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Chicago/Turabian Citation

  • Citing a Book

Basic Chapter Citation

Example chapter of a book, example chapter of an ebook, example foreword/preface of a book.

  • Citing an Article
  • Citing a Webpage
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Footnote/Endnote

Author First M. Last Name, "Chapter or Essay Title," in  Book Title , ed. First M. Last Name (Place of Publication: Publisher, date), page cited.

Short version: Author Last Name, "Chapter or Essay Title (shortened if necessary)," page cited.

Bibliography

Author Last Name, First M.   "Chapter or Essay Title."  In  Book Title ,   edited by First M. Last Name,  page range.   Place of Publication: Publisher, date.

Eric Charry, "Music and Islam in Sub-Saharan Africa," in  The History of Islam in Africa , eds. Nehwmia Levtzion and Randall L. Pouwels  (Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 2000), 550.

Short version: Charry, "Music and Islam in Sub-Saharan Africa," 550.

Charry, Eric.   "Music and Islam in Sub-Saharan Africa."  In  The History of Islam in Africa ,   edited by Nehwmia Levtzion and Randall L. Pouwels,   545-573.   Athens, OH: Ohio  University Press, 2000.

Alan Liu, "Where is Cultural Criticism in the Digital Humanities?," in  Debates in the Digital Humanities , ed. Matthew K. Gold (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013), accessed January 23, 2014,  http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/20. 

Short version: Liu, "Where is Cultural Criticism."

Liu, Alan.  "Where is Cultural Criticism in the Digital Humanities?."   In  Debates in the Digital Humanities ,   edited by Matthew K. Gold.   Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013.   A ccessed January 23, 2014.   http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/20. 

Strobe Talbott, foreword to   Beyond Tianamen: The Politics of U.S.-China Relations 1989-2000 , by Robert L. Suettinger (Washington, D. C.: Brookings Institute Press, 2003), x.

Short version: Talbott, foreword, x.

Talbott, Strobe.   Foreword to   Beyond Tianamen: The Politics of U.S.-China Relations 1989-2000 ,   by Robert L. Suettinger,  ix-x.   Washington, D. C.: Brookings Institute  Press, 2003.

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APA Citation Style, 7th edition: Article or Chapter in an Edited Book

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Article or Chapter in an Edited Book

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About Citing Books

For each type of source in this guide, both the general form and an example will be provided.

The following format will be used:

In-Text Citation (Paraphrase) - entry that appears in the body of your paper when you express the ideas of a researcher or author using your own words.  For more tips on paraphrasing check out The OWL at Purdue .

In-Text Citation (Quotation) - entry that appears in the body of your paper after a direct quote.

References - entry that appears at the end of your paper.

Information on citing and several of the examples were drawn from the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (7th ed.).

Numbers in parentheses refer to specific pages in the manual.

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APA Citation - Quick Guide to 7th edition (2020)

  • Book Chapters - Reference list and in-text citations
  • General Notes on citations in Reference Lists
  • Journal Articles - Reference list and in-text citations
  • Books - Reference list and in-text citation

Book Chapters- Reference list and in-text citations

Citing book chapters is a bit different from citing books or articles in that there are two sets of authors/editors. The first is the author(s)/editor(s) of the CHAPTER, the second is the author(s)/editor(s) of the book.

Let's go back to the purposes of citation - one of them is to enable others to find the material you are citing. So if you are citing material from a chapter, it is NOT helpful to the reader to cite only the book - they don't know where the cited material is within the book.

Sometimes a chapter is written by author(s) who are also the author(s) of the book. One would still cite the chapter so that the reader can locate the cited material.

More typical is that an authored chapter is in a book edited by editor(s).

In either of these cases, the chapter author(s) and chapter title are presented first, and in the same manner as for articles and books, i.e., last name followed by initial(s). The book author(s)/editor(s) are presented second, and the author/editor information is presented initials first, followed by last names. The page numbers of the chapter follow the book title, followed by the publisher.

BOOK CHAPTER IN AUTHORED BOOK: in Reference list

Prevatt, F., & Levrini, A. (2015). Case study: ADHD coaching with a young adult with comorbid mood disorders. In F. Prevatt & A. Levrini, ADHD coaching: A guide for mental health professionals (pp. 189-205). American Psychological Association .

BOOK CHAPTER IN AUTHORED BOOK: In-text citations (parenthetical and narrative)

A case study (Prevatt & Levrini, 2015) found...

Prevatt and Levrini (2015) found... Note that the ampersand "&" is used in parenthetical in-text citations, while the word "and" is used in narrative in-text citations

BOOK CHAPTER IN AN EDITED BOOK: In Reference list

Stahmer, A. C., Wong, C., Segall, M. J., & Reiner J. (2020). Fostering inclusion with peers and in the community. In Y. Bruinsma, M. B. Minjarez, L. Schreibman, & A. C. Aubyn (Eds.). Naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions for autism spectrum disorder (pp. 99-119).  Paul H. Brookes Publishing.

BOOK CHAPTER IN AN EDITED BOOK: In-text citations (parethentical and narrative)

In a study on peer interactions, Stahmer et al. (2020) found...

Stahmer et al. (2020) found...

Note that it is the authors of the CHAPTER that are cited in-text. In this particular case, there were more than three authors, so the "et al" is used. If there were one or two authors, all the CHAPTER authors would be presented in the in-text citations.

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APA 7th referencing style

  • About APA 7th
  • Printing this guide
  • In-text references
  • Direct quotations
  • Reference list
  • Author information
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  • Using headings

Referencing multiple chapters from same book

Chapter in an edited book, mental measurements yearbook.

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  • If there are different authors for each chapter, you need to reference EACH chapter you use.
  • If you use multiple chapters from a book with different authors for each chapter, you still need to reference EACH chapter you use. (This is because you need to acknowledge who wrote the work you are using, not the person who edited/compiled the book).
  • If the book does not have chapters written by different authors, you only need to reference the book. 

Only reference a chapter if it has individual authors  for each chapter in the book. Use book examples if there are not chapter authors.

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Citation Help for APA, 7th Edition: Book Chapter & Ebook Chapter

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General Example & Explanation

General example of a book chapter reference with each part of the reference, including author, copyright date, chapter title, editors, book title, edition, chapter pages, publisher, DOI, color coded with corresponding explanation in matching color coded text boxes.

