considered.

Provide the salary history in your cover letter. For example, include a brief sentence that says “My salary history ranges from $10 an hour to $25 hour." You don't have to go into detail about which job paid how much. This salary history sentence lets the employer now how expensive it may be to hire you.

Attach a separate “salary history” sheet to your application/resume. On this sheet, be as detailed as possible. State the company name, your starting salary and your ending salary. Do this for each job listed on your resume.

Provide a ballpark range when listing your salary history if you don't want to state your exact salary. For example, if you earned $45,000 per year with a company, simply state that your salary was in the mid-$40,000 range.

  • Quintessential Careers: Responding to Requests for Salary Requirements or Salary Histories
  • Creating Prints: Should You Provide a Salary History?

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Providing Salary History to Employers

how to write salary history in cover letter

What is Your Salary History?

Is it legal for employers to ask, how to handle a request, how to provide salary history, what is included in a list, salary history templates.

Do you have to give employers your salary history if they request it? What's the best way to handle information about what you've earned in the past? Some  job postings  ask you to include your salary history when applying for the position.

It's important to be careful how you disclose your salary history, so you have flexibility when it comes to negotiating compensation.

If the job posting doesn't mention it, don't offer any salary information.

Also, keep in mind that it is illegal to ask about how much you earned in past positions in some locations.

A salary history is a document that presents an employee’s past earnings. Some employers ask job candidates to give them a salary history list when they apply for a job. Others may request it as part of the  interview process  when you are definitely in contention for the job. A salary history typically includes the name of each company, job title, and the salary and benefits package the candidate has received in the past.

Salary history is different from a  salary requirement , which is the pay a job candidate expects for a new job.

Some cities and states have passed legislation prohibiting employers from asking applicants for salary information or setting conditions regarding such inquiries. Legislators in these jurisdictions believe that placing past salary information in the hands of employers perpetuates wage inequality since many women have historically been  underpaid  compared to men who hold similar positions.

The AAUW reports that some states and territories have restrictions in place curtailing inquiries by all employers about salary history including the following: Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Vermont, and Washington.

Several others including Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia have provisions in place regarding candidates for jobs with state agencies.

In addition, the cities of San Francisco, New York, Kansas City, Cincinnati, Toledo, and Philadelphia, as well as the counties of St. Louis, Missouri and Albany, New York, all have regulations in place curtailing the practice of asking about salary history by most employers. Several other municipalities including Chicago, Atlanta, Pittsburgh, Salt Lake City, New Orleans, and Louisville prohibit city agencies from making inquiries about the salary history of job candidates.

Check with your  state department of labor  for the latest laws in your area. 

Also, some employers, including Amazon, Facebook, and Google  have banned interview questions related to salary history .

If you are asked to include your salary history with your resume, you could ignore the request, but that means you could risk not getting  an interview . There is nothing employers like less than candidates who don't follow directions. An alternative would be to include a  salary range  rather than a specific amount.

If you do include your salary history, be honest. It's easy for potential employers to verify your salary with previous employers. However, you can also say that your  salary requirements  are flexible. That may help keep you in the running for the position and will give you some flexibility when  negotiating compensation  later on.

What's the best way to provide your salary history? You can list your salary history in your cover letter without itemizing.

For example, you could say, "I am currently earning in the mid-fifties." That gives you some flexibility when it comes to discussing compensation if you get a job offer.

If you're concerned that your salary is high enough to knock you out of contention for the position, what you might want to do instead is to include a salary range rather than a specific amount. For example, you could say "My salary range is from $40,000 - $50,000." Here's an example of a  cover letter with a salary range .

Or, your salary history can be listed on a separate salary history page and enclosed with your resume and cover letter. 

A salary history list includes the name of each company worked for, job title, and the salary the candidate has earned while working at the employer:

  • List your job title, company, and salary for each job in reverse chronological order with your current or most recent job at the top of the list.
  • List your gross annual salary (the amount prior to taxes being withheld) including any bonuses or other additional compensation over the base pay that you have received.
  • You may also want to mention benefits, in addition to salary.

The following are templates you can use to provide employers with salary history. The second example mentions benefits in addition to annual salary.

Salary History Template #1

Your Name Address City, State Zip Phone Email

Salary History

Benefit Representative Baptist Medical Hospital Little Rock, AR 12/16 - Present Annual Salary:  $42,000

Account Analyst Baptist Medical Hospital Little Rock, AR 1/13 - 12/16 Annual Salary:  $35,000

Account Analyst Carillon Financial Services Tampa, FL 4/10 - 12/13 Annual Salary:  $29,000

Salary History Template #2

First Last Name Street Address City, State Zip Phone Email

Marketing Manager Chrome and Partners New York, NY 06/17 - Present Annual Salary:  $64,000 plus benefits

Marketing Coordinator Metropolitan, Inc. Patchogue, NY 12/14 - 06/17 Annual Salary:  $50,000 plus benefits

Social Media Assistant Prime Communications Bennington, VT 6/12 - 12/14 Annual Salary:  $29,000 plus benefits

The information contained in this article is not legal advice and is not a substitute for such advice. State and federal laws change frequently, and the information in this article may not reflect your own state’s laws or the most recent changes to the law. 

AAUW. " State and Local Salary History Bans ," Accessed Dec. 14, 2021.

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How to provide salary information in a cover letter.

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Know how much you are worth and why you are worth that much. When applying for a new job it is important that you can specify a salary range you are willing to accept and that you can back up your demands. While disclosing your salary requirements or history in the cover letter is not ideal, some employers will ask that this information is included. In this case, be sure it is.

Salary Negotiation

While it may seem a wee bit uncomfortable at the time, it is worth the effort. Negotiating your salary can really pay off -- literally -- in the years to come. The best time to negotiate is after you get the job offer. Keep this in mind when addressing your salary requirements in your cover letter. You do not want to attempt negotiations in your letter before you know the employer even wants to hire you, and you do not want to limit the opportunity to negotiate by offering a low figure just to get your foot in the door.

Salary History

Employers may want to know your salary history. You can include in your cover letter that you currently earn $55,000, for example. But only mention this if you are sure your current salary is in the range you expect from the new employer. If a complete history is requested, prepare a separate document for this information. Using the same format as your resume, list your past jobs in reverse chronological order. Include your title, the name of the employer, the date and your salary information. You can list both your beginning and ending salary if you received a raise during your employment.

Desired Salary

If the employer asks for your desired salary, address it in your cover letter. Do some research before you write this part of your letter to find out just how you can expect the position to pay based on the current job market. Provide the employer with a salary range of what you believe the position is worth. You can write a statement such as, "My current salary requirement is $42,000 to $49,000." If you are not sure what the market rate is, opt for a wide salary range or mention that you would like a certain amount but are willing to negotiate.

Other Considerations

Rather than list an amount, you may want to opt for addressing the salary question with a line such as, "salary is negotiable." Keep in mind, the employer is most likely asking you about your salary history or requirements to give herself an edge. The salary information you provide tells the employer how much, and in some cases, how little they can get away with paying you. In some cases, if your past salary was much higher than this job pays, you might scare the employer away.

