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Listen: we know homework isn’t fun, but it is a good way to reinforce the ideas and concepts you’ve learned in class. But what if you’re really struggling with your homework assignments?

If you’ve looked online for a little extra help with your take-home assignments, you’ve probably stumbled across websites claiming to provide the homework help and answers students need to succeed . But can homework help sites really make a difference? And if so, which are the best homework help websites you can use? 

Below, we answer these questions and more about homework help websites–free and paid. We’ll go over: 

  • The basics of homework help websites
  • The cost of homework help websites 
  • The five best homework websites out there 
  • The pros and cons of using these websites for homework help 
  • The line between “learning” and “cheating” when using online homework help 
  • Tips for getting the most out of a homework help website

So let’s get started! 

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The Basics About Homework Help Websites–Free and Paid

Homework help websites are designed to help you complete your homework assignments, plain and simple. 

What Makes a Homework Help Site Worth Using

Most of the best sites allow users to ask questions and then provide an answer (or multiple possible answers) and explanation in seconds. In some instances, you can even send a photo of a particular assignment or problem instead of typing the whole thing out! 

Homework help sites also offer more than just help answering homework questions. Common services provided are Q&A with experts, educational videos, lectures, practice tests and quizzes, learning modules, math solving tools, and proofreading help. Homework help sites can also provide textbook solutions (i.e. answers to problems in tons of different textbooks your school might be using), one-on-one tutoring, and peer-to-peer platforms that allow you to discuss subjects you’re learning about with your fellow students. 

And best of all, nearly all of them offer their services 24/7, including tutoring! 

What You Should Should Look Out For

When it comes to homework help, there are lots–and we mean lots –of scam sites out there willing to prey on desperate students. Before you sign up for any service, make sure you read reviews to ensure you’re working with a legitimate company. 

A word to the wise: the more a company advertises help that veers into the territory of cheating, the more likely it is to be a scam. The best homework help websites are going to help you learn the concepts you’ll need to successfully complete your homework on your own. (We’ll go over the difference between “homework help” and “cheating” a little later!) 

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You don't need a golden piggy bank to use homework help websites. Some provide low or no cost help for students like you!

How Expensive Are the Best Homework Help Websites?

First of all, just because a homework help site costs money doesn’t mean it’s a good service. Likewise, just because a homework help website is free doesn’t mean the help isn’t high quality. To find the best websites, you have to take a close look at the quality and types of information they provide! 

When it comes to paid homework help services, the prices vary pretty widely depending on the amount of services you want to subscribe to. Subscriptions can cost anywhere from $2 to $150 dollars per month, with the most expensive services offering several hours of one-on-one tutoring with a subject expert per month.

The 5 Best Homework Help Websites 

So, what is the best homework help website you can use? The answer is that it depends on what you need help with. 

The best homework help websites are the ones that are reliable and help you learn the material. They don’t just provide answers to homework questions–they actually help you learn the material. 

That’s why we’ve broken down our favorite websites into categories based on who they’re best for . For instance, the best website for people struggling with math might not work for someone who needs a little extra help with science, and vice versa. 

Keep reading to find the best homework help website for you! 

Best Free Homework Help Site: Khan Academy

  • Price: Free!
  • Best for: Practicing tough material 

Not only is Khan Academy free, but it’s full of information and can be personalized to suit your needs. When you set up your account , you choose which courses you need to study, and Khan Academy sets up a personal dashboard of instructional videos, practice exercises, and quizzes –with both correct and incorrect answer explanations–so you can learn at your own pace. 

As an added bonus, it covers more course topics than many other homework help sites, including several AP classes.

Runner Up: Brainly.com offers a free service that allows you to type in questions and get answers and explanations from experts. The downside is that you’re limited to two answers per question and have to watch ads. 

Best Paid Homework Help Site: Chegg

  • Price: $14.95 to $19.95 per month
  • Best for: 24/7 homework assistance  

This service has three main parts . The first is Chegg Study, which includes textbook solutions, Q&A with subject experts, flashcards, video explanations, a math solver, and writing help. The resources are thorough, and reviewers state that Chegg answers homework questions quickly and accurately no matter when you submit them.  

Chegg also offers textbook rentals for students who need access to textbooks outside of their classroom. Finally, Chegg offers Internship and Career Advice for students who are preparing to graduate and may need a little extra help with the transition out of high school. 

Another great feature Chegg provides is a selection of free articles geared towards helping with general life skills, like coping with stress and saving money. Chegg’s learning modules are comprehensive, and they feature solutions to the problems in tons of different textbooks in a wide variety of subjects. 

Runner Up: Bartleby offers basically the same services as Chegg for $14.99 per month. The reason it didn’t rank as the best is based on customer reviews that say user questions aren’t answered quite as quickly on this site as on Chegg. Otherwise, this is also a solid choice!

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Best Site for Math Homework Help: Photomath

  • Price: Free (or $59.99 per year for premium services) 
  • Best for: Explaining solutions to math problems

This site allows you to t ake a picture of a math problem, and instantly pulls up a step-by-step solution, as well as a detailed explanation of the concept. Photomath also includes animated videos that break down mathematical concepts to help you better understand and remember them. 

The basic service is free, but for an additional fee you can get extra study tools and learn additional strategies for solving common math problems.

Runner Up: KhanAcademy offers in-depth tutorials that cover complex math topics for free, but you won’t get the same tailored help (and answers!) that Photomath offers. 

Best Site for English Homework Help: Princeton Review Academic Tutoring

  • Price: $40 to $153 per month, depending on how many hours of tutoring you want 
  • Best for: Comprehensive and personalized reading and writing help 

While sites like Grammarly and Sparknotes help you by either proofreading what you write via an algorithm or providing book summaries, Princeton Review’s tutors provide in-depth help with vocabulary, literature, essay writing and development, proofreading, and reading comprehension. And unlike other services, you’ll have the chance to work with a real person to get help. 

The best part is that you can get on-demand English (and ESL) tutoring from experts 24/7. That means you can get help whenever you need it, even if you’re pulling an all-nighter! 

This is by far the most expensive homework site on this list, so you’ll need to really think about what you need out of a homework help website before you commit. One added benefit is that the subscription covers over 80 other subjects, including AP classes, which can make it a good value if you need lots of help!  

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Best Site for STEM Homework Help: Studypool

  • Best for: Science homework help
  • Price: Varies; you’ll pay for each question you submit

When it comes to science homework help, there aren’t a ton of great resources out there. The best of the bunch is Studypool, and while it has great reviews, there are some downsides as well. 

Let’s start with the good stuff. Studypool offers an interesting twist on the homework help formula. After you create a free account, you can submit your homework help questions, and tutors will submit bids to answer your questions. You’ll be able to select the tutor–and price point–that works for you, then you’ll pay to have your homework question answered. You can also pay a small fee to access notes, lectures, and other documents that top tutors have uploaded. 

The downside to Studypool is that the pricing is not transparent . There’s no way to plan for how much your homework help will cost, especially if you have lots of questions! Additionally, it’s not clear how tutors are selected, so you’ll need to be cautious when you choose who you’d like to answer your homework questions.  

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What Are the Pros and Cons of Using Homework Help Sites?

Homework help websites can be a great resource if you’re struggling in a subject, or even if you just want to make sure that you’re really learning and understanding topics and ideas that you’re interested in. But, there are some possible drawbacks if you don’t use these sites responsibly. 

We’ll go over the good–and the not-so-good–aspects of getting online homework help below. 

3 Pros of Using Homework Help Websites 

First, let’s take a look at the benefits. 

#1: Better Grades Beyond Homework

This is a big one! Getting outside help with your studies can improve your understanding of concepts that you’re learning, which translates into better grades when you take tests or write essays. 

Remember: homework is designed to help reinforce the concepts you learned in class. If you just get easy answers without learning the material behind the problems, you may not have the tools you need to be successful on your class exams…or even standardized tests you’ll need to take for college. 

#2: Convenience

One of the main reasons that online homework help is appealing is because it’s flexible and convenient. You don’t have to go to a specific tutoring center while they’re open or stay after school to speak with your teacher. Instead, you can access helpful resources wherever you can access the internet, whenever you need them.

This is especially true if you tend to study at off hours because of your extracurriculars, work schedule, or family obligations. Sites that offer 24/7 tutoring can give you the extra help you need if you can’t access the free resources that are available at your school. 

#3: Variety

Not everyone learns the same way. Maybe you’re more of a visual learner, but your teacher mostly does lectures. Or maybe you learn best by listening and taking notes, but you’re expected to learn something just from reading the textbook . 

One of the best things about online homework help is that it comes in a variety of forms. The best homework help sites offer resources for all types of learners, including videos, practice activities, and even one-on-one discussions with real-life experts. 

This variety can also be a good thing if you just don’t really resonate with the way a concept is being explained (looking at you, math textbooks!).

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Not so fast. There are cons to homework help websites, too. Get to know them below!

3 Cons of Using Homework Help Websites 

Now, let’s take a look at the drawbacks of online homework help. 

#1: Unreliable Info

This can be a real problem. In addition to all the really good homework help sites, there are a whole lot of disreputable or unreliable sites out there. The fact of the matter is that some homework help sites don’t necessarily hire people who are experts in the subjects they’re talking about. In those cases, you may not be getting the accurate, up-to-date, and thorough information you need.

Additionally, even the great sites may not be able to answer all of your homework questions. This is especially true if the site uses an algorithm or chatbot to help students…or if you’re enrolled in an advanced or college-level course. In these cases, working with your teacher or school-provided tutors are probably your best option. 

#2: No Clarification

This depends on the service you use, of course. But the majority of them provide free or low-cost help through pre-recorded videos. Watching videos or reading info online can definitely help you with your homework… but you can’t ask questions or get immediate feedback if you need it .

#3: Potential For Scamming 

Like we mentioned earlier, there are a lot of homework help websites out there, and lots of them are scams. The review comments we read covered everything from outdated or wrong information, to misleading claims about the help provided, to not allowing people to cancel their service after signing up. 

No matter which site you choose to use, make sure you research and read reviews before you sign up–especially if it’s a paid service! 

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When Does “Help” Become “Cheating”?

Admittedly, whether using homework help websites constitutes cheating is a bit of a grey area. For instance, is it “help” when a friend reads your essay for history class and corrects your grammar, or is it “cheating”? The truth is, not everyone agrees on when “help” crosses the line into “cheating .” When in doubt, it can be a good idea to check with your teacher to see what they think about a particular type of help you want to get. 

That said, a general rule of thumb to keep in mind is to make sure that the assignment you turn in for credit is authentically yours . It needs to demonstrate your own thoughts and your own current abilities. Remember: the point of every homework assignment is to 1) help you learn something, and 2) show what you’ve learned. 

So if a service answers questions or writes essays for you, there’s a good chance using it constitutes cheating. 