Image Credit: American Psychological Association. (2019). APA Style 7th ed. Quick Reference Guide . Copyright American Psychological Association 2019. Image used with permission. 

Variation - Multiple Authors?

Multiple Authors - 20 Authors or Less?

List all authors up to and including 20 authors. 

Clarke, N., D'Amato, A., Higgs, M., & Ramesh, V. (2018). Responsible leadership in projects: Insights into ethical decision making .  Project Management Institute.

Explanation

List each author's last name first followed by a comma. Then, add the initials for the first and middle names (if there is one). Add a period after each initial. Separate each author with a comma. Insert an ampersand (&) before the last author.

Parenthetical & Narrative Citations

For one or two authors, list all authors in the reference. For three or more authors, list the first author followed by et al. This includes the first time the source is used in the paper. 

Parenthetical Citation Example

(Clarke et al., 2018)

Narrative Citation Example

Clarke et al. (2018) found ......

Multiple Authors - 21 or More Authors?

List the first 19 authors' names, then insert an ellipse, and then add the last author's name.

Gilbert, J. R., Smith, J. D., Johnson, R. S., Anderson, A., Plath, S., Martin, G., Sorenson, K., Jones, R., Adams, T., Rothbaum, Z., Esty, K., Gibbs, M., Taultson, B., Christner, G, Paulson, L., Tolo, K., Jacobson, W. L., Robinson, R. A., Maurer, O., . . . White, N. (2014 ). Choosing a title (2nd ed.). Unnamed  Publishing.

(Gilbert et al., 2014)

Gilbert et al. (2014) ...

More Information

For more information about author format, see Section 9.8 on page 286 of the APA Manual, 7th edition.

Variation - Group Author?

American Psychological Association. (2019). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (7th ed.). https://doi.org/10.1037/0000165-000

Group authors include the name of a study group, government agency, association, corporation, task force, hospital, organization, etc. Put the name of the group author in the author position followed by a period. Do not include an abbreviation for the group author within the reference. Abbreviations should only be introduced and used within the body of the paper.

Parenthetical Citation

(American Psychological Association, 2019)

Narrative Citation

American Psychological Association (2019) ....

More information

For more information about group authors, see Section 9.11 on pages 288-289 of the APA Manual, 7th edition.

Variation - Edition?

Smith, S. F., Duell, D. J., Martin, B. C. Aebersold, M. L., & Gonzalez, L. (2016). Clinical nursing skills: Basic to advanced skills (9th ed.). Pearson.

Place the edition number in parentheses after the book title. Follow by "ed." and a period outside the parentheses. There is no period after the book title.

For more information about editions or volumes, see Section. 9.28 on page 295 of the APA Manual, 7th edition. 

Chapter in an Authored Print Book or Authored Ebook From the CSS Library Ebook Collections Without a DOI

Introduction.

Identifying the format, platform, or device (e.g., ebook, Kindle book, etc.) of a chapter in an authored ebook is no longer needed. A chapter in an authored ebook from an academic collection should be treated as a chapter in an authored print book with the reference ending with the publisher. For a chapter in an authored print book or ebook with a DOI, see Chapter in an Authored Book with a DOI .

More Information:

For more information about citing books, see Section 10.2 on page 321-325 of the APA Manual, 7th edition. 

Mehrotra, C. M., & Wagner, L. S. (2019).  Aging and diversity: An active learning experience  (2nd ed.). Routledge.

To create a reference for a chapter in an authored book, just create a reference for the entire book. Follow the authored print book  example as a guide for creating the reference in the reference list. Do not include any chapter information within the reference. Instead, within the body of the paper, refer to the Chapter in the parenthetical or narrative citation. 

For more information, see Section 10.2 on page 321 (opening remarks) and Section 8.13 on page 264 of the APA Manual, 7th edition.

Parenthetical & Narrative Citation Examples

Parenthetical citation example:.

(Mehrotra & Wagner, 2019, Chapter 2)

Narrative Citation Example:

According to Mehrotra and Wagner (2019), active learning ..... (Chapter 2). 

More Information:  

For more information about authors in parenthetical and narrative citations, see Section 8.17 and Table 8.1 on page 266 of the APA Manual, 7th edition. 

Chapter in an Edited Print Book or Edited Ebook From the CSS Library Ebook Collections Without a DOI

Identifying the format, platform, or device (e.g., ebook, Kindle book, etc.) of a chapter in an edited book is no longer needed. A chapter in an edited ebook from an academic collection should be treated as a chapter in an edited print book. For a chapter in an edited print book or edited ebook from an academic collection that has a DOI, see Chapter in an Edited Book with a DOI .

Brotzman, S. B., & Novotny, S. R. (2018). Historical perspectives in orthopaedic manual physical therapy. In C. E. Giangarra &

R.  Manske (Eds.), Clinical orthopaedic rehabilitation: A team approach  (4th ed., pp. 2-15). ELSEVIER.

Authors of the Chapter:  Brozman, S. B., & Novotny, S. R.

Begin the reference with the first author's last name. Add a comma after the author's last name. Then, add the author's first and middle name always represented by initials. Add a period after each initial. If the author has a middle name, add a space between the first and middle initial. Add a comma after the middle initial. Add additional authors in order exactly as listed following the same steps. Do not change the order of the authors! Before the last author, add an ampersand (&).   

Year of Publication:  (2018).

Next, add the date the book was published. Examine the title page or the title verso page (back side of the title page) to determine the date of publication. Place in parentheses with a period following the parentheses.   

Title & Subtitle of the Chapter:  Historical perspectives in orthopaedic manual physical therapy.

Next, add the title and subtitle of the chapter. The title and subtitle are separated by a colon. Capitalize only the first word of the title and subtitle as well as any proper nouns. End with a period.  

Editor(s) of the Book:  In C. E. Giangarra  & R. Manske (Eds.),

Next, include the word "In" before the editor(s). List names of editors beginning with initials for the first and middle names. Add a period after each initial, and if there is a middle initial, add a space between the initials. Following the initials of each editor will be the editor's last name. List editors in the order as they appear on the title page. Place an ampersand (&) before the last editor followed by Eds. in parentheses (or Ed. if there is only one) with a comma after the parentheses.  