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How to Include Your Salary Requirements in a Cover Letter: With Examples and a Template

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Should you Include Salary Requirements in a Cover Letter

How to calculate your salary requirements, how to include salary requirements in a cover letter, example sentences of including salary requirements in a cover letter, where to add a paragraph like this, salary requirements in a cover letter - takeaways.

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Quick Answer: When a job posting specifically requests salary requirements, it's important to include a realistic number in your cover letter. Research the industry, your skills and experience levels, and comparable salaries on sites such as Salary.com and Glassdoor. Consider using a range instead of a specific number, and indicate that your expectations are negotiable and flexible. Remember, keep your requirements in line with the job's expectations and don't ask for too little or too much.

Know what you want, need or expect in terms of pay from your next job?

We’re going to dig deep into how you can include your salary requirements in a cover letter in a professional way without going too high or low, and without sounding pushy!

You may be asking yourself why companies sometimes ask applicants to include their salary expectations in a cover letter. Basically, it’s a first step in narrowing down the applicant field.

Employers can make sure they don’t waste time reaching out to candidates whose expectations don't fit with the salary range they have set for the position.

Sometimes, though, it can feel a little awkward or intimidating to throw a number out to a prospective employer.

But it’s actually really easy to include a strong salary expectation that will make you seem knowledgeable, confident, and will get you what you deserve, as one extra part of writing a great cover letter .

In this article, we’ll go over:

  • Whether you even should include salary requirements in a cover letter
  • And of course, how to include your salary requirements in a cover letter when you need to

We’ve also included examples of how you can include your salary requirement in your cover letter, and we have 500+ great cover letter examples and templates you can use to write a cover letter that will land you that job.

First off, if a job application doesn’t ask you to include salary information, then don’t. It could undermine your application.

For example, if you request too high a salary, the employer may immediately set your application aside. On the flip side, if you ask for too low a salary, you may lose out on earnings they would have otherwise paid you.

Salary discussions often come up in interviews anyhow, so if they don’t ask in advance, wait for that. Of course, that means you should still be prepared to answer the question, and any other common tricky ones that come up.

But, if the job posting or application specifies that they want you to include a salary requirement, be sure that you do ( unless you live somewhere where questions like that are prohibited ).

In the case, you’re in a position that you are expected to include a salary requirement. You’ll want to do some research on the industry and take an honest look at your skills and experience to come up with a fair and reasonable number that will work for both parties.

A good first step is to check the average salaries for your industry. There are a few good websites that can help you with this.

Salary.com is maybe the most popular salary-specific job site. It lists every position in a field with free salary info, and they include cost-of-living calculators, comparison tools, lists of benefits, and even negotiation tips.

Glassdoor gives users the opportunity to read company reviews based on employee feedback. This tool is great because instead of general industry info, you can do a salary search for a specific company and position - giving you a real insider edge.

Indeed is a really popular job posting aggregator that also has a salary search tool . Here you can use keywords in your search, on top of job titles.

Some other options that include salary info, cost of living calculators, and/or other help in finding out what salary to expect are SalaryList , Salary Expert , and for Americans, the Bureau of Labor Statistics can help.

Remember, no matter how specific or general the website you’re looking at is, what you’re getting from them is info based on other workers.  So, you should also consider specific things about yourself that could influence your salary, like:

Your education is an important determinant of pay. An applicant with a bachelor’s degree should expect a lower starting salary compared to someone with a master’s or a doctorate.  The more relevant education you have, the higher you can expect to fall in the salary range for a job.

Do consider the relevance of your education -  a degree in Sports Medicine doesn’t have much impact in an accounting firm, but a Forensic Accounting degree, or an MBA in Accounting obviously do! You’d likely see a higher starting wage with the latter two as a result.

Location and cost of living

Different places have different costs of living - we know rents in Manhattan are going to be higher than in Boise, Idaho for a comparable apartment! But the costs of transportation, food, entertainment, and everything else varies from one city to another.

Because of that, employers know and compensate people differently depending on where they’re expected to work. So take into account where the job is located when you’re considering the salary.

Look at your work history. If you have a lot of experience in the company’s industry and operations, you can usually expect higher compensation than someone with little or no experience.

Look back on your work and experience history though, and you may be able to find great transferable skills, or performance results that apply to the new job.

Courses/certifications

Having specific professional certifications and licenses means you can ask for higher salaries, in the same way that education affects your value as an employee. Since you’ve put time into your professional development, an employer would be interested in offering you a greater salary for the value you bring and add to their team.

If you’re a candidate with an in-demand skill, you can consider asking for a higher salary. For example, if you’re applying for a UX design job in Germany, and you speak English and German (and/or other languages in the region) you’d have applicable skills and can ask to be compensated accordingly.

Personal situation

When it comes down to it, you also have to think about what you need or would accept for a job, too. No matter what the average is, consider your personal expenses and expectations.

If you need a certain amount to live and for your savings target, you may need to ask for that amount, because it’s not going to be a good fit long-term if you can’t pay your bills! Likewise, if it’s a dream job, and you don’t have other financial commitments, you may decide to strategically undercut the expected rate to get your foot in the door.

Other considerations

  • Consider that to move to another company, you’d expect a pay rise.
  • Switching jobs can be inherently risky, and it’s not unusual for a candidate to ask for a pay raise when switching from one company to another doing the same job. Asking for more helps mitigate the risk.
  • Consider additional benefits a company would offer/provide.
  • Not every company has the same benefits, and some benefits packages outweigh lower wages.  Consider health plans, pension/savings plans, cost of living increases, annual technology or professional development grants, or any other non-salary additional benefit a company provides as part of the total package.
  • Consider mentioning your range
  • Given all the variables we’ve just covered, it can sometimes be hard to come up with just the right amount.  In this case, it’s a good idea to consider mentioning a salary range, instead of one firm number.

Has the employer asked for you to use a specific format? If so, follow their instructions.

If they haven’t specified that they want your salary requirement in a specific format, then you have a few options open to you.

Use a salary range

When you include your salary requirements in a cover letter, consider phrasing it as a salary range instead of an absolute number. You can say something like, “My salary requirement is in the $50,000-60,000 range.”

While this doesn't give the employer an exact figure, it gives them an idea of what you hope to earn. That way, you and the employer have some flexibility to move forward with, and you can avoid being dismissed for asking for too much or too little.

When using a range, still make sure the high and low figures are realistic based on your experience, the position, your industry and the other considerations we talked about.

Tell the employer your salary requirements are negotiable

Another good idea is to tell the employer you’re willing to negotiate your salary based on their budget, the specific requirements of the job, and other compensation considerations like benefits. This is vague, so it may not satisfy their question entirely, but it addresses it, and opens the door to move forward.

Say that you're flexible

This is something you should always do. Whether you provide a salary range or include a definite figure, you should include a sentence letting the employer know that your salary requirements are flexible.

This way, if your ask is out of their range, they may still bring you in for an interview instead of casting your application aside.  Saying this also means you can talk about the salary more once you have a better idea of the company and their expectations from the interview process.

Writing a cover letter can be tricky.  There are a lot of considerations about their design , their general format , the best outline to use , and even how to start writing and how to close them.