Here’s an example that might help clarify the difference for you. Brainstorming essay ideas with others or looking online for inspiration is “help” as long as you write the essay yourself. Having someone read it and give you feedback about what you need to change is also help, provided you’re the one that makes the changes later. 

But copying all or part of an essay you find online or having someone write (or rewrite) the whole thing for you would be “cheating.” The same is true for other subjects. Ultimately, if you’re not generating your own work or your own answers, it’s probably cheating.

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5 Tips for Finding the Best Homework Help Websites for You

Now that you know some of our favorite homework help websites, free and paid, you can start doing some additional research on your own to decide which services might work best for you! Here are some top tips for choosing a homework help website. 

Tip 1: Decide How You Learn Best 

Before you decide which site or sites you’re going to use for homework help, y ou should figure out what kind of learning style works for you the most. Are you a visual learner? Then choose a site that uses lots of videos to help explain concepts. If you know you learn best by actually doing tasks, choose a site that provides lots of practice exercises.

Tip 2: Determine Which Subjects You Need Help With

Just because a homework help site is good overall doesn’t mean that it’s equally good for every subject. If you only need help in math, choose a site that specializes in that area. But if history is where you’re struggling, a site that specializes in math won’t be much help. So make sure to choose a site that you know provides high-quality help in the areas you need it most. 

Tip 3: Decide How Much One-On-One Help You Need 

This is really about cost-effectiveness. If you learn well on your own by reading and watching videos, a free site like Khan Academy is a good choice. But if you need actual tutoring, or to be able to ask questions and get personalized answers from experts, a paid site that provides that kind of service may be a better option.

Tip 4: Set a Budget

If you decide you want to go with a paid homework help website, set a budget first . The prices for sites vary wildly, and the cost to use them can add up quick. 

Tip 5: Read the Reviews

Finally, it’s always a good idea to read actual reviews written by the people using these homework sites. You’ll learn the good, the bad, and the ugly of what the users’ experiences have been. This is especially true if you intend to subscribe to a paid service. You’ll want to make sure that users think it’s worth the price overall!

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What’s Next?

If you want to get good grades on your homework, it’s a good idea to learn how to tackle it strategically. Our expert tips will help you get the most out of each assignment…and boost your grades in the process.

Doing well on homework assignments is just one part of getting good grades. We’ll teach you everything you need to know about getting great grades in high school in this article.

Of course, test grades can make or break your GPA, too. Here are 17 expert tips that’ll help you get the most out of your study prep before you take an exam.

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Ashley Sufflé Robinson has a Ph.D. in 19th Century English Literature. As a content writer for PrepScholar, Ashley is passionate about giving college-bound students the in-depth information they need to get into the school of their dreams.

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7 Hacks For How To Do Homework Fast

7 Hacks for how to do Homework Fast

Esteemed late and great Coach John Wooden used to say, “Be quick, but don’t hurry.” The phrase that was directed towards his team of basketball players can be applied to virtually every aspect of life, including for students approaching their homework. Learning how to do homework fast is both an art and a skill.

While it’s not a race to the finish, applying the following tips and tricks can help you better manage your time. As a student, time management becomes one of the most important skills you can possess. This then transfers to your work at any job, and even the ability to balance your personal life with professional activities.

But, before we go further down this rabbit hole, let’s focus on the task at hand, which is to adopt techniques to finish your homework quickly.

Student’s workspace for homework with graph paper and supplies / https://unsplash.com/photos/TB3CxSMHqmY

How to do your homework faster.

These homework hacks can be utilized for more than just homework. For anything that you have to get done with immense focus and accuracy, consider applying the following:

1. Create a to-do list

One of the upsides of homework is that it’s black-and-white. You know exactly what you have to get done and by when. This makes it easier to create a prioritized to-do list. While making a to-do list may not seem like a big hack, it ends up being one of the most important and useful things to do along your homework journey.

Instead of opening your notebook and jumping right into the first homework assignment that comes to mind, take a few moments to review what you have to get done. To make this easier, use a homework agenda or planner, so you don’t forget your tasks. Once you have everything written out, consider due dates and the length of time it should take to cross them off the list.

Creating a to-do list that is in order of priority helps you to stay on track and also provides you with a burst of endorphins and a sense of accomplishment each time you put a check in the box of completion.

2. Remove distractions

Distractions come in many different shapes and sizes. From cell phone chimes and notifications to a sibling throwing jelly beans at you, distractions can be of any type. While you cannot control how others affect you while you work, you can take control of your own study space and habits.

Turn off your phone and electronic devices, leave them in a different room, or at least put them on silent. It’s become a habit that as soon as the screen lights up, most people stop what they are doing and take a peek. Whether you act on the notification or not, you’ve lost valuable time with the distraction. Then, you need to refocus your brain on your homework all over again. These small bouts of broken concentration add up to a lot of wasted time.

3. Estimate time

Getting your homework done quickly means that you have to first be aware of the time it takes. You can time yourself on different tasks to start gaining an understanding and general idea of what takes the most time. This way, you can work to sharpen specific skills to move faster. For example, if you’re a slow reader, then you can try to learn more about speed reading so that you can shave off time on this task.

Timing yourself is also a good idea because if all your due dates are the same for tasks, then you can at least order your to-do list based on time. If a certain homework assignment takes less time than another, it may be best to start off with that task. This not only helps you to reserve your energy for time-consuming tasks, but it also means that you get started off on a positive note by completing something quickly. You can use that momentum to continue pushing through your list.

4. Find your study location

Find the type of environment that best suits you to get work done. This could mean a coffee shop with some ambient background noise, or it could be a library so quiet that you can hear a pin drop. Every person has their own preferences when it comes to where they work the best. As long as you minimize your distractions, you can get your work done quickly given you’re in an optimal workspace.

5. Gather supplies

Say you sit down to do some math homework. Then, you realize you need a graphing calculator. So, you go to get one. You sit back down and get into the groove. But now, you have forgotten the graphing paper you need to draw the equation. It may not seem like a big deal to get back up and run to the next room for your supplies, but again, you’re losing time.

In the endeavor of minimizing wasted time, you should gather all your supplies in advance and take them with you to your workspace. In order to do this successfully, review your to-do list once again and make a mental note of everything you’ll need to get each line item done.

6. Take breaks

Breaks are not bad. Breaks are actually beneficial. However, not all breaks are made equally.

By taking breaks, you can recharge your energy and focus. This could actually translate into being able to focus for longer stretches of time. Approach your homework like you would a high-intensity interval training exercise regimen. This means that you’ll go hard for a certain amount of time (say 45-60 minutes), and then you’ll take a quick, but meaningful break (say for 15-20 minutes).

If you focus for longer amounts of time, then take a slightly longer break. This helps to avoid burnout. Your body and mind will thank you for taking healthy breaks (i.e., a short walk, stretching, or any other activity that doesn’t require too much mental capacity).

7. Reward yourself

You’re the master of your own fate (and homework). So, if you thought that it would take you 45 minutes to finish your coding exercise, but you finished it in 30 minutes, you can apply those saved 15 minutes to a reward.

By celebrating small wins, you will continue to motivate yourself to get your work done in a timely manner. Alternatively, if you don’t want to take long breaks between your tasks, you can accrue your time and spend it all doing whatever brings you joy once you finish your homework to-do list.

Woman writing in a daily planner / https://unsplash.com/photos/N9uOrBICcjY

Wrapping up.

The desire to finish homework quickly is a universal feeling. When you look at the big picture, the ability to complete homework without wasting too much time turns out to be a lesson in time management. Having strong time management skills is paramount in education, especially if you choose to do so in a self-paced and online learning environment.

Try some or all of these homework hacks so that you can know how to do homework fast. Have fun while finding out which ones prove to be most beneficial for you.

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How to Help Students Develop the Skills They Need to Complete Homework

Middle and high school students can learn to work more efficiently by using strategies that improve their executive function skills.

Middle school-aged girl doing homework

The effects of homework are mixed. While adolescents across middle and high school have an array of life situations that can make doing homework easier or harder, it’s well known that homework magnifies inequity . However, we also know that learning how to manage time and work independently outside of the school day is valuable for lifelong learning. From the homework wars  to students who have little time for homework to students who don’t even know where to begin, everyone can agree that kids who can self-regulate and engage in independent rehearsal are better positioned for whatever the future holds.

How can we empower students to overcome barriers to doing homework well?

Executive Functioning

Homework is partially an assessment of executive functioning. Executive functioning and self-regulation take time to develop. They depend on three types of critical brain function: working memory, mental flexibility, and self-regulation .

Let’s break this down to consider how to improve their efficiency.

Working memory: Don’t hold everything in your head; it is not possible. When doing homework, students should write down their ideas, whether they are notes while reading, numbers when working through a math problem, or non-school-related reminders about chores, such as remembering to take the dog for a walk. Clearing working memory for the immediate task at hand allows the brain to focus as the strain is reduced.

Mental flexibility: As students build their independence and grow their homework routines, seeing an array of strategies, or more than one way to solve a problem, is important. Consider the results when a child gets stuck and doesn’t know what to do to get unstuck or when one keeps trying the same failed approach. Chunking homework helps simplify the process. When stuck, a student looks at a smaller piece, which makes it easier to see other solutions. More practice with mental flexibility happens when others model thinking in different ways, and students practice flexible thinking with partners by asking them: What is another way? Use this bubble map to chart out multiple ways.

Self-regulation: Learning how to prioritize work and stick with it by not giving in to impulses is a skill that students develop over time . One way to teach self-regulation is to have students practice control by concentrating for short periods of time with the goal of building up to longer, more sustained periods of time as the year progresses. For a child who struggles with reading for an extended time, start with five minutes and then build from there.

Another self-regulation tip is creating a plan to overcome distractions. What happens when the child stumbles? Three minutes into reading and a student is reaching for their cell phone. Recommend that they practice moving the cell phone away from the homework area, and summarize before returning to the reading. Stops and starts are frustrating and often result in lost homework time. Have students practice responses to distraction, and make this part of their homework. When a student struggles to stay on task, they should be encouraged to remove any distraction in order to regain focus.

Use classroom assessment as a tool to plan for and support student homework. Record the following information for students:

  • Do they write, read, and/or solve problems in class? For how many minutes independently?
  • What is the quality of their work? Are they actually learning, or are they just going through the motions?
  • Do they know how to strategize on their own or get help from a peer when they’re stuck? Observe them and take notes, and/or have them reflect on this question.

We cannot expect that students will independently practice a skill they don’t engage with during class. If it doesn't happen in the classroom, it's not going to happen at home. The teacher should be able to realistically gauge how much and what students might achieve at home. A suggestion to build independence is to use task analysis . Here is a model . For students who struggle with getting homework done, at first they may not actually do homework; rather, they practice the routines of setting up and getting started.