Title & Subtitle of the Book: Clinical orthopaedic rehabilitation: A team approach 

Next, add the title and subtitle of the book. The title and subtitle are separated by a colon. Capitalize only the first word of title and subtitle as well as any proper nouns. Italicize title and subtitle.  Do not add a period after the title!  

Edition & Page numbers:  (4th ed., pp. 2-15).

Next, add the edition of the book (if there is one) and the page numbers of the chapter. The edition is added by adding the number and the abbreviation for edition, which is "ed." Add a period and comma after ed. Then, add the page numbers of the chapter, which are preceded by the abbreviation for pages, which is "pp." Place in parentheses, and add a period after the parentheses.   

Source Information:  ELSEVIER.

Complete the reference with the source information, which is the publisher. The publisher's name should be listed exactly as it appears on the title page including retaining the capitalization and spelling as it appears on the title page. End the reference with a period. NOTE: Do not include designations of business structure (e.g., Inc., Ltd., LLC, etc.).

For more information about book citations, see page 326 of the APA Manual, 7th ed. For author format, title format, or source (publication) information, see pages 285-289, pages 291-293, and pages 293-301 respectively in the APA Manual, 7th ed.

Parenthetical Citation Example: 

(Brotzman & Novotny, 2018)

Narrative Citation Example:  

Brotzman and Novotny (2018) demonstrated .....  

Chapter in an Authored Print Book or Authored Ebook From the CSS Library Ebook Collections with a DOI

Identifying the format, platform, or device (e.g., ebook, Kindle book, etc.) of a chapter in an authored ebook is no longer needed. A chapter in an authored ebook from an academic collection should be treated as a chapter in an authored print book. For a chapter in an authored print book or ebook without a DOI, see Chapter in an Authored Book without a DOI .

Example 

Green, C. (2019). Incivility among nursing professionals in clinical and academic environments: Emerging research and opportunities .

IGI Global. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-5225-7341-8

To create a reference for a chapter in an authored book, just create a reference for the entire book. Follow the example of an  authored print book   as a guide for creating the reference in the reference list. Do not include any chapter information within the reference. Instead, within the body of the paper, refer to the Chapter in the parenthetical or narrative citation. 

At the end of the reference, after the publisher, add the DOI using the current DOI URL format. The current standard for the DOI begins with "https://doi.org/". Do not add a period after the DOI. 

For more information about book references with a DOI, see page 321 and page 322 of the APA Manual, 7th ed. For additional source (publication) information, see pages 293-301 in the APA Manual, 7th edition.

(Green, 2019, Chapter 5)

In Chapter 5, Green (2019) outlined ..... 

Green (2019) demonstrated ..... (Chapter 5).   

Chapter in an Edited Print Book or Edited Ebook From the CSS Library Ebook Collections with a DOI

Identifying the format, platform, or device (e.g., ebook, Kindle book, etc.) of a chapter in an edited ebook is no longer needed. A chapter in an edited ebook from an academic collection should be treated as a chapter in an edited print book. For a chapter in an edited print book or ebook without a DOI, see Chapter in an Edited Book without a DOI .

Example for a Chapter in an Edited Book with DOI

Jenkins, S. (2018). Perspectives on behavioral development. In R. Gibb & B. Kolb (Eds.),  The neurology of brain and

behavioral  development (pp. 29-80). Academic Press.  https://doi.org/10.1016/C2015-0-00695-5

To create a reference for a chapter in an edited book, follow the example for a chapter in an edited book without a DOI . At the end of the reference, after the publisher, add the DOI using the current DOI URL format. The current standard for the DOI begins with "https://doi.org/". Do not add a period after the DOI. 

(Jenkins, 2018)

Jenkins (2018) formulated .....  

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APA Citation Style, 7th Edition: Chapter in a Book

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Citing a Book Chapter

References:

Thompson, C. (2012). How can we develop an evidence-based culture? In J. V. Craig & R. L. Smith (Eds.), The evidence-based practice manual for nurses  (3rd ed. ,  pp. 323-357). Churchhill Livingstone Elsevier.  https://www.elsevier.com/books/the-evidence-based-practice-manual-for-nurses/craig/978-0-7020-4193-8

In-text Citation (Paraphrase):

(Thompson, 2012)

In-text Citation (Direct Quote):

(Thompson, 2012, p. 326)

Carrie Forbes, MLS

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Page References

Citation information has been adapted from the APA Manual (6th Edition). Please refer to page 326-327 of the APA Manual (7th Edition) for more information.

Helpful Tips

-Be mindful of hyphenated names, particularly hyphenated first names in your reference list. If an author or editor has a hyphenated first name, include first initials for both separated by a hyphen. For example: Lamour, J.-B. for Jean-Baptiste Lamour.

-If your reference list includes publications by two or more authors with the same last name, you should include the first initial in all in-text citations in order to help the reader avoid confusion.

-Suffixes like "Jr." or "III" are not included in in-text citations but are included in the reference list.

- Electronic books and books from electronic databases are cited exactly the same way print books are, there is no difference. The only time you differentiate is if you use an audio version of the book. 

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  • Referencing Books in Harvard Style | Templates & Examples

Referencing Books in Harvard Style | Templates & Examples

Published on 12 May 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on 7 November 2022.

To reference a book in Harvard style , you need an in-text citation and a corresponding entry in your reference list or bibliography .

A basic book reference looks like this:

Try our free reference generator to create accurate Harvard references for all your sources:

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Table of contents

Edition or volume of a book, edited or translated book, book chapter, dictionary or encyclopedia, frequently asked questions about harvard referencing.

If the book you’re citing is a second or later edition (i.e. when the edition is stated on the title page or cover), specify this in your reference. Abbreviate ‘edition’ to ‘edn’ or ‘revised edition’ to ‘rev ed’.

When referencing a book published in multiple volumes, include the total number of volumes in your reference.

If you’re just referencing one volume, omit the total number but include the number and subtitle of the particular volume you’re referencing as part of the title.

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If a book specifies an editor and/or translator, this information should be included in the reference.

When a book has an editor in addition to the main author, the editor’s name is included later in the reference.

When the editor is the main author (i.e. when it’s their name on the cover), their name comes first. Use “ed.” for a single editor and “eds.” if there are multiple editors.

If you use a specific chapter or work from an edited collection, follow the format for referencing a book chapter instead.

When you reference a book that has been translated from another language, include the original language and the translator’s name.

