140 Preschool Report Card Comments | PreSchool Teacher Comment Bank

In this article you’ll find plenty of preschool report card comments on various abilities that kids demonstrate in this age group. 3-5yr olds are developing a variety of skills and most common of those are covered within this article.

Using these preschool report card comment examples, you’ll be able to write precise and motivating preschool report card comments for your preschool children.

20 Preschool Report Card Comments for Learning skills

Here are 20 comments for preschool children on their learning skills. Make use of these positive comments for both outstanding as well as average students to write on their preschool report card.

10 Preschool Report Card Positive Comments on Learning skills

  • {student name} is showing great progress in language development and is able to develop the context when {he/she} shares something with the class. {He/She} is a quick learner.
  • {student name} has made significant improvements in cognitive skills such as problem-solving and critical thinking. {His/Her} learning abilities are remarkable.
  • {student name} demonstrates a strong ability to focus and pay attention during class activities and learns things faster than most children. {He/She} is a bright student.
  • {student name} shows great curiosity and is always eager to explore and learn. {He/She} participates in almost all activities and performs really well.
  • {student name} has a great memory and is able to retain information well. {He/She} is a talented child.
  • {student name} is becoming more confident in {his/her} ability to work independently and complete tasks on {his/her} own. Great work!
  • {student name} is developing strong creative skills and is producing imaginative and colourful artwork. Keep it up!
  • {student name} is showing improvement in maths and number sense, and is making strides in basic counting and recognizing shapes. Keep up the good work.
  • {student name} is becoming more confident in early literacy skills such as letter recognition and phonemic awareness. {He/She} has been a good kid and I’ll miss {him/her} next year.
  • {student name} is a fast learner and is almost always among the first few children to finish their class work. Great work!

10 Preschool Report Card Needs Improvement Comments on Learning skills

  • {student name} can learn what is taught in class if {he/she} puts {his/her} mind to it. On various occasions they have displayed such capacity, but {he/she} needs to be more consistent in their efforts.
  • {student name} struggles to follow directions independently but follows them well within groups. Parent’s support might add to the confidence level {he/she} needs to act independently.
  • {student name} needs more practice in recognizing and writing letters and numbers. {He/She} recognises almost 70% of the letters and numbers {he/she} studies in class. With more practice, {he/she} will perform very well.
  • {student name} requires assistance with basic counting and memorising, with some more practice, {he/she} can do so much better.
  • {student name} needs to work on fine motor skills such as cutting, colouring, and writing. {He/She} has a shaky hand and it generally goes away with practice.
  • {student name} struggles to concentrate during group activities and tasks. Communicating with parents will help us understand {him/her} better to help them engage better in class.
  • {student name} needs more support with social skills such as sharing and taking turns. Practising at home will help develop this habit.
  • {student name} engages in activities that {he/she} likes, but doesn’t try out new games. Trying new things is healthy for {his/her} development. With your support, {he/she} should be able to explore more.
  • {student name} finds it difficult to pronounce words and spell them out. Some practise at home will help {him/her} learn faster.
  • {student name} needs more encouragement to participate in class activities and engage with peers. Playing with children in {his/her} age group may help {him/her} open up.

20 Preschool Report Card Comments for Behaviour

You can find some very balanced comments on behaviour of preschool children to put on their report card. These include both positive and needs improvement in behaviour comments.

10 Preschool Report Card Positive Comments on Behavior

  • {student name} demonstrates kindness and empathy towards peers and teachers.
  • {student name} consistently follows classroom rules and routines and sets a very good example for others.
  • {student name} shows respect towards materials and equipment in the classroom. {He/She} puts them back in place after using them every time. {He/She} is very organised and considerate.
  • {student name} displays enthusiasm for learning and trying new things. {He/She} joins every activity and quickly learns the rules.
  • {student name} exhibits responsibility by taking care of personal belongings and belongings of peers. {He/She} is a keeper.
  • {student name} works cooperatively with peers during group activities like ring time and building clay models.
  • {student name} shows initiative by taking on tasks independently and works sincerely on every task assigned to {him/her}
  • {student name} demonstrates good manners, respects teachers and peers and uses polite language.
  • {student name} displays a positive attitude towards school and learning. {He/She} brings a lot of energy to the room and is always ready to begin a new day.
  • {student name} shows appreciation for the efforts of others and gives compliments wherever {he/she} can.

10 Preschool Report Card Needs Improvement Comment on Behavior

  • {student name} struggles to follow classroom rules and routines, but is a well-behaved child. A conference with parents may help us guide {him/her} better.
  • {student name} needs reminders to treat classmates and teachers with kindness and respect. Parent’s involvement may be useful in helping {him/her} engage better with peers.
  • {student name} has difficulty sharing and taking turns with peers. {He/She} may use a little practice sharing things at home with siblings and friends to develop this habit.
  • {student name} requires more encouragement to involve peers in the activities {he/she} engages in. Meeting {his/her} peers outside the classroom setting may prove beneficial.
  • {student name} needs more practice with listening and following directions. {He/She} is more of a free spirit, but some coordination may help {him/her} connect better with peers.
  • {student name} sometimes exhibits disruptive behavior during class and we would be able to understand and support {him/her} better after communicating with parents.
  • {student name} requires reminders to use polite language and good manners. Practising the same at home with friends, siblings and family should be very helpful.
  • {student name} may need more support and confidence to share with class during circle time. Doing similar activities in a more friendly environment like home may be very fruitful.
  • {student name} often interacts rudely with peers {he/she} isn’t friends with. We will be able to make {him/her} more comfortable with all her peers with some support from parents.
  • {student name} doesn’t like to engage in group activities and often plays alone. Being a single child, {he/she} may find it beneficial to play with family friends more often to build a habit of doing things together.

20 Preschool Report Card Comments for Social Skills

Below are 10 positive and 10 needs improvement comments for the preschool report card that you can use to write a balanced report on social skills of the children of your class.

10 Preschool Report Card Positive Comments on Social Skills

  • {student name} is developing strong social-emotional skills and is becoming more adept at recognizing and managing emotions in themselves and others.
  • {student name} builds positive relationships with peers and teachers and is therefore a lot of fun to be with. {He/She} is a very energetic child.
  • {student name} demonstrates empathy and understanding towards others' feelings. {He/She} listens patiently to {his/her} peers and supports them where needed.
  • {student name} shares toys and materials willingly with classmates. Has a healthy habit of borrowing and returning things in good shape.
  • {student name} communicates needs and wants effectively with peers and teachers. {He/She} is often able to convince {his/her} peers to follow {him/her}.
  • {student name} participates in group activities and shows willingness to collaborate. {He/She} often leads the activities.
  • {student name} respects personal boundaries and demonstrates good social manners.
  • {student name} participates in every activity almost everyday. {He/She} is energetic and keeps the atmosphere lively in the class. {He/She} is a pleasure to have in the room.
  • {student name} is curious and interested in learning about different cultures from {his/her} peers and adapts well in new social situations and environments.
  • {student name} shows appreciation when peers and teachers help {him/her} do difficult tasks such as perfecting a clay model.

10 Preschool Report Card Needs Improvement Comments on Behavior

  • {student name} struggles to make friends and build relationships with peers. Social interaction with children {his/her} age in a family setting is a good way to support the child.
  • {student name} should be more comfortable in sharing {his/her} toys with other children. Sharing {his/her} stuff with others at home might help develop the habit.
  • {student name} requires more support in understanding and respecting personal boundaries. Having {him/her} practise the same at home would help establish the habit.
  • {student name} may exhibit aggressive behavior towards peers when {he/she} is not listened to. Often likes to do things {his/her} own way. An opportunity to talk to the parents may help figure out good ways to help {him/her} bond with classmates.
  • {student name} struggles to communicate needs and wants effectively with others and therefore, often plays alone. Having friends over at home to play with might help develop better collaboration skills.
  • {student name} has difficulty understanding social cues and may misinterpret others' intentions thereby, getting into arguments with peers. Learning to adjust with other children is a necessary skill and {he/she} can practise this at home with the help of parents.
  • {student name} needs to develop more patience while interacting with others in the class. {He/She} easily gets frustrated, often not being able to finish the group tasks. Parents’ involvement will be appreciated and will prove fruitful for the child.
  • {student name} is timid and finds it a little difficult to adapt to new circumstances such as playing with a group of children {he/she} has never met before. Meeting new friends and family members may help make this easy for {him/her}.
  • {student name} frequently fails to use respectful language towards others in the class and needs reminders to follow through. Some guidance and support at home might prove beneficial for {his/her} growth and development.
  • {student name} may need more help in understanding and respecting cultural differences as {he/she} finds {himself/herself} in a multicultural environment at school. Learning about differences will make {him/her} more accepting of various cultures.

20 Preschool Report Card Comments for Group Interaction Skills

Use the below comments to write about the group interaction skills of average to outstanding students. All comments are well balanced to share the capabilities of the children while keeping it positive and motivating.

10 Preschool Report Card Positive Comments on Group Interaction Skills

  • {student name} actively engages in group activities and discussions and enjoys the process very much. {He/She} is a catalyst for the class.
  • {student name} shows respect towards peers and their ideas and responds by adding {his/her} points to the existing ideas. Often brings new ideas to the table to bond with others.
  • {student name} collaborates well with others to complete group tasks. {He/She} participates actively in class.
  • {student name} exchanges ideas with group members during group discussions and waits enthusiastically for {his/her} turn to speak.
  • {student name} demonstrates good listening skills when others are speaking, appreciates and encourages {his/her} friends who struggle to participate and share with the group. {He/She} is a mature child. It is a pleasure to have {him/her} in my class.
  • {student name} offers help and support to peers when needed. {He/She} is very kind hearted.
  • {student name} uses problem-solving and critical thinking skills to find solutions in group tasks. {His/her} group is always among the top 5 to finish the task. Keep up the good work.
  • {student name} shows enthusiasm for working in groups and values others' contributions. {He/She} is a very considerate other’s emotions.
  • {student name} understands the importance of teamwork and cooperation. {He/She} is quick to select team mates in the group once a group task is assigned. {He/She} is a bright child.
  • {student name} celebrates group achievements and gives compliments to peers and shows genuine interest and happiness in the achievement of others.

10 Preschool Report Card Needs Improvement Comments on Group Interaction Skills

  • {student name} requires more encouragement to participate in group activities. {He/She} will gain more confidence by playing or doing activities with parents or friends at home.
  • {student name} struggles to take turns during group activities and often misses {his/her} turn leading to lower levels of participation and practise.
  • {student name} needs reminders to join and interact with group members during show and tell sessions.
  • {student name} has difficulty listening to others during group discussions. {He/She} shares their ideas during their turn, but does not acknowledge similar other ideas shared before.
  • {student name} needs practice using kind and respectful language when interacting with peers. Developing this habit will lead to a healthy social life for the child.
  • {student name} has trouble making meaningful contributions in group discussions and show and tell activity. Helping {him/her} recite small stories may help {him/her} develop story-telling skills.
  • {student name} needs encouragement to include all classmates in activities and games. Struggles to work collaboratively with others. Doing things together at home might be a simple way to help develop collaboration skills.
  • {student name} needs practice in expressing thoughts and feelings appropriately to peers. Oftentimes {he/she} is more direct in expressing and {he/she} ends up hurting other children. Regular guidance from parents will prove to be beneficial.
  • {student name} requires some practice in using “sorry”, “thank you”, “please”, and make use of similar expressions and gestures in their conversations to express their feelings better.
  • {student name} seldom interacts during class group discussions, {he/she} may find it helpful to interact in a more friendly atmosphere of their home to practise sharing stories from school or simply speaking at length about anything that interests {him/her}.

20 Preschool Report Card Comments for Class Participation

Here are some comments for average to outperforming children in their preschool age. Use these to express and share with parents on a variety of behaviours from children that is observed in their class participation.

10 Preschool Report Card Positive Comments on Class Participation

  • {student name} actively participates in all class activities. Loves to share in show and tell activities.
  • {student name} demonstrates enthusiasm and curiosity for learning. Asks questions often in class when {he/she} has a doubt.
  • {student name} shows willingness to try new things and take on challenges.
  • {student name} participates in classroom activities and follows directions independently.
  • {student name} shows good listening skills and understanding of class instructions. {He/She} does not hesitate in asking questions which is the best way to learn in class.
  • {student name} collaborates well with peers during group projects and activities. Keeps a healthy participation all the year around.
  • {student name} displays active participation in all activities whether educational or recreational. {He/She} loves singing and dancing a lot. {He/She} is a very cheerful child.
  • {student name} Shares ideas and thoughts with the class during group discussions. Always has stories to tell in the class, {he/she} is an active participant in our class.
  • {student name} demonstrates creativity and imagination in class assignments. {He/She} has made several drawings that I adore personally.
  • {student name} genuinely loves participating in circle time and sharing with class.

10 Preschool Report Card Needs Improvement Comments on Class Participation

  • {student name} needs encouragement to actively participate in group discussions. {He/She} is a little shy and should open up in time with regular practice.
  • {student name} requires support to engage in classroom activities on {his/her} own. {He/She} may feel more confident if encouraged to participate and express themselves frequently.
  • {student name} needs reminders to stay focused and on-task during class. {He/She} participates more often if the activity is of their interest. Opening up and exploring new things might help {him/her} be more engaged in new activities.
  • {student name} participates in games and activities more often than educational activities. Perhaps {he/she} finds it difficult to understand. Parent’s support at home in preparing {him/her} before or after class would help immensely.
  • {student name} needs help in asking for assistance when needed. Some practise on how to ask for what {he/she} needs will help {him/her} get through the day smoothly.
  • {student name} struggles to stay on topic during class discussions. More often shares unrelated stories with the class but always participates in ring time. Assistance from parents at home can help {him/her} focus on the topic of discussion.
  • {student name} seldom asks questions during class and I feel {he/she} simply needs more confidence to speak up in larger groups. Appreciation from parents and practice should help {him/her} boost confidence.
  • {student name} needs to timely complete assignments to be able to participate more effectively in class. When {he/she} has completed {his/her} tasks, {he/she} is more active in class.
  • {student name} is a quiet student who does most of the work independently and communicates less often with peers. Discussing with class is a talent which boosts confidence and the opportunity to interact more often with children will be a great help.
  • {student name} needs practice in raising hands and waiting to be called on during class. {He/She} participates in class, just needs to be more patient and organised to make the activities more efficient for the whole class.

20 Preschool Report Card Comments for Time/Task Management Skills

Use the below comments to write in your preschool report card comments for average to bright children. The comments balance both improvement remarks and excellence remarks with future expectations from the children.

10 Preschool Report Card Positive Comments on Time/Task Management Skills

  • {student name} completes assigned tasks in a timely manner. {He/She} has never come to class with incomplete work. Bravo! Keep up the good work.
  • {student name} uses time effectively during class activities, completes the work during class and does not keep any pending tasks to complete at home. Very focused child.
  • {student name} takes responsibility for completing class assignments and always finishes before time.
  • {student name} follows daily routines and transitions well in a timely manner. {He/She} is a very well organised child.
  • {student name} shows a sound understanding of start and finish time during activities and follows the instructions very well.
  • {student name} manages school time very well and keeps {his/her} work complete and up-to-date. Always comes prepared to class, indicating that {he/she} is very organised in personal life as well.
  • {student name} takes initiative to start and complete tasks without reminders. {He/She} is often the first to copy items from the board.
  • {student name} maintains a clean and organised work area, clears off space timely before and after each activity.
  • {student name} transitions timely between activities and uses the time in each activity efficiently and almost always completes the tasks in the given time.
  • {student name} displays good time management skills during group activities. {He/She} prepares within the given time and speaks sufficiently during their turn.

10 Preschool Report Card Needs Improvement Comments on Time/Task Management Skills

  • {student name} struggles to complete tasks within the allotted time. Often needs more time and is therefore unable to finish tasks in class. Preparing the lessons before class might help gain speed.
  • {student name} needs reminders to use time effectively during class activities. Due to incomplete classwork, {he/she} struggles with large amounts of work to do at home. Help from parents after school will help keep the assignments complete.
  • {student name} requires assistance in organising personal belongings and materials. {He/She} will be able to better manage their time if they organise their personal belongings well before each class. Practising to do so at home will be very useful in developing the habit.
  • {student name} has difficulty transitioning between activities and routines. {He/She} needs more practice switching between tasks and activities.
  • {student name} needs help in understanding time concepts (e.g., days of the week, seasons, etc.). {He/She} faces issues due to lack of proper understanding of the deadlines on their assignments.
  • {student name} requires reminders to complete classwork in class and homework at home. {He/She} usually finds {himself/herself} doing homework in class and class assignments at home. Parent’s involvement will help organise {his/her} schedule better.
  • {student name} needs to organise {his/her} time so {he/she} can complete each task in the assigned time and transition to the next class.
  • {student name} has trouble maintaining a clean and organised work area and that leads to loss of time in beginning and finishing the tasks assigned in class. Organising {his/her} toys and belongings at home will be a good practice to become more organised.
  • {student name} requires assistance in using available resources (e.g., materials, tools) efficiently. {He/She} often takes more time with each material and is unable to pass it on timely to the other children.
  • {student name} struggles to manage time during group activities and projects. Learning to multitask on building models could be a fun way to learn more and be more efficient.

20 Preschool Report Card Comments for Communication Skills

Below comments on communications skills are written to help you describe every student’s talents and improvement areas in language learning. Use these expressive and motivating comments to help boost confidence in the children in your classroom.

10 Preschool Report Card Positive Comments on Communication Skills

  • {student name} communicates effectively and clearly with peers and adults. Good work!
  • {student name} uses a wide range of vocabulary to express {himself/herself} and to share stories with class. Great work!
  • {student name} expresses thoughts and ideas with confidence and enthusiasm. {He/She} uses very polite language to communicate. I’m proud to have {him/her} in the class.
  • {student name} listens attentively and follows directions well. Responds precisely and adequately to questions asked during class. Possesses very good communication skills.
  • {student name} participates actively in group discussions and is able to explain {his/her} ideas clearly. Keep up the good work.
  • {student name} shows interest in learning new words and concepts. {He/She} quickly learns the new vocabulary and takes no time in putting them to use in daily conversations.
  • {student name} uses appropriate tone and variation of voice in conversations. Speaks enthusiastically and has a talent to make {his/her} presentation interesting and lively.
  • {student name} asks and answers questions with ease and clarity. Handles communication well in both formal and informal contexts. Very mature and thoughtful child.
  • {student name} expresses feelings and emotions verbally in a healthy way.
  • {student name} uses nonverbal cues effectively to support verbal communication. Excellent work!

10 Preschool Report Card Needs Improvement Comments on Communication Skills

  • {student name} needs improvement in using complete sentences to express thoughts and ideas. Practice will help develop the skill further.
  • {student name} needs practice reading aloud to hear {his/her} own voice and gain confidence while reading in class.
  • {student name} needs to practise using polite words such as “please” and “thank you” more often when communicating with peers.
  • {student name} needs to develop better eye contact during conversations. It helps one understand if {he/she} is being understood or not. This skill can best be developed by encouraging and appreciating the child so they gain confidence in speaking.
  • {student name} needs to learn to take turns when speaking in group settings. {He/She} is often very excited to share during group speaking activities and find it hard to hold on to their thoughts. Practising to speak taking turns at home could infuse habit and patience over time.
  • {student name} should practise expressing feelings and emotions verbally. {He/She} often engages in non verbal communication such as being upset or angry rather than expressing what they feel. Appreciation and encouragement from parents when the child expresses verbally might help develop the habit.
  • {student name} needs to work on using the appropriate tone of voice and volume when speaking. {He/She} is often very loud and excited to talk. With practice and patience, {he/she} can develop good command over {his/her} voice.
  • {student name} needs to improve ability to ask and answer questions clearly. Should work on framing questions and understanding them when asked by another student.
  • {student name} needs to practise using descriptive language to explain ideas and experiences. You may assist {him/her} by describing various objects to {him/her} and asking {him/her} to repeat after you.
  • {student name} needs to work on using appropriate gestures and body language to support verbal communication. {His/Her} written communication skills are good, but oral expressions need support of facial expressions and body language.

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Report Card Comments & Phrases for Preschool

Jessica Peresta, TeacherVision Contributor

Wondering how and what to write for report card comments for preschool?

This list of 100 ready-to-use report card comments covers academic progress, cognitive development, communication and language skills, artistic and creative skills, social emotional learning, behavior, and time/task management for preschool and nursery report cards, and provides both examples of positive feedback for students and suggestions for improvement.

Help make the preschool grading and evaluation process easier with this selection of editable, categorized comments.

Academic Achievement and Progress Remarks for Preschool Students

Positive Comments:

____________ is progressing in ____________. Good job! Continue to [read/count] at home together.

____________ excels in the area(s) of ____________. It’s been a delight seeing your child really love learning so much.

____________ seems to really enjoy learning ____________.

____________ really enjoys school and [his/her] enthusiasm is reflected in the quality of work [he/she] does in class and at home. [He/she] is a great student!

____________ has shown excellent progress in ____________. Their dedication is inspiring! Keep encouraging this love for learning at home.

Needs Improvement Comments:

____________ is making progress in certain areas, but is encountering difficulties in others. With ongoing support both at school and home, we anticipate growth.

____________ is facing challenges in several academic areas. It would be beneficial to schedule a conference to discuss their progress.

There is noticeable growth in certain areas for ____________, but they are struggling in others. With consistent support and reinforcement at school and home, we expect to see improvement.

____________ is struggling considerably in areas like ____________. It would be helpful to schedule a meeting to discuss their progress.

____________ has been having some challenges in understanding ____________. Additional practice and maybe some extra help could significantly enhance their learning progression.

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Cognitive Development Remarks for Preschool Students

____________ shows a strong understanding of numbers and counting. Keep up the good work!

____________ is developing strong problem-solving skills and often figures out solutions independently.

____________ is doing an excellent job in recognizing shapes and colors.

____________ has shown a significant improvement in memory skills and recall of information.

____________ demonstrates a keen interest in learning and actively participates in class activities. Keep it up!

____________ is having difficulty recognizing basic shapes and colors. Additional practice at home could be beneficial.

____________ struggles with counting and recognizing numbers. Extra support in this area would be helpful.

____________ needs improvement in problem-solving skills. Continued practice and guidance are recommended.

____________ is having challenges with memory skills and recalling information. Further support and practice will help improve this skill.

____________ is having difficulties in understanding complex concepts. Additional guidance and simplification of information could aid in comprehension.

Communication and Language Skills Remarks for Preschool Students

____________ communicates effectively with peers and teachers.

____________ has a rich vocabulary for his/her age.

____________ listens attentively when others are speaking.

____________ expresses thoughts and ideas clearly.

____________ articulates well and displays a growing vocabulary for his/her age.

____________ struggles to express him/herself clearly.

____________ needs to improve his/her listening skills.

____________ often interrupts others while they are speaking.

____________ needs to expand his/her vocabulary.

____________ needs more practice in recognizing and writing letters. Extra support at home would be helpful.

Artistic and Creative Development Remarks for Preschool Students

____________ shows excellent creativity in art projects and enjoys exploring different materials.

____________ can express thoughts and feelings beautifully through art.

____________ has an innovative approach to creative tasks.

____________ demonstrates a high level of interest and enthusiasm in art activities.

____________ displays an exceptional ability to use color and texture to express ideas in art projects. It's inspiring to see their creativity flourish!

____________ struggles with using different materials creatively and could benefit from more practice.

____________ could benefit from expressing feelings and ideas more clearly through art.

____________ often needs guidance during art activities and could use more independence.

____________ could improve on exploring different art techniques and materials.

____________ could benefit from experimenting more with color combinations. Practice at home could boost their confidence in this area.

Behavior and Attitude Remarks for Preschool Students

____________ shows great behavior most of the day and follows directions the majority of the time. I love having your child in my class!

____________ remains focused on the task at hand [most of/some of] the time.

____________ consistently displays respect towards classmates and staff.

____________ has a positive attitude and contributes to a harmonious classroom environment.

____________ consistently follows classroom rules and sets a good example for peers.

____________ has trouble keeping [his/her] hands to [himself/herself]. This happens between ____________ times a day.

____________ needs to work on following directions during ____________ time.

____________ is struggling with consistency in [his/her] attitude in school. While [he/she] is very good at [behavior/attitude], [he/she] sometimes struggles with [behavior/attitude]. We will continue to work on this, and your assistance would be greatly appreciated.

____________ is struggling with consistently following classroom rules, especially those having to do with [behavior/attitude/norm]. I am confident that with ongoing support and reminders, [he/she] will make quick improvements in this area.

____________ frequently has difficulty staying seated during instruction time, which can distract others. Practice in maintaining focus and self-control would be beneficial.

Social Emotional Learning Remarks for Preschool Students

____________ is thoughtful, pleasant, curious, and demonstrates strong social-emotional skills through active participation and cooperation. Keep up the good work!

____________ shows respect for teachers, students, and staff most of the day, demonstrating strong emotional intelligence. Well done!

____________ is a leader and the rest of the class looks up to [him/her]. This shows a positive influence and emotional maturity.

____________ enjoys participating in class activities, working in groups, and helping others, showing strong social skills and empathy. [He/she] contributes significantly to our classroom community.

____________ treats the property of the classroom and others with respect, demonstrating responsibility and respect for others.

____________ loves to ask questions and is interested in what [he/she] is learning throughout the day, but could work on listening skills to balance [his/her] curiosity and respect for others' contributions.