Direct Instruction

The following are some techniques that help students with homework:

  • Mindful meditation to gain focus
  • Prioritizing and estimating time
  • Filtering out distractions

Peers as Partners

Class partnership routines need practice. With strong partnerships, kids learn how to support and learn from each other. Access to teachers will never match the unlimited access to peers. The hours that students who achieve at high levels put in after class are often spent alone rehearsing the content or with peers who push each other to improve.

Class-to-Home Connection

While some students struggle with executive functioning, others rush through their homework. The most important step in having homework count is to make it seamless, not separate from class. Homework flows from classwork. Especially with a mix of synchronous and asynchronous work, now there is no homework, just work done for our classes. Consistent instructional goals with engaging and meaningful tasks help students see the value in working beyond the last bell.

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Strategies to make homework go more smoothly.

Routines and incentive systems to help kids succeed

Writer: Peg Dawson, EdD, NCSP

Clinical Expert: Peg Dawson, EdD, NCSP

Here is the best guide to helping kids do homework successfully that we’ve seen, published by the National Association of School Psychologists on their website, NASPonline.org . Our thanks to NASP for sharing it with us.

There are two key strategies parents can draw on to reduce homework hassles. The first is to establish clear routines around homework, including when and where homework gets done and setting up daily schedules for homework. The second is to build in rewards or incentives to use with children for whom “good grades” is not a sufficient reward for doing homework.

Homework Routines

Tasks are easiest to accomplish when tied to specific routines. By establishing daily routines for homework completion, you will not only make homework go more smoothly, but you will also be fostering a sense of order your child can apply to later life, including college and work.

Step 1. Find a location in the house where homework will be done. The right location will depend on your child and the culture of your family. Some children do best at a desk in their bedroom. It is a quiet location, away from the hubbub of family noise. Other children become too distracted by the things they keep in their bedroom and do better at a place removed from those distractions, like the dining room table. Some children need to work by themselves. Others need to have parents nearby to help keep them on task and to answer questions when problems arise. Ask your child where the best place is to work. Both you and your child need to discuss pros and cons of different settings to arrive at a mutually agreed upon location.

Step 2. Set up a homework center. Once you and your child have identified a location, fix it up as a home office/homework center. Make sure there is a clear workspace large enough to set out all the materials necessary for completing assignments. Outfit the homework center with the kinds of supplies your child is most likely to need, such as pencils, pens, colored markers, rulers, scissors, a dictionary and thesaurus, graph paper, construction paper, glue and cellophane tape, lined paper, a calculator, spell checker, and, depending on the age and needs of your child, a computer or laptop. If the homework center is a place that will be used for other things (such as the dining room table), then your child can keep the supplies in a portable crate or bin. If possible, the homework center should include a bulletin board that can hold a monthly calendar on which your child can keep track of longterm assignments. Allowing children some leeway in decorating the homework center can help them feel at home there, but you should be careful that it does not become too cluttered with distracting materials.

Step 3. Establish a homework time. Your child should get in the habit of doing homework at the same time every day. The time may vary depending on the individual child. Some children need a break right after school to get some exercise and have a snack. Others need to start homework while they are still in a school mode (i.e., right after school when there is still some momentum left from getting through the day). In general, it may be best to get homework done either before dinner or as early in the evening as the child can tolerate. The later it gets, the more tired the child becomes and the more slowly the homework gets done.

Step 4. Establish a daily homework schedule. In general, at least into middle school, the homework session should begin with your sitting down with your child and drawing up a homework schedule. You should review all the assignments and make sure your child understands them and has all the necessary materials. Ask your child to estimate how long it will take to complete each assignment. Then ask when each assignment will get started. If your child needs help with any assignment , then this should be determined at the beginning so that the start times can take into account parent availability. A Daily Homework Planner is included at the end of this handout and contains a place for identifying when breaks may be taken and what rewards may be earned.

Incentive Systems

Many children who are not motivated by the enjoyment of doing homework are motivated by the high grade they hope to earn as a result of doing a quality job. Thus, the grade is an incentive, motivating the child to do homework with care and in a timely manner. For children who are not motivated by grades, parents will need to look for other rewards to help them get through their nightly chores. Incentive systems fall into two categories: simple and elaborate.

Simple incentive systems. The simplest incentive system is reminding the child of a fun activity to do when homework is done. It may be a favorite television show, a chance to spend some time with a video or computer game, talking on the telephone or instant messaging, or playing a game with a parent. This system of withholding fun things until the drudgery is over is sometimes called Grandma’s Law because grandmothers often use it quite effectively (“First take out the trash, then you can have chocolate chip cookies.”). Having something to look forward to can be a powerful incentive to get the hard work done. When parents remind children of this as they sit down at their desks they may be able to spark the engine that drives the child to stick with the work until it is done.

Elaborate incentive systems. These involve more planning and more work on the part of parents but in some cases are necessary to address more significant homework problems. More complex incentives systems might include a structure for earning points that could be used to “purchase” privileges or rewards or a system that provides greater reward for accomplishing more difficult homework tasks. These systems work best when parents and children together develop them. Giving children input gives them a sense of control and ownership, making the system more likely to succeed. We have found that children are generally realistic in setting goals and deciding on rewards and penalties when they are involved in the decision-making process.

Building in breaks. These are good for the child who cannot quite make it to the end without a small reward en route. When creating the daily homework schedule, it may be useful with these children to identify when they will take their breaks. Some children prefer to take breaks at specific time intervals (every 15 minutes), while others do better when the breaks occur after they finish an activity. If you use this approach, you should discuss with your child how long the breaks will last and what will be done during the breaks (get a snack, call a friend, play one level on a video game). The Daily Homework Planner includes sections where breaks and end-of-homework rewards can be identified.

Building in choice. This can be an effective strategy for parents to use with children who resist homework. Choice can be incorporated into both the order in which the child agrees to complete assignments and the schedule they will follow to get the work done. Building in choice not only helps motivate children but can also reduce power struggles between parents and children.

Developing Incentive Systems

Step 1. Describe the problem behaviors. Parents and children decide which behaviors are causing problems at homework time. For some children putting homework off to the last minute is the problem; for others, it is forgetting materials or neglecting to write down assignments. Still others rush through their work and make careless mistakes, while others dawdle over assignments, taking hours to complete what should take only a few minutes. It is important to be as specific as possible when describing the problem behaviors. The problem behavior should be described as behaviors that can be seen or heard; for instance, complains about h omework or rushes through homework, making many mistakes are better descriptors than has a bad attitude or is lazy.

Step 2. Set a goal. Usually the goal relates directly to the problem behavior. For instance, if not writing down assignments is the problem, the goal might be: “Joe will write down his assignments in his assignment book for every class.”

Step 3. Decide on possible rewards and penalties. Homework incentive systems work best when children have a menu of rewards to choose from, since no single reward will be attractive for long. We recommend a point system in which points can be earned for the goal behaviors and traded in for the reward the child wants to earn. The bigger the reward, the more points the child will need to earn it. The menu should include both larger, more expensive rewards that may take a week or a month to earn and smaller, inexpensive rewards that can be earned daily. It may also be necessary to build penalties into the system. This is usually the loss of a privilege (such as the chance to watch a favorite TV show or the chance to talk on the telephone to a friend).

Once the system is up and running, and if you find your child is earning more penalties than rewards, then the program needs to be revised so that your child can be more successful. Usually when this kind of system fails, we think of it as a design failure rather than the failure of the child to respond to rewards. It may be a good idea if you are having difficulty designing a system that works to consult a specialist, such as a school psychologist or counselor, for assistance.

Step 4. Write a homework contract. The contract should say exactly what the child agrees to do and exactly what the parents’ roles and responsibilities will be. When the contract is in place, it should reduce some of the tension parents and kids often experience around homework. For instance, if part of the contract is that the child will earn a point for not complaining about homework, then if the child does complain, this should not be cause for a battle between parent and child: the child simply does not earn that point. Parents should also be sure to praise their children for following the contract. It will be important for parents to agree to a contract they can live with; that is, avoiding penalties they are either unable or unwilling to impose (e.g., if both parents work and are not at home, they cannot monitor whether a child is beginning homework right after school, so an alternative contract may need to be written).

We have found that it is a rare incentive system that works the first time. Parents should expect to try it out and redesign it to work the kinks out. Eventually, once the child is used to doing the behaviors specified in the contract, the contract can be rewritten to work on another problem behavior. Your child over time may be willing to drop the use of an incentive system altogether. This is often a long-term goal, however, and you should be ready to write a new contract if your child slips back to bad habits once a system is dropped.

Click here to download the homework planner and incentive sheet .

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Homework Help for Reluctant Children

  • Posted October 15, 2018
  • By Heather Miller

mother and two daughters doing homework at kitchen table

It’s hard to fault the child who resists doing homework. After all, she has already put in a long day at school, probably been involved in afterschool activities, and, as the late afternoon spills into evening, now faces a pile of assignments. Parents feel it, too — it’s no one’s favorite time of day.

But despite its bad rap, homework plays an important role in ensuring that students can execute tasks independently. When it’s thoughtfully assigned, homework provides deeper engagement with material introduced in class. And even when it’s “just” worksheets, homework can build the automatic habits and the basic skills required to tackle more interesting endeavors. Finally, homework is a nightly test of grit. Adult life brings its share of tasks that are both compulsory and unenjoyable. Developing the discipline to fulfill our responsibilities, regardless of whether they thrill us, begins in middle childhood.

So how to help the avoidant child embrace the challenge, rather than resist it?

The first step, especially with kids 13 and under, is to have them do their homework at a communal space, like a dining room or kitchen table. If other children are in the home, they can all do their homework at the same table, and the parent can sit nearby to support the work effort. This alleviates some of the loneliness a reluctant child might associate with assignments. The alternative — doing homework at a bedroom desk — can result in the child guiltily avoiding the work for as long as possible. Like all forms of procrastination, this has the effect of making the entire process take much longer than it needs to.  

When parents turn the homework ritual into a series of conversations about what needs to be done, how, and for how long, children feel less “alone” with their nightly work, they relish the company and support of their parent, and they work better and more efficiently.

Many parents are under the impression that they shouldn’t have anything to do with their children's homework. This comes from schools emphasizing that homework is a child's responsibility, not the parents'. While it is absolutely true that parents should not do their children's homework, there is a role for parents — one that's perhaps best described as “homework project manager.” Parents can be monitoring, organizing, motivating, and praising the homework effort as it gets done. And yes, that means sitting with your child to help them stay focused and on task. Your presence sends the message that homework is important business, not to be taken lightly.

Once you’re sitting down with your child, ask him to unload his school bag and talk you through his various assignments. Maybe he has a school planner with all his homework listed, or a printout from school, or perhaps his work is listed on the classroom website. Many children attend an afterschool program where, in theory, they are doing homework. They’ll often claim that they’ve done all their homework, even though they’ve only done some. Together, make a quick and easy “Done/To Do” list. Writing down what she has finished will give her a sense of satisfaction. Identifying what she still needs to do will help her to focus on the remaining assignments. Over time, this practice will help your child build an understanding that large tasks are completed incrementally.