Unlike other names, the translator’s name is not inverted: the initial comes first.

If a book contains chapters or works by various different authors, such as a collection of essays or an anthology of short stories, reference the specific chapter or work, followed by details of the book.

The chapter title appears in quotation marks, while the book title is italicized. At the end of the reference, specify the page range on which the chapter appears.

If a book is entirely written by one author, always reference the whole book, even if you only discuss one chapter.

Dictionaries, encyclopedias, and other reference works very often don’t list specific authors. In these cases, they are cited and referenced using their titles in the author position:

Where a reference work does have an author, it can be referenced like a normal book. Where different sections of a reference work are attributed to different authors, they can be referenced like chapters in an edited book.

When an ebook is presented like a printed book, with page numbers and publication details included, you can reference it in the same format as you would the print version.

Otherwise, the ebook format differs slightly: I nclude a link to where you found or purchased it online instead of publisher information. This link is generally just to the store or database you used, not the specific book.

In addition, in-text citations will have to use something other than page numbers when necessary, such as a percentage or location number. Use whatever marker is available on your device.

A Harvard in-text citation should appear in brackets every time you quote, paraphrase, or refer to information from a source.

The citation can appear immediately after the quotation or paraphrase, or at the end of the sentence. If you’re quoting, place the citation outside of the quotation marks but before any other punctuation like a comma or full stop.

In Harvard style , when you quote directly from a source that includes page numbers, your in-text citation must include a page number. For example: (Smith, 2014, p. 33).

You can also include page numbers to point the reader towards a passage that you paraphrased . If you refer to the general ideas or findings of the source as a whole, you don’t need to include a page number.

In Harvard referencing, up to three author names are included in an in-text citation or reference list entry. When there are four or more authors, include only the first, followed by ‘ et al. ’

In Harvard style referencing , to distinguish between two sources by the same author that were published in the same year, you add a different letter after the year for each source:

  • (Smith, 2019a)
  • (Smith, 2019b)

Add ‘a’ to the first one you cite, ‘b’ to the second, and so on. Do the same in your bibliography or reference list .

Cite this Scribbr article

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Caulfield, J. (2022, November 07). Referencing Books in Harvard Style | Templates & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved 29 April 2024, from https://www.scribbr.co.uk/referencing/harvard-book-reference/

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To be made up of:

  • Author of the chapter/section.
  • Year of publication (in round brackets).
  • Title of chapter/section (in single quotation marks) 'in' plus author/editor of book.
  • Title of book (in italics).
  • Place of publication: publisher.
  • Page reference.

In-text citation:

(Franklin, 2012, p.88)

Reference list:

Franklin, A.W. (2012). 'Management of the problem', in Smith, S.M. (ed.)  The maltreatment of children.  Lancaster: MTP, pp.83-95.

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There are different versions of the Harvard referencing style. This guide is a quick introduction to the commonly-used Cite Them Right version. You will find further guidance available through the OU Library on the Cite Them Right Database .

For help and support with referencing and the full Cite Them Right guide, have a look at the Library’s page on referencing and plagiarism . If you need guidance referencing OU module material you can check out which sections of Cite Them Right are recommended when referencing physical and online module material .

This guide does not apply to OU Law undergraduate students . If you are studying a module beginning with W1xx, W2xx or W3xx, you should refer to the Quick guide to Cite Them Right referencing for Law modules .

Table of contents

In-text citations and full references.

  • Secondary referencing
  • Page numbers
  • Citing multiple sources published in the same year by the same author

Full reference examples

Referencing consists of two elements:

  • in-text citations, which are inserted in the body of your text and are included in the word count. An in-text citation gives the author(s) and publication date of a source you are referring to. If the publication date is not given, the phrase 'no date' is used instead of a date. If using direct quotations or you refer to a specific section in the source you also need the page number/s if available, or paragraph number for web pages.
  • full references, which are given in alphabetical order in reference list at the end of your work and are not included in the word count. Full references give full bibliographical information for all the sources you have referred to in the body of your text.

To see a reference list and intext citations check out this example assignment on Cite Them Right .

Difference between reference list and bibliography

a reference list only includes sources you have referred to in the body of your text

a bibliography includes sources you have referred to in the body of your text AND sources that were part of your background reading that you did not use in your assignment

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Examples of in-text citations

You need to include an in-text citation wherever you quote or paraphrase from a source. An in-text citation consists of the last name of the author(s), the year of publication, and a page number if relevant. There are a number of ways of incorporating in-text citations into your work - some examples are provided below. Alternatively you can see examples of setting out in-text citations in Cite Them Right .

Note: When referencing a chapter of an edited book, your in-text citation should give the author(s) of the chapter.

Online module materials

(Includes written online module activities, audio-visual material such as online tutorials, recordings or videos).

When referencing material from module websites, the date of publication is the year you started studying the module.

Surname, Initial. (Year of publication/presentation) 'Title of item'. Module code: Module title . Available at: URL of VLE (Accessed: date).

OR, if there is no named author:

The Open University (Year of publication/presentation) 'Title of item'. Module code: Module title . Available at: URL of VLE (Accessed: date).

Rietdorf, K. and Bootman, M. (2022) 'Topic 3: Rare diseases'. S290: Investigating human health and disease . Available at: https://learn2.open.ac.uk/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=1967195 (Accessed: 24 January 2023).

The Open University (2022) ‘3.1 The purposes of childhood and youth research’. EK313: Issues in research with children and young people . Available at: https://learn2.open.ac.uk/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=1949633&section=1.3 (Accessed: 24 January 2023).

You can also use this template to reference videos and audio that are hosted on your module website:

The Open University (2022) ‘Video 2.7 An example of a Frith-Happé animation’. SK298: Brain, mind and mental health . Available at: https://learn2.open.ac.uk/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=2013014&section=4.9.6 (Accessed: 22 November 2022).

The Open University (2022) ‘Audio 2 Interview with Richard Sorabji (Part 2)’. A113: Revolutions . Available at: https://learn2.open.ac.uk/mod/oucontent/view.php?id=1960941&section=5.6 (Accessed: 22 November 2022).

Note: if a complete journal article has been uploaded to a module website, or if you have seen an article referred to on the website and then accessed the original version, reference the original journal article, and do not mention the module materials. If only an extract from an article is included in your module materials that you want to reference, you should use secondary referencing, with the module materials as the 'cited in' source, as described above.