____________ [needs reminders for] when it’s time to use [his/her] inside and outside voice, indicating a need to develop better self-regulation and understanding of appropriate behaviors in different settings.

____________ is enthusiastic but may interrupt others. [He/she] could benefit from practicing patience and waiting for [his/her] turn to speak.

____________ often reacts impulsively to situations. Focusing on thoughtful responses and controlling impulses would be beneficial.

____________ occasionally struggles with respecting personal boundaries. Developing an understanding of personal space and boundaries would improve [his/her] social interactions.

Group Interaction Remarks for Preschool Students

____________ participates in class discussions [most of/some of] the time. [He/she] shows an interest when we talk about ____________.

____________ cooperates well with others in class. The other students love doing group time with [him/her].

____________ does well during centers or circle time and doesn’t complain when it’s time to transition to a new activity or place in the classroom.

____________ is always looking for ways to be helpful to other students and members of the school community.

____________ actively engages in group activities, demonstrating excellent teamwork skills and respect for fellow students.

____________ sometimes has trouble sharing with [his/her] peers.

____________ has trouble with cooperative play and would rather play alone. After observing [him/her], I'm a bit concerned and would like to schedule a conference to discuss this with you.

____________ often struggles to take turns during group activities. Encouraging [him/her] to respect others' turns would be beneficial.

____________ tends to dominate group discussions and could work on allowing space for others to contribute.

____________ finds difficulty in actively participating in group tasks, it would be beneficial for [him/her] to further develop collaborative skills.

Class Participation Remarks for Preschool Students

____________ participates during ____________. He/she puts in [his/her] best effort most of the time.

____________ needs little prompting to participate in what we’re doing in class.

____________ listens attentively during carpet/circle time and loves to ask questions!

____________ actively contributes valuable ideas during class discussions, enhancing the learning experience for all.

____________ demonstrates an infectious enthusiasm during lessons, inspiring peers to participate more fully.

____________ doesn’t like to or want to participate during ____________ time. [He/she] needs several reminders to stay on task.

____________ often distracts others during ____________ time. Encouraging [him/her] to stay focused would improve [his/her] participation.

____________ is hesitant to engage in group activities during ____________. Boosting [his/her] confidence could improve [his/her] active participation.

____________ tends to withdraw during group discussions. Encouraging [him/her] to share [his/her] thoughts could enhance [his/her] class involvement.

____________ often needs assistance to stay on task during ____________. Increasing [his/her] independence and focus would aid [his/her] class participation.

Time/Task Management Remarks for Preschool Students

____________ transitions well between activities during class and/or in the hallway.

____________ keeps [his/her] area organized and [his/her] materials put away nicely. Great job!

____________ completes [his/her] work on time. It isn’t rushed or hurried through and [his/her] work is well thought out.

____________ shows excellent focus and determination in completing tasks and assignments. Your dedication is commendable!

____________ does a great job finishing tasks and always does them on time. Keep up the awesome work!

____________ sometimes needs a 5 minute warning when it’s time to transition between ____________ and ____________.

____________ needs to work on transitions during ____________ and ____________. [He/she] struggles with leaving that area to go on to the next activity.

____________ often needs reminders to complete tasks within the given time during ____________.

____________ struggles with managing time effectively during ____________, further practice and guidance would be beneficial.

____________ struggles with maintaining focus on one task at a time, frequently shifting activities before completion. Encouraging [him/her] to persist with tasks until finished could improve [his/her] time and task management skills.

End of the Year Summary Comments for Preschool Students

____________ has made significant academic and social progress over the year. It's been a joy to witness [his/her] development.

____________'s keen enthusiasm for learning has radiated throughout the classroom, positively influencing their peers.

____________ has blossomed into a confident communicator, frequently sharing [his/her] thoughts during class discussions.

____________ has successfully built a strong foundation in basic literacy and numeracy skills. [His/her] hard work is commendable!

____________'s artistic abilities have come to the fore this year. [His/her] unique, creative expressions in art have been a delight to observe.

____________ has shown excellent collaboration during group activities, truly embodying the spirit of teamwork.

____________ has shown a steady improvement in focus and attention, especially during individual tasks. [His/her] progress is noteworthy.

____________ has been working well on developing patience, especially when waiting for their turn in activities. [His/her] efforts are appreciated.

____________ has made strides in improving listening skills during story time. [His/her] continued effort to improve is commendable.

____________'s handwriting skills have shown signs of improvement over the year. [His/her] dedication to practicing is admirable.

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The Ultimate Guide for Preschool Report Card Comments (+Templates)

report comments for 3 year olds

What could be more difficult than the responsibility of writing distinct remarks about each child in your class? The preschool assessment report comments that follow will assist you in tailoring your remarks and highlighting their abilities. Also, check out our progress report templates for a comprehensive list of achievements for the preschool year in several areas of the curriculum. You’ll discover the correct terms here to keep your remarks current and accurate. By using the preschool assessment tool you can effectively record observations and evidence over time.

Table of Contents

6 strategies for effective preschool report card comments.

  • The secret magic format of writing preschool report card comments
  • 80 Sample Preschool Report Card Comments
  • 5 Tips for Writing Preschool Report Card Comments Fast
  • Preschool Report Card Templates from Illumine

10 Steps for Creating Progress Reports on the Illumine App

Faqs about preschool report card comments.

Keep these hacks in mind for writing honest and credible preschool assessment report comments:

  • Begin your assessment report comments for kindergarten by telling parents how pleased you are to be teaching their kid, or how much their child is learning and developing. Positive comments can motivate pupils to do better.
  • Report cards aren’t the best place to go over preschool curriculum . Student performance and ambitions for the coming term should be highlighted in the short remarks for the assessment report.
  • Incorporating both parents and students in preschool assessment report comments broadens the scope of the report and decreases the likelihood of conflict between preschool teachers, pupils, and parents.
  • Avoid general comments in preschool assessments. While vague phrasing may make parents feel better, it will not help your student improve and will prove to be a massive challenge for you later. To write specific preschool assessment report comments, look for important moments in class.
  • Report card comments for kindergarten should cover a wide range of topics related to a student’s performance, like cognitive, social, emotional, linguistic, adaptive, etc.
  • The primary goal of a report card is to inform parents of their child’s progress. MAJOR issues should be discussed face-to-face with the child’s parents. No matter if the child is doing well or not, the report card should be an honest reflection of the child’s performance. That said, of course, we want to frame things as positively as possible and in a way that is encouraging, with suggestions.

The MAGIC report card format

If the child is doing well on the whole… you have an easy task ahead! An easy-report card is the one everyone likes to make. Sadly , not all  children are Newton and Picasso, and a teacher needs  to mention  certain  areas that need improvement . This is where the magic format comes in handy

  • Start with a compliment. You may have to dig deep here, but be creative, while still being sincere and kind. Every  kid  has attributes we can praise, even the most  challenging ones. 
  • Then add a line or two about the kid’s challenges, and how he/she struggles in a certain area, and be sure to offer a solution or suggestions.
  • End with a positive tone. A compliment is a nice touch at any time of the year and for the Year-End report card. Remember that your report card shouldn’t make life tough for the kids and the parents. Each parent like showing the report card of their kids to everyone. My best wishes for ____ school year or a great summer, or I am so happy to have been the _____ teacher this year, and so on.

Tips for drafting preschool assessments

These tips for drafting preschool assessment comments are real-time savers:

  • Set a timer for fifteen minutes and write two or three assessment report remarks within that period. Tell yourself you just have 15 minutes to complete it. You’ll be more productive and efficient .
  • Break down the large process of drafting a report into smaller segments. Consider starting with your broad observations . Break out your general assessment report remarks into two or three parts every day.
  • Begin with the most difficult assignment. It’s surprising how empowering and inspiring it is to know that you’ve finished the part you were most dreading.
  • Make positive self-talk a habit. Tell yourself that you’ve got this!
  • When you’re having trouble expressing yourself, comment banks are a great place to start.

150 Sample Preschool Report Card Comments

Our preschool teachers have compiled a list of assessment report comments that are meaningful and impactful for both the parents and the students alike:, for behaviour.

  • _____ is caring, enjoyable, curious, and a hard worker. [He/she] loves school and is a great classmate. Great work!
  • _____manages and regulates emotions in an appropriate manner and responds well to feedback.
  • _____ is very good at finishing things which [he/she] begins and makes sure that the work done completed perfectly.
  • _____ communicates with peers, teachers, and other staff in a highly effective and respectful manner.
  • _____ is reliable and trustworthy, responds well to leadership and coaching, and delivers on commitments to himself and others.
  • _____ is responsible for working, behaving, and communicating within and outside the classroom.
  • _____ has a lot of empathy and always seeks ways to be useful to other students and staff of the school community.
  • _____ works very well with schoolmates and others on projects and group activities and is comfortable being a leader and taking charge of the groups.
  • _____has good relations with others and is sensitive to different perspectives, experiences, and circumstances.
  • _____ manages his/her feelings with maturity and responds appropriately to feedback.
  • _____ cooperates with other students.
  • _____ is respectful and has decent manners.
  • _____observes the rules of the classroom.
  • _____ responds appropriately when corrected.
  • _____ sets a high standard for behavior.
  • _____ is helpful and friendly to everyone in the classroom.
  • _____ resists the urge to be distracted by other students.
  • _____ maintains a laser-like concentration on tasks at hand.
  • _____ is courteous.
  • _____ transitions between classroom activities without distraction.

For Class Participation

  • is considerate of others in the class.
  • carefully executes group activities.
  • collaborates with peers in a democratic manner.
  • encourages his peers to follow directions.
  • pays close attention to others’ answers.
  • follows directions.
  • replies to what was read or spoken about in class.
  • asks for clarification when needed.
  • remains an active learner throughout the day.
  • puts forth their best effort.

For Social Skills

  • makes friends quickly in the classroom.
  • is well-liked by peers.
  • chooses to spend breaks with friends.
  • enjoys conversation with pals during breaks.
  • appears to be at ease in new situations.
  • empathetic towards their peers.
  • treats other pupils with the utmost fairness.
  • handles disagreements with peers well.
  • doesn’t interrupt others.
  • demonstrates a high level of respect for classmates.

For Communication and Collaboration

  • Listens and follows directions given by the teachers
  • Speaks and writes clearly to express his or her views and ideas.
  • Communicates well with students and  educators  in different learning  settings.
  • Works respectfully in group settings
  • Listens and values someone else’s ideas.
  • Actively participates in discussions.
  • Speaks confidently.

20 general positive comments on student performance

  • ______ is going in the correct direction. You can remember more information on the test day if you begin studying early. ______ performance has been excellent this year. 
  • I’ve seen ______ character development over time. I’m proud of their growth.
  • It’s fantastic that ______ is giving it its all. 
  • ______ growth has been massive this year. Keep working hard to get even greater outcomes. 
  • ______work is excellent. Continue searching for ways to push harder and strive for greatness.
  • If ______ continues to be consistent with your performance, your grades will improve massively. 
  • This is ______ greatest attempt, I can tell! I really like your drive. You seem very committed. I’m extremely fortunate to evaluate your work.
  • ______ excitement is wonderful! Their work is excellent. What a fantastic vision you possess. 
  • ______  has come a long way. You have quick problem-solving skills. I want to learn more from you!
  • I am happy that ______ made a fresh discovery in my class. I had fun reading their essay.
  • ______  has talent and is really wise. I appreciate their ideas in my class.
  • ______  wrote a wonderful essay on ______  using precise language and beautiful imagery.
  • Although the examples ______  offered were compelling and brilliant, providing additional context for how they are related to the essay is a good idea.
  • ______  has emphasized their points using evocative language.
  • I appreciate that ______ checks their writing for spelling and punctuation errors.
  • ______ did a fantastic job on this project, but for future ones, strive to use shorter sentences.
  • ______ completed the assignment on time and with great accuracy.
  • ______ makes astounding observations that are right on point. Doesn’t it feel great to do such awesome work?
  • ______, what fantastic math abilities you’re displaying!
  • ______ is demonstrating outstanding comprehension. They write complete, succinct, and straightforward essays.

40 positive attitude comments

  • ______ regularly attends class prepared and eager to learn.
  • ______ possesses a curious and active mind.
  • ______ is eager to do their chores each day.
  • ______ enjoys attending school and studying with their buddies.
  • ______ has a constructive outlook on personal growth.
  • ______ likes to enter the classroom with an upbeat attitude and an open mind.
  • ______ sets very high goals for themselves and works hard to reach them every day.
  • ______ consistently exhibits excellent behavior in class.
  • ______ is always ready to follow commands.
  • ______ is a diligent and courteous student.
  • ______ never acts improperly in class.
  • ______ is a fantastic example for peers to aspire to.
  • ______ is excellent at adhering to the rules.
  • ______ can always be trusted with tasks assigned to them.
  • ______ consistently carries themselves with integrity and honesty.
  • ______ is forthright, honest, and open about their ideas and convictions.
  • ______ offers intelligent and sincere comments.
  • ______ is always eager to examine themselves and offer sincere assessments of their development.
  • ______ is always eager to pitch in and help with any assignment.
  • ______ is a wonderful helper who never hesitates to provide a helping hand to anyone who asks for it.
  • ______ participates in all duties. This zeal is admirable.
  • ______ always shows up prepared to participate in the lessons and activities.
  • ______ always offers to help out first when work has to be done.
  • ______ loves to learn by getting engaged and experiencing things firsthand.
  • ______ possesses excellent self-reflection abilities.
  • ______  is able to recognize its own advantages and disadvantages.
  • ______ takes a moment to reflect on their work and finds opportunities for development.
  • ______ possesses the capacity to pause and alter their direction when they spot opportunities for development.
  • ______ is particularly proficient in finding and fixing draft-related mistakes.
  • ______ has shown a lot of consideration for their own potential.
  • ______ has demonstrated a strong capacity for empathy and compassion for classmates.
  • ______ has made significant progress in their communicative abilities since preschool.
  • ______ is a good team player.
  • ______ is a pleasant and kind kid who gets along well with others.
  • During play situations, ______ always shares and keeps others in mind.
  • ______ is a well-liked student who has little trouble making friends with other kids.
  • ______ always shares and thinks about others during play scenarios.
  • ______ is a popular student who finds it very easy to make friends with other children.
  • ______ has demonstrated some excellent budding leadership abilities in role-playing situations.
  • ______ is quite glad to play with and learn from others in groups. 

30 critical comments

  • ______ requires extra help to keep on target.
  • ______ needs some persuasion to finish things.
  • ______ is occasionally disinterested in studying or distracted.
  • ______ is trying to focus more intently on their responsibilities.
  • ______ occasionally have days where they lack motivation in studying.
  • ______ usually arrives at class hesitant to participate in group discussions.
  • During class, ______ needs to improve focus and attentiveness.
  • ______ has made progress in certain areas but is still lagging in others.
  • ______ is losing some of their attention and falling behind in their coursework.
  • There is still a great deal of opportunity for improvement, and in the upcoming months, we’ll be working hard to increase ______ attention and motivation.
  • In the future, it would be wonderful to see ______ progress in their areas of weakness.
  • When ______ gets stuck on a task, I want to see them seek assistance.
  • ______ can occasionally disturb their classmates and friends.
  • ______ is occasionally disruptive to other pupils.
  • When returning to class after a hiatus, ______ may get uneasy.
  • ______ can be chatty when doing solo work.
  • ______ could do better if they are more courteous of fellow students.
  • ______ is having a hard time this year feeling at ease in class.
  • ______ has occasionally tried to attract too much attention and disturbed the flow of teaching.
  • ______ occasionally has trouble participating in class discussions.
  • ______ needs several rewards from outside sources to become focused.
  • Due to a lack of desire to perform to their full potential, ______ works far below her talents.
  • ______ significantly depends on external incentive. 
  • In the upcoming months, it would be wonderful to see the more intrinsic motivation for success from ______.
  • ______ struggles to find activities that interest them.
  • ______ has a hard time being interested in and involved in the class.
  • ______ will respond favorably to rewards but finds it difficult to take initiative.
  • In the future months, ______ has to dig deep and discover more drive to study.
  • ______ plays with other kids, but in the next months has to establish cooperative play strategies. They need prodding to engage in more language-based play-based learning.
  • ______ plays well by himself, but he still has to learn to share and play with other kids. They are interested in playing with others yet tend to withdraw out of shyness.

Needs Improvement Report Card Comments

  • Mostly  does good work but [he/she] is  inconsistent . We will  keep   working  to  help  him/her  present his/her best work every time – please continue with the great support at home
  • He/she is easily distracted and has trouble sticking to the task.
  • Usually does quality work, but sometimes focuses too much on doing independent work too quickly, leading to accuracy issues.
  • He/she struggles to complete his work quickly.
  • ___ has   great   difficulty understanding concepts for his  academic level. He/she would benefit from reading with an adult every day
  • _____ has a difficult time knowing when it is appropriate to share his/her thoughts.  He is working on learning when it is a good time to share and when it is a good time to listen.
  • ____ is not proud of the work he/she does. We are trying to teach him and cultivate the feeling of being proud of his/her work

Preschool Assessment Report Card from Illumine

One of the most important components in defining a student’s learning path is creating short remarks that are both relevant and meaningful. It is one of the best strategies for effective engagement and teacher-parent communication . Illumine enables teachers to effectively capture and track progress through preschool comments for assessment report s. It also provides support and training to teachers. Illumine collects and analyses rich, detailed data throughout the school year and saves time by organizing the data for you

Creating preschool assessment reports is easy, fast, and hassle-free when you use a preschool assessment software . Illumine pre-school assessment tool is compatible with various curriculum structures such as Montessori , Early Years Foundation Stage Statutory Framework (EYFS), and other country-specific frameworks.

Here’s the breakdown of the steps:

Step 1: Go to the menu and select learning, then milestones .

Step 2: To create a development area, go to the top right corner and click the add development area button.

Step 3: Select the classrooms for which you wish to construct the development area and give it a short name, label, and add.

Step 4: After that, give it a title and submit it. The development area will be added to the list successfully.

Step 5: Next to the development area you wish to add it to, select the subdomain option.

Step 6: Select the classrooms for which you wish to construct the development area and give it a short name, label, and add.

Step 7: After that, give it a title and submit it. The development area will be added to the list successfully.

Step 8: Next to the development area or subdomain you wish to add it to, select the milestone option.

Step 9: After that, add a description and hit submit.

Step 10: The achievement will be added to the list.

Using Illumine’s high-tech tools to create and share accurate progress reports with parents can help you develop a strong working connection with them. Our app also enables you to write preschool comments for assessment reports fast, helping you save a massive amount of time. Get a free 11-day trial today with all features included!

SAMPLE PRESCHOOL REPORT TEMPLATES

report comments for 3 year olds

EDIT TEMPLATE

report comments for 3 year olds

EDIT Template

Q 1. How do you write preschool comments for assessment reports?

You highlight the students’ achievements and deficiencies in preschool comments for assessment reports and highlight what they are good at.

Q 2. What are some positive preschool comments for assessment reports?

Some positive preschool comments for assessment reports include: keep it up, you’ve done an excellent job, you’re doing superbly, good luck!

Q 3. How do you end preschool comments for assessment reports?

You end preschool comments for assessment reports with positive affirmations and an encouraging remark or two.

Q 4. How do you write a comment for a kindergarten student?

You write positive comments for assessment reports, even if you’re talking about the child’s weak areas

Get Preschool Assessment Software Demo

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Preschool Report Card Comment Examples

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It can feel daunting to write 15 to 20 report cards in one sitting. Be sure to maintain notes for each child on a weekly basis so you can write a thorough and helpful report card without struggling to remember specifics.

The Importance of Report Cards

Report cards help track a child's progress and let both the teacher and parents know what the child is excelling in and what they need to work on. Comments and observations can provide tremendous insight into the child's wellbeing and help foster a supportive network of teachers and family members.

  • 33 Teacher Thank You Notes From Parents to Show Your Appreciation

Comments for Specific Subjects

Your subjects will differ depending on what your school emphasizes. Keep comments short, yet detailed and use as many templates as you need to explain the child's experience with each specific subject. You can write:

  • He/She seems to really enjoy (specific subject) and is excelling in (specific subject-related skill).
  • He/She seems distracted during (specific subject) as evidenced by (insert supporting behavior).
  • He/She seems to like learning about (specific subject or topic) and has been a pleasure to teach.
  • He/She appears to really like (specific subject) and could use some extra help with (insert specific topic).
  • He/She is very enthusiastic when (subject) is brought up and consistently participates during discussions.
  • He/She has come up with very creative answers during (subject) and I've enjoyed teaching him/her.
  • He/She has been a joy to have in class and especially excels in (enter several subjects if applicable).
  • He/She tends to get antsy during (subject) and may need a little extra help understanding (specific subject-related topic).
  • He/She loves listening to (insert subject topic) and actively shares his/her thoughts.
  • He/She has seems to enjoy (insert subject) and has a deep understanding of the material.
  • He/She shows advanced abilities in (subject) and would benefit from (insert recommendation).

Improvement Comments

Letting a parent or parents know what the child needs help with can accelerate their ability to find appropriate solutions. Doing so early on can help the little one improve upon necessary skills before heading to kindergarten . You can write:

  • It seems like (child's name) could use some help with (insert behavior or subject matter).
  • I've noticed that (child's name) consistently struggles with (insert behavior or subject matter) because he/she has been (give examples).
  • (Child's name) would benefit from some extra practice with (insert behavior or topic).
  • More often than not, (child's name) appears to have difficulties with (insert behavior or topic).
  • It would help (child's name) improve upon (skill or behavior) if it were practiced a bit more at home.
  • I've noticed (child's name) seems to struggles with (behavior). We will continue to work on this at school and it would be great if (child's name) could practice these skills at home as well.
  • (Child's name) seems nearly ready for (insert skill) but still could use some extra practice getting there.
  • (Child's name) could use a brush up on (skill or behavior).
  • There's been a few instances where I've seen (child's name) have a challenging time with (skill).
  • Although (child's name) has made great progress with (skill or behavior), he/she could still use some extra help understanding it a bit better.

Praise Comments

Praise comments can be really fun to write. Highlight what each child is doing well by writing:

  • (Child's name) is excelling in (list subjects) and consistently participates in class.
  • (Child's name) is eager to lend a helping hand and gets along with his/her classmates.
  • (Child's name) works well with others and is liked amongst his/her peers.
  • He/She has been a joy to teach and always comes to class with a smile.
  • (Child's name) is incredibly creative and consistently impresses me with his/her (skills).
  • (Child's name) consistently excels in (behaviors) and has been really fun to teach.
  • (Child's name) is smart, creative, and consistently kind to his/her classmates.
  • (Child's name) learns quickly and demonstrates (skills) at an advanced level.
  • (Child's name) has picked up (skills) very quickly and shows an eagerness to learn.
  • (Child's name) always participates in class and has great problem-solving skills.
  • (Child's name) handles misunderstandings well and is great at communicating.
  • (Child's name) does very well at identifying his/her feelings and communicating them in a calm, mature way.
  • (Child's name) shows an interest in learning new topics and consistently makes insightful observations.

Comments for Behavioral Issues

Although it can be tricky to write about behavioral issues on a report card, it is important information for the child's caregiver to understand. You can say:

  • He/She seems to struggle with sharing toys and learning materials with his/her peers.
  • He/She is working on raising his/her hand and has shown some improvement.
  • I've noticed (child's name) seems to have a difficult time following directions. This typically happens during (activity).
  • (Child's name) has had a challenging time keeping his/her hands to him/herself. This happens (amount) times a day.
  • (Child's name) is struggling to complete projects in entirety. This is something we will continue to work on in class.
  • (Child's name) tends to throw tantrums when (insert example). We are actively working on emotional expression with him/her.
  • (Child's name) has shown some aggression towards a few classmates during playtime. Examples of this include (insert examples). We are working on using words instead of touch.
  • During one occasion, (child's name) grabbed a toy from another child. Since then we have seen great improvement, but are still working on sharing.

Socializing Comments

Noting how each child interacts with their peers and adults can help paint a thorough picture for the child's parent. You can write:

  • (Child's name) tends to keep to him/herself and often prefers to observe his/her classmates.
  • (Child's name) loves to engage with his/her peers and plays well with others.
  • (Child's name) seems to struggle with connecting with his/her peers.
  • (Child's name) enjoys spending time with his/her peers and reports having a good time with his/her friends.
  • (Child's name) shares well with friends and gets along with everyone in class.
  • (Child's name) seems to have a hard time getting along with his/her peers.
  • (Child's name) has developed close friendships with several classmates and prefers spending time with one or two friends at a time.

Group Play Observations

Group projects or play can reveal a lot about a child's ability to collaborate with peers. On their report card you can note:

  • (Child's name) does well working with others and tends to take on a leadership role.
  • (Child's name) seems to enjoy collaborating with others during group projects.
  • He/She gets along well with others and is very interactive during group play time.
  • He/She tends to keep to themselves during group play time.
  • He/She seems to prefer listening to others' ideas during group projects.
  • He/She is typically withdrawn during group projects and tends to prefer playing one on one.
  • He/She listens to instructions well during group activities and follows through with the assignment.
  • He/She collaborates well with others and is respectful when his/her peers share their opinions.
  • He/She tends to struggle with group activities and usually prefers to spend time playing alone.
  • He/She reports liking group activities and thrives in this environment.