Next, ask your child to put the assignments in the order he’d like to do them. Encourage him to explain his thinking. Doing this helps a child feel in control of the evening’s tasks and prompts him to reflect on his work style. Discuss the first task of the night together. Ask your child to think about the supplies he is likely to need, and ensure they’re at the ready. This “pre-work” work helps a child think through a task, understand it, and prepare to execute it with gusto.

Last but not least, introduce a timer to the evening’s proceedings. Challenge your child to estimate how long the first assignment will take. Then ask, “Do you want me to set the timer for the full amount of time you think you’ll need, or a smaller amount?” Then, set the timer with the understanding that the child must work without interruption until the timer goes off. Even questions are verboten while the timer runs. The goal here is to enable the child to solve problems independently, through concentration. This not only builds concentration powers, it builds creativity, critical thinking, resilience, and resourcefulness. In my experience, the theatricality of being timed helps relax children who would otherwise feel daunted by a mountain of homework.

As each piece of work gets done, parents can add meaningful positive reinforcement. Exclaiming, “Another assignment done! And done well!” helps your child feel like what they are doing matters.

By turning the homework ritual into a series of conversations about what needs to be done, how, and for how long, children feel less “alone” with their nightly work, they relish the company and support of their parent, and they complete the work much more efficiently and at a higher standard than they might otherwise.

Helping the Homework Resisters

  • Have children do their work at a communal table. Stay nearby, to alleviate the loneliness that some kids feel — and to prevent procrastination.
  • Ask your child to unload her backpack and talk through assignments.
  • Help your child make a "Done/To Do" list.
  • Ask your child to put the assignments in the order he’d like to do them. Encourage him to explain his thinking — fostering a sense of control.
  • Use a timer. Challenge your child to estimate how long an assignment will take, and ask if she wants to set the timer for that full amount of time, or less. 
  • Your role: To monitor, organize, motivate, and praise the homework effort as each piece is done. 

Additional Resource

  • More about Heather Miller's work to help parents create healthy routines on weeknights

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Does Homework Really Help Students Learn?

A conversation with a Wheelock researcher, a BU student, and a fourth-grade teacher

child doing homework

“Quality homework is engaging and relevant to kids’ lives,” says Wheelock’s Janine Bempechat. “It gives them autonomy and engages them in the community and with their families. In some subjects, like math, worksheets can be very helpful. It has to do with the value of practicing over and over.” Photo by iStock/Glenn Cook Photography

Do your homework.

If only it were that simple.

Educators have debated the merits of homework since the late 19th century. In recent years, amid concerns of some parents and teachers that children are being stressed out by too much homework, things have only gotten more fraught.

“Homework is complicated,” says developmental psychologist Janine Bempechat, a Wheelock College of Education & Human Development clinical professor. The author of the essay “ The Case for (Quality) Homework—Why It Improves Learning and How Parents Can Help ” in the winter 2019 issue of Education Next , Bempechat has studied how the debate about homework is influencing teacher preparation, parent and student beliefs about learning, and school policies.

She worries especially about socioeconomically disadvantaged students from low-performing schools who, according to research by Bempechat and others, get little or no homework.

BU Today  sat down with Bempechat and Erin Bruce (Wheelock’17,’18), a new fourth-grade teacher at a suburban Boston school, and future teacher freshman Emma Ardizzone (Wheelock) to talk about what quality homework looks like, how it can help children learn, and how schools can equip teachers to design it, evaluate it, and facilitate parents’ role in it.

BU Today: Parents and educators who are against homework in elementary school say there is no research definitively linking it to academic performance for kids in the early grades. You’ve said that they’re missing the point.

Bempechat : I think teachers assign homework in elementary school as a way to help kids develop skills they’ll need when they’re older—to begin to instill a sense of responsibility and to learn planning and organizational skills. That’s what I think is the greatest value of homework—in cultivating beliefs about learning and skills associated with academic success. If we greatly reduce or eliminate homework in elementary school, we deprive kids and parents of opportunities to instill these important learning habits and skills.

We do know that beginning in late middle school, and continuing through high school, there is a strong and positive correlation between homework completion and academic success.

That’s what I think is the greatest value of homework—in cultivating beliefs about learning and skills associated with academic success.

You talk about the importance of quality homework. What is that?

Quality homework is engaging and relevant to kids’ lives. It gives them autonomy and engages them in the community and with their families. In some subjects, like math, worksheets can be very helpful. It has to do with the value of practicing over and over.

Janine Bempechat

What are your concerns about homework and low-income children?

The argument that some people make—that homework “punishes the poor” because lower-income parents may not be as well-equipped as affluent parents to help their children with homework—is very troubling to me. There are no parents who don’t care about their children’s learning. Parents don’t actually have to help with homework completion in order for kids to do well. They can help in other ways—by helping children organize a study space, providing snacks, being there as a support, helping children work in groups with siblings or friends.

Isn’t the discussion about getting rid of homework happening mostly in affluent communities?

Yes, and the stories we hear of kids being stressed out from too much homework—four or five hours of homework a night—are real. That’s problematic for physical and mental health and overall well-being. But the research shows that higher-income students get a lot more homework than lower-income kids.

Teachers may not have as high expectations for lower-income children. Schools should bear responsibility for providing supports for kids to be able to get their homework done—after-school clubs, community support, peer group support. It does kids a disservice when our expectations are lower for them.

The conversation around homework is to some extent a social class and social justice issue. If we eliminate homework for all children because affluent children have too much, we’re really doing a disservice to low-income children. They need the challenge, and every student can rise to the challenge with enough supports in place.

What did you learn by studying how education schools are preparing future teachers to handle homework?

My colleague, Margarita Jimenez-Silva, at the University of California, Davis, School of Education, and I interviewed faculty members at education schools, as well as supervising teachers, to find out how students are being prepared. And it seemed that they weren’t. There didn’t seem to be any readings on the research, or conversations on what high-quality homework is and how to design it.

Erin, what kind of training did you get in handling homework?

Bruce : I had phenomenal professors at Wheelock, but homework just didn’t come up. I did lots of student teaching. I’ve been in classrooms where the teachers didn’t assign any homework, and I’ve been in rooms where they assigned hours of homework a night. But I never even considered homework as something that was my decision. I just thought it was something I’d pull out of a book and it’d be done.

I started giving homework on the first night of school this year. My first assignment was to go home and draw a picture of the room where you do your homework. I want to know if it’s at a table and if there are chairs around it and if mom’s cooking dinner while you’re doing homework.

The second night I asked them to talk to a grown-up about how are you going to be able to get your homework done during the week. The kids really enjoyed it. There’s a running joke that I’m teaching life skills.

Friday nights, I read all my kids’ responses to me on their homework from the week and it’s wonderful. They pour their hearts out. It’s like we’re having a conversation on my couch Friday night.

It matters to know that the teacher cares about you and that what you think matters to the teacher. Homework is a vehicle to connect home and school…for parents to know teachers are welcoming to them and their families.

Bempechat : I can’t imagine that most new teachers would have the intuition Erin had in designing homework the way she did.

Ardizzone : Conversations with kids about homework, feeling you’re being listened to—that’s such a big part of wanting to do homework….I grew up in Westchester County. It was a pretty demanding school district. My junior year English teacher—I loved her—she would give us feedback, have meetings with all of us. She’d say, “If you have any questions, if you have anything you want to talk about, you can talk to me, here are my office hours.” It felt like she actually cared.

Bempechat : It matters to know that the teacher cares about you and that what you think matters to the teacher. Homework is a vehicle to connect home and school…for parents to know teachers are welcoming to them and their families.

Ardizzone : But can’t it lead to parents being overbearing and too involved in their children’s lives as students?

Bempechat : There’s good help and there’s bad help. The bad help is what you’re describing—when parents hover inappropriately, when they micromanage, when they see their children confused and struggling and tell them what to do.

Good help is when parents recognize there’s a struggle going on and instead ask informative questions: “Where do you think you went wrong?” They give hints, or pointers, rather than saying, “You missed this,” or “You didn’t read that.”

Bruce : I hope something comes of this. I hope BU or Wheelock can think of some way to make this a more pressing issue. As a first-year teacher, it was not something I even thought about on the first day of school—until a kid raised his hand and said, “Do we have homework?” It would have been wonderful if I’d had a plan from day one.

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Sara Rimer

Sara Rimer A journalist for more than three decades, Sara Rimer worked at the Miami Herald , Washington Post and, for 26 years, the New York Times , where she was the New England bureau chief, and a national reporter covering education, aging, immigration, and other social justice issues. Her stories on the death penalty’s inequities were nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and cited in the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision outlawing the execution of people with intellectual disabilities. Her journalism honors include Columbia University’s Meyer Berger award for in-depth human interest reporting. She holds a BA degree in American Studies from the University of Michigan. Profile

She can be reached at [email protected] .

Comments & Discussion

Boston University moderates comments to facilitate an informed, substantive, civil conversation. Abusive, profane, self-promotional, misleading, incoherent or off-topic comments will be rejected. Moderators are staffed during regular business hours (EST) and can only accept comments written in English. Statistics or facts must include a citation or a link to the citation.

There are 81 comments on Does Homework Really Help Students Learn?

Insightful! The values about homework in elementary schools are well aligned with my intuition as a parent.

when i finish my work i do my homework and i sometimes forget what to do because i did not get enough sleep

same omg it does not help me it is stressful and if I have it in more than one class I hate it.

Same I think my parent wants to help me but, she doesn’t care if I get bad grades so I just try my best and my grades are great.

I think that last question about Good help from parents is not know to all parents, we do as our parents did or how we best think it can be done, so maybe coaching parents or giving them resources on how to help with homework would be very beneficial for the parent on how to help and for the teacher to have consistency and improve homework results, and of course for the child. I do see how homework helps reaffirm the knowledge obtained in the classroom, I also have the ability to see progress and it is a time I share with my kids

The answer to the headline question is a no-brainer – a more pressing problem is why there is a difference in how students from different cultures succeed. Perfect example is the student population at BU – why is there a majority population of Asian students and only about 3% black students at BU? In fact at some universities there are law suits by Asians to stop discrimination and quotas against admitting Asian students because the real truth is that as a group they are demonstrating better qualifications for admittance, while at the same time there are quotas and reduced requirements for black students to boost their portion of the student population because as a group they do more poorly in meeting admissions standards – and it is not about the Benjamins. The real problem is that in our PC society no one has the gazuntas to explore this issue as it may reveal that all people are not created equal after all. Or is it just environmental cultural differences??????

I get you have a concern about the issue but that is not even what the point of this article is about. If you have an issue please take this to the site we have and only post your opinion about the actual topic

This is not at all what the article is talking about.