Surname, Initial. (Year of publication) 'Title of message', Title of discussion board , in Module code: Module title . Available at: URL of VLE (Accessed: date).

Fitzpatrick, M. (2022) ‘A215 - presentation of TMAs', Tutor group discussion & Workbook activities , in A215: Creative writing . Available at: https://learn2.open.ac.uk/mod/forumng/discuss.php?d=4209566 (Accessed: 24 January 2022).

Note: When an ebook looks like a printed book, with publication details and pagination, reference as a printed book.

Surname, Initial. (Year of publication) Title . Edition if later than first. Place of publication: publisher. Series and volume number if relevant.

For ebooks that do not contain print publication details

Surname, Initial. (Year of publication) Title of book . Available at: DOI or URL (Accessed: date).

Example with one author:

Bell, J. (2014) Doing your research project . Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Adams, D. (1979) The hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy . Available at: http://www.amazon.co.uk/kindle-ebooks (Accessed: 23 June 2021).

Example with two or three authors:

Goddard, J. and Barrett, S. (2015) The health needs of young people leaving care . Norwich: University of East Anglia, School of Social Work and Psychosocial Studies.

Example with four or more authors:

Young, H.D. et al. (2015) Sears and Zemansky's university physics . San Francisco, CA: Addison-Wesley.

Note: You can choose one or other method to reference four or more authors (unless your School requires you to name all authors in your reference list) and your approach should be consistent.

Note: Books that have an editor, or editors, where each chapter is written by a different author or authors.

Surname of chapter author, Initial. (Year of publication) 'Title of chapter or section', in Initial. Surname of book editor (ed.) Title of book . Place of publication: publisher, Page reference.

Franklin, A.W. (2012) 'Management of the problem', in S.M. Smith (ed.) The maltreatment of children . Lancaster: MTP, pp. 83–95.

Surname, Initial. (Year of publication) 'Title of article', Title of Journal , volume number (issue number), page reference.

If accessed online:

Surname, Initial. (Year of publication) 'Title of article', Title of Journal , volume number (issue number), page reference. Available at: DOI or URL (if required) (Accessed: date).

Shirazi, T. (2010) 'Successful teaching placements in secondary schools: achieving QTS practical handbooks', European Journal of Teacher Education , 33(3), pp. 323–326.

Shirazi, T. (2010) 'Successful teaching placements in secondary schools: achieving QTS practical handbooks', European Journal of Teacher Education , 33(3), pp. 323–326. Available at: https://libezproxy.open.ac.uk/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/log... (Accessed: 27 January 2023).

Barke, M. and Mowl, G. (2016) 'Málaga – a failed resort of the early twentieth century?', Journal of Tourism History , 2(3), pp. 187–212. Available at: https://doi.org/10.1080/1755182X.2010.523145

Surname, Initial. (Year of publication) 'Title of article', Title of Newspaper , Day and month, Page reference.

Surname, Initial. (Year of publication) 'Title of article', Title of Newspaper , Day and month, Page reference if available. Available at: URL (Accessed: date).

Mansell, W. and Bloom, A. (2012) ‘£10,000 carrot to tempt physics experts’, The Guardian , 20 June, p. 5.

Roberts, D. and Ackerman, S. (2013) 'US draft resolution allows Obama 90 days for military action against Syria', The Guardian , 4 September. Available at: http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/04/syria-strikes-draft-resolut... (Accessed: 9 September 2015).

Surname, Initial. (Year that the site was published/last updated) Title of web page . Available at: URL (Accessed: date).

Organisation (Year that the page was last updated) Title of web page . Available at: URL (Accessed: date).

Robinson, J. (2007) Social variation across the UK . Available at: https://www.bl.uk/british-accents-and-dialects/articles/social-variation... (Accessed: 21 November 2021).

The British Psychological Society (2018) Code of Ethics and Conduct . Available at: https://www.bps.org.uk/news-and-policy/bps-code-ethics-and-conduct (Accessed: 22 March 2019).

Note: Cite Them Right Online offers guidance for referencing webpages that do not include authors' names and dates. However, be extra vigilant about the suitability of such webpages.

Surname, Initial. (Year) Title of photograph . Available at: URL (Accessed: date).

Kitton, J. (2013) Golden sunset . Available at: https://www.jameskittophotography.co.uk/photo_8692150.html (Accessed: 21 November 2021).

stanitsa_dance (2021) Cossack dance ensemble . Available at: https://www.instagram.com/p/COI_slphWJ_/ (Accessed: 13 June 2023).

Note: If no title can be found then replace it with a short description.

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Home / Guides / Citation Guides / MLA Format / How to Cite an Essay in MLA

How to Cite an Essay in MLA

The guidelines for citing an essay in MLA format are similar to those for citing a chapter in a book. Include the author of the essay, the title of the essay, the name of the collection if the essay belongs to one, the editor of the collection or other contributors, the publication information, and the page number(s).

Citing an Essay

Mla essay citation structure.

Last, First M. “Essay Title.” Collection Title, edited by First M. Last, Publisher, year published, page numbers. Website Title , URL (if applicable).

MLA Essay Citation Example

Gupta, Sanjay. “Balancing and Checking.” Essays on Modern Democracy, edited by Bob Towsky, Brook Stone Publishers, 1996, pp. 36-48. Essay Database, www . databaseforessays.org/modern/modern-democracy.

MLA Essay In-text Citation Structure

(Last Name Page #)

MLA Essay In-text Citation Example

Click here to cite an essay via an EasyBib citation form.

MLA Formatting Guide

MLA Formatting

  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Bibliography
  • Block Quotes
  • et al Usage
  • In-text Citations
  • Paraphrasing
  • Page Numbers
  • Sample Paper
  • Works Cited
  • MLA 8 Updates
  • MLA 9 Updates
  • View MLA Guide

Citation Examples

  • Book Chapter
  • Journal Article
  • Magazine Article
  • Newspaper Article
  • Website (no author)
  • View all MLA Examples

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To cite your sources in an essay in MLA style, you need to have basic information including the author’s name(s), chapter title, book title, editor(s), publication year, publisher, and page numbers. The templates for in-text citations and a works-cited-list entry for essay sources and some examples are given below:

In-text citation template and example:

For citations in prose, use the first name and surname of the author on the first occurrence. For subsequent citations, use only the surname(s). In parenthetical citations, always use only the surname of the author(s).