Leadership Comments

Although not all children tend to take on leadership roles, it can be helpful for parents to know which collaboration style their child tends to gravitate towards. On their report card you can say:

  • (Child's name) tends to enjoy being in charge during group activities and projects.
  • He/She shows great leadership skills, especially during (insert activity).
  • He/She tends to shy away from leadership roles and prefers to observe his/her classmates.
  • He/She usually takes on leadership roles but also seems to enjoy collaborating with others.
  • He/She actively participates in group activities and tends to take charge when offered the opportunity to do so.
  • (Child's name) demonstrates impressive leadership skills and is consistently respectful of other's opinions.
  • He/She has a take charge spirit and enjoys doing group activities.

Referral Comments

Because you spend so much time with each child, you may notice that a few may benefit from a referral. These can be included on their report card, along with some supporting examples. You can write:

  • (Child's name) seems to struggle with (specific) subject and would benefit from having a tutor provide a little extra help.
  • (Child's name) is having a hard time reading and writing and may benefit from an evaluation with a medical psychologist.
  • (Child's name) is struggling socially. Some examples of this include (give examples). You may want to consider contacting a child psychologist or therapist for an evaluation.
  • (Child's name) appears anxious throughout the day, especially during (mention examples). You may want to take him/her to a child psychologist or therapist for an evaluation so we can increase his/her comfort level. Let me know if you'd like to discuss this further or have any questions and I'm happy to help.
  • (Child's name) seems to have a mild reaction to (list food or beverage). It would be a good idea to consult with his/her pediatrician to make sure there isn't an allergy that we should know about.

Writing Useful Report Card Comments

Take your time writing each child's report card. Even though the task may feel tedious, remember that you are providing incredibly helpful and insightful information for the child and their family to build upon.

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223 Copy and Paste Final Report Card Comments

Hey, Teacher! Is it report writing time again?

Hopefully these comments for student report cards will come in helpful.

decorative text that says report card comments for all ages

Copy and paste these report card comments for your students. It’ll save you time and heartache!

Read below for my full list of report card comment ideas:

Positive Comments

Use a few positive comments to show the strengths of the student and how they’ve improved recently.

Positive Attitude to Learning

  • Comes to class every day ready and willing to learn.
  • Has an inquisitive and engaged mind.
  • Is excited to tackle her tasks every day.
  • Likes to come to school and learn with her friends.
  • Has a positive attitude to self-development.
  • Tends to come into the classroom with a big smile and an open mind.
  • Sets herself very high standards and strives to meet them each and every day.

Showing Improvement

  • Is consistently improving.
  • Is developing very well for her age.
  • Has shown strong signs of growth in all learning areas.
  • Has made clear and commendable gains.
  • Improves each and every day.
  • Her hard work and effort has paid off.

Positive Behavior

  • Is always very well behaved during class time.
  • Has a good ability to avoid peers who she sees may be distractions to her learning.
  • Is always willing to listen to instructions.
  • Is a very helpful and respectful student.
  • Never misbehaves in class.
  • Sets a good standard for classmates to follow.
  • Is very good at following the rules.

Read Also: Words to Describe a Student

Shows Respect for Others

  • Has a great deal of respect for all visitors to the classroom.
  • Cares for and respects her classmates.
  • Is always respectful to classroom equipment.
  • Always puts her hand up and follows instructions.
  • Is very considerate of others and often puts others’ needs and interests at the front of her mind.
  • Is a very respectful and responsible classmate.
  • Has proven to be a courteous and polite classmate.
  • Is held in high regard for her kindness to others.
  • Is a very outgoing, positive and upbeat student.
  • Tackles every task with enthusiasm and self-belief.
  • Is building her confidence more and more every day.
  • Has shown remarkable growth in confidence this year.
  • Has reached many achievements this year, which is reflected in her budding confidence.
  • Is a self-assured young learner who is always willing to try something new.
  • Can always be trusted with tasks assigned to her.
  • Conducts herself with honesty and integrity at all times.
  • Is trusted with school equipment including expensive computer technology.
  • Is open, honest and upfront about her thoughts and beliefs.
  • Shares thoughtful and genuine opinions during lessons.
  • Is always willing to self-reflect and provide genuine analyses of her progress.

Self-Expression

  • Is a very expressive and confident student.
  • Has a great ability to express thoughts and feelings in writing.
  • Is always willing to express herself in front of the class with a bold and confident voice.
  • Has artistic talent and can articulate her thoughts through drawing and painting very well.
  • Is a very articulate public speaker when talking about issues that she knows well.
  • Is always willing to contribute her own thoughts and beliefs in class discussions.
  • Uses her body and hand movements to express herself artistically.

High Motivation

  • Has a great deal of intrinsic motivation . She’s a real go getter!
  • Has bucket loads of initiative.
  • Has an active mind and is eager to achieve.
  • Comes to class with a huge willingness to participate.
  • Never wants to waste a day in the classroom.
  • Loves to soak up all the information around her.
  • Is an ambitious and proactive student.
  • Knows her goals and strives every day to achieve them.

Strong Communication Skills

  • Projects her voice very well when communicating in class.
  • Is effective at using the written word to express herself.
  • Has a great deal of confidence when speaking to groups.
  • Is very good at clearly and succinctly speaking up when she feels she has a valuable contribution.
  • Consistently provides valuable contributions to class discussion.
  • Is a skilled public speaker.
  • Has shown great strides in written communication skills in recent months.

Is Neat and Tidy

  • Always keeps her belongings neatly organized.
  • Looks after her belongings very carefully.
  • Always has neat book work which shows respect and high regard for her own work.
  • Keeps her desk space very tidy, clean and organized.
  • Takes pride in keeping her work neat, clean and tidy for every submission.
  • Keeps her personal work spaces very well organized.

Good Listening Skills

  • Is an active listener who is always ready to respond with relevant and engaging questions.
  • Listens thoughtfully to other people’s ideas and contributes her own thoughtful ideas.
  • Listens with an open mind to her classmates’ perspectives.
  • Always listens intently with the hope of learning new things.
  • Concentrates and pays close attention during demonstrations to ensure she understands task requirements.
  • Takes directions well and is quick to apply directions to tasks.
  • Is always attentive in class and asks for clarification when required.
  • Is good at working in small groups unaided by a teacher.
  • Listens intently to others and takes their opinions in mind.
  • Excels when given leadership roles in small groups.
  • Appears to thrive in group learning situations.
  • Has developed strong skills in communicating in groups.
  • Works productively in groups of all sizes to get tasks done.
  • Has a knack for managing multiple personalities in group situations.
  • Could work on sharing resources more fairly during group tasks.
  • Needs to work on allowing other group members equal time to speak during group discussions.

Strong Organization and Time Management

  • Always arrives to class on time with her books and is ready to learn.
  • Is exceptionally good at completing tasks in a timely manner.
  • Is a natural organizer and is often seen helping to get her peers organized and ready for tasks.
  • Is always trusted to meet deadlines.
  • Uses color coding and headings in her books effectively to organize her notes.
  • Keeps a neat and organized work space at all times.

Good at Homework

  • Always comes to class with very neat and well written homework.
  • Tends to complete independent homework tasks with ease.
  • Thrives with independent homework tasks, which are always presented in a timely manner.
  • Comes to class with great questions based on the assigned homework tasks, showing thoughtfulness and independence.
  • Can be trusted to complete her homework in time.
  • Often asks for extra homework. She has shown great thirst for knowledge.

Read Also: 27 Pros and Cons of Homework

Strong Participation

  • Is always willing to jump in and participate in any task.
  • Is a great helper, always giving people a hand when she sees they are in need.
  • Participates in all tasks, no matter her skill level. This enthusiasm is laudable.
  • Always comes to class willing to get involved in the daily activities.
  • Is always the first person to put their hand up to volunteer for a task.
  • Loves to learn by getting involved and gaining first-hand experiences.
  • Is beginning to develop her own interest and is eager to learn more about them.
  • Has a strong personal interest in ________ and has been taking the initiative to explore the topic.
  • Is very enthusiastic about ________ and has shown great promise in this area.
  • Has picked a great extracurricular hobby of _____. Her skills learned in this hobby has helped to boost her confidence in the classroom.
  • Shows interest in a variety of different topics which she has been enthusiastically exploring during free study time.
  • Always finds personal interest in topics presented in class.

Independence

  • Is showing increasing independence to learn and study without the need for excessive guidance.
  • Is a fiercely independent person who knows what she wants and goes out to get it.
  • Has an independent and free spirited mind.
  • Is not afraid to go against the majority if she is certain of her beliefs and thoughts.
  • Happily goes about her tasks independently but seeks help when required.
  • Shows confidence striking out on her own to do things she is interested in.

Strong Learning and Thinking Skills

  • Is very resourceful and uses the internet, books and peers to find new knowledge.
  • Is aware of her learning styles and makes every effort to work to her strengths as a student.
  • Uses higher-order thinking strategies like analysis and critique to question assumptions.
  • Knows when she needs help and asks for it willingly.
  • Thinks deeply about her responses before providing them.
  • Is very good at reflecting on her weaknesses and working on them to grow as a person.
  • Is great at solving problems using her own initiative.

Good Attention to Detail

  • Pays close attention to the details of a tasks so that she doesn’t miss anything.
  • Is very systematic about going about her tasks so she can complete them thoroughly.
  • Is great at identifying small and nuanced mistakes in her own work.
  • Always creates very presentable and professional looking pieces of work.
  • Has great self-reflection skills , being able to identify her own strengths and weaknesses.
  • Can pause and look at her own work to identify areas for improvement.
  • Has the ability to stop and change course when she identifies areas for improvement.
  • Is very good at identifying and repairing errors in drafts.
  • Has exercised great thoughtfulness about her own capabilities.
  • Has shown the ability to empathize with classmates and show great compassion.

Perseverance and Determination

  • Shows great determination when is set a challenging task.
  • Perseveres through difficulties to achieve her goals.
  • Is resilient in the face of significant challenges and problems presented.
  • Will always work through struggles and come out the other end more confident and skilled.

Constructive Comments

Present constructive comments to show the areas for improvement for the student. Carefully craft the comments so they’re not overly upsetting or impersonal.

Negative Attitude to Learning

  • Occasionally needs special assistance to stay on task.
  • Requires some coaxing to complete tasks.
  • Is at times distracted or uninterested in learning.
  • Is working on paying more attention to her tasks.
  • Has some off days where she is uninterested in learning.
  • Is easily distracted by friends.
  • Will often come to class unwilling to contribute to group discussions.

Needs Improvement

  • Needs to work on focus and concentration during class time.
  • Has improved in some areas, but continues to slip behind in others.
  • Is showing some lack of focus and is slipping behind in some subjects.
  • There is still a lot of room for growth and we are working on improving her focus and drive in coming months.
  • It would be great to see some improvement in her weakest subjects in the future.
  • I would like to see her asking for help when stuck on tasks.

Disruptive Behavior

  • Can occasionally disrupt her friends and classmates.
  • Is at times a distraction to other students.
  • Can be unsettled when entering the class after breaks.
  • Can be talkative during quiet times and individual tasks.
  • Could work on being more considerate to other classmates.
  • Has had a difficult time getting comfortable in class this year.
  • Has at times sought undue attention and distracted the flow of lessons.

Read Also: 13 Best Classroom Management Theories

Low Motivation

  • Sometimes struggles to engage in class discussions.
  • Requires a lot of external rewards to get focused.
  • Works well below her capabilities due to lack of motivation to do her best.
  • Relies heavily on extrinsic motivation. It would be great to see more intrinsic desire to succeed in coming months.
  • Struggles to find things she is interested in.
  • Has trouble getting engaged and interested in class topics.
  • Will respond well to rewards but struggles to use initiative.
  • Needs to dig deep and find greater motivation to learn in coming months.

Is Not Neat and Tidy

  • Occasionally presents work that is messy and difficult to read.
  • I would like to see her paying more attention to neatness in her writing.
  • It would be great to see her showing more care for her workspace to ensure all her belongings are well cared for.
  • At times comes to class disheveled and disorganized.
  • Presents homework that is untidy and appears to have been rushed.
  • Needs to work on ensuring her work is presentable, neat, and error-free.

Weak Communication Skills

  • Speaks very softly. An area for improvement is speaking up in class discussions.
  • Could work some more on communicating her opinions during discussions.
  • Is often shy and intimidated when asked to speak up in class discussions.
  • Needs coaxing to share her thoughts in class.
  • Can work on being clearer when expressing her thoughts in writing.
  • I look forward to seeing further development in expressing her thoughts in class.

Poor Listening Skills

  • Has had some trouble paying attention to others during class discussions.
  • Has some trouble listening to peers and teachers.
  • Is easily distracted during class discussions.
  • Is a good talker but needs to work on pausing and listening to others more attentively.
  • Is often fidgety and distracted when spoken to.
  • Is often resistant to make eye contact and be responsive when spoken to.
  • Has trouble repeating and remembering instructions.

Read Also: 47 Best Classroom Rules for Middle and High School

Weak Organization and Time Management

  • Tends to leave tasks to the last minute.
  • Often submits incomplete drafts due to poor time management.
  • Is often disorganized and forgets important school supplies.
  • Has submitted homework late on several occasions.
  • Could work on using her time more efficiently to complete tasks in allotted time periods.
  • I would like to see her working on her organizational skills in coming months so she can use her class time more efficiently.

Bad at Homework

  • Will often skip assigned homework tasks.
  • Regularly forgets to bring homework to school.
  • Her homework is often brought to class incomplete and rushed.
  • Is often seen completing homework tasks the morning before they are due.
  • I would like to see her working on setting aside more time for homework in the coming months.
  • Is good at class work, but needs more initiative to complete her weekly homework in a timely manner.

Poor Attention to Detail

  • Could be getting higher grades if she edited her work more carefully before submission.
  • Will sometimes make mistakes due to distractedness and carelessness.
  • Has started to let carelessness seep into his work for the past few months.
  • Often does not pay enough attention to test questions, leading to small unforced errors.

Preschool and Kindergarten Comments

Here are some great comments specifically for children in the early years of their development.

Play Based Learning – Strong

  • Plays well with other children.
  • Shares resources with her peers during play time.
  • Has begun to develop cooperative play skills such as sharing and taking turns.
  • Is a creative and imaginative learner.
  • Engages in strong exploratory and discovery play behaviors without prompting.
  • Is enthusiastic and engaged when given developmentally appropriate resources to play with.
  • Thrives in unstructured play environments where she can explore, learn and discover in her own time.
  • Has started to use extended vocabulary well during play scenarios.
  • Is great at taking measured risks during play which reveals great self-confidence for her age.

Play Based Learning – Needs Improvement

  • Plays in parallel with other children, but needs to start developing cooperative play strategies in the coming months.
  • Is good at solitary play, but needs more practice sharing and playing with other students.
  • Is curious about playing with others, but often sits back due to shyness.
  • Needs encouragement to use more language skills during play-based learning .
  • Struggles to take turns when playing with others.

Strong Development

  • Is developing in an age appropriate way and continues to show good progress.
  • Has visibly developed fine and gross motor skills during class sessions.
  • Is using language at an age appropriate level.
  • Is starting to move out of her comfort zone to explore more and more new challenges.
  • Is socially, cognitively and physically on track for transition to school.

Socialization

  • Has shown remarkable strides in communication skills at preschool.
  • Plays well with others.
  • Is a thoughtful and kind student who plays well with others.
  • Always shares and thinks about others during play scenarios.
  • Is a popular student who finds it very easy to make friends with other children.
  • Has been seen to show some great emerging leadership skills during play scenarios.
  • Is very happy to play in groups and learn from peers .

Final Thoughts

I will often start with a comment bank like the one above. For each student, I’ll copy four or five of the most suitable statements.

But, I will also follow-up my generic comment from the comment bank with a specific example for the parents to read.

Parents do like to see that you have provided specific and thoughtful statements – so don’t forget to use the student’s name and specific anecdotes as much as possible.

I do hope this comment bank for report card comments has come in handy for you.

Remember to also maintain a positive but honest and constructive voice when writing.

If there is serious concern that might be difficult to express in writing, you should arrange for a parent-teacher conference to have a discussion and see how things progress.

Good luck with your report card writing!

About The Author: Hi, I’m Chris Drew (Ph.D) and I run things around here. I’m an Education expert and university professor.

Chris

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

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168 Sample Report Card Comments (Plus a Printable Version)

Help has arrived just in time for report cards!

"Your child has come so far in math! Focusing on two-digit addition is the next step."

Each progress report and report card provides an opportunity for you to give parents insight into their child’s performance beyond a letter or numerical grade for conduct or academics. Parents want to know how their child is doing, but they also want to know that you get their child. Report cards also help students understand what they are doing well … as well as areas where they could improve. The best way to get these points across is via meaningful comments. Need help? We’ve got dozens of sample report card comments below that are sorted for students at every level: emerging, developing, proficient, and extending standards, plus comments that address behavior, social skills, and more.

Get a free Google Slide version of these comments by submitting your email.

report comments for 3 year olds

Tips for report card comments

Before using the list below, it’s important to know that teacher comments should be accurate, specific, and personal. The comments below are structured to allow you to fill in the blank for a particular subject or behavior, and then expand the comment. Sometimes you might require an action like a meeting with the parent. Other times you may be encouraging the student to do something in school or at home to improve on a skill or get more practice. Either way, these sample report card comments will establish the how that attaches to the what of any number or letter grade you are documenting.

Sample report card comments for students with emerging skills

It’s often difficult to know the cause of why a student’s skills are still emerging. In these situations, parents can often help you get to the bottom of it. Be specific about areas of difficulty in these comments, and don’t be afraid to ask for a parent’s help. Here are some ideas:

  • Your student could use some extra practice in [subject]. Please have them study [skill] for [time] each night.
  • Your student hasn’t yet had the chance to master [specific skill]. Review sessions are available [time frame].
  • Your student may need additional assistance with [skill/subject]. Completing classwork and homework is the first step to improving.

Your student may need additional assistance with [skill/subject]. Completing classwork and homework is the first step to improving.

  • Your student needs more practice with [specific skill]. Please check that they have completed their homework each evening.
  • We will continue focusing on reinforcing your student’s positive efforts.
  • Your student should put more effort into [subject area] to avoid incorrect or incomplete assignments.
  • Your student would benefit from more active participation in small-group activities.
  • This semester/trimester, I would like your student to work on …

Sample report card comments to encourage a follow-up phone call

We can think of many situations where a report card comment can be the first step in scheduling a phone call or meeting to discuss a concern. Write something positive about the child’s personality while requesting a parent meeting or phone call. Some examples are:

  • Your student is always respectful, but I am concerned about their work. When can we meet?
  • Your child is inquisitive and engaged in class, but they have quite a bit of missing work. Please call me to discuss some strategies.
  • Your child has a wonderful sense of humor/is helpful/is kind but fails to turn in their assignments. Let’s meet to come up with a plan to move forward.

Your child has a wonderful sense of humor/is helpful/is kind but fails to turn in their assignments. Let’s meet to come up with a plan to move forward.

  • Let’s work on strategies that will help your student follow through on their assignments.

Sample report card comments about (negative) behavior

Parents want to know how their child has behaved, even if they are not surprised by the behavior. Behavior can be even more difficult to write about than academics. Be careful to avoid personal attacks or statements that can make the parent or child feel judged. For difficult behaviors, stick to statistics and/or basic descriptions. Try things like:

  • Your student struggles with [DESIRED behavior]. We will continue to work on this behavior at school.
  • Your child struggles with [UNDESIRABLE behavior] and needs to focus on [DESIRED behavior].
  • When your student is focused, they are a pleasure to have in class. Let’s meet to discuss strategies to keep them on track.
  • Your student often struggles to focus in class, which harms their ability to engage well with class activities and assignments.
  • [Student] is working on independent work production and staying on task.
  • [Student] often struggles to focus in class, which impacts their ability to engage in class activities.
  • I encourage [student] to use time wisely to finish tasks in a timely manner.
  • I encourage [student] to be more responsible in completing tasks without frequent reminders.
  • I encourage [student] to show that they are properly engaged in learning by improving quality of work and use of class time. Please support this at home by [idea here].
  • Your student needs to slow down in order to produce quality/carefully done work.

Report card comment: Your student needs to slow down in order to produce quality/carefully done work.

  • Your student needs to follow classroom rules more closely throughout the school day.
  • Your student has exhibited [UNDESIRABLE behavior]. We will continue to reinforce appropriate behaviors.
  • Your student exhibited [UNDESIRABLE behavior] [this many] times this quarter. Let’s work to reduce the incidence of this behavior to [goal] times.
  • [Student] is encouraged to demonstrate more responsible attitudes and behaviors in the classroom.
  • [Student] is working on using appropriate language at all times.
  • [Student] requires encouragement to listen attentively during group instruction.
  • [Student] requires frequent reminders to remain attentive during instruction.
  • [Student] is working on voicing feelings and opinions and listening to others.

Sample report card comments for students with developing skills

For students who are still developing, focus on any improvement while also providing suggestions to keep the momentum going. Try these comments:

  • Your student has come so far in [subject]! Focusing on [important skill] is the next step.
  • Your student has made so much progress! They still struggle with [important skill], so that should be our next focus.
  • Your child has done well, but I am concerned that their lack of [listening/focus/motivation] has contributed to a lower grade than I know they could achieve.
  • Let’s work on motivating your student to reach their potential.
  • I would like to see your student pay closer attention to [subject/topic] in order to get a better grade.

I would like to see your student pay closer attention to [subject/topic] in order to get a better grade.

  • If your student works as hard on [important skill] as they have worked on [improved subject], then they will be caught up in no time!
  • Your child is very engaged during whole-group [subject instruction] but struggles to work independently.
  • Your student’s persistence is exemplary.
  • When motivated, your child does well on class assignments. We need to extend that motivation further.
  • Your child has improved significantly but still needs to slow down and check their work to make sure that all answers are correct.
  • Your student is struggling to understand new concepts in [subject]. Paying closer attention to the assigned reading and class lecture would be beneficial.
  • The hard work is paying off! Let’s keep it up when we start working on [next skill].
  • Your child is enthusiastic but still doesn’t understand [topic]. Additional work on this topic would be incredibly helpful.

Report card comment: Your child is enthusiastic but still doesn’t understand [topic]. Additional work on this topic would be incredibly helpful.

  • Your child requests a great deal of adult assistance when completing school work. Let’s work on encouraging independent work.

Sample report card comments for students with proficient skills

Let the parent know all the positives about their child and perhaps encourage students to dig just a little bit deeper.

  • Your student comes to school each day prepared to work hard.
  • I appreciate that your student does their best every single day.

I appreciate that your student does their best every single day.

  • Your student is an enthusiastic member of the class and shows a willingness to learn.
  • I enjoy how invested your child is in their learning.
  • I appreciate your child’s dedication to their studies in my class.
  • Not only is your student strong academically, but they are also a leader in the classroom.
  • I appreciate that your student is always committed to doing their best.
  • Your student understands the material well. Let’s find a way to help them shine.
  • Your child has the potential to be at the top of the class.
  • With a little more effort, your child could move up to the advanced group in [the subject where effort is lacking].

Report card comment; With a little more effort, your child could move up to the advanced group in [the subject where effort is lacking].

  • Your child puts in great work in [preferred subject]! If they apply those skills to [non-preferred subject], there’s no stopping them.
  • Your child excels at applying what they learn in the classroom to real-world and real-life situations. With a little more work, they could really go far!

Sample report card comments for students with advanced skills

Positive behaviors deserve just as much (if not more) attention as negative behaviors. These comments can be the most fun to write. Begin with a simple stem and then fill in the personal details that will make the parent smile. Example sentence starters are:

  • Your child exhibits exceptional focus and diligence in their work.
  • Your student is excellent at taking ownership of their learning.
  • I appreciate that your child is committed to doing their best.
  • Your student seeks new challenges.
  • Your child has a fantastic work ethic.
  • Your child exceeds expectations on a regular basis.
  • Your student avoids careless errors through attention to detail.

Report card comments: your student avoids careless errors through attention to detail.

  • Your child sets high standards for themself and achieves them.
  • Teaching your child is always an adventure! I love it when they …
  • Your child conducts themself with maturity.
  • Your child is able to focus and stays on task during independent work times.
  • Your student uses instincts to deal with matters independently and in a positive way.
  • I have enjoyed your child’s sense of humor in our classroom, as well as …
  • Your child has an impressive understanding and knowledge about their interests.

Sample report card comments to showcase students’ strengths

Students who excel at helping out others deserve to have their skills mentioned in comments!

  • [Student] is confident, positive, and a great role model for their classmates.
  • [Student] is a valuable part of class. They are among the first to help and mentor classmates.
  • [Student] has shown an ability to set goals and work to achieve them.
  • [Student] is engaged and able to set their own learning targets.
  • [Student] is an active participant. They listen attentively and make an effort to avoid distractions that could disrupt their learning.
  • [Student] is accountable for their actions and takes opportunities to improve.
  • [Student] relates well to classmates and appreciates peers’ perspectives.
  • [Student] demonstrates emotional maturity and responds appropriately to feedback.
  • [Student] always looks for ways to be helpful in the classroom.
  • [Student] is dependable and reliable and follows through on commitments.
  • Your student relates well to classmates and is appreciative of different perspectives and experiences.

Report card comments: Your student relates well to classmates and is appreciative of different perspectives and experiences.