This literally has nothing to do with the article brought up. You should really take your opinions somewhere else before you speak about something that doesn’t make sense.

we have the same name

so they have the same name what of it?

lol you tell her

totally agree

What does that have to do with homework, that is not what the article talks about AT ALL.

Yes, I think homework plays an important role in the development of student life. Through homework, students have to face challenges on a daily basis and they try to solve them quickly.I am an intense online tutor at 24x7homeworkhelp and I give homework to my students at that level in which they handle it easily.

More than two-thirds of students said they used alcohol and drugs, primarily marijuana, to cope with stress.

You know what’s funny? I got this assignment to write an argument for homework about homework and this article was really helpful and understandable, and I also agree with this article’s point of view.

I also got the same task as you! I was looking for some good resources and I found this! I really found this article useful and easy to understand, just like you! ^^

i think that homework is the best thing that a child can have on the school because it help them with their thinking and memory.

I am a child myself and i think homework is a terrific pass time because i can’t play video games during the week. It also helps me set goals.

Homework is not harmful ,but it will if there is too much

I feel like, from a minors point of view that we shouldn’t get homework. Not only is the homework stressful, but it takes us away from relaxing and being social. For example, me and my friends was supposed to hang at the mall last week but we had to postpone it since we all had some sort of work to do. Our minds shouldn’t be focused on finishing an assignment that in realty, doesn’t matter. I completely understand that we should have homework. I have to write a paper on the unimportance of homework so thanks.

homework isn’t that bad

Are you a student? if not then i don’t really think you know how much and how severe todays homework really is

i am a student and i do not enjoy homework because i practice my sport 4 out of the five days we have school for 4 hours and that’s not even counting the commute time or the fact i still have to shower and eat dinner when i get home. its draining!

i totally agree with you. these people are such boomers

why just why

they do make a really good point, i think that there should be a limit though. hours and hours of homework can be really stressful, and the extra work isn’t making a difference to our learning, but i do believe homework should be optional and extra credit. that would make it for students to not have the leaning stress of a assignment and if you have a low grade you you can catch up.

Studies show that homework improves student achievement in terms of improved grades, test results, and the likelihood to attend college. Research published in the High School Journal indicates that students who spent between 31 and 90 minutes each day on homework “scored about 40 points higher on the SAT-Mathematics subtest than their peers, who reported spending no time on homework each day, on average.” On both standardized tests and grades, students in classes that were assigned homework outperformed 69% of students who didn’t have homework. A majority of studies on homework’s impact – 64% in one meta-study and 72% in another – showed that take home assignments were effective at improving academic achievement. Research by the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) concluded that increased homework led to better GPAs and higher probability of college attendance for high school boys. In fact, boys who attended college did more than three hours of additional homework per week in high school.

So how are your measuring student achievement? That’s the real question. The argument that doing homework is simply a tool for teaching responsibility isn’t enough for me. We can teach responsibility in a number of ways. Also the poor argument that parents don’t need to help with homework, and that students can do it on their own, is wishful thinking at best. It completely ignores neurodiverse students. Students in poverty aren’t magically going to find a space to do homework, a friend’s or siblings to help them do it, and snacks to eat. I feel like the author of this piece has never set foot in a classroom of students.

THIS. This article is pathetic coming from a university. So intellectually dishonest, refusing to address the havoc of capitalism and poverty plays on academic success in life. How can they in one sentence use poor kids in an argument and never once address that poor children have access to damn near 0 of the resources affluent kids have? Draw me a picture and let’s talk about feelings lmao what a joke is that gonna put food in their belly so they can have the calories to burn in order to use their brain to study? What about quiet their 7 other siblings that they share a single bedroom with for hours? Is it gonna force the single mom to magically be at home and at work at the same time to cook food while you study and be there to throw an encouraging word?

Also the “parents don’t need to be a parent and be able to guide their kid at all academically they just need to exist in the next room” is wild. Its one thing if a parent straight up is not equipped but to say kids can just figured it out is…. wow coming from an educator What’s next the teacher doesn’t need to teach cause the kid can just follow the packet and figure it out?

Well then get a tutor right? Oh wait you are poor only affluent kids can afford a tutor for their hours of homework a day were they on average have none of the worries a poor child does. Does this address that poor children are more likely to also suffer abuse and mental illness? Like mentioned what about kids that can’t learn or comprehend the forced standardized way? Just let em fail? These children regularly are not in “special education”(some of those are a joke in their own and full of neglect and abuse) programs cause most aren’t even acknowledged as having disabilities or disorders.

But yes all and all those pesky poor kids just aren’t being worked hard enough lol pretty sure poor children’s existence just in childhood is more work, stress, and responsibility alone than an affluent child’s entire life cycle. Love they never once talked about the quality of education in the classroom being so bad between the poor and affluent it can qualify as segregation, just basically blamed poor people for being lazy, good job capitalism for failing us once again!

why the hell?

you should feel bad for saying this, this article can be helpful for people who has to write a essay about it

This is more of a political rant than it is about homework

I know a teacher who has told his students their homework is to find something they are interested in, pursue it and then come share what they learn. The student responses are quite compelling. One girl taught herself German so she could talk to her grandfather. One boy did a research project on Nelson Mandela because the teacher had mentioned him in class. Another boy, a both on the autism spectrum, fixed his family’s computer. The list goes on. This is fourth grade. I think students are highly motivated to learn, when we step aside and encourage them.

The whole point of homework is to give the students a chance to use the material that they have been presented with in class. If they never have the opportunity to use that information, and discover that it is actually useful, it will be in one ear and out the other. As a science teacher, it is critical that the students are challenged to use the material they have been presented with, which gives them the opportunity to actually think about it rather than regurgitate “facts”. Well designed homework forces the student to think conceptually, as opposed to regurgitation, which is never a pretty sight

Wonderful discussion. and yes, homework helps in learning and building skills in students.

not true it just causes kids to stress

Homework can be both beneficial and unuseful, if you will. There are students who are gifted in all subjects in school and ones with disabilities. Why should the students who are gifted get the lucky break, whereas the people who have disabilities suffer? The people who were born with this “gift” go through school with ease whereas people with disabilities struggle with the work given to them. I speak from experience because I am one of those students: the ones with disabilities. Homework doesn’t benefit “us”, it only tears us down and put us in an abyss of confusion and stress and hopelessness because we can’t learn as fast as others. Or we can’t handle the amount of work given whereas the gifted students go through it with ease. It just brings us down and makes us feel lost; because no mater what, it feels like we are destined to fail. It feels like we weren’t “cut out” for success.

homework does help

here is the thing though, if a child is shoved in the face with a whole ton of homework that isn’t really even considered homework it is assignments, it’s not helpful. the teacher should make homework more of a fun learning experience rather than something that is dreaded

This article was wonderful, I am going to ask my teachers about extra, or at all giving homework.

I agree. Especially when you have homework before an exam. Which is distasteful as you’ll need that time to study. It doesn’t make any sense, nor does us doing homework really matters as It’s just facts thrown at us.

Homework is too severe and is just too much for students, schools need to decrease the amount of homework. When teachers assign homework they forget that the students have other classes that give them the same amount of homework each day. Students need to work on social skills and life skills.

I disagree.

Beyond achievement, proponents of homework argue that it can have many other beneficial effects. They claim it can help students develop good study habits so they are ready to grow as their cognitive capacities mature. It can help students recognize that learning can occur at home as well as at school. Homework can foster independent learning and responsible character traits. And it can give parents an opportunity to see what’s going on at school and let them express positive attitudes toward achievement.

Homework is helpful because homework helps us by teaching us how to learn a specific topic.

As a student myself, I can say that I have almost never gotten the full 9 hours of recommended sleep time, because of homework. (Now I’m writing an essay on it in the middle of the night D=)

I am a 10 year old kid doing a report about “Is homework good or bad” for homework before i was going to do homework is bad but the sources from this site changed my mind!

Homeowkr is god for stusenrs

I agree with hunter because homework can be so stressful especially with this whole covid thing no one has time for homework and every one just wants to get back to there normal lives it is especially stressful when you go on a 2 week vaca 3 weeks into the new school year and and then less then a week after you come back from the vaca you are out for over a month because of covid and you have no way to get the assignment done and turned in

As great as homework is said to be in the is article, I feel like the viewpoint of the students was left out. Every where I go on the internet researching about this topic it almost always has interviews from teachers, professors, and the like. However isn’t that a little biased? Of course teachers are going to be for homework, they’re not the ones that have to stay up past midnight completing the homework from not just one class, but all of them. I just feel like this site is one-sided and you should include what the students of today think of spending four hours every night completing 6-8 classes worth of work.

Are we talking about homework or practice? Those are two very different things and can result in different outcomes.

Homework is a graded assignment. I do not know of research showing the benefits of graded assignments going home.

Practice; however, can be extremely beneficial, especially if there is some sort of feedback (not a grade but feedback). That feedback can come from the teacher, another student or even an automated grading program.

As a former band director, I assigned daily practice. I never once thought it would be appropriate for me to require the students to turn in a recording of their practice for me to grade. Instead, I had in-class assignments/assessments that were graded and directly related to the practice assigned.

I would really like to read articles on “homework” that truly distinguish between the two.

oof i feel bad good luck!

thank you guys for the artical because I have to finish an assingment. yes i did cite it but just thanks

thx for the article guys.

Homework is good

I think homework is helpful AND harmful. Sometimes u can’t get sleep bc of homework but it helps u practice for school too so idk.

I agree with this Article. And does anyone know when this was published. I would like to know.

It was published FEb 19, 2019.

Studies have shown that homework improved student achievement in terms of improved grades, test results, and the likelihood to attend college.

i think homework can help kids but at the same time not help kids

This article is so out of touch with majority of homes it would be laughable if it wasn’t so incredibly sad.

There is no value to homework all it does is add stress to already stressed homes. Parents or adults magically having the time or energy to shepherd kids through homework is dome sort of 1950’s fantasy.

What lala land do these teachers live in?

Homework gives noting to the kid

Homework is Bad

homework is bad.

why do kids even have homework?

Comments are closed.

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How to do homework is one of the questions the highest school and college students come across in their academic life. Doing homework the right way is very important to ensure a path to good grades. Undoubtedly, correct homework and better grades can fast-track your professional growth. Invariably, the question remains about how should one do the homework to ensure that it is up to the mark. Before we move on to demystify how to do homework, it is wise to understand the purpose of homework. 

How to do homework

To begin with, most schools and colleges give students homework to ensure that students revise what is taught in school. Homework is a way to prevent ‘out of sight, out of mind’ from happening. Secondly, it is a way to make students practice their learning and excel in their respective fields. Without appropriate homework, students will seldom practice and thus, lose out on marks in the exams. Finally, homework encourages students to delve deeper into classroom learning and question any concept they lack understanding. In brief, homework is one way to help students recapitulate learning and reap more benefits out of it.