Citation in prose:

First mention: Annette Wheeler Cafarelli

Subsequent occurrences: Wheeler Cafarelli

Parenthetical:

….(Wheeler Cafarelli).

Works-cited-list entry template and example:

The title of the chapter is enclosed in double quotation marks and uses title case. The book or collection title is given in italics and uses title case.

Surname, First Name. “Title of the Chapter.” Title of the Book , edited by Editor(s) Name, Publisher, Publication Year, page range.

Cafarelli, Annette Wheeler. “Rousseau and British Romanticism: Women and British Romanticism.” Cultural Interactions in the Romantic Age: Critical Essays in Comparative Literature , edited by Gregory Maertz. State U of New York P, 1998, pp. 125–56.

To cite an essay in MLA style, you need to have basic information including the author(s), the essay title, the book title, editor(s), publication year, publisher, and page numbers. The templates for citations in prose, parenthetical citations, and works-cited-list entries for an essay by multiple authors, and some examples, are given below:

For citations in prose, use the first name and surname of the author (e.g., Mary Strine).

For sources with two authors, use both full author names in prose (e.g., Mary Strine and Beth Radick).

For sources with three or more authors, use the first name and surname of the first author followed by “and others” or “and colleagues” (e.g., Mary Strine and others). In subsequent citations, use only the surname of the first author followed by “and others” or “and colleagues” (e.g., Strine and others).

In parenthetical citations, use only the author’s surname. For sources with two authors, use two surnames (e.g., Strine and Radick). For sources with three or more author names, use the first author’s surname followed by “et al.”

First mention: Mary Strine…

Subsequent mention: Strine…

First mention: Mary Strine and Beth Radick…

Subsequent mention: Strine and Radick…

First mention: Mary Strine and colleagues …. or Mary Strine and others

Subsequent occurrences: Strine and colleagues …. or Strine and others

…. (Strine).

….(Strine and Radick).

….(Strine et al.).

The title of the essay is enclosed in double quotation marks and uses title case. The book or collection title is given in italics and uses title case.

Surname, First Name, et al. “Title of the Essay.” Title of the Book , edited by Editor(s) Name, Publisher, Publication Year, page range.

Strine, Mary M., et al. “Research in Interpretation and Performance Studies: Trends, Issues, Priorities.” Speech Communication: Essays to Commemorate the 75th Anniversary of the Speech Communication Association , edited by Gerald M. Phillips and Julia T. Wood, Southern Illinois UP, 1990, pp. 181–204.

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Reference List: Books

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Welcome to the Purdue OWL

This page is brought to you by the OWL at Purdue University. When printing this page, you must include the entire legal notice.

Copyright ©1995-2018 by The Writing Lab & The OWL at Purdue and Purdue University. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, reproduced, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our terms and conditions of fair use.

Note:  This page reflects the latest version of the APA Publication Manual (i.e., APA 7), which released in October 2019. The equivalent resource for the older APA 6 style  can be found here .

The following contains a list of the most commonly cited print book sources. E-books are described on our "Electronic Sources" page . For a complete list of how to cite print sources, please refer to the 7 th edition of the APA Publication Manual. 

Note: If available, APA 7 requires a DOI for all works that have one — whether print or digital. If a print work does not have a DOI do not include it in the reference citation.

Basic Format for Books

Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle . Publisher Name. DOI (if available)

Stoneman, R. (2008). Alexander the Great: A life in legend . Yale University Press.

Edited Book, No Author

Editor, E. E. (Ed.). (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle . Publisher. DOI (if available)

Leitch, M. G., & Rushton, C. J. (Eds.). (2019).  A new companion to Malory . D. S. Brewer.

Edited Book with an Author or Authors

Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle (E. Editor, Ed.). Publisher. DOI (if available)

Malory, T. (2017). Le morte darthur (P. J. C. Field, Ed.). D. S. Brewer. (Original work published 1469-70)

A Translation

Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle (T. Translator, Trans.). Publisher. (Original work published YEAR) DOI (if available)

Plato (1989). Symposium (A. Nehamas & P. Woodruff, Trans.). Hackett Publishing Company. (Original work published ca. 385-378 BCE)

Note : When you cite a republished work, like the one above, in your text, it should appear with both dates: Plato (385-378/1989)

Edition Other Than the First

Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle (# edition). Publisher. DOI (if available)

Belcher, W. (2019). Writing your journal article in twelve weeks: A guide to academic publishing success (2nd ed.). University of Chicago Press.

Article or Chapter in an Edited Book

Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Year of publication). Title of chapter. In E. E. Editor & F. F. Editor (Eds.), Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle (pp. pages of chapter). Publisher. DOI (if available)

Note : When you list the pages of the chapter or essay in parentheses after the book title, use "pp." before the numbers: (pp. 1-21). This abbreviation, however, does not appear before the page numbers in periodical references. List any edition number in the same set of parentheses as the page numbers, separated by a comma: (2nd ed., pp. 66-72).

Armstrong, D. (2019). Malory and character. In M. G. Leitch & C. J. Rushton (Eds.), A new companion to Malory  (pp. 144-163). D. S. Brewer.

Multivolume Work

Author, A. A. (Year of publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle (Vol. #) . Publisher. DOI (if available)

David, A., & Simpson, J. (Eds.). (2006). The Norton anthology of English literature: The Middle Ages (8 th ed.,Vol. A). W. W. Norton and Company.

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Home > Christian Resources > How to Quote a Bible Verse in an Essay

How to Quote a Bible Verse in an Essay

Christian Resources

How to Quote a Bible Verse in an Essay

Published: April 23, 2024

Learn the proper way to cite Bible verses in academic essays, ensuring accurate and respectful integration of scripture into your writing.

(Many of the links in this article redirect to a specific reviewed product. Your purchase of these products through affiliate links helps to generate commission for Christian.net, at no extra cost. Learn more )

Table of Contents

Choosing the right translation, determining the citation style, in-text citations, introducing bible verses, quoting longer passages, citing the bible in references/works cited, ethical considerations, additional tips.