  • It is a joy teaching your student! I can always count on them to …
  • Your child makes the classroom a brighter place. They often …
  • Your student’s conduct is exemplary. They …
  • Your student works well with classmates and often takes a leadership role.
  • Not only is your child a strong student, but they are also a wonderful human being.
  • Your student displays good citizenship by assisting other students.
  • Your child demonstrates responsibility daily by caring for the materials in our classroom conscientiously.
  • Your child is exceptionally organized and takes care of their things.
  • Your child is thoughtful and kind in their interactions with others.
  • Your student plans and carries out group activities carefully.
  • Your child is a very special student and one that I will never forget. I will miss them next year!

While all of these comments can supplement the grades on a report card, you don’t have to wait to use them. Sending notes home between progress reports and report cards with little comments like these can bolster the parent-teacher relationship. Write them in communication folders or on postcards for that extra school-home connection.

Sample report card comments to highlight positive behavior

Sometimes you’ll have a lot to say about a student’s positive behaviors. Parents love to hear that their kids are model citizens. Here are comments that communicate all the good behaviors you see in class.

  • [Student] works well with classmates on group work and often takes a leadership role.
  • [Student] shows a positive attitude when working with peers. They take and give suggestions and directions effectively.
  • [Student] excels at applying what they learn to real-world situations.
  • It is a pleasure to have [student]’s enthusiasm and maturity in class.
  • [Student] is an enthusiastic member of class and shows a willingness to learn.
  • [Student] shows responsible behavior, works well in a group, and shows appreciation for classmates’ efforts.

[Student] shows responsible behavior, works well in a group, and shows appreciation for classmates’ efforts.

  • [Student] is focused during class activities and participates in discussions.
  • [Student] works on independent work with focus and confidence.
  • [Student] has overcome big challenges this year.
  • [Student] follows directions promptly and accurately.
  • [Student] transitions easily between classroom activities without distraction.
  • [Student] is polite and uses good manners in the classroom.
  • [Student] responds appropriately when corrected.
  • [Student] takes classroom jobs seriously and demonstrates responsibility when completing them.

Sample report card comments for math

Providing specific information about how a child is doing in core subjects helps parents know exactly what to expect on the grades portion of the report card. And providing a positive statement about a subject can help you lead into a statement about what the child needs to work on.

  • [Student] has a good understanding of math concepts taught this year. They continue to complete work correctly and enjoy math activities.
  • [Student] has a positive attitude toward math but has trouble in a few key areas [list here]. Practicing every night at home will help them improve in these areas.
  • [Student] demonstrates a good understanding of math concepts and communicates clearly and with strong justification.
  • [Student] seems to need continuous encouragement in math. They continue to struggle with foundational math concepts for [grade level].

[Student] seems to need continuous encouragement in math. They continue to struggle with foundational math concepts for [grade level].

  • [Student] is having a difficult time with certain concepts in math. Areas in need of extra work include [list here].
  • [Student] is struggling to maintain pace in math. They could benefit from [practice activity here].
  • [Student] is easily distracted during math and this impacts their learning.
  • [Student] does well on math assignments but struggles with tests. Please make sure they study and prepare for tests as they approach.

Sample report card comments for reading and writing

Just like with math, it’s good to comment on the specific aspects of academics that students are doing well and those that they can work on. Use these comments to explain where a student is in their reading and writing progress.

  • [Student] has made great improvements in [spelling, comprehension, reading] and could use support in [spelling, comprehension, reading]. Please reach out if you need supplemental learning materials to use for practice at home.
  • [Student] always puts effort into their writing work.

[Student] always puts effort into their writing work.

  • [Student] is able to take new skills and apply them to writing assignments.
  • [Student] is able to offer responses to text and supports ideas with sound reasoning and examples.
  • [Student] reads with fluency and comprehension.  
  • [Student] is working on reading fluency. They would benefit from reading aloud at home.
  • [Student] is able to understand and discuss text read aloud.
  • [Student] consistently reads grade-level material.
  • [Student] is able to choose books to read that they really enjoy.
  • [Student] uses editing skills to edit writing to improve grammar and punctuation.
  • [Student] organizes writing well and organizes thoughts into complete paragraphs.

[Student] organizes writing well and organizes thoughts into complete paragraphs.

  • [Student] is able to analyze character actions and story plots and make inferences from what they read.
  • [Student] is thoughtful and insightful in class discussion and written work. They express their ideas clearly.

Sample report card comments about social skills

As much as school is about academics, parents also worry about social skills and how their child is doing in terms of fitting in, making friends, and managing social situations. For some kids, this will be a strength and for some it will be an area of focus, but make sure to include whatever information parents need to know.

  • [Student] has made many friends in the classroom.
  • [Student] is well liked by classmates.
  • [Student] treats other students with empathy and fairness.

[Student] treats other students with empathy and fairness.

  • [Student] handles disagreements with peers appropriately.
  • [Student] appears comfortable in new situations.
  • [Student] chooses to spend free time with friends.

Sample report card comments about communication

Communication is another important skill that students are learning and honing in school that you can report on. Particularly for kids whose communication skills are either a strength or something they need help with, a comment about this can be very helpful to parents.

  • [Student] has a well-developed vocabulary.
  • [Student] expresses their ideas clearly.
  • [Student] has a vibrant imagination and uses their imagination in storytelling and writing.
  • [Student] always participates in whole-group discussions.
  • [Student] can make a logical and persuasive argument in oral discussion or in writing.

[Student] can make a logical and persuasive argument in oral discussion or in writing.

  • [Student] listens to the comments and ideas of others without interrupting.
  • [Student] is working on participating in class. Please encourage them to raise their hand or engage in group discussion.
  • I would love to hear from [student] more. Please encourage them to participate in class.
  • [Student] is working on using their words to solve problems/communicate well with peers.

Sample report card comments about group work

Group work gets at a child’s ability to work with peers, solve problems, and communicate. It’s also often a barometer for social skills. Giving comments about group work can tell parents a lot about how their child is able to succeed in teamwork and if there are any red flags.

  • [Student] offers constructive suggestions to peers.
  • [Student] accepts recommendations of peers and acts on them when appropriate.
  • [Student] takes various roles in group work as assigned or as needed.
  • [Student] welcomes leadership roles in groups.
  • [Student] shows fairness in distributing group tasks.
  • [Student] plans and carries out group activities carefully.

[Student] plans and carries out group activities carefully.

  • [Student] works democratically with peers.
  • [Student] encourages peers during group work.
  • [Student] is working on accepting their share of the work during group assignments.

Sample report card comments about time management

Managing time is a skill that gets more and more important as kids move through school, and it is something that all parents can help with at home. Help parents know how their child is doing managing time with these comments.

  • [Student] approaches classroom assignments, tasks, and group work in an organized way.
  • [Student] is on time and prepared for class each day.
  • [Student] works at an appropriate pace.
  • [Student] is able to pace their work for long-term assignments.

[Student] is able to pace their work for long-term assignments.

  • [Student] completes makeup work in a timely fashion.
  • [Student] is working on using time wisely.
  • [Student] is working on managing time, especially when there are multiple tasks to complete during a work period.
  • [Student] is working on organizing their materials and using organization to support work completion.

Sample report card comments about work habits

Same as time management, comments about work habits are helpful for parents because they explain how a student is approaching their work and how their academics are impacted because of these habits.

  • [Student] is self-motivated.
  • [Student] exceeds expectations with the quality of their work.
  • [Student] readily grasps new concepts or ideas.
  • [Student] produces neat and careful work.

[Student] produces neat and careful work.

  • [Student] checks work thoroughly before submitting it.
  • [Student] pays attention to work and submits work that does not have errors.
  • [Student] is working on producing neat work.
  • [Student] is working on checking work thoroughly before submitting it.
  • [Student] is working on submitting work that does not have errors. They frequently require additional review to ensure that all errors are corrected.

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A Complete Guide to Preschool Progress Reports

  • brightwheel
  • Child development

A Complete Guide to Preschool Progress Reports

For a child to be successful, parents and teachers need to work together to support their learning. A preschool progress report is a valuable tool for educators to track each child’s development in key areas and keep families informed and engaged in their child’s learning outcomes.

a woman holding a preschooler talking to another woman

Benefits of preschool progress reports 

  • Documents the child's progress in key developmental areas. A thorough progress report will track a child’s growth and development in social-emotional, language, cognitive and physical skills. The details gathered can be used to identify any learning and behavior trends, as well as any delays in developmental milestones. 
  • Allows families to engage with their child's learning. Progress reports guide parents in creating holistic home learning environments for their children. For example, if a child is struggling with language skills, families can supplement with additional language-focused activities at home. 
  • Encourages collaboration between educators and families. Preschool progress reports provide a clear picture of each child’s learning, ensuring both teachers and families are aware of the child’s progress and any steps needed to support their success. 

Which developmental areas should you track?

A preschool report card should cover a child's progress in the main developmental areas of language and literacy, physical skills, social-emotional development, and cognitive skills. Monitoring these skills will help support children's development into well-rounded individuals and successful learners. 

Language and literacy 

The skills in this section include reading, communicating with others, and writing.

For language and literacy skills, focus on:

  • Growing their interest in books and reading. Possible activities include story time, singing the alphabet song, and learning to recognize letters. 
  • Encouraging their ability to ask questions verbally and nonverbally.
  • Improving their verbal and nonverbal communication.

Physical  

Physical progress is linked to other areas of early development, such as sensory development, cognitive thinking, and social-emotional development. 

For a physical progress evaluation, focus on tracking:

  • Gross and fine motor skills. Pay attention to their ability to throw or kick a ball, hold a crayon, skip, and bounce. 
  • Independence. This includes how they zip their coat, tie their shoelace, close their buttons, and swing without help.
  • Hand and eye coordination. Track their ability to string beads, connect dotted activities, and play with jigsaw puzzles.

Social-emotional 

Social-emotional skills are essential to a child’s ability to establish positive relationships with others.

Skills include: 

  • Ability to recognize, regulate and express their emotions
  • Ability to cooperate and problem solve with their peers
  • Ability to follow instructions and class routines

Cognitive 

Cognition refers to the child's mental process of comprehending issues and gaining knowledge. Cognitive processes include problem-solving, memory, perceptual reasoning, and verbal comprehension. 

Focus on: 

  •  Problem-solving skills
  • Improved story narrating skills 
  • Recognizing and naming colors

Preschool progress report examples  

Your report’s design will depend on what you're reporting, how many items are on your checklist, and how often you report. Here are a few templates to consider: 

Daily preschool progress report

Our preschool daily report template tracks daily activities like meals and naptime, as well as each day's learning highlights in key skill areas.

Quarterly progress report

preschool progress report

A quarterly preschool progress report gives children ample time to learn new things and develop skills. This template tracks and assesses skills on a quarterly basis.  

Skills progress report

preschool progress report

This template records progress on specific skills such as communication, social-emotional and motor skills.

FAQs on preschool progress reports

What should a preschool progress report include.

A preschool progress report card should include comments on all aspects of a child's development, including:

  • Social-emotional skills 
  • Physical skills 
  • Cognitive skills
  • Language and literacy skills

What should I include in a preschool assessment report?

Include observations on a child's accomplishments and areas of improvement. Note any unique behavior. 

How do you write a report for a preschool student?

Include developmental achievements and any specific challenges the child has and discuss the progress they've been making. End by stating any goals and next steps and provide families with any resources or suggestions to support their child.

How do you end preschool assessment reports?

A preschool assessment report should end on a positive note listing any goals or follow up actions. 

How do I gather information for a preschool progress report?

  • Be observant . Watching how children interact with other children, solve their problems, or play can help you evaluate their motor skills, problem-solving abilities, and social-emotional skills. 
  • Be present and listen . When you're around children, you're a part of their world. Pay attention and listen to how they reason.
  • Understand the curriculum you're using . Understanding your curriculum ensures you're clear on your expectations of the children, making it easier to support and evaluate them.

How often should I issue a preschool report card?

Children are rapidly growing and reaching new milestones in their preschool years, so a regular reporting cadence will show a child's clear progress from one point to another.  While the exact frequency will vary depending on your program, it is a good idea to schedule your formal preschool report cards quarterly or semi-annually. 

Final thoughts 

Preschool progress reports help ensure children get the support they need in early childhood. They can focus on a short-term goal like improving a challenging behavior, or a long-term goal like improving their reading and writing skills. As an educator, you can choose the best format and reporting cadence that fits the needs of your children as you guide them to the next stage of their development.

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Use Your Preschool Progress Report... as a Planning Tool!

report comments for 3 year olds

Developmental progress reports in preschool have many names: preschool progress reports, report cards (I LOATHE this name!), developmental progress forms.

You may complete them annually, semi-annually or quarterly depending on your program’s policy and state requirements.

They should be developed with sound growth and developmental milestones in mind for each age group. 

As early childhood educators, we put much time and thought into completing these for each child.

You may have collected items for a portfolio, written anecdotal comments from your observations to share with the families and have carefully completed each section of the form with that individual child in thoughtful focus.

This helps the family to know what the goals of your program are for their child’s classroom as well as where there child is in the areas of social, intellectual, emotional and physical development. Your personal notes help the family realize that you KNOW their child and what they are capable of.

Where Do Your Progress Reports Go After the Parent-Teacher Conference?

The question: What happens to these developmental progress reports and checklists after they have been shared with the families at the Parent-Teacher Conference ?

All too often, they are filed in the child’s individual file not to be looked at again or at least until the end of the school year when the final report is written for each child.

If this is what happens in your program, you are missing out on a great curriculum planning tool!

Your observations, assessments and progress reports can, and should, be used to develop activities based on where your class is as a whole. They can also be used to plan small group activities based on individual abilities and needs. Let's take a look at how.

For example, your math area has many themed activities planned that encourage children to develop their one-to-one correspondence up to 5; sort manipulatives by color and/or size; and recognize numbers up to 10.

You review your notes (which include observations, assessments and progress reports) from the fall and see that, at that time, ALL of your children had strong one-to-one correspondence up to 10 and ALL knew their colors. You notice that about half of your children recognized numbers up to 5 and many recognized up to 15.

Knowing this information would change your plans for the math center. It would also suggest that you may want to have some small group activities for number recognition to work with children where they are at.

Many times we get so caught up in the planning for “three year olds” or “four year olds” that we lose sight of what we know about “OUR” three and four year olds!

General Preschool Progress Reports

I've received many requests for samples of progress reports to use. Each program's reports and checklists will look differently depending upon the ages served.  There is no one size fits all form.  Wondering where to even start?

I have created a few basic samples for you that include:

  • A checklist for 3-4 year olds
  • A checklist for 4-5 year olds
  • A general developmental checklist to use during observations

Progress Report Keys

When creating a key for your progress reports, be sure to list them so they are not pass/fail type keys.  Remember, preschoolers are all at different levels of development.  Do not "grade" them as though they know or do not know their multiplication tables of the capitols of all the States!  

Here are some that I use on my progress reports and their explanations:

I=Independently/Consistently

List an I next to a skill that you are observing the child performing or participating in independently on their own with minimal adult help.

S = Developing Satisfactorily

List an S next to a skill that you are observing a child performing or participating in on a regular basis- this may be with or without adult help/explanation. (For example, you may see a child using plastic links to line up in a row, sorted by or linked together by color. This would show that they are sorting items by attributes as listed in the Cognitive Development section of the form.

A child using these as a dramatic play prop (such as using them as wood in a pretend campfire or linking them to use them as a dog leash) would show that they are able to pretend with imaginary objects as listed in the Creativity Development section of the form.

B = Beginning

List a B next to a skill that you observe the child beginning to show interest in. It does not mean they are proficient but that he/she is developing the skill. For example, you may see a child who is making scribble marks on paper and then tells the adult "That's my name!". Is the child moving the writing tool on the paper without looking at the paper? If so, they are making random marks. If they are watching the paper while printing and making intentional marks, they are making controlled scribbles (see Art Skill Development Section).

N = Not Observed

Use N when you have not observed a skill in the classroom. This N means the child either does not participate in a skill OR that you have not observed that skill in the classroom.

It is important to list a note in the note section when using N as a description for any skill.

For example, listing an N next to "Walks up and down steps unassisted-one foot per step" (in the Physical/Large motor development section) might mean that the child goes down steps on their "bottoms" or it could mean you have no stairs in your program and therefore have not observed them doing this! Notes are importants!

N/A = Not Applicable

You would use N/A for areas that you would not expect to see and are not looking for. You might use this for a child with an IEP (Individualized Education Plan)(for example--a child in speech therapy who is not easily understood by others at this time) or a disability/impairment (a child who physically can not run, jump, etc.).

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report comments for 3 year olds

How to create a preschool progress report (with a free template)

  • Posted by Katelyn Vickers
  • November 30, 2020
  • in Posted in Leadership / Management Tips

Progress reports can be a daunting task for both children and educators. For educators, it’s a time to buckle down and really think of all of the skills each child is learning. Are they really confident with counting to 10? Do they know how to zip up the zipper on their coat? Equally as scary for children, they might be intimidated to show that they know how to count to 10 or zip up their zipper in front of their teacher when they know they’re being graded, or worse, in front of the whole class!

Children in childcare

So, what’s the technique for educators to ensure children are retaining the skills and knowledge learned in your classroom and fostering a safe and welcoming environment for children to showcase their skills and knowledge? Through natural learning and assessment!

Before we hop into how to track your children’s learning and development there are a few things to note on progress. First, not every child develops the same. Each child is unique and may develop at different paces. It’s important to remember that not every child will have a check in each box on their report card, and that’s ok! This doesn’t mean the child is failing by any means, it simply means this is an area to focus on to increase the likelihood of the skill being shown.

Bonus: We’ve created a sample template below to get you started on your progress reports.

report comments for 3 year olds

It’s also important to consider what areas you should focus on- social, emotional, academic, cognitive, fine motor, gross motor, literacy, the list goes on! Let’s narrow it down to a few essentials and then we can scope it out from there.

Which developmental areas should you report on?

There are five major areas that should be reported on when it comes to your progress report: the child’s social progress, emotional progress, cognitive progress, gross and fine motor progress, and language and literacy progress. These are the building blocks of a successful individual in a classroom that is supportive and nurturing.

Think of the last time you tried to solve a really difficult problem with your team, working your way through the problem by keeping calm, communicating clearly, and thinking logically about a solution. These are all fundamental aspects of problem-solving that you learned at a very young age. Hence, why they should be the main focal point for your progress report. Let’s dive into these areas a bit deeper to find out specifically what each area should focus on.

Social progress

Children in a classroom

Documenting social progress is vital as it helps children resolve conflict, helps them establish a positive attitude, and strengthens language and communication skills. 

When it comes to social progress, here are a few areas to consider reporting on:

  • Respecting authority
  • Participating in group activities
  • Following directions and classroom routines
  • Speaking clearly and responding to questions

Emotional progress

Emotional progress is equally as important as it helps with ongoing relationships with peers and adults as well as positive self-esteem. 

When it comes to emotional progress, report on skills such as:

  • Ability to recognize and regulate their own emotions
  • Shows they have self-esteem and recognizes their abilities. 
  • Holds a positive attitude toward learning such as persistence, engagement, and curiosity

Cognitive progress

Cognitive progress is the building block of learning. Skills such as attention, memory, and critical thinking are a few examples of areas you should consider.

daycare craft activity

When it comes to cognitive progress, you should focus on skills such as:

  • Understanding the concept of numbers and number operations.
  • Ability to identify and create patterns in their environment.
  • Describing and determining quantity and ordinal number and position.

Physical progress

Physical development can be linked to other areas of development such as cognitive thinking, sensory development, and social progress.

When it comes to physical progress, you should focus on skills such as:

  • Gross and fine motor skills
  • Independence with self-help skills (like zippers and buttons)
  • Hand-eye coordination

Language and literacy progress

Language and literacy skills range from learning to talk, listen and read during the first few years of childhood. Children who come from a home that does not speak the local language or children who speak more than one language will develop at a different pace than those who speak the local language or come from a home that speaks one language.

When it comes to language and literacy progress, you should focus on skills such as:

  • Able to ask questions verbally and non-verbally (ASL)
  • Verbal and non-verbal communication
  • Has an interest in books and literacy

These skills above can be broken down further based on your state or provincial framework. Consider each child’s development as well. Not every child will be on the same page and it’s important to recognize this early- before any progress reports are done.

The letter lineup

It’s up to you how you want to document the learning in your children. Typically a scale is used to see if a skill is present (P), emerging (E), or not yet developed (N). Keep in mind that some children may exhibit a skill one day, and not show it again or for a long time. That skill would still be considered emerging.

How often should you issue a preschool report card?

Women on computer

In the early years, development happens quickly and children are always reaching new milestones. Therefore, your reporting should be nearly real-time as you update parents on the skills their child is working towards.

Luckily, there are ways to simplify this reporting through software, reducing stress on educators who often find writing report cards a daunting task!

If you want to have a formal progress report for each child, quarterly or semi-annually is a good cadence to report on children’s development. Creating report cards takes a lot of time, and producing a progress report too frequently may go unread by families if they get fatigued.

A note on assessments

When creating your report cards, it’s important to leave yourself an ample amount of time to complete them. You want to make sure you’re not up late the night before they’re due wondering if little Luca can tie his shoe or not! When you observe a skill in a child, make a note of it – either on the paper or using software such as HiMama.

On the other end of things, you don’t want to sit each child down and have them go through the list of skills to see if they can do each one- this intense one-on-one testing scenario isn’t natural and doesn’t yield good results. Not to mention it can be quite scary for young children to be tested one on one! 

For more in-depth reports, educators use HiMama to review observations and milestones over a longer period of time, adding further comments and suggestions for further development and skill-building. Interested in joining the family? Learn more about our preschool assessment tool

Download our free Preschool Progress Report form and start improving your observations today!

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In 15 minutes you could be on your way with HiMama - it doesn't take longer than that!

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Preschool Progress Report Template - Three Year Olds

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The Preschool Progress Report Template - Three Year Olds is a document used by preschool teachers to assess and report on the development and progress of three-year-old children in various areas such as social skills, cognitive abilities, motor skills , and language development. It helps parents and caregivers understand their child's growth and areas that may need attention or further support.

The preschool progress report template for three-year-olds is typically filed by the preschool or early childhood education program the child is enrolled in.

Q: What is a preschool progress report? A: A preschool progress report is a document that assesses and reports on a three-year-old child's development and learning.

Q: Why are preschool progress reports important? A: Preschool progress reports are important because they provide parents and educators with valuable information about a child's growth, skills, and areas that may need improvement.

Q: What should be included in a preschool progress report? A: A preschool progress report should include information on a child's social-emotional development, language and communication skills, cognitive abilities, fine and gross motor skills, and any additional observations or notes about the child's progress.

Q: How often are preschool progress reports given? A: Preschool progress reports are typically given at regular intervals throughout the school year , such as every quarter or semester.

Q: Who fills out a preschool progress report? A: Preschool progress reports are typically filled out by teachers or educators who interact with the child on a regular basis.

Q: What is the purpose of a preschool progress report? A: The purpose of a preschool progress report is to communicate a child's development and learning progress to parents or guardians, and to serve as a tool for planning future educational activities and interventions.

Download Preschool Progress Report Template - Three Year Olds

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report comments for 3 year olds

90 Quick Report Card Comments for Kindergarten

For the Teacher | 2 comments

kindergarten-report-card-comments

Table of Contents

  • 1 Writing Student Report Cards
  • 2 Tips for Awesome Report Card Comments
  • 3 Sample Report Card Comments
  • 4 Parent Teacher Communication
  • 5 90 Kindergarten Report Card Comments
  • 6 What Teachers are Saying
  • 7 Conclusion

Writing report card comments can be stressful, and leave you feeling mentally exhausted. But, I’m here to help you keep a positive attitude, and get through the school year, and report card time, with less stress.

Did you know report card comments are sometimes the only part parents read to summarize their child’s progress?

For that sake, your original comments need to be well-written, show the strengths of the student, clearly communicate if the child is having a tough time, and offer a list of ideas to practice at home.

kindergarten-report-card-comments

Below are some sample comments as a starting point to write perfect comments. You’ll also find a Kindergarten Report Card Writing product throughout to help you write comments with little effort.

Writing Student Report Cards

Whether you’re a student teacher or a veteran teacher, writing report card comments for any grade level is time consuming.

When teaching younger grade levels, such as Prek, kindergarten , and first grade, you will most likely be expected to write personalized comments to summarize each child’s performance.

Whereas, the upper elementary, middle school, and high school are a reflection of teachers choosing a select comment from a drop-down menu.

report comments for 3 year olds

While the drop-down menus and letter grades are easy, but they don’t relay personal experiences, or specific examples of the students’ behavior and/or school work.

As a parent, and a kindergarten teacher for 17 years, I learned a child’s development is worth much more than a passing grade on recognizing numbers and letters. 

Don’t get me wrong; letter recognition, letter-sound correspondence, number identification, and counting are the foundation of one’s education.

We cannot fail to inform parents on the social-emotional and work habits that these little ones are developing.

report comments for 3 year olds

Tips for Awesome Report Card Comments

When writing comments, you will want to craft your thoughts in a way that will grab the parents attention. 

It’s a good idea to recognize their child’s strengths while also give suggestions to help them improve.