Including a salary requirement adds another complication that you might struggle with. The examples below should give you an idea of how you might tackle it in your specific case.

Example 1 - Firm Number

Based on my qualifications, professional results, certifications, and the range of duties and responsibilities of the role, my salary requirement is $75,000 per year. Please note that I am, however, flexible and willing to negotiate based on your budget, requirements, and the complete compensation package being offered. I would be happy to further discuss my salary requirements once I have a better picture of the offer, your position, as well as the potential for career advancement.

Example 2 - Salary Range

As per your request, I would like to suggest a salary in the range of $75,000 to $90,000. My requested salary is based on my previous salary history, the posted job description, my direct and related experience, and my research on the typical compensation for this role in the industry. As you’ll see in my resume, I have put many years into my education and regularly take classes and certifications to continue my professional development, and I feel I would add great value to your team. Please bear in mind that the actual salary we might agree on is also negotiable based on other relevant factors such as professional development opportunities, employee benefits, and career advancement.

Example 3 - Salary Range

With regard to your request for a desired salary, and based on the listed job duties and responsibilities, I would like to suggest compensation in the $40,000-$50,000 range. I base this on having researched the salaries for comparable roles in the industry, considering my academic qualifications living, and bearing in mind the cost of living in Portland. I would be happy to further discuss this, and would be willing to negotiate this salary based on any further information you can provide about the role and compensation.

Example 4 - Firm Number Briefly

My salary requirement is $85,000, which is comparable with the average compensation for a professional with my level of experience in the local market. My salary expectation is flexible, depending on other benefits you can provide such as career advancement, bonuses, and your overall compensation package.

Example 5 - Salary Range Briefly

Per your request, based on the posted job description, my credentials, and industry research, an acceptable salary range for this role is $75,000-$80,000. My salary requirements are negotiable, depending on the opportunities to earn bonuses, career advancement, and professional development.

If you’re asked, including your salary requirement is just one of several things you should be sure to include in your cover letter. The general structure we recommend doesn’t typically include this item.

So where should you add the salary requirement?

Our recommendation is that your cover letter include an introduction, and two body paragraphs explaining why you’re the perfect candidate for the job and why you are a good fit for the company.

We’d say you should include the salary requirement at this point -  either as short a standalone paragraph, or as part of your closing call to action paragraph. Take a look at our cover letter examples and templates if you want to get a better idea of exactly what this structure looks like and where to add the salary expectation.

You can also use our cover letter builder to be sure you’re putting together the best possible cover letter to land your next job.

  • If they don’t ask, then you shouldn’t ask!
  • Thoroughly research your desired rate of pay.
  • Use sentences such as "My salary expectation is flexible depending upon the overall compensation package and additional benefits such as opportunities for advancement.," or "Per your request, given my qualifications and achievements, my salary requirement is $X0,000(-$X0,000).
  • Always state your compensation requirements are flexible or negotiable.
  • Include your salary requirement just before or as part of your closing call to action paragraph.

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How to Include Salary History on Resume

Last Updated: March 6, 2024 Approved

This article was co-authored by Amber Leima . Amber Leima is a Resumé Consultant and the Founding Editor of Best Words Editing. She has two decades of experience helping people and companies express their unique value. Amber is a master at drawing out what matters from your personal story and promoting it to optimal effect, crafting beautifully clear resumés and on-point personal branding supported by thoughtfully-structured interview coaching. She holds Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees in English Literature from the University of Sussex, England. Her clients have been hired by their employers of choice, including Amazon, Meta, Microsoft, and PayPal. wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 100% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status. This article has been viewed 366,577 times.

Amber Leima

Mentioning Your Current Salary in Your Resume

Include a “Salary History” section at the bottom of your resume. List the salary range for your last several jobs without inflating it, rounded to the nearest $5,000 or $10,000 (for example, “I made $45,000–$60,000 at my last 3 jobs.”). State your desired salary as a range, too.

Including Your Salary History or Requirement

Step 1 Create a range.

  • For instance, if you made $34,500, $46,000, and $51,000 in your last three jobs, you could write, "I have made $35,000 to $50,000 in my last three jobs." [4] X Research source

Step 2 Don't inflate your salary.

  • When create a salary requirement, look at job listings that have salaries on them in your industry; look for similar level positions with your education and experience. That process will help give you an idea of a range, if you don't already know. You can also use salary surveys to help you. Don't forget, salaries vary by location, as cost of living will make salaries higher in some areas than in others.
  • One reason to look for positions similar to your education and experience is that you can ask for more money if you have more experience or more education than other candidates. For example, if you have a master's degree, you can ask for more money than if you have a bachelor's degree.
  • Don't add benefits and bonuses into the salary. The salary requirement range should be just your base salary. [7] X Research source

Step 4 Choose the cover letter or resume.

  • In your cover letter, include it near the end of your letter.
  • On the resume, you can add it as a section under your experience.

Step 5 Include a note about flexibility.

Understanding the Salary History and Requirement

Step 1 Know it gives you less to bargain with.

  • Essentially, you want to sell them on your services and skills before you tell them how much you want them to pay you.

Step 2 Be smart about including it.

  • When using this approach, you can show how your salary has increased for each job by putting a starting salary and an ending salary. That way, you show your salary progression.

Step 4 Don't make a separate sheet.

Expert Q&A

You might also like.

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  • ↑ Amber Leima. Resumé Consultant. Expert Interview. 18 March 2022.
  • ↑ http://theundercoverrecruiter.com/salary-requirements-resume/

About This Article

Amber Leima

To include salary history on your resume, list your salary history as a range as opposed to including the exact amount you made at each of your previous jobs. For example, you could write something like, "I have made $35,000 to $50,000 in my last three jobs." Just make sure you don't lie and inflate your salary since some companies will check with past employers. Also, only include your salary history if the company explicitly asks for it. If they don't, you should leave it off your resume. To learn how to include your salary requirement on a resume, scroll down! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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How To Write A Cover Letter With Salary Requirements

How To Write A Cover Letter With Salary Requirements

Including your salary requirement in a cover letter can be tricky. You want to make sure that you are asking for a fair wage, but you don’t want to price yourself out of a job before you even have the chance to interview. In this guide, we will walk you through the process of including your salary requirement in a cover letter, and give you some tips on how to negotiate once an offer is made. Let’s get started!

Why do Employers ask for Salary Requirements?

Employers ask for salary requirements as a way to screen candidates. They want to make sure that they are not wasting their time interviewing someone who is asking for too much or too little money. It is also a way to gauge whether or not you are serious about the job. If you are not willing to disclose your salary requirements, the employer may think that you are not serious about the job or that you are trying to hide something.

When to Include Salary Requirement in a Cover Letter?

If the job posting asks for salary requirements, you will need to include them in your cover letter. Make sure that you address the requirement in the first paragraph of your letter, and be as specific as possible.

For example, if the job posting says “salary requirements must be included,” you might write something like this: “I am looking for a position that pays between $60,000 and $70,000 per year.”

This shows that you have done your research on the market rate for the position and that you are reasonable in your expectations. If you are unsure of what to write, or how specific to be, err on the side of caution and give a range rather than a specific number.

However, if the job posting or application does not specifically ask for salary requirements, you should not include them. This can be a red flag to employers, and may even disqualify you from consideration.