Quoting Bible verses in an essay is a common practice, especially in religious studies, theology, or literature classes. However, it’s essential to do it correctly to maintain academic integrity and avoid unintentional plagiarism. In this comprehensive guide from Academized.com , I’ll walk you through the steps to quote Bible verses properly, ensuring your essay is well-structured and follows academic conventions.

The first step is to choose the right translation. The Bible has been translated into numerous languages and versions, each with slight variations in wording and phrasing. When quoting a Bible verse, it’s crucial to use a reputable and widely accepted translation that aligns with your specific academic or research purposes.

Some popular translations include the King James Version (KJV), New International Version (NIV), and English Standard Version (ESV). The KJV is known for its literary quality and poetic language, while the NIV and ESV are more modern translations aimed at preserving the original meaning while using contemporary language.

If you’re writing for a religious studies or theology course, it’s generally recommended to use a translation approved by the religious institution or denomination you’re studying, as discussed in this Academized review on https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/academized-review-2023-actually-good-mary-walton . For literature or general academic purposes, any widely accepted translation should suffice.

Read more : Christian Blogs To Follow Before Writing a Religious Essay

Next, you’ll need to determine the appropriate citation style. Different academic disciplines and institutions may have their own preferred citation styles. The most common citation styles for quoting Bible verses are:

  • MLA (Modern Language Association) style: Commonly used in literature, arts, and humanities. 
  • APA (American Psychological Association) style: Frequently used in social sciences, education, and psychology. 
  • Chicago/Turabian style: Often used in history, religion, and some humanities fields.

Before you start writing, check with your instructor or consult the style guide to ensure you’re using the correct citation format. Adhering to the proper citation style is crucial for maintaining academic integrity and avoiding plagiarism.

When quoting a Bible verse within the body of your essay, you’ll need to include an in-text citation. The format for in-text citations varies depending on the citation style you’re using.

In MLA style, the in-text citation for a Bible verse should include the book name (abbreviated), chapter number, and verse number(s). For example: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3.16).

In APA style, the in-text citation for a Bible verse should include the book name (not abbreviated), chapter number, and verse number(s), separated by colons. For instance: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3:16).

In Chicago/Turabian style, the in-text citation for a Bible verse should include the book name (abbreviated), chapter number, and verse number(s), separated by periods, like this: “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3.16).

It’s also important to introduce Bible verses properly within the context of your essay. You can provide context by explaining the situation or context in which the verse is being used or referenced. Alternatively, you can use a signal phrase to indicate that you’re quoting a Bible verse, such as “As stated in the Gospel of John,” or “The Bible says.”

Introducing the verse with context or a signal phrase helps to smoothly integrate the quotation into your writing and clarifies the source for the reader.

If you’re quoting a longer passage from the Bible that spans multiple verses, you’ll need to format it differently. In MLA style, for example, longer quotations (four or more lines) should be indented one inch from the left margin and double-spaced. Here’s an example:

As the Apostle Paul writes in his letter to the Ephesians:

For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works, lest any man should boast. For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them. (Eph. 2.8-10)

Note the indentation and the use of a signal phrase to introduce the quotation. This format helps to visually separate the longer quotation from your own writing and makes it easier for the reader to follow.

Read more : 35 Beautiful And Inspirational Bible Verses For Daughters

In addition to in-text citations, you’ll need to include a full citation for the Bible in your references or works cited list at the end of your essay. The format for this citation varies depending on the citation style you’re using.

  • MLA Style: In MLA style, the Bible citation should appear as: The Bible. Authorized King James Version, Oxford UP, 1998.
  • APA Style: In APA style, the Bible citation should appear as: Bible. (Year of publication). (Version/Translation). (Publisher details). For example: Bible. (2011). New International Version. Biblica.
  • Chicago/Turabian Style: In Chicago/Turabian style, the Bible citation should appear as: Bible. Translated by [Translation/Version]. [Publisher details]. For example: Bible. Translated by New International Version. Biblica, 2011.

Including a full citation in your reference list ensures that readers can easily locate the specific version of the Bible you’ve used in your research.

When quoting from the Bible, it’s important to consider ethical implications and potential biases. The Bible is a sacred text for many religions, and quotes should be handled with respect and sensitivity.

Avoid taking verses out of context or using them to promote harmful or discriminatory viewpoints. Be mindful of the historical and cultural contexts in which the verses were written, and strive for a balanced, objective analysis.

If you’re writing about controversial or sensitive topics related to the Bible, it’s advisable to consult with experts or religious authorities to ensure your interpretations are accurate and respectful.

While quoting Bible verses is important, you should also include your own analysis and interpretation, avoiding excessive quotation. Use quotations judiciously, only quoting verses that are directly relevant to your argument or analysis.

Provide context by explaining the significance of the quoted verse and how it relates to your essay’s main points. Don’t assume that the reader has the same level of familiarity with the Bible or the specific context of the verse.

When interpreting or analyzing Bible verses, be sure to back up your claims with evidence from reliable sources, such as scholarly works or authoritative religious texts.

By following these guidelines, you’ll be able to effectively quote Bible verses In your essay while maintaining academic integrity, adhering to citation conventions, and demonstrating a nuanced understanding of the material. Remember, quoting Bible verses is not just about including the text; it’s also about providing context, analysis, and demonstrating your knowledge of the subject matter.

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IMAGES

  1. 37+ How To Cite A Chapter In A Textbook

    how to cite a book chapter in an essay

  2. 4 Ways to Cite a Book

    how to cite a book chapter in an essay

  3. Cite A Chapter In A Book

    how to cite a book chapter in an essay

  4. Cite A Chapter In A Book Apa 7

    how to cite a book chapter in an essay

  5. How to cite a chapter in a book

    how to cite a book chapter in an essay

  6. How To Cite A Chapter In A Book In Text Mla

    how to cite a book chapter in an essay

VIDEO

  1. Class 6 Subject

  2. How to Cite an Essay in an Edited Volume

  3. How to cite a book in harvard format

  4. Reading Citations

  5. How to cite a reference from a book كيف تقتبس مرجعا من كتاب إلى برنامج الإندنوت

  6. The book biologists hate to read but love to cite

COMMENTS

  1. Book chapters: What to cite

    In the text, when you have paraphrased an edited book chapter, cite the author (s) of the chapter and the year of publication of the book, as shown in the following examples. Parenthetical citation of a paraphrase from an edited book chapter: (Fountain, 2019) Narrative citation of a paraphrase from an edited book chapter: Fountain (2019) If the ...