Here are tips for new teachers or veteran teachers to use when writing kindergarten report card comments :

  • Always include a student name. This shows specific student progress.
  • Start with a positive note. Leave a very specific comment that highlights the great work done and positive qualities.
  • Put a positive spin on areas of weakness.
  • Give parents insight and suggestions for practicing at home.

report comments for 3 year olds

In short, positive report card comments include a strength, an area that needs improvement, and give suggestions to practice at home.

It is our personal responsibility, as teachers, to put in the extra work, and give parents more than report card grades.

The Kindergarten Report Card Comments is a helpful resource that will save you time writing a couple dozen report cards each grading period.

Sample Report Card Comments

Let’s take a look at some examples of kindergarten report card comments often found at the end of a student’s report card.

These sample report card comments are broken down into categories for positive, needs improvement, and suggestions for home. 

Then, we will look at ways you can compile these comments into well-written paragraphs for the parents.

report comments for 3 year olds

Positive Report Card Comments

The following statements are examples of students who’ve done great during classroom activities and independent work time.

  • is very kind and inquisitive
  • enjoys participating in small group lessons
  • is continuing to show positive changes with his/her work habits
  • takes great pride in her/his work
  • has a pleasant personality and an excellent attitude towards learning.
  • has a good foundation of basic academic skills; such as letter identification, sounds, and number recognition.

Needs Improvement Report Card Comments

The following statements are used to communicate when a child is having a hard time during class discussions, group work, reading skills, and/or basic math facts.

  • continuing to work on understanding boundaries, getting along with others, and putting more effort into work.
  • having a difficult time accepting redirection from adults
  • unexcused absences have greatly effected his/her grades.
  • respecting others personal space
  • needs frequent reminders to complete work in a timely manner.
  • needs extra time when learning new skills
  • Suggestions for Home
  • Play-doh, puzzles, cutting, and stringing beads are great activities to help with fine motor skills at home.
  • Download apps to practice letters, sight words, and basic math skills. Have them use the learning app for 15 minutes prior to playing games or watch videos.
  • Continue working on letters and sounds.
  • Let’s touch base with a phone call to discuss additional work to best prepare him/her for next year.

report comments for 3 year olds

Now that you have examples kindergarten report card comments, let’s look at an example of how to put everything together for the parents to get a clear picture.

  • _______ is a great listener and participates often. He/she follows directions, completes his/her work, and is always willing to help out. He/she tries very hard, but is struggling with the basic academic skills. As previously stated, _______ needs extra support at home to catch up with his/her classmates. Thank you.

Parent Teacher Communication

Well-written report card comments can help build the communication between you and the families. The parents will greatly appreciate your effort to recognize their child’s academic and social development.

Report cards, sending home parent letters, and requesting parent volunteers, are great strategies to build a trusting relationships with families.

Although writing detailed comments can be time consuming, there are ways to make this teacher task less daunting and more pleasurable. 

To help you save hours of time, and build parent-teacher communication, I have put together easy comments inside this Kindergarten Comments resource just for you.

90 Kindergarten Report Card Comments

These easy comments are going to save you so much time and stress!

Focus on the kids, spend more time with your family; whatever it is that you love – just not spending hours writing report card comments for all of your students.

Like the examples shown above, I have created and organized the comments into 4 categories.

  • Needs Improvement
  • Complete paragraph comments

Build the perfect comment by choosing from the organized lists, or simply insert students names in the complete paragraph comments.

Here are some of the topics and skills covered throughout these kindergarten report comments:

  • peer relationships
  • class participation
  • expressive and receptive language skills
  • tardies and absences
  • work habits
  • letter recognition
  • reading comprehension
  • disruptive habits to the learning environment
  • fine motor skills
  • problem solving skills
  • social skills
  • organization

There are over 65 comments, as well as 25 paragraph-length comments to choose from.

kindergarten-report-card-comments

You can also mix and match the bulleted comments to best fit your students. Simply copy, paste, and insert a name.

What Teachers are Saying

With over 900 Five Star Reviews on Teachers Pay Teachers , you can see whey these comments are a must have for kindergarten. 

Many first grade teachers have also found these to be very helpful when writing their first quarter report cards.

Here’s what teachers are saying about this time-saving resource:

 “Very helpful and saved me a lot of time! Thanks” (Andrea)

 “Great ideas! This was one of the best purchases I’ve ever made !” (Katharina R.)

 “ Huge help thank you!” (Sybill T)

report-card-comments

 “Loved these! Helped me sooooooo much!” (ShabbyinSecond)

 “Very useful. I always need help writing remarks that are concise, helpful, but not harsh.” (Donna H.)

 “ Very helpful when creating comments.” (Lesley R.)

“I had a bad bout of procrastination when it came to report writing…these helped me stay focused!” (Belinda B.)

Reduce your teacher stress, save yourself hours of time, and build parent communication, with these prewritten comments.

With a over 900 5-star reviews, you can see how the comments have saved teachers so much time, and helped parents better understand their child’s progress.

You can purchase the set of comments from my TPT store , or save 10% when you purchase using the link below. *Enter discount code LEARNING when checking out.

Before you go, here are some blog posts you may enjoy:

How to do Math Talks in Kindergarten

185 Awesome Questions of the Day

33 Amazon Must Haves for Kindergarten Teachers

Report Card Comments

When I read, I tend to let my thoughts wander, but this article kept me focused. That’s a real feat. You did a good job. After reading this article i get to know more about plano preschools

Thank you, Lee.

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Writing Prompts and Phrases For Yearly Reports On Children

  • Written by  Lorina
  • December 5, 2023

Writing Prompts and Phrases For Yearly Reports On Children

When writing a report on a child, it's an opportunity for the Educator to capture the child's learning and for parents to receive an account of their child's engagements within an early childhood setting. The following article provides information on examples of writing prompts and comments that can be used when writing yearly reports on the child.

For educators writing the report, the comments need to be descriptive. It must be based on observation of the child in different environments and engaging in different activities. Comments should not be comparative, judgemental or conclusive.

Writing Prompts and Comments

The following are examples of writing prompts, and comments that can be used when writing yearly reports on the child:

Child's Personality 

  • Zee comes cheerfully to school and greets her teachers with a bright smile. She leaves her things in class and runs off to catch a little game with her friends outdoors before the bell goes.
  • Tina has learnt to express her needs and difficulties clearly and appropriately. When someone is assertive in a group and she disagrees, she is able to stand up to them with an emphatic ‘no’.
  • He does not give in easily to the demands of his peers. He confidently stands up and asks for his rights.
  • Her interest wanes when an activity has to be done in a group and she tends to get playful. She prefers to complete a project by herself.
  • He tries to talk himself out of a tricky situation with his teacher but his own sense of fairness and reasoning stops this process midway.

Interactions

  • Her social circle has widened. She has begun playing with the boys in her class. She shares a warm relationship with adults in the class. She always communicates her difficulties with her teacher.
  • He seems interested in people, feels connected and has an affection for them. He is concerned when any of his classmates is in pain or is injured and will help them.
  • He is very observant of his classmates and can report coherently what most of his friends are doing at any given point in time.

Cognitive Development 

  • Learning by watching others is a strategy Lee adopts successfully.
  • He explores actively his natural environment and observes phenomena he comes across with a keen eye.
  • He makes good connections and infers well.
  • She is quick to follow concepts and directions. She listens carefully to instructions and responds accordingly.
  • She is confident of whatever she undertakes and works independently.
  • She completes a given task and does not hesitate to ask for help whenever required.
  • Her interest in books continues as she spends a lot of time browsing through the books in the library corner.
  • She is quick to notice the change of books and immediately settles down to browse through them.
  • His quality of listening is selective. He will listen only to what interests him.
  • He has to be reminded very often that he is in a group and needs to restrain himself.
  • Sometimes this lack of listening is because he thinks he knows it already.

Communication and Language

  • During circle time, she occasionally participates by sharing news.
  • She has not been regular in bringing things for Show and Tell’. Participating in the programme may help her gain confidence in the presentation.
  • Tarika is articulate. She has started participating in class discussions. She shares the news with much enthusiasm.
  • She enjoys the ‘guest’ assemblies and asks pertinent questions to the speaker.
  • He is an articulate child who speaks fluently in English. His speech is clear and coherent.
  • He expresses his thoughts and ideas clearly. He is regular in bringing items for ‘Show and Tell’. He speaks confidently to the group. He also listens to his friends while they are speaking.
  • Long conversations bore him as also listening to ‘Show and Tell’.

Physical Development

  • Active and energetic, John enjoys being outdoors. He is agile on the jungle gym and runs very fast.
  • He participates well in organised games. His motor coordination is good.
  • Lucy takes long to finish her lunch. She seems to have strong reservations about some vegetables and food
  • She is being helped to have all that is served without indulging in strong likes and dislikes.
  • Her creativity is expressed in her artwork. Her work is meticulously done. She is innovative in her craft work.
  • Chris is learning to take care of his belongings. Very often he misplaces his books and stationery.
  • He is also yet to take responsibility for the classroom chores. He does not volunteer to do the classroom duties but when called upon by the teacher or friends, does a neat job.

End Of The Year

  • I have truly enjoyed getting to know Rose and wish her the very best in Kindergarten and beyond.
  • I have enjoyed having Tim in my room this year and will truly miss him as he moves on to Kindergarten.
  • Maya is a very special child and one that I will never forget. I will miss her next year.
  • Toby is a wonderful student, and I’m happy to have had him this year.
  • With her friendly, cooperative attitude, she will always be a pleasant addition to Kindergarten.
  • Thank you for your cooperation and assistance at home with James.
  • I enjoyed having Corey in my room.

Words and Phrases

Here are words and phrases that can be used and incorporated into reports:

Stressing The Positive

  • Words : thorough, caring, cooperative, growth, superior, quality, striving, seeking, attempting, admirable, consistent, persevering
  • Phrases : is able to, is strong in, has a good grasp of, independent learner, works hard, improved tremendously, is willing to take more risks, excels at, making good progress, does a great job with, has great potential for

Appreciating a Child's Unique Qualities

  • Words : energetic, creative, hard worker, risk taker, imaginative, persistent, diplomatic, innovative, cooperative, original, leader, eager, thoughtful, enthusiastic, perceptive, welcomes, problem solver
  • Phrases : interested in, positive attitude, interacts well with peers, thinks clearly, understands complex tasks, shows compassion, sets a standard for others, selects carefully, concentrates well, follows directions carefully, suggests new approaches, generates many original ideas, fluent reader, intrigued by, special talent for, skilled in, follows projects through to the end

Child Needs Extra Help

  • Words : requires, struggles, seldom, usually
  • Phrases : could profit by, shows a need for, finds it difficult at times to, it is helpful to, is challenged by, works best when, needs help with, I'm working with him/her to, had trouble with, making progress, seems reticent about, needs encouragement in, has a tendency to, let's find a way to solve this together

Words to be Wary of : Unable, can't, won't, always, never

When completing the end of year reports remember the main focus is to inform parents about their child's progress. It's important when writing reports they remain positive and can be used to encourage the child. It's a good learning opportunity as an Educator to take this time to reflect on the child's learning and to develop a meaningful understanding of each individual child.

References : Shivram, Bina "Reporting On The Kindergarten Child", Journal of Krishnamurti Schools, Issue 8 "Favourite Words and Phrases For Reports", Scholastic, Teachers Magazine "Report Card Comments", Lake Shore Learning

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325 amazing report card comments and remarks to save your time!

teacher giving report card comments

What's more difficult than creating your student report cards? Writing unique and meaningful report card comments. Creating report card comments and remarks can be a daunting and tedious task for teachers.

Every teacher will agree that writing unique report card comments is important as it helps the parents to understand their child's progress, they can take necessary action by understanding the report card comments.

We have made your task easier by providing a list of report card comments for every feedback category and applicable to all grades. Just copy and paste the comment, insert the student's name and you are good to go! You can edit and modify the comments as you like.

  • Save your time.
  • Help parents understand the feedback in a better way.

Achievement and Improvement - General Comments:

  • If _____ continues to put out the effort he has demonstrated in the last two reporting periods, he will benefit greatly from his education.
  • The following ideas might help him enhance his _____.
  • I'm hoping that the current level of enthusiasm and progress will continue.
  • In all academic disciplines, _____ is improving. She's having a hard time with____.
  • She has a long way to go, but if she works hard enough, she will see results soon.
  • _____ takes tremendous pride in his work and always completes it neatly.
  • _____ is a frequent volunteer who makes significant contributions to the class. She has a tendency to work too rapidly, which leads to a lot of unintentional mistakes. At home and at school, we can assist her in correcting this.
  • For his age, _____ is a hard worker with outstanding vocabulary skills. He likes to read and write.
  • The quality of _____'s work reflects her positive attitude. Thank you for all of your hard work.
  • Despite his best efforts, _____ finds it difficult to keep up with the rest of the class. Can we meet to discuss this?
  • As we mentioned at our latest meeting, ______'s work is not up to par. I am confident that with more effort and concentration, he will quickly improve.
  • _____ is genuinely interested in everything we do in class. She, on the other hand, is experiencing some difficulties with . Please go through this with her every night.

Achievement and Improvement - Academic Achievement:

  • In ______, _____ is quite strong.
  • _____ has received an excellent grade on his report card.
  • ______ is something that _____ knows a lot about.
  • _____ is a bright and hardworking student who excels in_____
  • In all of the fundamental subjects, _____ is performing admirably.
  • In ______, _____ is working over grade level.
  • _____ is particularly skilled at______.
  • Because of her low achievement level, _____ finds it challenging to keep up with the rest of the class.
  • In the domains of ____, _____ is capable of reaching a higher average.
  • We will concentrate on _____ in the coming term because _____ has had problems learning .
  • _____ is capable of doing a much better job.
  • Both you and I must continue to guide and assist _____.
  • To get her up to _____ grade level, _____ has been really cooperative and only needs to improve her social studies skills.
  • _____ has been getting poor grades on quizzes and tests.
  • _____ does not work to her full potential.
  • The material is tough for _____ to comprehend.

Achievement and Improvement - Improvement:

  • The independence of _____ is increasing.
  • _____ has steadily improved.
  • _____ has been steadily improving.
  • In ______, _____ has demonstrated a positive attitude toward wanting to improve.
  • _____ appears to be eager to learn more. In _______, _____ has experienced rapid expansion.
  • Academically, _____ is making steady progress.
  • The quality of _____'s work is improving.
  • _____ has improved her _____ abilities.
  • _____ has demonstrated a positive desire to improve herself in _____.
  • If he were more interested in _______, his performance would increase.
  • This reporting period, _____ has made significant progress.
  • I'm pleased to see that _____ is maturing well, and I hope that this trend continues.
  • The classroom attitude of _____ has improved.

Work habits - General Report Card Comments:

  • As I have stated in my reports, _______ does not manage his time effectively in class. Please explain to him that we study in class and play only at particular times during the school day.
  • When ______ is able to relax, she produces considerably better results. She does, however, frequently seek the attention of her peers, which causes everyone to be distracted.
  • _________ must continue to improve his work habits, as we mentioned in earlier meetings. We need to encourage him to take his work much more seriously.
  • ______ enjoys participating in artistic pursuits. However, I am concerned about how much time she spends painting when she has other responsibilities. Could we possibly meet to explore methods for assisting ________ in resolving this problem?
  • _______ is now working on grade-level material. I am confident, though, that he is capable of producing superior work. I'm confident that his work will improve as his attention improves.
  • ______ wastes a lot of his work time daydreaming and then fails to finish on time. He is capable of doing the work in the time provided, and he needs to get started.
  • _______ has done some good work, but it hasn't been consistent. She is a very gregarious and restless person who frequently does not complete her assignment on time. Thank you so much for your assistance at home. Please keep working with her on this matter.
  • _______ is very eager to do her work, yet she can be a nuisance to the other pupils. Despite the fact that she has made improvement in this area over the last month, she still has work to do.
  • ______ is having trouble because he frequently speaks out loud, disrupting the other pupils. He's working on changing this unhealthy behaviour, and he's made some progress in the last several weeks.
  • _________ needs to continue to improve his work habits, as we mentioned in earlier meetings. We must motivate him to take his task more seriously.
  • _______ has done some excellent work, but it hasn't been consistent. She is a social butterfly who is often agitated and frequently fails to complete her tasks on time. I appreciate your assistance at home. Continue to collaborate with her on this matter.
  • _______ is very eager to do her work, yet she can be a nuisance to the other pupils. She has made progress in this area over the last month, but she still has work to do.

Work habits - listening skills:

  • _____ is improving her ability to pay attention to directions.
  • _____ is working on improving her listening skills.
  • ______  is learning to listen and share.
  • _____ pays close attention to what is being said.
  • _____ is a hard worker who listens carefully.
  • _____ assesses what she hears.
  • All instructions must be followed by _____.
  • Directions are tough for _____ to follow.

Work habits - Quality of work:

  • The handiwork of _____ is superb.
  • _____ appreciates doing nice, meticulous work.
  • The work of _____ is tidy and precise.
  • _____ creates vibrant and intriguing artwork.
  • Work well done is something that _____ is proud of.
  • _____ is prone to making careless mistakes.
  • _____ is untidy.
  • Proofreading is something that _____ must do.

Work habits - Time management:

  • _____ is learning to use his free time wisely.
  • _____ is always efficient with her time.
  • _____ never finishes assignments in the time provided.
  • During work hours, _____ is getting more dependable.
  • _____ is on the verge of being self-sufficient.
  • _____ is growing more self-sufficient.
  • On assignments, _____ works autonomously.
  • _____ is unable to do individual assignments.
  • _____ is a good listener, but she needs to work faster.
  • _____ needs to be pushed.
  • _____ lacks self-sufficiency.
  • _____ is prone to being easily distracted.
  • _____ operates at a slow pace.
  • _____ does not finish assignments in the time allotted.
  • _____ appears unable to complete the required work.
  • _____ frequently completes work ahead of schedule.
  • _____ is indifferent about the value of time.
  • In his written work, _____ sacrifices accuracy for the sake of speed.

Work habits - Work potential and effort report card comments:

  • _____ has a lot of potential and is working hard to realise it.
  • _____ is performing to the best of his or her ability.
  • _____ is a dependable and conscientious worker.
  • _____ is enthusiastic about his or her job in general.
  • _____ is looking for information.
  • _____ is a dedicated student.
  • _____ is very conscientious.
  • _____ is a pleasant and responsible student.
  • _____ is a dedicated worker.
  • During the ___ period, _____ is a hard worker.
  • _____ is a respectful and conscientious student.
  • If _____ is to gain the fundamentals required for ____ grade work, he must improve his work habits.
  • _____'s efforts are inconsistent, particularly in ____.
  • When not directly supervised, _____ makes little effort. _____ is eager to please.

Personality and Attitude - General report card comments:

  • Although ______'s attitude toward his schoolwork has improved, it has not been consistent. Throughout the rest of the school year, he will require consistent guidance from both home and school.
  • This report card reflects _______'s attitude toward school. He could do better if he worked harder and cooperated more.
  • This reporting quarter reflects ______'s attitude toward our school rules, other students, and myself. She has the potential to be a successful student if she works hard enough.
  • As my previous reports have shown, _____ does not complete his schoolwork. He can do better if he makes the decision to work harder and finish his assignments.
  • Although _____'s attitude toward her classmates has improved, she still needs to be reminded to be respectful on a regular basis.
  • As we discussed in our last meeting, _______ has a negative attitude toward basic skills. Please continue to do a nightly review with her, focusing especially on .
  • Thank you for your enthusiasm for our class. I am pleased to report that ______ is improving in terms of his attitude in our classroom.
  • ______ has made great strides this year in terms of her attitude in the classroom and on the playground.
  • If ______ is to overcome her attitude and social difficulties, I will continue to need your assistance and support. If she can make a positive effort in this area, she will find school much more enjoyable.
  • ________'s attitude has improved over time. Thank you for your cooperation and support.

Personality and Attitude - Attitude:

  • _____ has a fantastic attitude.
  • _____ has a great attitude toward school.
  • _____ maintains a positive attitude toward school.
  • _____ takes responsibility well and has a pleasant demeanour.
  • _____ takes the initiative and thinks things through on his own.
  • _____ is changing his attitude toward __ grade.
  • _____ must improve his or her classroom demeanour.

Personality and attitude - Personality:

  • _____ is a nice student to work with.
  • _____ is an exceptionally thoughtful student.
  • _____ has a pleasant demeanour.
  • _____ is a pleasant and friendly person.
  • _____ is cooperative and content.
  • _____ is courteous and cooperative.
  • _____ has a friendly attitude.
  • _____ is a joy to be around.
  • _____ is a pleasant and helpful person.
  • _____ is a pleasant and cooperative youngster.
  • _____ is a cheerful, well-adjusted child, but_____.
  • _____ is self-assured and well-mannered.
  • We all enjoy _____'s sense of humour.
  • _____ is amusing and enjoys the stories we read.
  • _____ is easily disturbed.
  • _____ is prone to crying.
  • _____ appears tired a lot at school.
  • Although ____________'s social maturity is increasing, it is inconsistent.

Personality and Attitude - Participation:

  • _____ is excited about taking part.
  • _____ contributes significantly in class.
  • _____ is a frequent volunteer.
  • _____ is eager to participate in all classroom activities.
  • _____ is enthusiastic about what we do.
  • _____ contributes significantly.
  • _____ participates actively in discussions about ____
  • _____ responds nicely.
  • _____ addresses the group with confidence.
  • _____ takes turns speaking.
  • Participating in conversations and discussions is something that _____ enjoys doing.
  • In class, _____ should take an active role in the discussion.

End of Year - General Report Card Comments:

  • This year has seen a significant improvement in ______'s study habits. Please keep working on these abilities over the summer.
  • Thank you for your interest in this year's schoolwork of _____ . Her work will provide her with a great deal of satisfaction if she continues to put forth the effort.
  • ______ is a good citizen who works hard. I've had a great time having him in my class this year. Have a fantastic summer!
  • This year, ______ has matured nicely. His progress over the last three months has been impressive. I'm hoping that this effort and attitude will continue into the next school year.
  • Thank you for your interest in our class this year and for your support. ______ is a diligent student who should do well in the ____ grade.

End of Year - Phrases:

  • This year, both academically and socially, ______ has matured nicely.
  • ______'s friendly, genuine demeanour has made him a popular member of the __ grade.
  • This summer, ______ would benefit from reading a lot of library books.
  • If ______ is to succeed in the _____ grade, he must improve his reading speed and comprehension.
  • As the year progressed, ______ continued to bloom.
  • ______ made my year more enjoyable.
  • ______ is a very pleasant and willing worker who takes a keen interest in all of her work. It's been great having her in my room.
  • Thank you for the assistance I'm sure you've provided her.
  • Please continue with _____ review and as many reading experiences as possible over the summer.
  • Thank you for your interest in ______'s personality.
  • I'm sorry I couldn't meet you this year.
  • Thank you for your help.
  • With her friendly, cooperative demeanour, ______ will always be a welcome addition to any class.
  • I've had a good time being associated with ______.
  • I had a great time having ______ in my class.
  • It was a pleasure having ______ in my class.

Language Arts and Reading - Report Card Remarks:

  • ______'s reading has improved significantly over the course of the year. Please continue to read with her every night.
  • ______ is an excellent public speaker. Her written work, on the other hand, could be much better. With more effort, progress should be made gradually.
  • ______ has made significant progress in her creative writing. She's gotten better at using more colourful words.
  • ______ is making great strides in her reading of sight words. Please keep practising with him every night.
  • Since the beginning of the school year, ______'s spelling scores have significantly improved. The fact that he studies his spelling words every night has made a significant difference. Thank you for your assistance.
  • ______ is having trouble writing clear, fluent sentences, despite her best efforts. Is it possible for us to meet to discuss some useful strategies?

Language Arts and Reading - Listening:

  • ______ pays close attention to stories.
  • ______ can tell the difference between sounds in words.
  • ______ has trouble differentiating between sounds in words.

Language Arts and Reading - Reading and Vocabulary report card comments:

  • ______ picks up new words rapidly.
  • ______ needs to improve his reading speed and comprehension.
  • _______ has a well-developed reading vocabulary.
  • ______ is a voracious reader.
  • ______ is now aware of and proficient in the use of ____ consonant and vowel sounds.
  • The sounds ____ and ____ are mixed up by _____ .
  • ______ may blend short words without help by utilising the vowel(s) .
  • ______ is working on attacking words on his own.
  • The reading of ______ is.. (smooth, jerky, hesitant, rapid, irregular, or fluent).
  • ______ understands what she is reading.
  • ______ enjoys reading and is passionate about literature.
  • ______ is able to read and follow instructions.
  • _____ sight words are now recognised by ____ .
  • ______ enjoys reading.
  • To retain reading vocabulary, ______ requires a lot of repetition and practise.
  • ______ continues to mix up words that appear to be the same.
  • ______ is starting to read phrases and groupings of words.
  • The reading of ______ is getting habitual.
  • The reading of ______ is still not automatic.
  • ______ enjoys talking about the stories we've been reading.
  • ______ can read his sentences back

Language Arts and Reading- Speaking:

  • ______ uses entire sentences when speaking.
  • ______ expresses himself clearly.
  • (Pronouns, verbs) are difficult for ______ to correctly use.
  • Dramatization is something that ______ appreciates.
  • ______ possesses a strong oral vocabulary.
  • ______ employs proper punctuation.
  • When speaking, ______ utilises a lot of colourful words.
  • When speaking, ______ utilises (complicated, basic) sentences.
  • ______ takes part in a group storytelling session.