How to Include Salary Requirement in a Cover Letter

There is no one formula for “How to include a salary requirement in a cover letter”. However, there are a few things that you can do to make sure that you are putting your best foot forward. Here are a few of the most common options:

1. In the Opening Paragraph.

If the job posting asks for salary requirements to be included, you will need to address this in the first paragraph of your cover letter. Be as specific as possible, and make sure that you are within the range that you are comfortable with.

Here are a few examples of How to include your Salary in the opening paragraph:

  • “I am looking for a position that pays between $60,000 and $70,000 per year.”
  • “My current salary is $75,000 per year, and I am looking for a position that pays in the same range.”
  • “I am open to discussing salary requirements after the initial interview.”

Remember, if you are unsure of what to write, or how specific to be, it is always better to err on the side of caution and give a range rather than a specific number.

2. As a range.

If you are unsure of what to ask for, or you want to leave room for negotiation, you can give a range rather than a specific number. This shows that you have done your research on the market rate for the position and that you are reasonable in your expectations.

Here are a few examples of How to include a Salary as a Range

  • “I am looking for a salary in the $60,000 – $70,000 range.”
  • “I am comfortable with a salary between $60,000 and $70,000.”
  • “I am open to negotiating a salary within the $60,000 – $70,000

3. Say Salary Requirements Are Negotiable.

If you want to be a little more coy, you can say that your salary requirements are negotiable. This shows the employer that you are interested in the job and that you are flexible when it comes to money. However, make sure that you have a number in mind that you would be comfortable with, just in case they decide to take you up on your offer.

Here are a few examples of How to inform your potential employer that your salary requirements are negotiable.

  • “I am open to negotiating a salary within the $60,000 – $70,000 range.”
  • “My salary requirements are negotiable.”
  • “I am comfortable with a range of $60,000 to $70,000.”
  • “I would be willing to negotiate salary within the $60,000 – $70,000 range.”

4. State That You’re Flexible.

If you want the job, and you are willing to be flexible with your salary requirements, you can state this outright in your cover letter. This shows that you are interested in the position and that you are willing to work with them on salary.

Here are a few examples of how you can state that you are flexible with your salary requirements:

  • “I am willing to be flexible with my salary requirements.”
  • “I am open to negotiating my salary.”
  • “I am flexible with my salary requirements.”

Remember, if you are going to take this approach, you need to have a range in mind that you are comfortable with so that you don’t end up getting low-balled.

Salary Requirements in a Cover Letter Example

Here is an example of how to include your salary requirements in a cover letter. This person is looking for a Marketing Manager position that pays between $90,000 and $100,000 per year:

Include Salary Requirements in a Cover Letter

Salary Requirements in Cover Letter Example (Text Version) Hello Hiring Manager, I am a Marketing Manager with 5+ years of experience leading the marketing campaigns for several notable companies. My skills lie in planning and executing marketing strategies, as well as developing high-performance teams that deliver results. I have a proven track record for increasing profits and brand awareness for a wide range of companies. I am also confident that I am a great fit for the position and would love to be a part of your team. In regards to salary, I am looking for a position that pays between $90,000 and $100,000 per year. My passion is coordinating teams to achieve marketing goals. I have a keen eye for detail and work hard to ensure that every aspect of the campaign is completed on time and within budget. I also thrive on collaborating with multiple departments to provide exceptional service to customers. You can find my resume attached, along with references from my past managers who sing my praises! Please feel free to contact me at [phone number] or via email at [email address]. Thank you for your consideration! Sincerely, Your Name

Tips for including your desired salary expectations in a cover letter

There are a few other things to keep in mind when it comes to including salary requirements in your cover letter.

  • First, make sure that you are using the same format as the job posting. If it asks for salary requirements to be included in the body of the email, make sure that you include them in the body of your cover letter.
  • Second, if you are including a range, make sure that it is a reasonable range. Don’t ask for too much, or you will risk being passed over, but don’t ask for too little either, or you will not be taken seriously.
  • Finally, if you are unsure of what to include, or how specific to be, it is always better to err on the side of caution and give a range rather than a specific number. This will show the employer that you have done your research and that you are reasonable in your expectations.

FAQ’s

What should you do if an employer asks for your salary requirements.

If an employer asks for your salary requirements, be honest and give them a range that you are comfortable with. If you have no idea what a fair wage is, look up salaries for similar positions in your area and use that as a starting point. Remember that you can always negotiate once an offer is made, so don’t feel like you have to give your bottom line right away.

Should I disclose my previous salary history?

Some job applications will ask for your previous salary history. This is different than disclosing your salary requirements, and you are not obligated to share this information. disclosing your salary history can work against you, as it can lower your asking wage. If an employer asks for this information, you can simply say that you are not comfortable sharing that information.

How to figure out a fair salary range?

If you are unsure of what to ask for, or how to figure out a fair salary range, there are a few things you can do. First, look up salaries for similar positions in your area. This will give you a good starting point as to what people are earning in your field. You can also use online salary calculators, like the one at payscale.com. These calculators will take into account your experience, education, and location to give you a more customized salary range.

When it comes to negotiating your salary, always remember that you have the upper hand. The employer wants you, and they will likely be willing to negotiate to get you on board. Stay confident, and don’t be afraid to ask for more money.

Key Takeaways

In a nutshell, it’s really simple to state compensation needs in a cover letter once you’ve discovered the secret. Let’s take a look at some key takeaways on How to mention salary requirements in a cover letter

  • Don’t include your Salary if you are not asked for by the Employer in the Job Description.
  • Research the market rate for the position and state that you are reasonable in your expectations.
  • Include a salary range if you want to be more specific.
  • Say that your salary requirements are negotiable.
  • State outright that you are flexible with your salary requirements.
  • Use sentences such as “I am open to discussing salary requirements after the initial interview” or “I am willing to be flexible with my salary requirements.”

Including salary requirements in your cover letter can be a tricky business. But, if you follow these tips, you will be sure to make the best impression possible. Good luck!

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How To Include Salary Requirements In A Cover Letter (With Examples)

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Find a Job You Really Want In

When you apply for a job, you may be asked about your salary requirements . Answering this question correctly is crucial. If you ask for an amount that is too high, you may be priced out of an interview or job offer . If you ask for an amount that is too low, you will find yourself boxed into a less than preferable salary.

We will go over why employers ask for salary requirements, when to include them, and how you should do it to help you get your desired salary.

Key Takeaways:

Salary requirements should appear at the end of the cover letter , but only when asked.

Provide a range when possible and a specific amount only when necessary.

Base your salary requirement on online research that includes industry standards, cost of living, and your educational/professional experience.

Salary requirements help an employer budget for a new hire.

How To Include Salary Requirements In A Cover Letter (With Examples)

What Are Salary Requirements?

Why do employers ask for salary requirements, when to include salary requirements and compensation in a cover letter, how to provide your salary requirements, example cover letter with salary requirements, how to calculate a fair salary range, final thoughts.

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A salary requirement is an amount you determine you would like to be paid. As an applicant, it also reveals to your employer important information about you. When you make a salary requirement, you should base it on your prior salary, skills/experience, and the cost of living in the area you will work.