What is a Good Homework?

What constitutes good homework has different meanings for both teachers and students. For students, it may mean anything that is easy and not too time intensive. On the other hand, teachers define good homework in a different manner altogether. However, since teachers are the final decision-makers of grades, it is their understanding of good homework that matters. Also, what is good homework is very important to understand for anyone trying to determine how to do homework.

For teachers, good homework is one which they receive on time. Teachers are not fans of late submissions. Secondly, the homework solutions should be correct. Thirdly, the steps of solutions or the method, or any other content should be crystal clear. Finally, the homework should be neat and well organized. If you are able to deliver homework on these lines, nothing can stop you from good grades. 

How to do Homework: Do not Overburden

The first step in this how-to-do homework guide is to understand how much should you be doing in one go. The objective of this lesson is to highlight that you should not overburden yourself. Try to understand what your concentration span and burden limit is. While it may be a good idea to incrementally increase the time and amount of effort you spend. However, if you try to go beyond your capacity in one go, it will have a negative impact.

In fact, overburdening yourself can lead to poor mental health, lack of sleep, poor concentration, other health issues, and the like. These may seem minute in the beginning. However, over the long term, they can impact you in several bad ways. 

Divide your Work

It would be a good idea to distinctly understand if you would like to finish all your homework in one go or split it into different sessions. You may have a shorter attention span of say 30-45 minutes. In that case, you can focus on just one assignment and finish it off. Take some rest and then again spend the next 30-45 minutes on the next assignment.

This way you can divide your work into small time capsules and focus on each one independently after a short interval. On the other hand, if you have greater concentration power, you may want to sit at length and finish all your work at once. You may sit for about 2-3 hours and finish all homework at a stretch. This way you just need to create concentration once and you’re good to go. 

Whichever way you pick, just ensure that you do not overburden yourself and only commit to the much that you are able to achieve. It is good to be ambitious and set targets that you can chase. However, make sure that your targets don’t stretch you too thin that you end up regretting it. 

How to do Homework: Eliminate the Distractions

When it comes to how to do homework, most students complain about the distractions. The digital age has unleashed a plethora of distractions which makes concentration difficult. However, eliminating, or at least minimizing distractions is not rocket science. There are simple steps that students can apply to their homework curriculum to concentrate better and for longer-

How to do homework :  Eliminate the Distractions

Ensure you are well fed

It happens quite often that distractions come along when you are hungry. To prevent those distractions, ensure that you have a good meal that provides you the energy and hydration you need. Be cautious of not consuming too heavy or fatty food as that might make you lethargic and sleepy. Also, ensure that you consume plenty of water.

Your brain may decelerate its speed of functioning in case of dehydration. If you take a healthy diet before doing your homework, your stomach growling will be one distraction less. Please note that a healthy diet can even be a salad that keeps you full. Do not at any cost, binge eat.

Make the lighting optimal

It is very important to have a motivating external environment. Ensure that there is plenty of light in the room. Dark rooms often repel homework. Additionally, make sure that your room is airy with a sufficient supply of oxygen. A basic need of how to do assignments fast is to ensure there is no suffocation. Obviously, if you have trouble breathing in your room, doing your homework will be the last thing on your mind. A well-lit room, along with fresh air, a suitable temperature (not too pleasant, or you will fall asleep) is all you need to eliminate any distractions due to external conditions.

Leave the gadgets behind

Gadgets and electronics are the biggest distractors. A message from your friend or a notification from an app is all you need to distract your attention. Try to keep all these distractions at bay if you seek to eliminate them. If you feel you have a phone or electronics addiction, start with baby steps. It might be a good idea to put your phone on silent and only check it after you complete a set target.

How to do homework is all about delaying your gratification of things that cause distraction. Additionally, if you are working on the internet, it is best to block any pop-up ads that may appear out of nowhere. Unless you are able to leave behind your gadgets, doing your homework well will always be a challenge.

How to do Homework: Pressed for Time

More often than not it happens that you are short of time when it comes to homework. It may be due to more assignments on a single day or maybe because you forgot about the homework. Either way, a lack of time to finish your homework can be frustrating and scary. Well, don’t break a sweat. There are a few tips you can follow to do your homework, even when you have less time-

How to do homework

Create a schedule

Firstly, when you have less time and more work, start by creating your daily schedule. This should involve all you have to cover. Additionally, enlist the time you have in hand. For instance, note down the number of assignments you have to complete and the number of hours you have to complete them. This way you will better understand what you have to finish. Additionally, this will prevent you from forgetting about anything important that might penalize you later.

Divide the time efficiently

Once you know what all work is pending, start by dividing the time. Understand how much time is needed for each pending assignment. Accordingly, divide your time in hand. Suppose assignment A is the most difficult, then it would be a good idea to allot to it the biggest chunk of time. Thus, based on the difficulty of the assignment, divide your time efficiently. Also, keep short refresher breaks in between to prevent exhaustion. While you may think that in shortage of time, you should not take a break, but that will be a big mistake. Take adequate breaks to stretch your legs and refresh your brain. 

Prioritize the work

Now that you know what all has to be done and have divided the time, start prioritizing. Invariably, there will be some assignments that are more urgent than others. Put them as the first priority. There are several ways you can judge the priority. When it comes to homework, you can either prioritize your assignments based on the difficulty level. You can first finish the assignments that are tougher and leave the easy ones for later. On the other hand, you can complete the ones which are due the very next day first, and leave the other ones for later. Either way, prioritizing your assignments will help you do all your homework within the time limit.

How to do Homework: Get Help Online

Doing all the homework on your own, without any external help, can be a challenge. This is true especially when you are unsure about the concept and are struggling with the subject. In such a situation, you should consider reaching out to online homework help services. Such portals, like TutorBin.com, can be a boon to students who need homework help. The idea is not to offload all your academic work on these websites. Rather, these e-learning portals can assist you in ensuring that you are able to submit good homework and receive good grades.

how to do homework help

There are several advantages of using such portals from time to time. Firstly, when you are short of time, these portals can help you get solutions in a very short span of time. Their expert homework helpers , who are global subject matter experts, can deliver homework assignments overnight. This will ensure timely submissions for you. Secondly, the rich experience of their subject matter experts ensures that you receive 100% correct solutions. These correct solutions will help you fetch good grades. Finally, each solution they provide will follow a methodology that you prescribe. Hence, you will also get better grades for step-by-step solutions that are easy to comprehend.

In a nutshell, such online homework help platforms can go a long way in helping you do homework in a way that fetches you good grades. Choosing the right homework help platform can also be tricky. Make sure you check out the rating of the platform and the credentials of the subject matter experts before you make your choice. It is best to do a comparative analysis, instead of just going where the crowd goes.

Concluding Observations

To cut a long story short, there are several ways on how to do your homework. The best would be to ensure that you are free from distractions and in a position to concentrate. Secondly, ensure that you prioritize and streamline your homework. Finally, don’t be shy about seeking help from online sources. In fact, if you are struggling with homework in any discipline, feel free to reach out to TutorBin.com . Our expert tutors can help you complete all your homework quickly and correctly. 

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How to Decide What College to Attend

Find the right college for you..

two students doing work outside

How to Decide Which College Is Best for You

Some students want to find the perfect college. The truth is, there's no such thing. However, you can find many colleges where you'll be happy and get an excellent education. The college search is about exploring who you are and what you want and then finding colleges where you can meet your goals. If you want to know how to choose a college, we’re here to help.

Although there may be many colleges where you’d be happy, it’s important to narrow the possibilities into a manageable list. Here are steps you can take to find colleges where you can thrive.

What College Should You Go to?

Reflect on what's important, where you want to be, and who you want to become. With those answers, you can figure out what types of colleges will allow you to reach your goals.

Here are some aspects to consider:

  • Distance from home
  • Available majors and classes
  • Housing options
  • Makeup of the student body
  • Available extracurricular activities
  • Campus atmosphere

Which of these are things you must have to be comfortable at a college? Which can you be more flexible about?

Also, think about what you want to accomplish in college. Do you want to train for a specific job or get a wide-ranging education? Ask yourself, "What do I want to go to college for?" If you have a major in mind, are the colleges you’re considering strong in that area?

Keep an Open Mind When Choosing Schools.

What else should you look for in a college? Although it's good to have some idea about what college could be right for you, stay open to all the possibilities as you begin your search. Here are some ways to keep an open mind when deciding where to go to college:

Challenge your assumptions about what will work for you. Luis Martínez-Fernández, a history professor at the University of Central Florida, notes, "You may not think you're able to thrive in a large institution because you come from a small high school, but you may actually do better in that type of setting."

Talk to people who know you well. Tell parents, teachers, relatives, family friends, and your school counselor about your goals. Ask them if they can suggest schools that may be a great fit for you.

Don't limit your search. At the start of this process, you might rule out some colleges because you think they're too expensive or hard to get into, but this may not be true. Remember that financial aid can make college more affordable, and keep in mind that colleges look at more than grades and test scores.

Do Your Homework to Discover the Right College.

Once you have a list of schools, it's time to research them in depth. To find the information you’re looking for, check out college guide websites, specific colleges' websites, and other available online tools.

Jot down your questions, and get answers by:

  • Talking to your school counselor or teachers.
  • Checking out colleges’ student blogs, if available.
  • Contacting college admissions officials directly or through tools like our Connect with Colleges feature
  • Asking admissions officials to recommend current students or recent graduates to talk to.
  • Visiting college campuses, if possible. For more information, see the Campus Visit Checklist .

Keep Perspective During College Selection.

During your search, keep asking yourself questions about your preferences and goals. You continue to evolve throughout high school. Your answers to "What college fits me?" may change during the search process.

Remember that there are many good college that are suitable for every student, and you can be successful at many types of schools. At College Board, we introduce test scores as one additional factor to weigh as you balance your list. Think about grouping your colleges into three categories:

  • Safeties: Your SAT or ACT score is higher than the average score range of last year’s first-year class.
  • Matches: Your SAT or ACT score is solidly in the same score range as last year’s first-year class.
  • Reaches: Your SAT or ACT score is lower than the average score range of last year’s first-year class.

To find this information, explore the BigFuture College Profile of every school you're interested in attending. You can view admissions data for easy comparison with your scores and high school GPA. There's also information about topics such as academics and tuition costs.

To have a balanced college list and increase your chances of acceptance, we recommend including three reach colleges, two matches, and one safety college.

How to Decide What College to Go to

There's no easy answer to the question, "What college should I go to?" Everyone's aspirations are unique. There's a good chance you'll find several schools that check off every box. Consider what factors are most important to you. Keep an open mind, explore all opportunities, and send in several applications to keep your options open.

There's no shortage of excellent schools to prepare you for your future. Learn more about them at BigFuture. Narrow your options. Find the college that’s best for you .