Language Arts and Reading - Writing:

  • ______ must use his or her abilities in all written work.
  • ______ is a fantastic writer of creative stories and poetry.
  • ______ can accurately arrange periods and question marks.
  • In his writing, ______ employs a variety of colourful words.
  • In her work, ______ employs (complicated, simple) sentences.
  • ______ can now compose a complete sentence on his own.
  • ______ can compose a two- to four-sentence original tale.
  • ______ arranges words in the correct sequence.
  • In writing, ______ demonstrates self-assurance.
  • ______ can put together a number of similar sentences.
  • ______ is working on expanding his spelling vocabulary.
  • To look up unusual words, ______ consults a dictionary.
  • ______ enjoys learning new words to spell.
  • ______ has an easy time learning to spell words.
  • ______ has a tendency of reversing letters in words.
  • ______ has trouble memorising non-phonetic word spellings.
  • To recall spelling, ______ makes use of hand or body motions.

General and Handwriting - General Report Card Remarks:

  • ______'s basic skills are all on grade level, but he is not working to his full potential.
  • Over the last quarter, ______'s schoolwork has improved. I sincerely hope that this work will continue.
  • ______'s actions are still inconsistent. She continues to struggle with obeying school rules and treating other pupils with respect. Please call to schedule a meeting. Thank you for your unwavering support and assistance from home. It's clear that you've been spending extra time with ______ on his schooling.
  • Since our last meeting, ______ has improved. I recommend that you keep working on ______ every night.
  • ______ is a well-mannered and vigilant ____ grader. He needs to be encouraged to engage in class because he is a quiet boy. Any assistance you can provide from your own home would be really valuable.
  • ______ has made a good transition to her new school. Could you please contact me as soon as you have moved into your new home to arrange a meeting?
  • ______ is becoming more self-assured.
  • ______ is adhering to grade-level standards.
  • ______ does a fantastic job in everything he does.
  • ______ is a hard worker who excels in all areas.
  • ______ is a person who thinks clearly.
  • ______'s thoughts are well-organized.
  • It is important to encourage ______ to .
  • ______ requires a lot of encouragement.
  • ______ is a creative person.
  • ______ is a frequent latecomer.
  • ______ takes a lot of time off.
  • ______ has not completed her makeup work.
  • ______ is a bright student who appears to ponder deeply.
  • ______ is quick to pick up on new concepts.
  • ______ is a person who talks a much.
  • ______ should devote more time to his or her allotted job.
  • ______ does not devote enough time to his or her homework.
  • ______ has to work on his or her self-control.
  • A meeting has been requested.
  • Please call to schedule a meeting.
  • Your unwavering cooperation and assistance are greatly appreciated.
  • It is conceivable for ______ to achieve higher grades than expected.

General and Handwriting - Handwriting:

  • The handwriting of ______ needs to be improved.
  • ______'s motor skills are good/ bad/ fine.
  • ______ can print along the lines.
  • ______ appropriately spaces letters and words.
  • The work of ______ is untidy.
  • ______ does not properly form letters.
  • Although some of ______'s printing is excellent, it is frequently clumsy in daily assignments.

Category wise:

  • Demonstrates perseverance in distance learning and serves as a role model for other students.
  • TEAMS is used to submit class assignments and communicate with teachers and classmates.
  • Has done an excellent job of navigating new technology and troubleshooting technical issues.
  • Completes asynchronous and autonomous work and always meets deadlines.
  • When it comes to completing learning assignments, she goes above and beyond in terms of detail and quality.
  • With online learning, ____ has successfully maintained his/her class demeanour and work habits.
  • _____ is methodical in his approach, thinks things through for himself, and is a quick and eager student.
  • _____ is fascinated by the nature of learning and always puts in his or her best effort to find the greatest available solutions.
  • _____ is a focused and enthusiastic participant in the online learning session, and works with zeal and determination.
  • _____ is able to reach his or her full potential, as evidenced by his or her contributions to conversations and work submitted.
  • Maintains focus in online learning despite technological challenges and changes associated with remote learning.
  • ___ enthusiastically engages in class discussions and works effectively with peers.
  • ___ takes charge of his or her own education and always asks for support when needed.
  • Always arrives on time for class and is a dedicated student.
  • ___ was usually well-prepared, well-organized, and enthusiastic about making the most of online classes.
  • ___ is a dedicated student who participates actively in class. His/her suggestions are useful and entertaining.
  • ___ takes an active interest in his or her own learning, pays close attention, and makes a concerted effort to avoid distractions that could disrupt the learning process.
  • ___ is a person who takes responsibility and accountability seriously. He or she makes sound decisions and is open to new ideas.
  • ___ gets along well with his peers and values varied viewpoints and experiences.
  • ___ is constantly looking for ways to assist in the classroom.
  • ___ is dependable and trustworthy, follows instructions well, and keeps his or her promises to himself and others.
  • In written and verbal communication, ___ is thoughtful, insightful, and comprehensive, and has a talent for clearly conveying his or her ideas.
  • When solving problems with students, ___ displays maturity and exhibits good communication skills when sharing thoughts and ideas about a certain topic/concept.
  • ___ excels at transferring classroom knowledge to real-world and real-life circumstances.
  • It's been a delight having ____'s energy, optimism, and maturity in my class.
  • ____ is a classmate who is eager about learning and willing to try new things.
  • During class, ____ is focused and willing to provide ideas.
  • With confidence and determination, ____ completes solo work.
  • ____ is a self-starter who takes pride in her job.
  • In class, ____ is attentive and eager to engage in discussions.
  • ____ is a very conscientious worker who puts in a lot of effort and attention on a daily basis.
  • In his or her daily labour, ____ makes a willing and conscientious effort.
  • ____ makes a conscious effort to study new things and improve his or her knowledge.
  • This term, ____ has done an outstanding job confronting and overcoming significant obstacles. Throughout the summer, please continue to foster and support this behaviour.
  • When given instructions, ____ takes responsibility and follows them.
  • ____ has trouble keeping on task and finishing his or her assignment.
  • He or she must pay close attention to directions in order to learn to operate autonomously.
  • Reminders about the regular classroom schedule are required. It would be beneficial to talk about the classroom routine at home.
  • Turns in incomplete work or no homework on a regular basis. Encouraging ____ to complete his or her work on time and according to the timetable and timeline set, so enhancing his or her organisational skills.
  • Does not actively participate in group activities; therefore, is encouraged to put forth effort in order to improve communication skills as well as attention and confidence.
  • ___ was an active participant in online learning sessions, but she needed to be reminded from time to time to allow other students to share their work and ideas as well.
  • ___ participates enthusiastically in online group activities, but finds it difficult to work independently.

Below Average:

  • During class, ___'s engagement and behaviour are inconsistent and disengaged.
  • ___ is having trouble grasping concepts. It would be useful to pay more attention to the required tasks and to attend the online classes on a regular basis.
  • When it comes to schoolwork, ___ needs a lot of help from adults. She has trouble grasping simple concepts and is unable to work on her own.
  • In the online learning environment, ___ struggled to engage and participate in discussions and activities.
  • ___ has not worked hard enough to satisfy the grade level objectives. It would be great to have regular work habits, active engagement, and the ability to clarify doubts.
  • ___ needs to pay greater attention to guidance throughout lessons in order to apply concepts learned and complete given assignments.
  • ___ would benefit from demonstrating a stronger desire to participate in class discussions.
  • ___ needs to be reminded to pay attention during instructions and lessons on a regular basis.
  • ___ has trouble focusing in class, which hinders his or her ability to participate fully in class activities and tasks.
  • ___ is encouraged to make good use of his or her time in order to finish things on schedule.
  • ___ is encouraged to take greater responsibility for completing chores without the need for frequent reminders.
  • ___ must demonstrate that he or she is engaged in the learning process through the quality of his or her work and the efficient use of class time.

Use EduCloud Report Card system to create reports with inbuilt report card comment bank. Save your own comments for future use.

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Pre-K Report Card

Report Cards for Preschool and Pre-K

Printable, Electronic Pre-K Report Card

The electronic report card was designed to make filling out report cards easier for Preschool and Pre-K teachers.

With the electronic report card there are just 3 easy steps to follow and your report cards are done, never fill out report cards by hand again!

Each report card is 2 pages per student and includes an electronic comments section and a space for parents to sign.

Electronic Report Card for Preschool and Pre-K

What makes the electronic report card different?

  • Fillable Class List: Type student names directly into the document.
  • Magic Wand: Just type student names in the class list, then click the magic wand and watch the magic happen! The report cards instantly populate student names on each report card for you!
  • Comment Fields: 7 comment fields with multiple comments to choose from! Just click the dropdown arrows, then select your preferred comments! No more writing comments by hand!
  • Personalized Comments: After you choose your preferred comments, select “personalize” to automatically populate all your comments with student names!

This is the ultimate report card for Pre-K and Preschool!

Report Card Frequently Asked Questions

  • What if I have more than one class or more than 24 students? Just save the document with a new name and now you have another set of report cards!
  • What happens next year? Just open the document and save with a new name, then erase the old names and start over.
  • What happens if I send report cards home more than once a year? Easy Peasy! Just save the first set with a specific name, such as “report-cards-oct-2015″, then save again the next time with another name such as “report-cards-jan-2016″ etc.

Report Card Skills

What skills are covered in this report card?

  • Letter Identification: Upper and Lowercase
  • Phonological Awareness: Letter Sounds, Rhyming, Syllables, Onset-Rime, Segmenting Phonemes
  • Stages of Writing
  • Early Literacy Skills
  • Numeral Recognition: 0-20
  • Math: One-to-One Correspondence, Patterns, Sorting
  • Color and Shape Recognition
  • Physical Development
  • Social Emotional Development

Report Card Comments

Report Card comments section includes comments for the following areas:

  • Interpersonal
  • Following Directions
  • Interest in Learning
  • Intrapersonal
  • Self-Regulation

Please read the Product FAQ’s before you make a purchase. All products are sent via email as digital downloads, nothing will be sent via postal mail.

You can find the Pre-K Assessment Packet HERE and the Pre-K Progress Report HERE .

Important Report Card Info

Can I buy the report card and use it for my entire school or district? Your purchase of any document from Pre-K Pages is for one single user (teacher). To use the electronic report card (or any purchased document) for more than one user you will need to purchase multiple copies, one per teacher. For more than ten users please contact me for a multiple user license quote. The report card isn’t working, what should I do? After you receive the link to your report card via email, download and save the document to a safe location on your computer. Then, navigate to the location where the document was saved and open it in Adobe Reader. Your version of Adobe Reader must be current to use the document properly. If you are experiencing difficulty with the magic wand or other advanced features this is an indication you have opened the document in ‘preview’ mode, which ​does not support the advanced features offered in this product. You must use Adobe Reader to open the document or the advanced features will not be fully functional. Can I change, add, or delete the skills assessed on the report card? No, the document is not editable. I don’t teach Pre-K or Preschool, can you make a custom electronic report card for me? Maybe. Please know that the skill required to create an electronic document of this sort requires many hours of highly skilled Javascript coding. If your school or district is willing to make the investment please contact me to receive a quote.

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107 Report Card Comments to Use and Adapt

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Written by Justin Raudys

Reviewed by Sarah Tino, M.Ed.

See your students' performance at a push of a button

With Prodigy's reports, teachers can easily track student progress and see their strengths and growth opportunities – all while the student has fun playing Prodigy Math!

  • Teacher Resources

Learning skills (positive comments)

Learning skills (needs improvement), addition and subtraction, skip counting, place value, comparing numbers, addition with regrouping.

  • Word problems
  • Language (general)

Reading responses

Reading comprehension, response journal, note taking, distance learning.

  • Tips for writing effective report cards
  • Key considerations for effective end-of-year report cards

Just about every teacher agrees: report card comments are important to provide insights and next steps to students and families. But there are few who actually look forward to writing them.

Because every instructor knows working under tight deadlines to create upwards of 20 unique and detailed reports at the end of the year or term isn’t exactly straightforward (or particularly fun). That's especially true in the era of distance learning.

And while no one at your school knows your students better than you do, writing valuable report card comments for each of them can be a huge challenge.

That’s why we created a list of 107 sample report card comments — starters to help you find ideas, inspiration, and insights while writing your own report cards.

The 107 report card comments in this list will help you:

  • Instill a  growth mindset in students
  • Build stronger home-to-school connections
  • Write stronger leads and use livelier language
  • Choose the right phrasing when writing positive and constructive report card comments

Report card comment starters

You'll notice that the report card comments below can act as a springboard for more fully developed ones. But don't worry, using them you'll be able to take some of these one-liners and turn them into insightful and actionable next steps!

For example, you'll be able to take a 1st grade number sense comment like "Your child is able to add and subtract numbers up to 20 using various manipulatives" and transform it into:

Your child is able to add and subtract numbers up to 20 using various manipulatives. This was evident when he was working independently to solve a real-world problem by adding toys in the classroom toy bin. As a next step, they should continue to add to larger numbers to encourage his skills. You can support him by asking him to add his own toy piles at home.

Or taking a responsibility-related learning skill comment from "Your child is able to take responsibility for her own actions both in and out of the classroom" to:

Your child is able to take responsibility for her own actions both in and out of the classroom. She often checks her agenda and day planner to make sure she has all of the necessary materials to complete work at home before leaving. During indoor recess, she takes time to tidy up everything she was playing with.

Notice the difference?

Compared to a single number or letter grade, report card comments can provide even more value to your students and their families. In other words, a number or letter or grade captures the what , while an accompanying comment captures the how .

Depending on the age group or grade level you teach, a letter or grade letter might be enough. However, research in Phi Delta Kappan, the professional journal for educators, suggests:

Comments that identify what students did well, what improvements they need to make, and how to make those improvements, provided with sensitivity to important contextual elements, can guide students on their pathways to learning success and ensure that all learn excellently.

Gather insights into student performance all year long and make report card writing easier with Prodigy, the adaptive math game that students love.

  • ________ is confident, positive and a great role model for his/her classmates.
  • ________ is frequently among the first to help and mentor other classmates. He/she is a valuable part of the classroom.
  • ________ has shown excellent ability to set goals and be persistent in achieving them.
  • ________ is interested in his/her own learning, listens attentively, and makes a solid effort to avoid distractions that could interrupt the learning process.
  • ________ is accountable and responsible. He/she makes smart decisions, admits mistakes and listens to opportunities to improve.
  • ________ relates well to classmates and is appreciative of different perspectives and experiences.
  • ________ manages his/her emotions maturely and responds to feedback appropriately.
  • ________ always looks for ways to be helpful in the classroom.
  • ________ is dependable and reliable, follows directions effectively, and follows through on his/her commitments to him/herself and others.
  • ________ is thoughtful, insightful and thorough in written and verbal communication, and has a talent for expressing his/her ideas clearly.
  • ________ works well with classmates in group work and often takes a leadership role.
  • ________ shows a positive attitude with classmates in group projects and activities, and both takes and gives suggestions and directions effectively.
  • ________ shows maturity when solving problems with classmates and uses good communication.
  • ________ excels at applying what he/she learns in the classroom to real-world and real-life situations.
  • It has been a pleasure to have _______'s enthusiasm, positivity and maturity in my class.
  • ________ is an enthusiastic member of the class and shows a willingness to learn.
  • ________ shows responsible behavior, works well with a group and shows appreciation for the efforts of classmates.
  • ________ is focused during classroom activities and willingly participated in class discussions.
  • ________ performs independent work with confidence and focus.
  • ________ works independently and takes pride in work done well.
  • ________ is focused in class and willingly participates in group discussion.
  • ________ is very conscientious and shows excellent effort and care with daily work.
  • ________ demonstrates a willing and conscientious effort in his/her daily work.
  • ________ shows a conscientious effort to learn.
  • ________ has done a great job facing and overcoming big challenges this year. Please continue to nurture and encourage this behavior over the summer.
  • ________ shows responsibility and follows directions whenever they are given.
  • ________ listens to and follows directions precisely and attentively.
  • ________ follows directions promptly and accurately.
  • ________ is an active participant in class.
  • ________ is a hard worker who calmly perseveres through challenging topics.
  • ________ is encouraged to demonstrate more responsible attitudes and behavior in the classroom.
  • ________ needs to show more appropriate behavior when interacting with classmates.
  • ________ needs to pay attention to the use of appropriate language at all times
  • ________ requires encouragement to listen attentively during group sharing times.
  • ________  needs to listen to directions more attentively during lessons.
  • ________ would benefit from showing a greater desire to contribute ideas in class.
  • ________ needs frequent reminders to be attentive during instructions and lessons.
  • ________ needs to improve his/her cooperation in group settings. He/she should work on voicing feelings and opinions and listening to others.
  • ________ needs to improve his/her work with others. He/she must ensure to accept a share of the work when participating in a group assignment.
  • ________ needs to improve on working independently and be sure to ask for assistance only when it is needed.
  • ________ often struggles to focus in class, which harms his/her ability to engage well with class activities and assignments.
  • ________ is encouraged to use time wisely to finish tasks in the time required.
  • ________ is encouraged to be more responsible in completing tasks without needing regular reminders.
  • ________ needs to show by the quality of work and use of class time that he/she is properly engaged in the learning process.
  • ________ consistently needs reminders to focus on time management.
  • ________ needs to follow classroom rules more closely throughout the school day.

Math (general comments)

  • ________ is having considerable difficulty with math. I recommend he/she work on studying ________ and ________. This extra practice will help him/her feel more relaxed when doing math in the classroom. Please contact me if you need materials to get him/her started.
  • ________ has a good understanding of all math concepts taught so far this year. He/she continues to turn in excellent assignments and especially enjoys hands-on math activities.
  • ________  has a positive attitude towards math but continues to have trouble in a few key areas. He should practice every evening at home. Areas that need extra attention are ________  and ________ .
  • ________  demonstrates a good understanding of all math concepts studied and communicates with clarity and good justification of reasoning.
  • ________ needs to work on increasing his/her speed in math facts. He/she should continue with daily practice with a focus on addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.
  • ________ seems to need continuous encouragement in math. He/she continues to struggle with basic math concepts for his/her grade level.
  • ________ is having a difficult time in certain areas of math. Areas in need of extra work are ________ . Working on these problem areas every night would help improve his/her learning outcomes.
  • ________ is struggling to keep up in math. He/she could benefit from practicing the multiplication table and should also continue to practice the long division process.
  • ________ is easily distracted during math lessons and behavioral issues are interfering with his/her learning. We will be working on more difficult subjects and he/she will struggle if he/she does not pay attention in class.
  • ________ is having trouble with math tests. He/she does well on assignments, but does not seem to retain information for tests. I always give a week’s notice before tests, so please be sure ________ studies and adequately prepares for them as they approach.
  • ________ is able to calculate addition and subtraction facts to 18 with confidence and accuracy.
  • ________  is becoming more able to calculate addition and subtraction facts to 18 with confidence and accuracy.
  • ________  requires more time and practice in calculating addition and subtraction facts to 18
  • ________ needs to put more effort into learning to calculate addition and subtraction facts to 18.
  • ________  is able to skip count forward and backward by twos, fives, tens, and hundreds to complete short patterns.
  • ________  is learning to skip count forward and backward by twos, fives, tens, and hundreds to complete short patterns.
  • ________  needs practice with skip counting forward and backward by twos, fives, tens, and hundreds to complete short patterns.
  • ________  needs considerable practice with skip counting forward and backward by twos, fives, tens, and hundreds to complete short patterns.
  • ________  is able to demonstrate place value concepts to give meaning to numbers from zero to 1000, identifying ones, tens, and hundreds.
  • ________  is developing an understanding of place value concepts to give meaning to numbers zero to identifying ones, tens, and hundreds.
  • ________  requires more time and practice to demonstrate place value concepts to give meaning to numbers 0 to 1000, identifying ones, tens, and 100s.
  • ________ is able to compare numbers to 1000 using terms such as greater or less and greatest or least.
  • ________ is learning to compare numbers to 1000 using terms such as greater or less and greatest or least.
  • ________ requires support to compare numbers to 1000 using terms such as greater or less and greatest or least.
  • ________ demonstrates a limited understanding in comparing numbers to 1000 using terms such as greater or less and greatest or least.
  • ________ can demonstrate and explain the process of addition of whole numbers up to 100, with and without regrouping.
  • ________ requires ongoing support to demonstrate and explain the process of addition of whole numbers up to 100 with and without regrouping.
  • ________ requires considerable attention and individual instruction to demonstrate and explain the process of addition of whole numbers up to 100 with and without regrouping.

Word problems (math)

  • ________ is able to complete word problems using one- and two-digit addition, showing his/her work and writing a full sentence answer.
  • ________ is becoming more confident in his/her ability to complete word problems using one- and two-digit addition, showing his/her work and writing a full sentence answer.

As we move into language and literacy, the following sections include starter report card comments which cover reading, writing, oral communication and critical thinking skills.

Language arts (general)

  • ________ ’s (comprehension, spelling, reading) has greatly improved, but he/she still needs extra work in (comprehension, spelling, reading). Please contact me if you need supplemental learning materials to use at home for practice.
  • ________  is conscious of putting care into his/her daily writing work, and frequently goes beyond the minimum requirements for assignments.
  • ________ has trouble with his handwriting. I believe he/she can form letters well, but has to slow down and take a little more time. Neater handwriting will improve his/her schoolwork overall.
  • ________ makes a good effort to make his/her handwriting legible. He/she is able to print on the lines, use good spacing, and form letters correctly.
  • ________ needs to focus on her spelling. More improvement is needed in the areas of (dictation, weekly spelling tests, sentence structure). Daily practice at home will help improve his/her results.
  • ________ shows the ability to quickly use spelling, punctuation and grammar rules that were recently taught. He/she is able to quickly learn new skills and is eager to apply them to his/her writing.
  • ________ is having considerable difficulty with reading, particularly with fluency and comprehension.
  • ________ speaks well in front of the class, but requires improvement in written language. He/she is having trouble with (dictation, copying words correctly, story writing, creating logical sequences). Further practice is needed in this area.
  • ________ continues to make excellent progress in spelling and reading. He/she works hard to submit work that is free of grammatical errors.
  • ________ has difficulty remembering previously discussed writing skills and often makes errors with punctuation, grammar, and overall sentence structure. Basic writing skills need improvement.
  • ________ is able to offer direct responses to his/her readings and supports ideas with sound reasoning and specific examples.
  • ________ is learning to offer more direct responses to her reading experiences supported by reasons, examples, and details.
  • ________ needs frequent support to offer direct responses to his/her reading experiences supported by reasons, examples, and details.
  • ________ shows good ability when completing reading comprehension tests.
  • ________ would benefit from extra practice with reading aloud and discussion of content.
  • ________ consistently demonstrates comprehension of short spoken texts by answering questions, and explaining the events described.
  • ________ consistently reads grade-level material independently.
  • ________ uses good editing skills and correctly places capitals, quotation marks, question marks, apostrophes, commas, and periods.
  • ________ is doing a good job of breaking a story into paragraphs
  • ________ determines various forms of writing and identifies important ideas through the development of insightful questions and answers.
  • ________ is able to analyze character actions, story plots, and shows strong fluency with reading.
  • ________ uses correct spelling, grammar and punctuation when writing simple sentences.
  • ________ is encouraged to show increased attention to the use of correct spelling, grammar and punctuation with general writing skills.
  • ________ needs more time and practice in the use of correct spelling, grammar and punctuation with general writing skills.
  • ________ requires considerable assistance to achieve the correct spelling, grammar and punctuation when writing simple sentences.
  • ________ shows an excellent understanding of note taking from lectures and readings in preparation for tests and assignments.
  • ________ requires ongoing support to develop an understanding of note taking from lectures and readings in preparation for tests.
  • ________ was very engaged and focused during distance learning activities, and participated in class discussions.
  • ________ stayed motivated to complete assignments during distance learning, and turned in all required materials on time. 
  • ________ needed some extra prompting to stay engaged during online lessons, but participated well in discussions when called upon. 
  • ________ modeled good online learning behavior for other students.
  • ________ was disruptive during online learning and did not meaningfully participate in class discussions.
  • ________ handled technical problems well and was always prepared.
  • Although he/she couldn’t always access a device, _________ consistently completed online assignments and asked thoughtful questions.
  • ________ should ask more questions during online discussions to avoid confusion later.
  • ________’s attendance during online lessons was infrequent and assignments were not always completed.
  • ________ worked well independently and in a group setting during distance learning activities.
  • ________ is excellent at completing distance learning activities independently, but struggled to engage with his/her classmates during breakout sessions or class discussions.
  • ________ is a technology superstar! He/she rarely needed assistance and even helped other classmates troubleshoot issues.
  • ________ asks good questions and always reaches out proactively when he/she needs help with an assignment or lesson.

Tips for teachers to write more effective student report card comments

1. give yourself extra time and start writing comments early.

Teacher at desk writing with paper and pen.

Somewhere around the halfway point to your deadline for report cards, you make your best effort to use time at the end of each week to reflect — and jot down notes — about your students’ performance and class week.

What are their strengths and weaknesses? How are their social skills developing with classmates? How is their class participation - are they an enthusiastic learner? Have they shown great improvement in one particular subject area? Are homework assignments getting done? Have any new challenges come up that affect learning?

Even just a few minutes of note-taking in the weeks preceding report card deadlines will help to ease your stress when the time comes to write your final comments.