The salary requirement can be listed as a specific amount or as a range. This depends on what your employer specifies in their inquiry. They may also ask for a salary history , which would be listing your past salaries and benefits from previous employers. It is essential to note the distinction between a salary requirement, which is something you are asking for, and a salary history, which is something you have received.

You should know that some states limit what companies can inquire about your salary history. Look up what your state’s laws are before you provide a salary history.

There are many reasons why an employer may ask for a salary requirement.

To fit their budget. Generally, the employer has a budgeted amount they can offer. If your salary requirement is too high, they will likely hesitate to give you an offer unless you are an exceptional candidate.

To see how you value yourself. A salary requirement reveals a lot about you. This will let them know if you are aware of how your skills and experience match up to the position. With this in mind, the employer can then go ahead and filter out candidates who seem outside their price range or show an inability to understand their professional value.

To see if you are at the right level for the position. If your salary is on the lower end of what they have budgeted, it could mean that you have a lower experience than what the job requires. And if you have over, it may mean you are overqualified.

Salary requirements. An employer may ask you to provide a salary requirement in your cover letter . Only include salary requirements if the application requires one. There is no reason to offer it unsolicited, as it could either remove you from consideration or else commit you to a salary you later might regret.

Do not ignore the request to provide a salary requirement. Always follow directions during an application. If you do not, then the employer may worry about your ability to follow directions in the future and reject your application .

Note if the employer asks for a specific salary amount. If you have the option, it is better to provide a range of desired salaries. This helps increase your chances that your salary requirement will be within an amount agreeable to the employer.

Compensation. Compensation needs, like salary requirements, may be asked on your application. Your employer will ask what non-monetary expectations you have for the position. This includes benefits such as healthcare, vacation time/paid time off , retirement plans such as a 401k, childcare, maternity leave, employee recreational activities, tuition reimbursement , and travel assistance.

Like salary requirements, you should only mention your compensation needs if you are asked. In your cover letter, prioritize your compensation and list as few as possible. Again, you do not want to box yourself in during the application process. Pick benefits that are immediately important to you, such as healthcare , and leave the rest for the interview .

Once you have determined your salary requirements, you should place them in your cover letter’s final paragraph. Keep this section short. You do not want it to distract from your cover letter’s overall message , which should highlight why you are a great fit for the position.

There are three options you can take when including a salary requirement in your cover letter:

Provide a specific amount. If the application asks for a specific salary amount, then you should comply and provide one. Failing to do so may be interpreted as an inability or unwillingness to follow directions, which should be avoided.

When you pick a specific amount, you need to balance the highest amount for you with what you think is a fair amount to ask for. Research the position and industry standards and balance with your own needs. As always, show a willingness to be flexible.

With my experience, I will be a great project manager who combines empathy with results. My salary requirement is $91,050. I can be flexible and am willing to negotiate this requirement.

Provide a range. If the application asks for a salary requirement but does not specify the amount, this is your best option. It allows for the greatest flexibility in negotiations and provides you with the best chance of landing your desired amount.

Like a specific amount, base your salary range off of the industry norms and your skill set, along with your needs and cost of living expenses.

With my experience, I will be a great project manager who combines empathy with results. My salary requirement is in the $90,000 to $100,000 range. I can be flexible and am willing to negotiate this requirement.

Avoid providing an amount. This is the last resort option if you are either uncomfortable or unwilling to discuss salary requirements. In such an instance, you should still show that you are willing to be flexible. Keep it short and honest.

I do not wish to discuss my salary requirements at this time. However, I would be willing and flexible to discuss it at a further date.

It is imperative to mention that you are flexible, and your requirements are negotiable. You want to show that you are open to compromise. If you keep your options open, then the employer will see you can work towards a mutual goal. Negotiability also helps if your salary range falls outside the employer’s budgeted offer.

To the Hiring Representative, I am applying for the project manager position at United Group. I have several years of project management experience, and I think it would be a great fit at United Group. In my past experience with Divided Inc., I effectively led teams that constructed user interfaces for our company’s web and mobile apps. My responsibilities included investigating software issues and developing new infrastructure based on pioneering tech trends. A lot of this work involved independent project management as well as collaboration with other team members. During my time as a project manager at Divided, Inc., I was able to develop my communication skills and specialize in task management using video conferencing software. This became particularly useful as we began work remotely as an organization. During this time, I also liaised with research institutions and became familiar with prototype development. Due to my knowledge, I have been asked to train other team members and have been entrusted to lead lectures for several other partner organizations. With my experience, I will be a great project manager who combines empathy with results. My salary requirement is in the $90,000 to $100,000 range. I can be flexible and am willing to negotiate this requirement. Please consider my application. I would love the opportunity to further discuss my skills and career goals. Thank you , Alex Smith

There are several factors to consider when you calculate your salary requirements. If you decide to provide a range, make sure it is fair. This means it is something you and your potential employer can agree on. Make it an amount you would be happy to receive and one that would not remove you from consideration.

Research the industry standard for the position. Go online and look up the average salary for the type of job you are applying to. Resources like Payscale , Salary.com , and the Bureau of Labor Statistics are excellent for determining your professional worth. You may find a range or only a single amount. If you do find a single amount, consider that your midpoint for your range.

Know your experience and skill set. If you have a lot of experience or a high level of demand for your skills, you need to base your salary range on the higher end of the industry standard. Conversely, if you are new to a position , you must approach your requirement from the lower end.

Consider your education and training. If you come from a higher education background or carry relevant certifications, you can make your requirements higher than the average range.

Consider the cost of living. Your salary requirements should, in part, be based on the geographic location of where you work. If a city, such as New York , has a higher cost of living than, say, Omaha , then you again will want to ask for a higher than average salary to meet your basic needs.

Make your range reasonable. It does not do you any good to ask for a salary in such a large range that the information is relevant. For example, you would say your requirements are between $40,000 and $100,000 even if the average salary is $70,000. Try to make your range within 20 to 30 percent of the midrange.

Your salary requirement is part of the more extensive dialogue you may have with a potential employer. Do not be afraid to stand up for your needs but also be reasonable in your expectations. By following these tips, you should be able to do just that.

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Chris Kolmar is a co-founder of Zippia and the editor-in-chief of the Zippia career advice blog. He has hired over 50 people in his career, been hired five times, and wants to help you land your next job. His research has been featured on the New York Times, Thrillist, VOX, The Atlantic, and a host of local news. More recently, he's been quoted on USA Today, BusinessInsider, and CNBC.

Matt Warzel a President of a resume writing firm (MJW Careers, LLC) with 15+ years of recruitment, outplacement, career coaching and resume writing experience. Matt is also a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Certified Internet Recruiter (CIR) with a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (Marketing Focus) from John Carroll University.

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Learn how to write a cover letter with your salary history.

Periodically, an employer or organization will request that you incorporate a salary history in your cover letter. A salary history which is unique about a salary necessity, and includes details & information on what you have earned in past employment. So. let's see the cover letter sample with salary history.

Some of the time, a salary history in a cover letter can be expressed as a sentence, for example, "I presently procure in the mid-fifties." A more point by point salary history may list your past a few occupations and incorporate the organization, work title, and advantages bundle for each.