How can I know what college is right for me?

Figuring out what school is right for you involves asking yourself tough questions and researching your options. While there's no such thing as a perfect choice, you can follow the suggestions above and explore college profiles to see which colleges might be a good fit for you. You can try different filters based on your interests and needs to find colleges that are right for you .

Your ultimate decision will require some self-reflection, thinking about what you want to do with your life and what journey you want to take to get there. With that information in mind, you can explore your options, see what schools fit the bill, and do your homework to settle on the right match.

What college should I go to if I don't know what I want to do?

If you're unsure about your career path, you can choose to learn more about schools with solid liberal arts programs or interdisciplinary studies majors. Another thing you might do is to begin at a two-year college, saving money until you’re ready to declare a major and settle on a college.

Where’s the best place to attend college?

The best place to attend college depends entirely on your needs and where you think you’ll be successful. When asking yourself, "What kind of college should I go to?" think about what characteristics, locations, and environments would help you succeed. BigFuture has a variety of resources to help you consider what type of college might be the best fit for you. Start by exploring types of colleges . Consider what environment you might list best, including big vs. small colleges as well as campus settings .

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How to Get Your Homework Done Fast

Last Updated: March 2, 2024 Fact Checked

Staying Focused

Getting organized, staying motivated, expert q&a.

This article was co-authored by Jake Adams . Jake Adams is an academic tutor and the owner of Simplifi EDU, a Santa Monica, California based online tutoring business offering learning resources and online tutors for academic subjects K-College, SAT & ACT prep, and college admissions applications. With over 14 years of professional tutoring experience, Jake is dedicated to providing his clients the very best online tutoring experience and access to a network of excellent undergraduate and graduate-level tutors from top colleges all over the nation. Jake holds a BS in International Business and Marketing from Pepperdine University. There are 8 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 1,150,786 times.

Doing homework can be both time-consuming and frustrating, and you probably want to do more with your free time than just homework. When you have a lot of work to do, it can be tough to work efficiently. By staying focused, organizing and planning, and motivating yourself, you can get your homework done in a timely manner and move onto more fun and exciting activities. But you should start with putting away all distractions such as your devices unless you need them.They are normally the main distraction. You should also work in a quiet place so you are not attempted to go and do something else. For example, you should not work near your TV because you will be tempted to go and watch it.

Step 1 Work in a comfortable, well-lit environment.

  • Download website-blocking apps such as Freedom or SelfControl to stay focused while using your computer for homework. Some, such as the Chrome extension Strict Workflow, even have the added bonus of preventing you from cancelling the timer once it has started.

Step 3 Set a timer.

  • If one subject or type of assignment is taking much more time than the others, you may want to ask for a little extra help in that area from your teacher or parent.
  • If you get distracted or go off-task, don't make excuses for yourself. (e.g. "I won't be able to focus until I do this anyway." or "I'm sure it will only take a minute or two."

Step 1 Get your supplies in order.

  • Consider consolidating your multiple different subject folders and notebooks into one big binder separated by tab dividers. This way, all of your schoolwork will be in one place.

Step 2 Make a homework plan for the evening.

  • Decide how much time you want to spend on your homework collectively.
  • Make a list of all the different tasks you need to finish.
  • Estimate how much time you’ll be able to spend on each task to finish your homework when you want to.
  • Work straight through your list and cross tasks off as you go. [7] X Research source

Step 3 Start your homework soon after you get home from school.

  • A ten page essay that’s due in a week that you haven’t started should be labeled an “A” or “B” while a short five question worksheet due in three days may be labeled a “C”.
  • Make sure you don't wait until the last second to get assignments done.

Step 1 Take breaks.

  • Try eating celery sticks and apple slices with peanut butter.

Step 3 Reward yourself with a fun post-homework activity.

Supercharge Your Studying with this Expert Series

1 - Study For Exams

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  • Wear something very comfortable while you work. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • Make sure to hand in all assignments on time. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • Try using a planner to help you remember the tasks that you need to complete. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0

Tips from our Readers

  • If you set a timer, it can motivate you to get your homework done more quickly. Be sure to take a 2-5 minute break in between. For example, if you're going to do an assignment that you expect to take 30 minutes, set a timer for 15 minutes. Take a 2-minute break when the timer goes off, then set your timer again for 15 minutes.
  • It can be good to have friends over if they help motivate you and are interested in getting their homework done quickly as well. They might be a distraction at times but it can also be easier to work when there are people around you who are working too.
  • If you drink something cold during your breaks it can help make you more alert so that you'll finish faster. It might also help to do it at night rather than during the day so you feel more time pressure.
  • Try to get your homework done as much as you can in school. You could do it during a flex or study hall. If your teacher gives you time in class to work on it, use it.

how to do homework help

  • Take your time. If you rush through your homework and don’t try your best, you might end up getting a bad grade. Thanks Helpful 176 Not Helpful 19

You Might Also Like

Concentrate on Your Homework

  • ↑ http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/creating-ideal-homework-environment-for-kids-with-adhd-0913164
  • ↑ http://info.achs.edu/blog/never-do-homework-in-bed-3-reasons-why
  • ↑ https://childmind.org/article/strategies-to-make-homework-go-more-smoothly/
  • ↑ https://learningcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/take-charge-of-distractions/
  • ↑ https://kidshealth.org/en/teens/homework.html
  • ↑ https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/homework.html
  • ↑ https://ofy.org/blog/homework-hacks-8-tips-get-done-faster/
  • ↑ Jake Adams. Academic Tutor & Test Prep Specialist. Expert Interview. 20 May 2020.

About This Article

Jake Adams

To get your homework done fast, work in a comfortable, well-lit area that doesn't have any distractions. Also, try setting a timer with however many minutes you want to finish your homework in so you can glance at it as you work and see if you're spending too much time on something. You can also make a to-do list before you get started so you don't waste any time figuring out what you need to be working on. To stay motivated, have a snack and some water nearby, and reward yourself with a fun activity once all your homework is done. To learn how to get organized so it's easier to do your homework, scroll down! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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Muslim students face tough challenges during Ramadan. Here's what teachers can do to help.

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Last year during Ramadan , Zara Ahmad’s school in southern Maryland hosted a waffle day. The smells of batter and syrup wafted through the campus hallways. Ahmad did everything she could to ignore the aromas, but the decision to hold the event then felt insensitive given she and other Muslim students were fasting .   

“Even if they know, they just don't care and they're not as considerate as they could be,” said Ahmad, 16, reflecting on how teachers and administrators handle day-to-day operations during the Islamic holy month of fasting, prayer and community. 

Several times in the past couple of decades , the U.S. Education Department has issued guidance about affirming students’ right to pray and express their religion at school. Last year, the department released the guidance again – specifically alluding to protections related to Ramadan, which began last week and runs through April 9. The latest guidance came as a growing number of school districts have taken steps to better accommodate students who observe Ramadan, including by making one of the major holidays following the month an official day off for all students. 

At a time of rising anti-Muslim discrimination, however, advocates say U.S. schools aren’t doing enough to raise awareness and ensure that students feel supported when practicing their religion. Teachers are often unaware that the holiday is taking place, putting the onus on kids or parents to request exemptions from certain activities or a place where students can pray.

The Education Department’s civil rights arm separately issued a letter on Thursday reminding schools of their obligation to protect such students from discrimination, highlighting the heightened Islamophobia after war broke out in Gaza.

USA TODAY spoke with Amaarah DeCuir, an education researcher and expert on Muslim student experiences about best practices for supporting Ramadan in schools. Here's what she said: 

Lunchtime accommodations and places to pray

A key tenet of Ramadan is fasting from dawn to sunset, which means people observing the holiday often don’t eat lunch. Schools should ensure children have a place to go during lunchtime other than the cafeteria, with its food smells and boisterous noises, said DeCuir, a lecturer at American University in Washington, D.C. 

Often that place is the library. Experts recommend schools staff this lunchtime room or area with at least one adult to monitor children and ensure they have what they need, whether it's quiet time for reflection or a game to play and recharge. 

Kids who choose to pray will also need a place to do so without being bothered. Ahmad, who has been sitting in the cafeteria and doing her schoolwork since Ramadan began, had to ask the guidance counselor earlier this school year if she could pray in her office. “But nothing really special has been done,” she said. This year, as with years before, “it’s definitely on the students to figure out what they want to do" during school, she said.

Flexible homework and testing

DeCuir stressed that Ramadan is a time of joy and reflection, when families may pray late at night and early in the morning. With fasting and limited sleep, students are sometimes low on energy. That’s especially true for younger students still figuring out how to navigate and manage the physical aspects of Ramadan. (Fasting typically isn't expected until followers reach puberty.)

That can make it difficult to concentrate on schoolwork at certain times of the day. DeCuir suggested that educators keep this in mind and be flexible with students who need leeway. Kids who feel their brains are most active during the morning can do any tests or important assignments early; students who feel most energetic in the afternoon can do the bulk of their work later in the day. 

DeCuir said it's important to check in with students and see what works best for them. She noted that the holy month coincides with high-stakes testing this year in many states and said schools should be flexible about timing with students who need consideration. 

At colleges and universities, it's typically up to faculty members to decide whether to accommodate Muslim students' needs during Ramadan, she said. Many professors aren't proactive about being flexible with students, penalizing them for turning in assignments late or refusing to let them take an exam at a different time than their peers.

When is Ramadan 2024? What is it? Muslims set to mark a month of spirituality, reflection

Alternatives in PE, music class and extracurriculars

Because of the physical limitations that sometimes come with fasting, DeCuir stressed the importance of exempting students from high-intensity cardiovascular activities. Instead, teachers can offer strength training or another low-intensity exercise.

Some people also abstain from singing and listening to music during Ramadan. Those students should be allowed to opt out of music class or engage in alternative activities during that time. 

Special consideration should also be made for children involved in after-school sports, DeCuir said. 

Ahmad is an avid tennis player and has often had to contend with matches scheduled on Eid al-Fitr, the holy day that marks the end of Ramadan. Ahmad’s parents have had to push the district to allow her to participate in the competitions after she missed class to attend Muslim events. Administrators typically bar students from playing on days they are absent from school.

Her parents have also had to request permission for Ahmad to be picked up from matches early, rather than take the bus back with her teammates, so she'll be home in time to break the fast at night with her family. 

“All these things can happen if the kids and parents ask for it,” said Omar Ahmad, Zara’s father. “But high school’s a tough time for children as it is, and there’s been a rise in Islamophobia and a backlash if you’re different.

"So many kids aren’t going to ask for it. Many parents might not even ask for it.”

Proactive support for students

Allowing Muslim students to exercise their right to pray is just a first step, DeCuir said. Schools should also be proactive about offering support. 

The Education Department guidance indicates that schools should excuse students from class so they can fast is such an allowance is requested.