Moreover, having a dated log of information detailed throughout the school year will help you remember how students are performing throughout each week, which can be valuable information come parent-teacher conference time.

This will also help to engage and reassure parents who want relevant and detailed commentary about their child’s performance at school.

2. Use free, curriculum-aligned apps for teachers

Prodigy Math screenshot.

Use Prodigy to write insightful report cards with a minimum of hassle. Prodigy Math is an engaging math adventure for students where success depends on correctly answering adaptive math questions. 

As students play, you’ll get insights into:

  • Which skills students are practicing
  • How far they’ve progressed through the curriculum
  • What they’ve mastered and where they need more support

Use one of Prodigy’s eight reports to track student progress throughout the year. When the time comes to write report card comments, you’ll have detailed reports on all your students’ achievements.

Just getting started with Prodigy? No problem! The first time students explore the world of Prodigy Math, they’ll start completing the Placement Test — without even knowing. Once they’re done, you’ll have a snapshot of the grade level they’re at, what they know and specific skills they still need to work on.

Five middle school students sitting at a row of desks playing Prodigy Math on tablets.

Spend more time teaching and less time grading

Prep for standardized tests, deliver adaptive skill practice or test students on a new skill — all while they play Prodigy Math, Prodigy English, or both!

3. Be encouraging, informational and professional

Teacher writing at desk.

Although every report card cannot be glowingly positive, do strive to write in an encouraging and informational tone. As you write constructive report card comments, use encouraging language that focuses on the student’s opportunity for improvement.

For example, instead of describing a student struggling with listening as a “bad listener,” remark that the student “would benefit from listening more carefully.”

If appropriate, frame a negative comment in terms of what students are doing well -- and consider how this more successful characteristic can help them bolster performance in other areas.

4. Use a consistent format

Two teachers walking together in hall.

Lead your report card comments with the positive comments, followed by areas that need more attention.

Choosing the right format for reporting information will simplify the entire process, while resulting in a clearer and more organized final product.

If you are unclear about your school’s format for report cards, request samples or consult with other teachers or staff members to clarify.

5. Be honest

Teacher using tablet with student in class.

Being open and honest about a student’s performance requires tact and consideration with regard to how you  express  those comments. Be transparent, and remain mindful that your goal is to improve your students’ learning experience.

Openness and honesty are key to ensuring that experience is the best it can be. If possible, discuss what  intervention strategies  you can use to help improve the student’s learning outcomes. 

As elementary teacher Donna Donaghue remarks in her book  A Guide for Beginning Elementary Teachers: Getting Hired and Staying Inspired :

If there is a problem, most parents will be grateful to you for telling them and will want to help you correct it as soon as possible. Many problems that show up at school are also problems noticed at home, so your comments will not surprise parents. Ideally, at some point prior to receiving the progress report, parents have already discussed the problem with you.

6. Move on if you get stuck

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If you get stuck completing the comments for a particular student, move on to your other students and return to it later. You will likely have more trouble completing comments for students who have multiple areas needing further improvement and attention.

Feel free to move on and return to those students periodically or as you find the right language to express your insights.

7. Keep parents and guardians in mind

Teacher sitting with student in class.

While every report card comment is ultimately about your student, think of your students’ parents or guardians as much as possible and offer suggestions for their participation.

In fact, if you can, keep parents up to date on an ongoing basis. This will help ensure they don't get caught off guard by any of your comments.

As you make note of your students’ strengths and weaknesses, endeavor to include practical insights into how parents can involve and support their child at home. If possible, make reference to how you use  differentiated instruction  to support the student in question.

Simple examples of tips for parents include:

  • "Encourage your child to read. It doesn't have to be on your own either. Dedicating time before bed to read together can help make it seem like less of a chore."
  • "Find homework help for your child if needed. Myself and other parents who are also getting homework help for their child are great resources to get started."
  • "Ensure that your child completes their homework by creating a homework routine with your family where incentives like TV or computer time come after homework."
  • "Help your child with organization skills at home. If a room in your house could be tidier, try using that as an opportunity to sort things like toys or dishes and utensils."
  • "Help your child prepare for math tests by focusing their skills in addition and subtraction. If they don't like studying with traditional worksheets, try a digital game-based learning tool to help get them excited about the process."

As high school educator and teaching comprehension expert Anne Goudvis writes in her book Strategies That Work:

It is important that you include the parents in your comment so they know the child’s education is a joint mission. Sometimes you need to sound firm so that parents know you need their help and that you will not allow their child to continue inappropriate behavior.

8. Try not to repeat yourself

Teacher writing report card comments on desk.

It is unlikely that your students or parents will compare their report card comments, but it is still a best practice to aim for unique commentary for each student that reflects each, individual learning outcome.

9. Proofread, even if you don’t want to

Report card time is perhaps your busiest period of the year, and it is understandable that you want to simply get them over with.

Despite this, you should make sure to double check all your comments before hitting print and handing them out. All your communications to parents are a reflection of you as a teacher, and should mirror the care and attention you show your students in class.

10. Notify parents

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Make use of your school’s parent portal or email system to let parents know — as needed — that report card time is coming up.

This will help parents be prepared, and will also ensure that any important questions they may have are addressed before the final report cards are delivered.

Did you know?

If you're using Prodigy Math in your classroom, you can connect parents to follow their child's progress. A free parent account comes with a monthly report card and insights into classroom learning, helping them stay informed of how their child is doing in class. They can also send their child an encouraging message to cheer their child on as they play and practice skills in Prodigy!

11. Use specific examples with the help of direct observation

Student and teacher working together in class.

Record and use classroom anecdotes in your assessments. No matter how involved you are in your students’ progress, it can still be difficult to produce specific examples related to their performance if you haven’t recorded them along the way.

When you notice a positive or negative skill, ability, strength, or weakness in a class activity or assignment, be sure to note it down so that you may refer to it in your report card comments. Likewise, consider noting a sample of a student’s work every week or two.

To help with ease of access, keep ongoing files of this work in a personal folder or use a digital tool such as a Google Doc.

Putting this into practice is a time-saver and helps prevent last-minute stress. A strategy like direct observation and note-taking (as soon as possible) is far more reliable than trying to recall information and behaviors from weeks or months prior.

12. Try using tech to help

Writer's block happens to all of us, including teachers. If the report card comments in this article didn't help, fear not, there are still plenty of tools and resources to give you a helping hand.

One new option for teachers is using artificial intelligence (AI) to assist with report card ideas. For example, teachers can use tools like ChatGPT to generate examples for their specific needs.

When using chat technology, try to keep your prompt concise and easy to follow. A good template prompt to follow is:

"Write [number] report card comments for students studying [subject] in [grade]."

Here are some more specific examples to help get you started:

  • Write 50 report card comments for students studying social studies in 5th grade.
  • Generate 20 report card remarks commending a student for a positive attitude to learning.
  • Create 10 report card comments that focus on a student needing to improve their attitude to learning.

Alternatively, you can use spreadsheets and report card builders to manually piece together a report card based on a template of comments.

Important tip: When using AI chat technology, make sure you don't submit any personal details about you or your students. Instead let the tool use a placeholder like "Student".

Key considerations for report card comments at the end of the year

Report card comments should aim to deliver feedback to students and parents that is  personalized, detailed,  and  meaningful .

Teacher looking stressed at desk.

Writing report card comments doesn’t have to be stressful. Use these strategies to create livelier, more meaningful evaluations.

Effective report card comments emphasize and discuss:

  • The specific, notable strengths that a student has shown and should attempt to continue to show
  • The specific elements of knowledge, skills, and other outcomes recognized in the curriculum that are the most pertinent to a student’s achievement or development in the period of assessment
  • The major next steps for improvement that will: identify the student’s most important learning needs, offer next steps for students and offer specific recommendations for how parents and guardians can help the student’s learning habits and skills (or the development of those habits and skills)

Effective report card comments are personalized – customized to each, individual student – and discuss:

  • The student’s learning preferences, willingness to learn, and interests
  • Detailed evidence of learning or skill-development gathered from in-class observations, and/or student assignments

Effective report card comments are expressed with clear and simple phrasing, using:

  • An encouraging and/or positive tone
  • Language that is easy to understand for both students and parents, as opposed to educational jargon used from the curriculum

Report Card Comments: Final Thoughts

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Common Sense Education observes that "effective parent communication is crucial in helping students learn. But, for busy teachers it can be challenging just to keep up... Transparency and equity are key to managing any communication between home and school."

Personalized report card comments that are clear, precise, and meaningful are essential for informing students and their parents about what students have learned, what their strengths are and how they can effectively progress.

Among the pressure and deadlines of writing report cards, it can be helpful to keep these key goals in mind.

Get inspired by the report card comment examples — and strategies for success — above to ensure that precision, clarity, and meaning shine through in your report card comments.

When it comes time to hand out your report cards, you can do so with the full confidence that you are doing yourself — and each of your students — the justice your hard work deserves.

Gather student insights on Prodigy

Create or log in to your free teacher account on Prodigy — a standards-aligned, game-based learning platform that assesses student progress and performance as they play. Use Prodigy to motivate student learning, control the questions they answer as they play and collect student learning insights all year long.

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Report Card Comments For Kindergarten End Of The Year

Positive report card comments based on students group work.

These are 10 positive report card comments based on a students group work:

  • provides constructive feedback to peers.
  • accepts peer recommendations and acts on them when necessary.
  • is receptive to other peoples ideas and opinions in the group.
  • takes on various and active roles in the workgroup environment.
  • enjoys taking on leadership roles in groups.
  • demonstrates fairness in the delegation of group tasks.
  • carefully plans and executes group activities.
  • collaborates with peers democratically.
  • encourages the groups other members to perform better.
  • keeps the workgroup on track and focused.

Esl Report Card Comments

As a teacher you want to see all your students succeed. One way to encourage or instruct them is through report card comments. For ESL teachers, these comments will focus on reading, writing, and grammar.

In order for ESL report card comments to be helpful, they will need to be specific, instructive, and concise.

As much as possible, you will want to write comments in a positive, affirmative tone, particularly when addressing areas that might need improvement.

You can also use report card comments to help set goals or milestones for the students.

Below we have compiled a list of 120 ESL report card comments to help you communicate with your students and guide them to English language proficiency.

Sample Report Card Comments

Lets take a look at some examples of kindergarten report card comments often found at the end of a students report card.

These sample report card comments are broken down into categories for positive, needs improvement, and suggestions for home. Then, we will look at ways you can compile these comments into well-written paragraphs for the parents.

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Positive Report Card Comments Based On Students Social Skills

Below are 10 positive report card comments based on a students social skills:

  • makes friends quickly.
  • is well-liked by their peers.
  • deals with peer disagreements in a mature manner.
  • treats other students with respect and fairness.
  • is a well-liked student in the class.
  • has empathy for peers and others.
  • appears to be at ease when confronting challenges.
  • enjoys conversing with friends.
  • spends their free time with friends.
  • makes their friends laugh and smile.

Encouraging A Phone Call With Parents:

Report Card Comments &  PhrasesEnd of Year

There are some times when a child doesnt turn in any work to be assessed. This situation is exceptionally difficult to handle with report card comments and should probably be mentioned ahead of time. Write something positive about the childs personality while requesting a parent meeting or phone call. Some examples are:

  • Your student is always respectful, but I am concerned about their work. When can we meet?
  • Your child is inquisitive and engaged in class, but they have quite a bit of missing work. Please call me to discuss some strategies.
  • Your child has a wonderful sense of humor/is helpful/is kind but fails to turn in their assignments. Lets meet to come up with a plan to move forward.
  • Lets work on strategies that will help your student follow through on their assignments.

Also Check: Sight Words List Kindergarten Printables

Report Card Comments For Students Whose Skills Are Proficient:

Let the parent know all the positives about their child and perhaps encourage students to dig just a little bit deeper.

  • Your student comes to school each day prepared to work hard.
  • I appreciate that your student does their best every single day.
  • Your student is an enthusiastic member of the class and shows a willingness to learn.
  • I enjoy how invested your child is in their learning.
  • I appreciate your childs dedication to their studies in my class.
  • Not only is your student strong academically, but they are also a leader in the classroom.
  • I appreciate that your student is always committed to doing their best.
  • Your student understands the material well. Lets find a way to help them shine.
  • Your child has the potential to be at the top of the class.
  • With a little more effort, your child could move up to the advanced group in .
  • Your child puts in great work in ! If they apply those skills to , theres no stopping them.
  • Your child excels at applying what he/she learns in the classroom to real-world and real-life situations. With a little more work, they could really go far!

Recommended Reading: Is Kindergarten Mandatory In Nj

Report Card Comments For All Grades

Report card comments are a vital component of a childs education. A small but meaningful comment can make a HUGE difference in the classroom experience. However, it can take forever to create custom comments for every student while still making an impact.

Good news: we have created 180 report card comments for all grades, including preschool and kindergarten, for you. Youre sure to find the perfect comment for every student below.

The 180 comments you see in this article can be leveraged to create dynamic feedback based on studentsâ performance.

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Positive Report Card Comments Based On Students Work Habits

Below are 10 positive report card comments based on a students work habits:

  • s attention to detail helps to avoid careless mistakes.
  • always double-checks work before submitting it.
  • completes homework assignments regularly.
  • creates awe-inspiring home projects.
  • demonstrates self-discipline.
  • exceeds expectations in terms of work quality.
  • is a responsible and hardworking student.
  • is a student that possesses self-motivation skills.
  • is self-sufficient and independent.
  • makes good use of unscheduled class time.

Writing report card comments is critical to improving student learning, but it can take a long time. If you have a class of 20+ students and you want to leave 2-3 comments on each report card, it will take a while to write the 40-60 comments. Using Text Blaze can help you make the process more efficient by allowing you to use text snippets to create your abbreviations and comments.

Teaching can be tough, and the last thing you need to worry about as a teacher is trivial writing tasks. There are just a lot of other important things on your plate. We understand that, and thats why we created Text Blaze : a tool that can help you get back to what matters!

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Play Based Learning Strong

  • Plays well with other children.
  • Has begun to develop cooperative play skills such as sharing and taking turns.
  • Is a creative and imaginative learner.
  • Engages in strong exploratory and discovery play behaviors without prompting.
  • Is enthusiastic and engaged when given developmentally appropriate resources to play with.
  • Thrives in unstructured play environments where she can explore, learn and discover in her own time.
  • Has started to use extended vocabulary well during play scenarios.
  • Is great at taking measured risks during play which reveals great self-confidence for her age.

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Faqs About Preschool Report Card Comments

Q 1. How do you write preschool comments for assessment reports?

You highlight the students achievements and deficiencies in preschool comments for assessment reports and highlight what they are good at.

Q 2. What are some positive preschool comments for assessment reports?

Some positive preschool comments for assessment reports include: keep it up, youve done an excellent job, youre doing superbly, good luck!

Q 3. How do you end preschool comments for assessment reports?

You end preschool comments for assessment reports with positive affirmations and an encouraging remark or two.

Q 4. How do you write a comment for a kindergarten student?

You write positive comments for assessment reports, even if youre talking about the childs weak areas

Strong Organization And Time Management

  • Always arrives to class on time with her books and is ready to learn.
  • Is exceptionally good at completing tasks in a timely manner.
  • Is a natural organizer and is often seen helping to get her peers organized and ready for tasks.
  • Is always trusted to meet deadlines.
  • Uses color coding and headings in her books effectively to organize her notes.
  • Keeps a neat and organized work space at all times.

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Is Not Neat And Tidy

  • Occasionally presents work that is messy and difficult to read.
  • I would like to see her paying more attention to neatness in her writing.
  • It would be great to see her showing more care for her workspace to ensure all her belongings are well cared for.
  • At times comes to class disheveled and disorganized.
  • Presents homework that is untidy and appears to have been rushed.
  • Needs to work on ensuring her work is presentable, neat, and error-free.

Academic Achievement And Improvement Remarks For Kindergarten Students

Pin on Report Card Comments

____________ has made solid progress in and is performing benchmarks. Good job!

____________ is making progress in core subjects but is having some difficulty with _________. I am not concerned about this at the moment, and believe that with continued hard work will see improvement quickly.

I am concerned with ___________s academic progress, and would like to schedule a conference with you to discuss how best to support [his/her} efforts both in school and at home.

____________ is an attentive student who has shown regular improvement in skills since last report card.

____________ works hard in class and has excellent skills for age. {He\she] enjoys . Please encourage to use these skills at home!

____________ is an enthusiastic learner who enjoys school. is having some difficulty with – please continue to review with {him/her] nightly.

____________ has continued to struggle with , despite additional in-class and at-home support. I would like to schedule a conference with you to discuss benchmark testing and possible specialist support.

____________ really enjoys school and enthusiasm is reflected in the quality of work does in class and at home. is a great student!

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Positive Report Card Comments Based On Students Attitude

Below are 10 positive report card comments based on a students attitude:

  • s an enthusiastic learner who enjoys school.
  • exhibits a positive outlook in the classroom.
  • appears refreshed and ready for each days activities.
  • shows genuine enthusiasm for our daily classroom activities.
  • shows impressive initiative and always seeks out new ways to get involved.
  • uses strong instincts to deal with matters independently.
  • strives to reach their full potential.
  • is committed to doing their best.
  • seeks new challenges.
  • takes responsibility for their learning.

Ideas For Penguin Week In Your Kindergarten Classroom

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Ideas for penguin week in your kindergarten classroom. Graduation kindergarten editable certificates diplomas diploma preschool printable chalkboard moving certificate pre template teacherspayteachers prek ceremony end templates class decorations. 100 report card comments you can use now

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Tips For Awesome Report Card Comments

When writing comments, you will want to craft your thoughts in a way that will grab the parents attention. Its a good idea to recognize their childs strengths while also give suggestions to help them improve.

Here are tips for new teachers or veteran teachers to use when writing :

  • Always include a student name. This shows specific student progress.
  • Start with a positive note. Leave a very specific comment that highlights the great work done and positive qualities.
  • Put a positive spin on areas of weakness.
  • Give parents insight and suggestions for practicing at home.

In short, positive report card comments include a strength, an area that needs improvement, and give suggestions to practice at home. It is our personal responsibility, as teachers, to put in the extra work, and give parents more than report card grades. The Kindergarten Report Card Comments is a helpful resource that will save you time writing a couple dozen report cards each grading period.

Poor Attention To Detail

  • Could be getting higher grades if she edited her work more carefully before submission.
  • Will sometimes make mistakes due to distractedness and carelessness.
  • Has started to let carelessness seep into his work for the past few months.
  • Often does not pay enough attention to test questions, leading to small unforced errors.

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Kindergarten General Report Card Comments

1. __________ is still unable to count beyond 20. As that is a primary standard, we will need to work with your child more closely to ensure that he/she masters these skills. You can help him/her to master this skill by incorporating math into your playtime at home, and have him/her count larger quantities of fun items such as small snack foods or cards.

2. Your child is confusing the terms beside, between, and below. You can help him/her to understand this concept using stuffed toys, and placing them according to the positional word that you want to demonstrate. Books that focus on position could also be helpful.

3. ________ is showing great progress in math. He/she is starting to understand time related terminology, and is finally able to really tell time! Way to go!

4.He/she finds it hard to differentiate between a circle and a triangle. Have your child identify shapes in your travels and play shape drawing and counting games that focus on those two shapes. We should see improvement with practice.

Kindergarten Language Arts Comments

1. Your child is doing a fantastic job recognizing popcorn or high frequency words. Use the popcorn cards that we sent home to continue to build on this skill, which will be a huge help in improving his/her reading skills.

3. I am concerned that __________ is not able to fully write his/her last name. Have him/her practice writing and identifying each letter in the name until he/she can do it without assistance.

Kindergarten Report Card Comments

These easy comments are going to save you so much time and stress! Focus on the kids, spend more time with your family whatever it is that you love just not spending hours writing report card comments for all of your students.

Like the examples shown above, I have created and organized the comments into 4 categories.

There are over 65 comments, as well as 25 paragraph-length comments to choose from. You can also mix and match the bulleted comments to best fit your students. Simply copy, paste, and insert a name.

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Many Of Our Readers Have Asked Where Our Sample Report Card Comments Come From Watch The Video Below To Find Out:

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Why Are Report Card Comments Important

75 Sample Report Card Comments to Use Right Now

Report card comments are important for two reasons. The first is that they provide feedback for students and gives them insight on how to improve. Another reason is that it provides information to parents so that they can understand how their child is doing in the classroom, without having to go to a parent-teacher conference.

Want to save hours of repetitive typing? Try Text Blaze, it’s free!

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Do I Need To Write A Comment For Every Subject

While you dont need to write a comment for every subject, its generally a good idea to do so. This way, the student and their family will have a complete picture of their progress. If youre short on time, try focusing on the subjects that the student is struggling in or that you feel are most important.

Weak Organization And Time Management

  • Tends to leave tasks to the last minute.
  • Often submits incomplete drafts due to poor time management.
  • Is often disorganized and forgets important school supplies.
  • Has submitted homework late on several occasions.
  • Could work on using her time more efficiently to complete tasks in allotted time periods.
  • I would like to see her working on her organizational skills in coming months so she can use her class time more efficiently.

Also Check: First Day Of Kindergarten Ideas

Free Kindergarten Report Card

I love this! Our report card is common core, but it just lists the standards and it’s 1 for emergent, 2 for approaching, 3 for mastered, and 4 for exceeds. The trouble is that until you have mastered all the parts of the standard the student is supposed to be a 2. I really feel that the report card gives no good information . I have been wondering how to communicate the information I was getting from your assessment packs. I never did come up with anything I liked. This looks great!

Terri Izatt

Positive Report Card Comments Based On Students Character

These are 10 positive report card comments based on a students character:

  • showcases good relationship skills.
  • You can count on to follow instructions.
  • demonstrates responsibility by caring for school supplies.
  • demonstrates a high level of respect for teachers and peers.
  • is dependable and is ready to assist when needed.
  • faithfully completes classroom assignments.
  • has incredible self-discipline and always gets work completed promptly.
  • is a caring young person who shows concern for their peers.
  • is a model citizen in our classroom.
  • is sensitive to the feelings of others.

Read Also: Free Sight Word Games For Kindergarten

Use Specific Concrete Examples

One of the most important things to do when writing report card comments is to use specific, concrete examples. This will help the student understand what they need to work on. For example, instead of saying, ______ needs to work on his behavior, you could say, _____ needs to work on staying seated during class.

Positive Attitude To Learning

  • Comes to class every day ready and willing to learn.
  • Has an inquisitive and engaged mind.
  • Is excited to tackle her tasks every day.
  • Likes to come to school and learn with her friends.
  • Has a positive attitude to self-development.
  • Tends to come into the classroom with a big smile and an open mind.
  • Sets herself very high standards and strives to meet them each and every day.

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Biden Won’t Face Charges in Classified Records Case

“this matter is now closed,” president biden declared before the house democratic caucus issues conference, after the special counsel’s report on his handling of classified documents came out..

The special counsel released their findings today about their look into my handling of classified documents. I was pleased to see they reached the conclusion I believe they knew all along they would, that there are — no charges should be brought in this case. [applause] As many of you know, this was an exhaustive investigation going back literally more than 40 years, 40 years when I became a United States senator. And I was a kid. I was a kid, 29 years old — special counsel acknowledged I cooperated completely. I did not throw up any roadblocks. I sought no delays. In fact, I was so determined to give special counsel what they needed, I went forward with a five-hour in-person interview over the two days of October the 9th — 8th and 9th — last year, even though Israel had just been attacked by Hamas on the 7th. Bottom line is the special counsel in my case decided against moving forward with any charges, and this matter is now closed.

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By Glenn Thrush

Reporting from Washington

The special counsel investigating President Biden said in a report released on Thursday that Mr. Biden had “willfully” retained and disclosed classified material after leaving the vice presidency in 2017 but concluded that “no criminal charges are warranted.”

Robert K. Hur, the special counsel, said in an unflattering 300-plus-page report that Mr. Biden had left the White House after his vice presidency with classified documents about Afghanistan and notebooks with handwritten entries “implicating sensitive intelligence sources and methods” taken from White House briefings.

Mr. Hur criticized Mr. Biden for sharing the content of the notebooks with a ghostwriter who helped him on his 2017 memoir, “Promise Me, Dad, ” even though he knew some of it was classified.

But the evidence “does not establish Mr. Biden’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt,” said Mr. Hur, a former Trump Justice Department official appointed by Attorney General Merrick B. Garland in January 2023 to lead the inquiry after classified files were found in the garage and living areas of Mr. Biden’s home in Delaware and his former office in Washington .

While Mr. Hur decided not to prosecute Mr. Biden, 81, some of the reasoning he cited for his decision immediately created a new political crisis for the White House. In recounting his interviews with the president, Mr. Hur portrayed him as unable to remember key dates of his time in the Obama White House — or even precisely when his son Beau had died.

“Mr. Biden would likely present himself to a jury, as he did during our interview with him, as a sympathetic, well-meaning, elderly man with a poor memory,” Mr. Hur wrote.

He cited Mr. Biden’s age by the time he would leave office — either in 2025 or 2029 — as an additional factor. It would be difficult to convince a jury that “a former president well into his 80s” was guilty of a felony that “requires a mental state of willfulness,” Mr. Hur added.

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Special Counsel’s Report on President Biden and Classified Documents

In a statement after the report was made public, Mr. Biden said he took national security seriously, “cooperated completely, threw up no roadblocks and sought no delays” in responding to Mr. Hur’s requests for information.