For the most part, don't share your salary history in a cover letter. As a rule, if an employer or organization requests these details & information, you ought to pursue the employer or organization's headings and give it on the off chance that you are in an area where it is lawful for an organization to inquire. Be that as it may, a few urban communities and states preclude bosses from examining. You don't have to show it.

There are approaches to share your salary history that shield you from being excessively particular. Read underneath for guidance on the best way to impart your salary history to an employer or organization. Likewise, observe beneath for an example cover letter with a salary history included.

Can an Employer Ask you About The Salary History?

Remember that, in a few areas, it is unlawful for managers to ask you anything identified with your salary. Consequently, look at your state or city laws before reacting.

Read here for more details & information about what managers are lawfully permitted to solicit you in wording from your previous salary.

Step by Step Instructions to Share Your Salary History

Once more, don't refer to your salary history except if asked to. In your cover letter, you need to center around why you are a solid match for the job or employment instead of discussing salary. You additionally would prefer not to place yourself in a corner, salary insightful. On the off chance that you say your present salary, it may be harder to consult for better remuneration later on.

Be that as it may, if an employer or organization requests that you incorporate a salary history, there are a few choices for giving details & information. You could disregard the demand, yet managers need work contender to pursue headings. Not noting could lose you a prospective employee meet-up.

There are a couple of approaches to incorporate these details & information in your cover letter. One path is to include a sentence that states either an expansive depiction of your salary, for instance, "I at present procure in the mid-sixties." or a range, for instance, "My present salary extend is between $25,000 - $35,000". You may likewise include that you are adaptable as far as salary.

You could likewise incorporate a different salary history page alongside your cover letter. You could include the previous one, two, or three employments you have held in the salary history section. List the employment in turn around the subsequent request with the sample occupation at best.

For each job or job, list the organization, work title, and salary before assessments. It is up to you to list the salary range or the matching salary figure. Doing so also incorporates any rewards or extra remuneration.

Here is The Sample Cover Letter With Salary History Listed

This is a sample of a cover letter with salary history. This letter is for your guidance only. You can review this letter and edit it as per your specific situation and requirement.

Here is The Sample Cover Letter With Salary History Listed - Text Version

Full Name of The Applicant

Name of The Street

City Name, State Name - Zip Code

Contact Number

[email protected]

Date of Sending The Letter

First Name Last Name - Of the Concerned Person

Post Name, Name of The Department

Name of The Company

Address of The Company

Dear Mr. / Ms. Last Name,

When I am writing this, I can't control my enthusiasm for the Web Content Manager position recorded on the job website. I have encounter constructing huge, shopper-centered, wellbeing based substance destinations. While a lot of my experience has been in the employer or organization world, I comprehend the social estimation of the non-benefit segment, and my employer or organization experience will be a resource for your association.

My duties at my present place of employment have incorporated the advancement and administration of the webpage's article voice and style, the publication timetable, and the day by day content programming and generation of the site. In my past and currently, I have worked intimately with human services experts and medicinal editors to enable them to give the ideal details & information to a customer group of onlookers of patients. Furthermore, I have helped doctors figure out how to use medicinal substances to compose easy to understand, promptly intelligible content.

Experience has shown me how to manufacture substantial associations with all divisions at an association. I can work inside a group and also crosswise over groups. I work with web architects to determine specific issues, actualize specialized improvements, work with the advancement office to execute the plan and useful upgrades, screen website insights, and direct site design improvement. I know my work experience would make me a perfect Web Content Manager at your organization.

I am right now acquiring in the mid-sixties.

Much obliged to you for your thought. I anticipate getting a notification from you.

Name of The Applicant

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how to write salary history in cover letter

How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

I ’ve read thousands, maybe tens of thousands, of cover letters in my career. If you’re thinking that sounds like really boring reading, you’re right. What I can tell you from enduring that experience is that most cover letters are terrible — and not only that, but squandered opportunities. When a cover letter is done well, it can significantly increase your chances of getting an interview, but the vast majority fail that test.

So let’s talk about how to do cover letters right.

First, understand the point of a cover letter.

The whole idea of a cover letter is that it can help the employer see you as more than just your résumé. Managers generally aren’t hiring based solely on your work history; your experience is crucial, yes, but they’re also looking for someone who will be easy to work with, shows good judgment, communicates well, possesses strong critical thinking skills and a drive to get things done, complements their current team, and all the other things you yourself probably want from your co-workers. It’s tough to learn much about those things from job history alone, and that’s where your cover letter comes in.

Because of that …

Whatever you do, don’t just summarize your résumé.

The No. 1 mistake people make with cover letters is that they simply use them to summarize their résumé. This makes no sense — hiring managers don’t need a summary of your résumé! It’s on the very next page! They’re about to see it as soon as they scroll down. And if you think about it, your entire application is only a few pages (in most cases, a one- or two-page résumé and a one-page cover letter) — why would you squander one of those pages by repeating the content of the others? And yet, probably 95 percent of the cover letters I see don’t add anything new beyond the résumé itself (and that’s a conservative estimate).

Instead, your cover letter should go beyond your work history to talk about things that make you especially well-suited for the job. For example, if you’re applying for an assistant job that requires being highly organized and you neurotically track your household finances in a detailed, color-coded spreadsheet, most hiring managers would love to know that because it says something about the kind of attention to detail you’d bring to the job. That’s not something you could put on your résumé, but it can go in your cover letter.

Or maybe your last boss told you that you were the most accurate data processor she’d ever seen, or came to rely on you as her go-to person whenever a lightning-fast rewrite was needed. Maybe your co-workers called you “the client whisperer” because of your skill in calming upset clients. Maybe you’re regularly sought out by more senior staff to help problem-solve, or you find immense satisfaction in bringing order to chaos. Those sorts of details illustrate what you bring to the job in a different way than your résumé does, and they belong in your cover letter.

If you’re still stumped, pretend you’re writing an email to a friend about why you’d be great at the job. You probably wouldn’t do that by stiffly reciting your work history, right? You’d talk about what you’re good at and how you’d approach the work. That’s what you want here.

You don’t need a creative opening line.

If you think you need to open the letter with something creative or catchy, I am here to tell you that you don’t. Just be simple and straightforward:

• “I’m writing to apply for your X position.”

• “I’d love to be considered for your X position.”

• “I’m interested in your X position because …”

• “I’m excited to apply for your X position.”

That’s it! Straightforward is fine — better, even, if the alternative is sounding like an aggressive salesperson.

Show, don’t tell.

A lot of cover letters assert that the person who wrote it would excel at the job or announce that the applicant is a skillful engineer or a great communicator or all sorts of other subjective superlatives. That’s wasted space — the hiring manager has no reason to believe it, and so many candidates claim those things about themselves that most managers ignore that sort of self-assessment entirely. So instead of simply declaring that you’re great at X (whatever X is), your letter should demonstrate that. And the way you do that is by describing accomplishments and experiences that illustrate it.