  2. How to Cite a Book

    To cite a book chapter, first give the author and title (in quotation marks) of the chapter cited, then information about the book as a whole and the page range of the specific chapter. The in-text citation lists the author of the chapter and the page number of the relevant passage. Author last name, First name.

  3. Citing a Chapter or Essay in a Book

    Citing a Book; Citing a Chapter or Essay in a Book. Basic Chapter Citation; Example Chapter of a Book; Example Chapter of an eBook; Example Foreword/Preface of a Book; Citing an Article; Citing a Webpage; Additional Resources; Writing Center. Visit the Writing Center for help with brainstorming, organization, revising, citations, and other ...

  4. How to Cite a Chapter in a Book APA

    If a direct quote is being made, use the format in the section above ("How to cite a chapter in a printed or online book with all contents written by the same author") to include page numbers. Structure: Chapter Author Last Name, F. M. (Year). Chapter name [Translated chapter name]. In Editor's F. M.

  5. APA Citation Style, 7th edition: Article or Chapter in an Edited Book

    For each type of source in this guide, both the general form and an example will be provided.. The following format will be used: In-Text Citation (Paraphrase) - entry that appears in the body of your paper when you express the ideas of a researcher or author using your own words.For more tips on paraphrasing check out The OWL at Purdue.. In-Text Citation (Quotation) - entry that appears in ...

  6. Book Chapters

    Sometimes a chapter is written by author(s) who are also the author(s) of the book. One would still cite the chapter so that the reader can locate the cited material. More typical is that an authored chapter is in a book edited by editor(s). In either of these cases, the chapter author(s) and chapter title are presented first, and in the same ...

  7. Library Guides: APA 7th referencing style: Book chapter

    Only reference a chapter if it has individual authors for each chapter in the book. Use book examples if there are not chapter authors. Author (s) of chapter - family name and initials, use & for multiple authors. (Year). Title of chapter. In Editor (s) - initial (s) and family name - of book (Ed.

  8. How to Cite a Book in APA Style

    Citing a chapter from an edited book. When citing a particular chapter from a book containing texts by various authors (e.g. a collection of essays), begin the citation with the author of the chapter and mention the book's editor(s) later in the reference. A page range identifies the chapter's location in the book.

  9. Book Chapter & Ebook Chapter

    A chapter in an edited ebook from an academic collection should be treated as a chapter in an edited print book. For a chapter in an edited print book or ebook without a DOI, see Chapter in an Edited Book without a DOI. More Information: For more information about citing books, see Section 10.2 on page 321-325 of the APA Manual, 7th edition.

  10. APA Citation Style, 7th Edition: Chapter in a Book

    -Suffixes like "Jr." or "III" are not included in in-text citations but are included in the reference list. - Electronic books and books from electronic databases are cited exactly the same way print books are, there is no difference. The only time you differentiate is if you use an audio version of the book.

  11. MLA Works Cited Page: Books

    Cite a book automatically in MLA. The 8 th edition of the MLA handbook highlights principles over prescriptive practices. Essentially, a writer will need to take note of primary elements in every source, such as author, title, etc. and then assort them in a general format. Thus, by using this methodology, a writer will be able to cite any ...

  12. How to Cite a Book Chapter in MLA

    How to Cite a Chapter in a Paper. You can use information from your research in three ways: Paraphrase - Take the information from a specific sentence, paragraph, or section of the chapter and rewrite it in your own words. Summarize - Take a larger view of the section or the chapter and rewrite it in your own words.

  13. Referencing Books in Harvard Style

    If a book contains chapters or works by various different authors, such as a collection of essays or an anthology of short stories, reference the specific chapter or work, followed by details of the book. The chapter title appears in quotation marks, while the book title is italicized. At the end of the reference, specify the page range on ...

  14. How to Cite a Book in MLA

    Citing a book chapter. Use this format if the book's chapters are written by different authors, or if the book is a collection of self-contained works (such as stories, essays, poems or plays).A similar format can be used to cite images from books or dictionary entries.If you cite several chapters from the same book, include a separate Works Cited entry for each one.

  15. How to cite a chapter Chicago style

    1. Author First Name Last Name, "Chapter Title," in Book Title, ed. Editor First Name Last Name (City: Publisher, Year), page (s) cited. You don't always need to cite the specific part of a book you are using. It's often sufficient to just cite the work as a whole.

  16. Chapter in a book (print)

    Author of the chapter/section. Year of publication (in round brackets). Title of chapter/section (in single quotation marks) 'in' plus author/editor of book. Title of book (in italics). Place of publication: publisher.

  17. How to Cite a Book in Chicago Style

    Citing a chapter from a book. When referring to a chapter from a multi-authored book (such as an essay collection or anthology), cite the specific chapter rather than the whole book. This means listing the author and title of the chapter first, then providing information about the book as a whole.

  18. Books

    Contributions from an edited collection with various authored chapters. When citing work by a single author that appears in a book with multiple authors, the contributing author's name is cited first, followed by the title of their contribution, the word 'in' and the title of the book, along with the name(s) of the editors, and other standard ...

  19. Quick guide to Harvard referencing (Cite Them Right)

    There are different versions of the Harvard referencing style. This guide is a quick introduction to the commonly-used Cite Them Right version. You will find further guidance available through the OU Library on the Cite Them Right Database. For help and support with referencing and the full Cite Them Right guide, have a look at the Library's ...

  20. How to Cite an Essay in MLA

    Create manual citation. The guidelines for citing an essay in MLA format are similar to those for citing a chapter in a book. Include the author of the essay, the title of the essay, the name of the collection if the essay belongs to one, the editor of the collection or other contributors, the publication information, and the page number (s).

  21. Reference List: Books

    Cite a book automatically in APA. The following contains a list of the most commonly cited print book sources. E-books are described on our "Electronic Sources" page . For a complete list of how to cite print sources, please refer to the 7 th edition of the APA Publication Manual. Note: If available, APA 7 requires a DOI for all works that have ...

  22. How to Quote a Bible Verse in an Essay

    When quoting a Bible verse within the body of your essay, you'll need to include an in-text citation. The format for in-text citations varies depending on the citation style you're using. In MLA style, the in-text citation for a Bible verse should include the book name (abbreviated), chapter number, and verse number(s).