Policies with this kind of language place a heavy burden on children and families, DeCuir said: “It requires a family or student to come before a school leader or classroom teacher to say: ‘I’m Muslim. I’m observing Ramadan.'” Since the Oct. 7 Hamas attack and the war in Gaza, expressing something like that can be "extremely difficult and risky for many Muslims across the nation,” she said.

It can also be logistically tricky, particularly for immigrant families who do not speak English as a first language or know how to navigate school bureaucracy.

A better practice, DeCuir said, would be for schools to distribute a districtwide message outlining support that's available. It's important to remember that while a small percentage of students are Muslim, Islam is the third-largest religion in the U.S.

Campus politics: Harvard under scrutiny for discrimination. This complaint comes from Palestinian students

Don’t do this : Rejecting Ramadan celebrations to avoid politics  

DeCuir shared the story of a person she knows whose daughter wanted to bring Ramadan goodie bags to school for her classmates, including cards, stickers and fidget spinners. That's similar to how kids bring treats for Christmas or Easter, but the principal rejected the idea. 

The effect crushed the child's spirit, she said, and the family has since challenged the decision.

Muslim students have faced stigmas for years, particularly since 9/11. It's important to dedicate classroom time to teaching about issues involving Muslims in an accurate and responsible way, but teachers often avoid them.

It’s understandable why school leaders are wary of that, DeCuir said, “but when it’s done to silence the expression of the joy that young children have at the beginning of the month of Ramadan, that act creates a sense of exclusion and isolation.”

Ahmad, the student, says she has noticed a similar chilling effect at her school, where Muslims make up a small percentage of the campus population. When conversations about Islamic countries come up in government class, for example, she sometimes feels compelled to minimize her identity. 

At the very least, she said, “I just wish school would mention (Ramadan) and make all the students aware of it.”

“I wish I didn’t have to feel awkward.”

how to do homework help

How parents can use ChatGPT to raise better kids: AI expert

What, were you raised by robots?

A tech worker has found the “easier” alternative of getting ChatGPT to get kids to sleep, plan their birthday parties, and even help with homework.

Celia Quillain, 31, of Atlanta, Georgia is coaching parent-of-the-year candidates on using the language model to make their lives easier from its “ability to ideate and just be creative.”

“There are a variety of things that if you look through a parenting lens you can do with AI which are incredibly helpful,” Quillain — who does not have kids — told SWNS.

In particular, she emphasized that it can ease “the pain of getting children to bed” by drafting a customizable bedtime story.

“You can include your child’s name to the story and use the AI to create a life lesson that they need to learn about sharing for instance, but it makes it engaging and fun because your kid can contribute to storytime as well.”

“You can ask the child: Who do you want to be in this story and who are the characters?”

Additionally, ChatGPT makes a great virtual assistant — particularly when planning things like travel and birthday parties.

For parties, a parent can bounce ideas off for items such as themed invitations, decorations, color schemes, activities, party favors and even snacks — including dietary needs.

“There are a variety of things that if you look through a parenting lens you can do with AI which are incredibly helpful.”

The coup de gras that makes AI a parenting asset is that it can help young students with their homework when prompted to “explain simply” a bevy of academic subjects.

Still, it’s important to fact-check answers as programs like ChatGPT often create false information or citations as a kink yet to be worked out.

Quillain “would absolutely recommend that parents get involved with AI,” she said. “Give it a try. Experiment with it and learn how it can help you and them.”

How parents can use ChatGPT to raise better kids: AI expert

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Do Homework: 15 Expert Tips and Tricks

    Here's how it works: first, set a timer for 25 minutes. This is going to be your work time. During this 25 minutes, all you can do is work on whatever homework assignment you have in front of you. No email, no text messaging, no phone calls—just homework. When that timer goes off, you get to take a 5 minute break.

  2. How to Do Homework (with Pictures)

    Just make sure to save enough time to circle back and give it another shot. 4. Take a break every hour. Set a specific amount of time you will spend every hour doing something besides homework, and stick to it. Be sure you set how long after the start of the hour, and how long you will take.

  3. The 5 Best Homework Help Websites (Free and Paid!)

    Best Site for Math Homework Help: Photomath. Price: Free (or $59.99 per year for premium services) Best for: Explaining solutions to math problems. This site allows you to take a picture of a math problem, and instantly pulls up a step-by-step solution, as well as a detailed explanation of the concept.

  4. Homework Help: Everything You Need to Know

    The Toronto District School Board offers a simple guideline to help determine how much homework is appropriate at each grade level. Following the guideline of 10 minutes per grade level, each grade should have this amount of homework: 30 minutes in Grade 3. 40 minutes in Grade 4. 50 minutes in Grade 5.

  5. Get Homework Help with Chegg Study

    Use the result of Example 3.16 to verify that the joint distribution function of the random variables x_ (1), x_ (2), and x_ (3) of Example 3.19 is given by F (x_ ( A: See Answer. Get homework help fast! Search through millions of guided step-by-step solutions or ask for help from our community of subject experts 24/7. Try Study today.

  6. 3 Ways to Get Homework Done when You Don't Want To

    2. Take 15-minute breaks. Every 45 minutes, take a break and walk away from your study area. [7] Breaks are the time to get your reward, to use the bathroom or get a glass of water, and to move a little. Taking a break can give your brain a short rest from your work so you come back feeling refreshed and energized.

  7. 3 Ways to Find Motivation to Do Homework

    It's your choice. 2. Find a quiet and comfortable work space. Your environment can make a big difference in how well you focus on your work. Before you begin doing your homework, find a spot that is quiet, well-lit, and gives you plenty of space to spread out.

  8. Homework challenges and strategies

    It's important for kids to learn how to do homework without help. Using a homework contract can help your child set realistic goals. Encourage "thinking out loud." Get tips for helping grade-schoolers do schoolwork on their own. Sometimes, homework challenges don't go away despite your best efforts. Look for signs that kids may have too ...

  9. Online Homework Help with 24/7 Access to Study Tools

    Bartleby is the go-to, online homework help service for students everywhere. We pride ourselves in supporting students through their academic journeys and offer resources for every type of learner. We aim to help students finish homework fast so they can spend more time doing what makes them happy 😊. Subscribe.

  10. 7 Hacks For How To Do Homework Fast

    3. Estimate time. Getting your homework done quickly means that you have to first be aware of the time it takes. You can time yourself on different tasks to start gaining an understanding and general idea of what takes the most time. This way, you can work to sharpen specific skills to move faster.

  11. How to Help Students Develop the Skills They Need to Complete Homework

    The effects of homework are mixed. While adolescents across middle and high school have an array of life situations that can make doing homework easier or harder, it's well known that homework magnifies inequity.However, we also know that learning how to manage time and work independently outside of the school day is valuable for lifelong learning.

  12. Homework anxiety: Why it happens and how to help

    Use a calm voice. When kids feel anxious about homework, they might get angry, yell, or cry. Avoid matching their tone of voice. Take a deep breath and keep your voice steady and calm. Let them know you're there for them. Sometimes kids just don't want to do homework. They complain, procrastinate, or rush through the work so they can do ...

  13. Strategies to Make Homework Go More Smoothly

    Others need to have parents nearby to help keep them on task and to answer questions when problems arise. Ask your child where the best place is to work. Both you and your child need to discuss pros and cons of different settings to arrive at a mutually agreed upon location. Step 2. Set up a homework center.

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    A 24/7 free homework AI tutor that instantly provides personalized step-by-step guidance, explanations, and examples for any homework problem. ... Receive step-by-step guidance & homework help for any homework problem & any subject 24/7. Ask any question. StudyMonkey supports every subject and every level of education from 1st grade to masters ...

  15. How to get into a good homework routine

    Find some space. Try and find a space away from other people to do your homework, if possible. Sit at a table rather than on the sofa, if you can. You might not have your own desk or your own room ...

  16. Step-by-Step Math Problem Solver

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  17. How to Finish Your Homework: 15 Steps (with Pictures)

    Download Article. 1. Ask your parents or peers for help. Parent involvement in homework has been shown to help with homework completion and improved academic performance. [15] Asking a friend for help in understanding a concept or an assignment can go a long way in helping you complete your homework on time. [16] 2.

  18. How Parents Can Help Children Who Struggle with Homework

    In my experience, the theatricality of being timed helps relax children who would otherwise feel daunted by a mountain of homework. As each piece of work gets done, parents can add meaningful positive reinforcement. Exclaiming, "Another assignment done! And done well!" helps your child feel like what they are doing matters.

  19. Key Lessons: What Research Says About the Value of Homework

    Too much homework may diminish its effectiveness. While research on the optimum amount of time students should spend on homework is limited, there are indications that for high school students, 1½ to 2½ hours per night is optimum. Middle school students appear to benefit from smaller amounts (less than 1 hour per night).

  20. Does Homework Really Help Students Learn?

    Yes, and the stories we hear of kids being stressed out from too much homework—four or five hours of homework a night—are real. That's problematic for physical and mental health and overall well-being. But the research shows that higher-income students get a lot more homework than lower-income kids.

  21. How to do Homework: Finding the Right Motivation and Help!

    How to do Homework: Get Help Online. Doing all the homework on your own, without any external help, can be a challenge. This is true especially when you are unsure about the concept and are struggling with the subject. In such a situation, you should consider reaching out to online homework help services. Such portals, like TutorBin.com, can be ...

  22. An Age-By-Age Guide to Helping Kids Manage Homework

    Third to fifth grades. Many children will be able to do homework independently in grades 3-5. Even then, their ability to focus and follow through may vary from day to day. "Most children are ...

  23. How to Decide What College to Attend

    Do Your Homework to Discover the Right College. Once you have a list of schools, it's time to research them in depth. To find the information you're looking for, check out college guide websites, specific colleges' websites, and other available online tools. Jot down your questions, and get answers by: Talking to your school counselor or ...

  24. 3 Ways to Get Your Homework Done Fast

    Every 25 minutes or so, take about 5 minutes to stretch and walk around to give your brain and body a quick rest. [11] 2. Eat snacks and drink water. Drink plenty of water and eat light, healthy, tasty snacks while you work to enjoy foods that you like, enhance your memory, and revitalize your brain and body.

  25. Ramadan in schools: What teachers can do to support Muslim students

    Here's what teachers can do to help. ... Flexible homework and testing. DeCuir stressed that Ramadan is a time of joy and reflection, when families may pray late at night and early in the morning ...

  26. [University Mortgage Calculation] Does anyone know how to do this

    The purpose of this subreddit is to help you learn (not complete your last-minute homework), and our rules are designed to reinforce this. Members Online howaido

  27. How parents can use ChatGPT to raise better kids: AI expert

    Celia Quillian. See SWNS story SWNJai. An expert reveals how parents can use AI to make their lives "easier" - and get their children into bed, plan birthday parties and help with homework.