Here’s a concrete example taken from one extraordinarily effective cover-letter makeover that I saw. The candidate had originally written, “I offer exceptional attention to detail, highly developed communication skills, and a talent for managing complex projects with a demonstrated ability to prioritize and multitask.” That’s pretty boring and not especially convincing, right? (This is also exactly how most people’s cover letters read.)

In her revised version, she wrote this instead:

“In addition to being flexible and responsive, I’m also a fanatic for details — particularly when it comes to presentation. One of my recent projects involved coordinating a 200-page grant proposal: I proofed and edited the narratives provided by the division head, formatted spreadsheets, and generally made sure that every line was letter-perfect and that the entire finished product conformed to the specific guidelines of the RFP. (The result? A five-year, $1.5 million grant award.) I believe in applying this same level of attention to detail to tasks as visible as prepping the materials for a top-level meeting and as mundane as making sure the copier never runs out of paper.”

That second version is so much more compelling and interesting — and makes me believe that she really is great with details.

If there’s anything unusual or confusing about your candidacy, address it in the letter.

Your cover letter is your chance to provide context for things that otherwise might seem confusing or less than ideal to a hiring manager. For example, if you’re overqualified for the position but are excited about it anyway, or if you’re a bit underqualified but have reason to think you could excel at the job, address that up front. Or if your background is in a different field but you’re actively working to move into this one, say so, talk about why, and explain how your experience will translate. Or if you’re applying for a job across the country from where you live because you’re hoping to relocate to be closer to your family, let them know that.

If you don’t provide that kind of context, it’s too easy for a hiring manager to decide you’re the wrong fit or applying to everything you see or don’t understand the job description and put you in the “no” pile. A cover letter gives you a chance to say, “No, wait — here’s why this could be a good match.”

Keep the tone warm and conversational.

While there are some industries that prize formal-sounding cover letters — like law — in most fields, yours will stand out if it’s warm and conversational. Aim for the tone you’d use if you were writing to a co-worker whom you liked a lot but didn’t know especially well. It’s okay to show some personality or even use humor; as long as you don’t go overboard, your letter will be stronger for it.

Don’t use a form letter.

You don’t need to write every cover letter completely from scratch, but if you’re not customizing it to each job, you’re doing it wrong. Form letters tend to read like form letters, and they waste the chance to speak to the specifics of what this employer is looking for and what it will take to thrive in this particular job.

If you’re applying for a lot of similar jobs, of course you’ll end up reusing language from one letter to the next. But you shouldn’t have a single cover letter that you wrote once and then use every time you apply; whatever you send should sound like you wrote it with the nuances of this one job in mind.

A good litmus test is this: Could you imagine other applicants for this job sending in the same letter? If so, that’s a sign that you haven’t made it individualized enough to you and are probably leaning too heavily on reciting your work history.

No, you don’t need to hunt down the hiring manager’s name.

If you read much job-search advice, at some point you’ll come across the idea that you need to do Woodward and Bernstein–level research to hunt down the hiring manager’s name in order to open your letter with “Dear Matilda Jones.” You don’t need to do this; no reasonable hiring manager will care. If the name is easily available, by all means, feel free to use it, but otherwise “Dear Hiring Manager” is absolutely fine. Take the hour you just freed up and do something more enjoyable with it.

Keep it under one page.

If your cover letters are longer than a page, you’re writing too much, and you risk annoying hiring managers who are likely sifting through hundreds of applications and don’t have time to read lengthy tomes. On the other hand, if you only write one paragraph, it’s unlikely that you’re making a compelling case for yourself as a candidate — not impossible, but unlikely. For most people, something close to a page is about right.

Don’t agonize over the small details.

What matters most about your cover letter is its content. You should of course ensure that it’s well-written and thoroughly proofread, but many job seekers agonize over elements of the letter that really don’t matter. I get tons of  questions from job seekers  about whether they should attach their cover letter or put it in the body of the email (answer: No one cares, but attaching it makes it easier to share and will preserve your formatting), or what to name the file (again, no one really cares as long as it’s reasonably professional, but when people are dealing with hundreds of files named “resume,” it’s courteous to name it with your full name).

Approaching your cover letter like this can make a huge difference in your job search. It can be the thing that moves your application from the “maybe” pile (or even the “no” pile) to the “yes” pile. Of course, writing cover letters like this will take more time than sending out the same templated letter summarizing your résumé — but 10 personalized, compelling cover letters are likely to get you more  interview invitations  than 50 generic ones will.

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Ungatekeeping: Here's My Cover Letter That Landed Me The Job

In a time when ChatGPT wasn’t yet known to the world, I wrote a cover letter that did exactly what it was supposed to: provided additional context for why I deserved the job I was applying for. And it ultimately landed me the gig.

It was 2016, and I really wanted a high-paying brand communication internship with General Motors as I rounded out my last year of journalism grad school. The requirements were simple. Submit a resume, job application, writing sample and…a cover letter. I’m not sure why that last ask was gave me pause but it was a daunting task to both sum up and expound on my resume, which is the purpose of a cover letter and essentially what you should aim to do when creating one. Since I knew the intern program was a coveted one and would likely garner scores of applications, I set out to ensure mine stood out with a few details: color, language and personality. Although cover letters may seem like they’re on the way to being obsolete, that’s not the case.

A recent survey of employers highlighted that the difference between getting the job you’re applying for and being overlooked lies in the cover letter. An impressive  87%  of employers read cover letters.

Ungatekeeping: Here’s My Cover Letter That Landed Me The Job

At the time, Girl Boss pink was the color of the moment, so I chose the tone to highlight the parts of the letter I wanted my prospective employer to pay attention to the most. Don’t be afraid to venture outside of the typical black font color when creating your cover letter, especially if you’re applying for a role in the creative industries like communications, marketing or graphic design.

Personality

I used thr opportunity to give them a preview of the type of person they would be working with: creative, outgoing and fun. I peppered in a few details about the type of skills I’d learned while in school and through other intern opportunities as well as how I’d already applied them. For example, I let them know that I was taught how to properly apply AP style writing, which was in alignment with my type A personality type. Don;t be afraid to inject some of yourself in the cover letter. After all, it’s likely that this will one of the first introductory documents the recruiter will look at of yours during the screening process.

Keep it specific and concise

Although the cover letter is a one-pager, you can utilize as a tool to let your recruiter know you’ve done your homework on the role and what it will likely entail from you. In my cover letter, I included information a partnership GM spearheaded, and what it’s aim was. It only took a quick Google search, but that detail was the differentiator that landed me the job I was later told by my recruiter.

At the end of the cover letter, reinforce your reason for applying to the job and why you’d be perfect for it. Use the last few lines as an opportunity to really drive your point home and leave a lasting impression on those who read it.

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IMAGES

  1. Sample Cover Letter With Salary History

    how to write salary history in cover letter

  2. Cover Letter With Salary History Collection

    how to write salary history in cover letter

  3. cover letter with salary history example

    how to write salary history in cover letter

  4. 9+ Sample Salary History Templates

    how to write salary history in cover letter

  5. Cover Letter With Salary History Collection

    how to write salary history in cover letter

  6. Cover Letter with Salary History Awesome 4 Salary History Cover Letter

    how to write salary history in cover letter

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COMMENTS

  1. How To Write a Salary History Letter in 4 Steps (Plus Example)

    Template 1. This template incorporates the salary history information into a cover letter: [Your name] [Your phone number] [Your email address] [Date] Dear Hiring Manager [or the name of the hiring manager], [Express that you're writing to express interest in a specific position, mentioning the employer's name.