In fiery remarks later from the White House, Mr. Biden assailed the report, saying his memory was fine and that he had not willfully retained classified material. He also expressed outrage that Mr. Hur had suggested he could not remember when his son had died.

“How in the hell dare he raise that?” Mr. Biden said.

Earlier, the White House counsel and Mr. Biden’s private lawyers slammed Mr. Hur for suggesting the president had flouted the law even as he concluded that prosecutors did not have the evidence to prove that in court. And they assailed Mr. Hur’s characterization of Mr. Biden as suffering from memory problems, saying it was hardly unusual to have trouble recalling dates and details of long-ago occurrences.

Bob Bauer, Mr. Biden’s personal attorney, accused Mr. Hur of disregarding Justice Department “regulations and norms” and compared the special counsel’s conduct to that of James B. Comey, the F.B.I. director who during the 2016 presidential campaign criticized Hillary Clinton’s handling of sensitive information even though he declined to recommend criminal charges.

In a letter included in the appendix of the report, Mr. Biden’s lawyers called the inclusion of discussion of Mr. Biden’s memory “pejorative” and noted that the five-hour interview with the president had taken place shortly after the Oct. 7 terrorist attacks on Israel, after Mr. Biden had spent hours on the phone with foreign leaders.

“The report uses highly prejudicial language to describe a commonplace occurrence among witnesses: a lack of recall of years-old events,” they wrote, adding: “This language is not supported by the facts, nor is it appropriately used by a federal prosecutor in this context.”

Still, Mr. Hur’s assessment is sure to provide potent new lines of attack for former President Donald J. Trump. Mr. Trump has long sought to sow doubts about Mr. Biden’s fitness for office, and he has been seeking to discredit the Justice Department over its far more serious investigation into Mr. Trump’s retention of classified materials after leaving office and his alleged obstruction of the government’s efforts to reclaim them.

Robert K. Hur speaking into multiple microphones.

Mr. Hur’s report includes a photograph of the open box where the F.B.I. found classified Afghanistan documents in Mr. Biden’s cluttered garage, next to a ladder and old exercise equipment, and another image of sensitive materials stored in a cardboard banker’s box.

Similar pictures taken during the 2022 search of Mr. Trump’s resort in Florida, Mar-a-Lago, showed that he had stored boxes in a bathroom that was accessible to visitors. After Mr. Hur’s report was made public, Mr. Trump sent out the image of the Biden garage through his campaign’s email account, along with the claim, unsupported by any evidence, that he had “cooperated far more” than Mr. Biden.

In fact, Mr. Hur noted that Mr. Biden had fully cooperated with the investigation, allowing investigators unimpeded access to his properties. Mr. Trump has been accused of misleading the government for months over the hundreds of highly classified documents in his possession and of having his personal staff move boxes as officials were seeking their return.

In the report’s introduction, Mr. Hur suggested that Mr. Biden’s cooperation with investigators was a factor in his decision not to bring charges.

Unlike Mr. Biden, Mr. Trump refused to return the materials he retained “after being given multiple chances to return documents and avoid prosecution,” he wrote.

Mr. Hur was bound by a Justice Department legal policy that makes sitting presidents immune from being charged with crimes while in office. But he said that his decision not to pursue criminal charges would have been the same even if regulations had allowed him to indict Mr. Biden.

The special counsel conducted 173 interviews, including with Mr. Biden and his top advisers, and examined hundreds of thousands of documents. Some of the material was collected before Mr. Hur took over the investigation, when Mr. Garland assigned John R. Lausch Jr., then the Trump-appointed U.S. attorney in Chicago, to make preliminary inquiries.

It was Mr. Lausch who recommended appointing a special counsel, department officials said.

Some of the classified material related Mr. Biden’s opposition, in 2009, to temporary troop increases in Afghanistan supported by President Barack Obama’s team, which he viewed as “a mistake akin to Vietnam,” Mr. Hur wrote.

Other documents pertained more broadly to Mr. Biden’s attempt to “document his legacy, and to cite evidence that he was a man of presidential timber,” the report noted.

In a conversation recorded at a rented property in Virginia in February 2017 — a month after he left office — Mr. Biden told his ghostwriter he had “just found all the classified stuff downstairs.”

Mr. Hur said that exchange was the strongest basis for a prosecution he had found. But he concluded that a jury was unlikely to convict Mr. Biden, given the fact that he had grown accustomed to legally retaining documents as vice president, might have not fully adjusted to the new restrictions and believed he had the right to keep his personal notes — based on President Ronald Reagan’s retention of similar materials for decades.

In his interview with investigators, Mr. Biden declared that his notebooks were “my property” and said that “every president before me has done the same thing,” singling out Mr. Reagan.

The special counsel said Mr. Biden was mistaken about the law, but conceded that his view “finds some support in historical practice.”

Mr. Hur said that the decision not to charge Mr. Biden for possessing the other classified materials was more straightforward: Prosecutors could not establish whether classified documents discovered at Mr. Biden’s house had been willfully retained, or whether they had been obtained during his vice presidency and sloppily stored.

The classified documents discovered in Mr. Biden’s Delaware garage in a “badly damaged box surrounded by household detritus” indicated he simply may have forgotten he had it over the years, rather than intentionally breaking the law, Mr. Hur concluded.

Charlie Savage contributed reporting.

Glenn Thrush covers the Department of Justice. He joined The Times in 2017 after working for Politico, Newsday, Bloomberg News, The New York Daily News, The Birmingham Post-Herald and City Limits. More about Glenn Thrush

Biden’s Mental Acuity Under Scrutiny

Comments about president biden’s age and memory in the special counsel’s report have captured democrats’ fears ahead of the november election and fueled republicans in their efforts to cast the president as weak..

An Age-Old Question: How old is too old to be president? The report has thrust the issue back into the spotlight  just as America seems poised to elect a commander in chief well past typical retirement age, no matter who wins in November.

Implications for 2024 Election: Why is the age issue hurting Biden  so much more than Donald Trump? Both are over 75, but voters are much less likely to worry that Trump is too old to serve .

Voter Reactions: To Americans in their 70s and 80s, the renewed questions swirling around Biden’s age have resonated in deeply personal ways . Many agree that it’s an issue, while others feel the criticism of Biden is insulting.

Rebuffing the Report: Vice President Kamala Harris and other White House officials have sought to discredit the report , suggesting that it was more of a political attack than an unbiased legal document .

The Science of Memory Loss: After the report’s release, medical experts noted that the special counsel’s judgments on Biden’s mental health did not appear to be based on science .

A Protective White House: Biden’s top aides have created a cocoon around him out of concern that his mistakes could be amplified and damage his image. The events that followed the report’s release emphasized those risks in striking ways .

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report comments for 3 year olds

ELK RIVER, Minn. (KFGO) – An 8-year-old Elk River boy is dead after a crash in Sherburne County northwest of the Twin Cities.   

The boy was a passenger in a car driven by a 43-year-old woman that was crossing Highway 169 when it was struck by a northbound SUV.     

The woman was taken to the hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. The driver of the SUV also suffered non-life-threatening injuries, but refused to be taken to a hospital.   

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The Wall Street Journal

Panic, Fury and Blame: Inside the White House After Report Targets Biden’s Age

W ASHINGTON—President Biden’s age has long been a private worry for many Democrats and a drag on his polling numbers. This week those anxieties came spilling out into the public.

The trigger was special counsel Robert Hur’s 345-page report on Biden’s retention of classified documents, which contained a series of damaging passages about the president’s recollections and “faulty memory” during interviews with investigators last fall. The fear for the White House and Biden’s re-election campaign is that the document will reinforce doubts among large groups of voters about the 81-year-old president’s abilities as he seeks a second term against likely GOP nominee former President Donald Trump.

Democrats reacted with a mix of frustration and anger to Hur’s report, which said Biden portrayed himself as an “elderly man with a poor memory.” Behind the scenes, Biden himself has been furious. At a House Democratic retreat on Thursday, the president unloaded to a small group of lawmakers, questioning the accuracy of the report by asking, “You think I would f—ing forget the day my son died?,” according to people familiar with his private comments.

Not all the fire was directed outward: One former Biden aide blamed members of the president’s team for allowing the president to be interviewed by the special counsel in the aftermath of the Oct. 7 attacks in Israel, an episode that led Biden to spend hours in meetings with national security advisers in the Situation Room. “How can they staff him so poorly and put him in that situation—on that day?” asked the former adviser.

At the White House, officials were apoplectic as they raced to contain the fallout from Hur’s characterization of Biden’s memory. Vice President Kamala Harris weighed in Friday, saying the report “could not be more wrong on the facts and clearly politically motivated.”

“We just reject that this is true, and I think that it does raise questions about the gratuitousness,” said Ian Sams, a spokesman for the White House Counsel’s Office who briefed reporters.

Some Democrats inside and outside of Biden’s bubble were privately anxious about what’s next for the campaign. The report came during a week when Biden made a number of high-profile flubs, confusing current and past world leaders. He didn’t help matters when he referred to the Egyptian president as the president of Mexico in his remarks on the counsel’s report Thursday night, and his decision to forego a high-profile interview ahead of Sunday’s Super Bowl has also drawn scrutiny.

“Anytime his age and capacity is front and center is bad for his re-election prospects. That said, it does provide an opportunity to more forcefully deal with this issue which they have to do,” said Brian Goldsmith, a Biden donor and a Democratic consultant based in Los Angeles. “The right response is that Biden is a better president because of his age and wisdom and experience, not despite his age and wisdom and experience.”

“They need to find a way to jujitsu this and turn it from a negative into a positive because it is not going away,” Goldsmith said. He added: “Avoiding the Super Bowl interview is a mistake.”

​​Minnesota Rep. Dean Phillips, who is mounting a long-shot Democratic primary challenge to Biden focused on the incumbent’s age, said Friday he had “heard from a number of fellow Democrats who are awakening from the delusion being propagated by people with neither the President’s nor our nation’s best interests in mind.”

Despite his worrisome polls and concerns about his age, Biden isn’t considering dropping his re-election bid, according to people familiar with his thinking. First lady Jill Biden, a key voice behind the scenes, has been a strong supporter of his decision to run for another term.

For now, the campaign and the White House aren’t signaling a new strategy. They plan to continue looking for ways to contrast with the 77-year-old Trump, who faces multiple criminal indictments—including for his handling of classified documents. (Trump and his fellow Republicans have reacted to Hur’s report by saying both that it shows Biden is unfit for office and that the president is benefiting from a double-standard because he wasn’t charged.)

Biden aides are also trying to keep the president active on the campaign trail, often with smaller events or interviews with nontraditional media like podcast hosts.

Biden, for example, was scheduled to meet with Jordan’s King Abdullah II at the White House on Monday and hold events during the week. But there were no calls internally for a course correction.

“We don’t feel like we had some tectonic shift here. The matter is closed,” said a White House official. “He is going to keep doing what he is doing. There is not going to be some major strategy shift here.”

Since the start of 2024, Biden has picked up the pace of his campaign travel, hitting battleground states and the West Coast for fundraisers. He was in New York City this week raising money. Some accommodations for his age are visible. He favors lightweight rubber soled Cole Haan dress shoes or black sneakers. He often boards Air Force One through a shorter set of stairs, after several tripping incidents on the steeper steps. And his appearances at fundraisers are often carefully scripted, with Biden standing on a podium reading from a teleprompter.

A Democrat close to the White House acknowledged that the line in the report about Biden as an elderly man with a poor memory was “a brutal quote.” But this person described meeting with Biden dozens of times over the past four years and said while Biden looks and sounds old and tends to repeat stories, “I have not noticed any sort of decline.”

White House counselor Steve Ricchetti said he knows “the pace and the hours and the level of activity that occurs everyday. I’m sitting with him — he’s outworking all of us.”

After the report came out, Biden rushed to address reporters at a hastily organized White House press conference Thursday night. He flashed anger when he recounted that the special counsel claimed that he had forgotten when his late son, Beau Biden, had died in 2015. “How in the hell dare he raise that,” said Biden, who noted that he had worn his late son’s rosary beads around his left wrist “since the day he died.”

Democrats said the enraged Biden was eager to address reporters directly about the report. There was some discussion about timing—like whether to do it on Thursday or Friday—but he had also told reporters earlier in the week that he would take questions on Thursday and the decision was made to go ahead. Many on his team said the press conference allowed him to push back forcefully, though the gathering arguably drew even more attention to the age issue than the report already had.

Democrats also expressed exasperation that Hur had taken license to describe Biden’s memory issues during his interactions with investigators last fall. “OMG, I got PTSD about James Comey all over again,” read one message in a text-chain among former aides to Hillary Clinton, said one person who was on the chain.

On Capitol Hill, some Democrats lashed out at the portrayal of Biden, countering that the president’s record was far superior to that of Trump’s and slammed the special counsel’s characterization of Biden as suffering from memory lapses.

“What a low blow—even referencing the death of his son,” said Sen. John Fetterman (D., Pa.). “It’s gross.”

Siobhan Hughes contributed to this article.

Write to Ken Thomas at [email protected], Catherine Lucey at [email protected] and Annie Linskey at [email protected]

Panic, Fury and Blame: Inside the White House After Report Targets Biden’s Age

Judge fines Donald Trump more than $350 million, bars him from running businesses in N.Y. for three years

The judge who presided over a civil business fraud trial against Donald Trump on Friday ordered the former president, his sons, business associates and company to pay more than $350 million in damages and temporarily limited their ability to do business in New York.

Judge Arthur Engoron ordered the former president and the Trump Organization to pay over $354 million in damages , and barred Trump “from serving as an officer or director of any New York corporation or other legal entity in New York for a period of three years,” including his namesake company.

New York Attorney General Letitia James, who’s office brought the case, said that with pre-judgment interest, the judgment totals over $450 million, an amount “which will continue to increase every single day” until the judgment is paid.

“Donald Trump is finally facing accountability for his lying, cheating, and staggering fraud. Because no matter how big, rich, or powerful you think you are, no one is above the law,” James said in a statement, calling the ruling “a tremendous victory for this state, this nation, and for everyone who believes that we all must play by the same rules — even former presidents.”

The ruling also bars Trump and his company from applying for any bank loans for three years.

In his first public remarks after the ruling, Trump said, “We’ll appeal and we’ll be successful.”

Speaking to reporters at Mar-a-Lago on Friday night, Trump bashed the ruling as “a fine of 350 million for a doing a perfect job.” He also repeated previous attacks by calling the judge “crooked” and the attorney general “corrupt.”

Trump did not take any questions from reporters after speaking for about six minutes.

The judge’s decision is a potential blow to both Trump’s finances and persona — having built his brand on being a successful businessman that he leveraged in his first run for president. Trump is currently running for the White House for a third time. This case is just one of many he is currently facing, including four separate pending criminal trials, the first of which is scheduled to begin on March 25.

Engoron also ordered the continued “appointment of an Independent Monitor” and the “the installation of an Independent Director of Compliance” for the company.

In posts on his social media platform Truth Social, Trump called the ruling “an illegal, unAmerican judgment against me, my family, and my tremendous business.”

“This ‘decision’ is a complete and total sham,” he wrote.

During the trial, Trump and executives at his company, including his sons Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump, attempted to blame exaggerated financial statements that were the heart of New York Attorney General Letitia James’ fraud case on the accountants who compiled them. Engoron disagreed.

“There is overwhelming evidence from both interested and non-interested witnesses, corroborated by documentary evidence, that the buck for being truthful in the supporting data valuations stopped with the Trump Organization, not the accountants,” he wrote.

In explaining the need for a monitor, the judge cited the lack of remorse by Trump and his executives after the fraud was discovered.

“Their complete lack of contrition and remorse borders on pathological. They are accused only of inflating asset values to make more money. The documents prove this over and over again. This is a venial sin, not a mortal sin. Defendants did not commit murder or arson. They did not rob a bank at gunpoint. Donald Trump is not Bernard Madoff. Yet, defendants are incapable of admitting the error of their ways,” Engoron wrote.

“Defendants’ refusal to admit error — indeed, to continue it, according to the Independent Monitor — constrains this Court to conclude that they will engage in it going forward unless judicially restrained,” he added.

The ruling also bars the Trump sons — who’ve been running the company since their father went to the White House — “from serving as an officer or director of any New York corporation or other legal entity in New York for a period of two years.” Both were fined over $4 million, plus interest, for their roles in the scheme.

Donald Trump Jr. posted on the social media site X that “We’ve reached the point where your political beliefs combined with what venue your case is heard are the primary determinants of the outcome; not the facts of the case! It’s truly sad what’s happened to our country.”

In a statement, Eric Trump called the judge “a cruel man.”

“He knows that every single witness testified to that fact that I had absolutely NOTHING to do with this case (as INSANE as the case truly is),” Eric Trump said.

He also attacked the ruling as “political vengeance by a judge out to get my father.”

 Trump attorney Alina Habba called the verdict “a manifest injustice — plain and simple.”

“Given the grave stakes, we trust that the Appellate Division will overturn this egregious verdict and end this relentless persecution against my clients,” she said in a statement.

A spokesperson for Trump Organization called the ruling “a gross miscarriage of justice. The Trump Organization has never missed any loan payment or been in default on any loan.”

High legal costs

An appeal in the case would likely take years, but Trump could have to post a bond for the full amount if he does so.

Read more: Trump faces about $400 million in legal penalties. Can he afford it?

The judgment is the second this year against Trump after he was hit last month with an $83.3 million verdict in writer E. Jean Carroll’s defamation case against him. Trump has said he plans to appeal that verdict as well, but would have to post a bond for that amount as well.

James had been seeking $370 million from Trump, his company and its top executives, alleging “repeated and persistent fraud ” that included falsifying business records and financial statements. James had argued those financial statements were at times exaggerated by as much as $2.2 billion.

James contended the defendants used the inflated financial statements to obtain bank loans and insurance policies at rates he otherwise wouldn’t have been entitled to and “reaped hundreds of millions of dollars in ill-gotten gains.”

Trump had maintained his financial statements were conservative, and has called the AG’s allegations politically motivated and a “fraud on me.”

“This is a case that should have never been brought, and I think we should be entitled to damages,” Trump told reporters when he attended closing arguments in the case on Jan. 11.

Trump testimony knocked

The monthslong civil trial included testimony from Trump and his oldest children . The former president was combative in his day on the stand, blasting James as a “hack” and calling the judge “extremely hostile.”

Trump repeatedly complained about Engoron before and throughout the trial, and the judge slapped him with a partial gag order after he started blasting the judge’s law clerk as well. Trump’s complaints led to a flood of death threats against the clerk, as well as Engoron, court officials said, and Trump was fined $15,000 for twice violating the order.

Among the examples cited as fraud by the attorney general’s office during the trial was Trump valuing his triplex home in Trump Tower in New York City at three times its actual size and value, as well as including a brand value to increase the valuation of his golf courses on the financial statements, which explicitly said brand values were not included.

Another example pointed to by the attorney general clearly got under his skin — a dispute over the value of Mar-a-Lago, his social club and residence in Florida. Trump’s financial statements from 2011 to 2021 valued Mar-a-Lago at $426 million to $612 million, while the Palm Beach County assessor appraised the property’s market value to be $18 million to $27 million during the same time frame. Trump had also fraudulently puffed up the value of the property by saying it was a private residence, despite having signed an agreement that it could only be used as a social club to lower his tax burden.

Trump maintained during the trial the property was worth much, much more .

“The judge had it at $18 million, and it is worth, say, I say from 50 to 100 times more than that. So I don’t know how you got those numbers,” Trump testified, adding later that he thinks it’s actually worth “between a billion and a billion five.”

In his ruling Friday, Engoron said he didn’t find Trump to be a credible witness.

“Overall, Donald Trump rarely responded to the questions asked, and he frequently interjected long, irrelevant speeches on issues far beyond the scope of the trial. His refusal to answer the questions directly, or in some cases, at all, severely compromised his credibility,” the judge wrote.

Michael Cohen testimony ‘credible’

James’ investigation into the former president’s business began in 2019 as a result of congressional testimony from his former personal lawyer Michael Cohen , who told the House Oversight Committee that Trump would improperly expand and shrink values to fit whatever his business needs were.

Cohen testified during the trial about his role in the scheme, and said while Trump didn’t explicitly tell him and then-Chief Financial Officer Allen Weisselberg to inflate the numbers in the financial statement, he was like a “mob boss” who tells you what he wants without directly telling you.

Trump claimed Cohen’s testimony exonerated him while also painting him as an untrustworthy liar because he admitted having previously lied under oath.

In his ruling, Engoron called Cohen an “important witness” and said he found his testimony “credible.” “This factfinder does not believe that pleading guilty to perjury means that you can never tell the truth. Michael Cohen told the truth,” the judge wrote.

Former CFO ‘evasive’

Engoron was less forgiving about former Trump CFO Weisselberg, who previously pleaded guilty to carrying out tax fraud at the company.

Weisselberg’s “testimony in this trial was intentionally evasive, with large gaps of ‘I don’t remember.’”

“There is overwhelming evidence that Allen Weisselberg intentionally falsified hundreds of business records during his tenure” at the company, the judge wrote. “Weisselberg understood that his assignment from Donald Trump was to have his reported assets increase every year irrespective of their actual values. The examples of Weisselberg’s intent to falsify business records are too numerous to itemize,” he added.

The judge permanently barred Weisselberg “from serving in the financial control function of any New York corporation or similar business entity operating in New York State,” and ordered him to pay the $1 million he’s already received from his $2 million separation agreement from the company as “ill-gotten gains.”

AG initially sought less

James filed her suit seeking $250 million in damages from Trump in 2022, and the judge appointed a monitor to oversee the company’s finances that November.

In a summary judgment  ruling the week before the trial started, Engoron found Trump and his executives had repeatedly engaged in fraud. The “documents here clearly contain fraudulent valuations that defendants used in business, satisfying [the attorney general’s] burden to establish liability as a matter of law against defendants,” the judge wrote, while denying Trump’s bid to dismiss the case.

Engoron summarized the Trump defense as “the documents do not say what they say; that there is no such thing as ‘objective’ value; and that, essentially, the Court should not believe its own eyes.”

The order, which Trump appealed, held that Trump’s business certificates in New York should be canceled, which could have wreaked havoc on Trump’s company and forced the sell-off of some assets.

Engoron backed off of that decision in his ruling Friday, saying the addition of the “two-tiered oversight” of the monitor and the compliance director makes that move “no longer necessary.”

Trump had complained about the summary judgment ruling while he was on the witness stand. “He said I was a fraud before he knew anything about me, nothing about me,” Trump said. “It’s a terrible thing you did.”

report comments for 3 year olds

Adam Reiss is a reporter and producer for NBC and MSNBC.

report comments for 3 year olds

Dareh Gregorian is a politics reporter for NBC News.

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    The Preschool Progress Report Template - Three Year Olds is a document used by preschool teachers to assess and report on the development and progress of three-year-old children in various areas such as social skills, cognitive abilities, motor skills, and language development.

  14. 90 Quick Report Card Comments for Kindergarten

    4 Parent Teacher Communication. 5 90 Kindergarten Report Card Comments. 6 What Teachers are Saying. 7 Conclusion. Writing report card comments can be stressful, and leave you feeling mentally exhausted. But, I'm here to help you keep a positive attitude, and get through the school year, and report card time, with less stress.

  15. Writing Prompts and Phrases For Yearly Reports On Children

    The following are examples of writing prompts, and comments that can be used when writing yearly reports on the child: Child's Personality Zee comes cheerfully to school and greets her teachers with a bright smile. She leaves her things in class and runs off to catch a little game with her friends outdoors before the bell goes.

  16. 325 amazing report card comments and remarks to save your time!

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  17. Nursery Report Writing Examples

    7 reviews EYFS Early Years EYFS Assessment Report Writing and Summative Assessment How will this resource help me to write my nursery reports? The new Twinkl Report Writer makes writing reports easier than ever before. Simply input a child's name, choose the relevant subject and review the comment banks included.

  18. Kindergarten Ages 3-4 Report Writing Templates and Statements Pack

    Take a look at this handy Kindergarten pack of report resources to find inspiration and support when writing reports for children aged three to four years old. This handy Kindergarten report pack contains a couple of report templates along with a detailed spreadsheet showing a variety of statements to use when writing a report for each child in your group. The spreadsheet contains a ...

  19. Pre-K Report Card

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  20. 107 Report Card Comments to Use and Adapt

    "Write [number] report card comments for students studying [subject] in [grade]." Here are some more specific examples to help get you started: Write 50 report card comments for students studying social studies in 5th grade. Generate 20 report card remarks commending a student for a positive attitude to learning.

  21. EYFS Report Writing Comments & Statements: Reception

    7 - 8 years old . Year 3 . 8 - 9 years old . Year 4 . 9 - 10 years old . Year 5 . 10 - 11 years old ... select the EYFS report comments that are the best fit for each child and build a professional and thorough end of year report. Each EYFS report comment is fully editable, meaning you can add personal information, examples, and anecdotes from ...

  22. Report Card Comments For Kindergarten End Of The Year

    Recommended Reading: Free Preschool Lesson Plans For 3 Year Olds. Positive Report Card Comments Based On Students Social Skills. Below are 10 positive report card comments based on a students social skills: ... If you have a class of 20+ students and you want to leave 2-3 comments on each report card, it will take a while to write the 40-60 ...

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