  2. Sample Cover Letter With Salary History

    Include a Description of Your Salary or a Range. There are a few ways to include this information in your cover letter. One way is to include a sentence that states either a broad description of your salary (for example, "I currently earn in the mid-sixties.") or a range (for example, "My current salary range is between $40,000 - $50,000").

  3. Cover Letter Example With Salary Requirements

    When to Include Salary Requirements in a Cover Letter . If a job application does not require you to include salary information (such as your salary history, a salary requirement, or a salary range), do not do so. If you request too high a salary, the employer may not even look at your application.

  4. How To Write a Cover Letter With Salary Requirements

    Here are the different ways to list your salary requirements in your cover letter: 1. Use a salary range. When you list your salary requirements, consider writing a sentence that states your preferred salary range instead of an absolute figure. This gives both you and the employer some flexibility when it comes to your salary.

  5. Providing Salary History

    Annual Salary: $40,000 Digital Marketing Specialist. 123 Co. Start Date - Last Date. Annual Salary: $35,000 If the employer hasn't asked for your desired salary, you may opt to include it with your salary history. Example: "I currently make $70,000 and am seeking a position that pays between $75,000 - $80,000.".

  6. How to Include Salary Expectations in Cover Letter (+ Examples)

    We also include some useful examples in our helpful tips section. Here are the most common tips for including your desired salary expectations in a cover letter: 1. Don't be direct about your salary requirement. We don't recommend this approach, but it does sometimes prove successful: don't directly answer the question.

  7. How To Include Salary Requirements in Cover Letters

    Tell the employer your salary requirements are negotiable. Another way to include salary requirements in your cover letter is to tell the employer you're flexible with salaries. You can say that your salary expectations are negotiable based on the employer's budget and need. It is also possible to quote a figure or salary range based on the ...

  8. 2 Sample Salary History Templates for Job Seekers

    Template of a simple salary history list, attached to your job application. Your Name Your Address Your Cell Phone Number Your Email. Salary History. Position 1 (the most recent) Name of the employer (address or website can be included, looks more genuine) Duration Annual Salary. Position 2 Name of the employer Duration Annual salary. Example:

  9. How to write a Salary History: All You Need To Know

    For example, you could say "My salary range is $ 40,000 to $ 50,000." Below is an example of a cover letter with a salary range. Also Check: UPS recruits Business Development Executive - Sales. Or, your salary history can be listed on a separate salary history page and attached to your resume and cover letter.

  10. How to write salary history

    2. Choose cover letter or resume. You can include salary history in the cover letter or resume. In the cover letter, you should include it at the end of the letter. In the resume, you can include it in a section under Work Experience. 3. Include a note about your flexibility.

  11. How To Write a Salary History Letter in 4 Steps (Plus Example)

    To write a salary history letter that is appropriate and advantageous to you, follow these guidelines: 1. Read your state and local laws. Determine whether the employer is permitted to request this information at all prior to starting to write a salary history letter. Some states have outlawed the practice entirely, while others have only done ...

  12. How to Address a Request for Salary History

    2. Provide the salary history in your cover letter. For example, include a brief sentence that says "My salary history ranges from $10 an hour to $25 hour." You don't have to go into detail about which job paid how much. This salary history sentence lets the employer now how expensive it may be to hire you.

  13. Providing Salary History to Employers

    A salary history list includes the name of each company worked for, job title, and the salary the candidate has earned while working at the employer: List your job title, company, and salary for each job in reverse chronological order with your current or most recent job at the top of the list. List your gross annual salary (the amount prior to ...

  14. How to Include Salary Requirements in Your Cover Letter

    Here are three tips for politely detailing your salary requirements in your well-written cover letter: 1. Research what salary requirements are appropriate for the role. If your skills, qualifications, and experience are in demand, you may have an advantage when negotiating your salary. Research the job market first to determine the going rates ...

  15. How to Provide Salary Information in a Cover Letter

    Salary History. Employers may want to know your salary history. You can include in your cover letter that you currently earn $55,000, for example. But only mention this if you are sure your current salary is in the range you expect from the new employer. If a complete history is requested, prepare a separate document for this information.

  16. How to Include Salary Requirements in a Cover Letter: Sample

    Use the high end as your salary desired, followed by " (flexible)" or " (negotiable).". Sure—the proposition is confident, you might even say aggressive. But it's based on hard facts, too. Targeting the top end creates a "high anchor" that directs attention to your positive qualities.

  17. How to Write a Cover Letter with Salary Requirements

    A cover letter with salary requirements is a short letter that consists of your prior work history, the reasons for wanting to work for that particular company and your preferred salary for that job. Including salary in your cover letter can help your employer quickly determine if the open position's salary suits your financial needs and can ...

  18. How to Include Your Salary Requirements in a Cover Letter: With

    When you include your salary requirements in a cover letter, consider phrasing it as a salary range instead of an absolute number. You can say something like, "My salary requirement is in the $50,000-60,000 range.". While this doesn't give the employer an exact figure, it gives them an idea of what you hope to earn.

  19. How to Include Salary History on Resume: 11 Steps (with Pictures)

    Include a "Salary History" section at the bottom of your resume. List the salary range for your last several jobs without inflating it, rounded to the nearest $5,000 or $10,000 (for example, "I made $45,000-$60,000 at my last 3 jobs."). State your desired salary as a range, too. Part 1.

  20. How To Write A Cover Letter With Salary Requirements

    Here are a few of the most common options: 1. In the Opening Paragraph. If the job posting asks for salary requirements to be included, you will need to address this in the first paragraph of your cover letter. Be as specific as possible, and make sure that you are within the range that you are comfortable with.

  21. How To Include Salary Requirements In A Cover Letter (With ...

    Make your range reasonable. It does not do you any good to ask for a salary in such a large range that the information is relevant. For example, you would say your requirements are between $40,000 and $100,000 even if the average salary is $70,000. Try to make your range within 20 to 30 percent of the midrange.

  22. Learn How to Write a Cover Letter With Your Salary History

    There are a couple of approaches to incorporate these details & information in your cover letter. One path is to include a sentence that states either an expansive depiction of your salary, for instance, "I at present procure in the mid-sixties." or a range, for instance, "My present salary extend is between $25,000 - $35,000".

  23. How To Write a Salary Verification Letter (With Example)

    2. Create a header and salutation. At the top left of your letter, add a standard business header. Start with your company's name, the business address, your name and job title and phone number. Add the date on its own line, then include the recipient's contact information. Below your header, address the recipient directly.

  24. How to Write a Cover Letter That Will Get You a Job

    Instead, your cover letter should go beyond your work history to talk about things that make you especially well-suited for the job. For example, if you're applying for an assistant job that ...

  25. Ungatekeeping: Here's My Cover Letter That Landed Me The Job

    Cover letters may be a pain to write sometimes, but they can be the key to getting your foot in the right door. Young adult caucasian male job candidate giving resume to latin american female HR ...