Turabian Footnote/Endnote Style

Table of Contents: Books E-books Journal Articles (Print) Journal Articles (Online) Magazine Articles (Print) Magazine Articles (Online) Newspaper Articles Review Articles Websites For More Help

The examples in this guide are meant to introduce you to the basics of citing sources using Kate Turabian's A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (seventh edition) .  Kate Turabian created her first "manual" in 1937 as a means of simplifying for students The Chicago Manual of Style ; the seventh edition of Turabian is based on the 15th edition of the Chicago Manual . For types of resources not covered in this guide (e.g., government documents, manuscript collections, video recordings) and for further detail and examples, please consult the websites listed at the end of this guide, the handbook itself or a reference librarian .

Whenever you refer to or use another's words, facts or ideas in your paper, you are required to cite the source. Traditionally, disciplines in the humanities (art, history, music, religion, theology) require the use of bibliographic footnotes or endnotes in conjunction with a bibliography to cite sources used in research papers and dissertations. For the parenthetical reference (author-date) system (commonly used in the sciences and social sciences), please refer to the separate guide Turabian Parenthetical/Reference List Style . It is best to consult with your professor to determine the preferred citation style.

Indicate notes in the text of your paper by using consecutive superscript numbers (as demonstrated below). The actual note is indented and can occur either as a footnote at the bottom of the page or as an endnote at the end of the paper. To create notes, type the note number followed by a period on the same line as the note itself. This method should always be used for endnotes; it is the preferred method for footnotes. However, superscript numbers are acceptable for footnotes, and many word processing programs can generate footnotes with superscript numbers for you.

When citing books, the following are elements you may need to include in your bibliographic citation for your first footnote or endnote and in your bibliography, in this order:

1. Author or editor; 2. Title; 3. Compiler, translator or editor (if an editor is listed in addition to an author); 4. Edition; 5. Name of series, including volume or number used; 6. Place of publication, publisher and date of publication; 7. Page numbers of citation (for footnote or endnote).

Books with One Author or Corporate Author

Author: Charles Hullmandel experimented with lithographic techniques throughout the early nineteenth century, patenting the "lithotint" process in 1840. 1

Editor: Human beings are the sources of "all international politics"; even though the holders of political power may change, this remains the same. 1

Corporate Author: Children of Central and Eastern Europe have not escaped the nutritional ramifications of iron deficiency, a worldwide problem. 1

First footnote:

1 Michael Twyman, Lithography 1800-1850 (London: Oxford University Press, 1970), 145-146.

1 Valerie M. Hudson, ed., Culture and Foreign Policy (Boulder: L. Rienner Publishers, 1997), 5.

1 UNICEF, Generation in Jeopardy: Children in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union , edited by Alexander Zouev (Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe, 1999), 44.

Note the different treatment of an editor's name depending on whether the editor takes the place of an author (second example) or is listed in addition to the author (third example). 

Subsequent footnotes:

       Method A: Include the author or editor's last name, the title (or an abbreviated title) and the page number cited.

2 Twyman, Lithography 1800-1850, 50.

2 Hudson, ed., Culture and Foreign Policy, 10.

2 UNICEF, Generation in Jeopardy, 48.

       Method B: Include only the author or editor's last name and the page number, leaving out the title.  

2 Twyman, 50.

2 Hudson, ed., 10.

2 UNICEF, 48.

Use Method A if you need to cite more than one reference by the same author.

1. Michael Twyman, Lithography 1800-1850  (London: Oxford University Press, 1970), 145-146.

Ibid., short for ibidem, means "in the same place."  Use ibid. if you cite the same page of the same work in succession without a different reference intervening.  If you need to cite a different page of the same work, include the page number.  For example:   2 Ibid., 50.

Bibliography:

Hudson, Valerie, N., ed. Culture and Foreign Policy . Boulder: L. Rienner Publishers, 1997.

Twyman, Michael. Lithography 1800-1850 . London: Oxford University Press, 1970.

UNICEF.  Generation in Jeopardy: Children in Central and Eastern Europe and the             Former Soviet Union . Edited by Alexander Zouev. Armonk, NY: M. E. Sharpe, 1999.

Books with Two or More Authors or Editors

1 Russell Keat and John Urry, Social Theory as Science, 2d ed. (London: Routledge and K. Paul, 1982), 196.

1 Toyoma Hitomi, "The Era of Dandy Beauties," in Queer Voices from Japan: First-Person Narratives from Japan's Sexual Minorities,  eds. Mark J. McLelland, Katsuhiko Suganuma, and James Welker ( Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2007), 157.

For references with more than three authors, cite the first named author followed by "et al." Cite all the authors in the bibliography.

1 Leonard B. Meyer, et al., The Concept of Style , ed. Berel Lang (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1979), 56.

2 Keat and Urry, Social Theory as Science , 200.

2 Meyer, et al., The Concept of Style , 90.

Keat, Russell, and John Urry. Social Theory as Science , 2d. ed. London: Routledge and K. Paul, 1982.

Hitomi, Toyoma. "The Era of Dandy Beauties." In Queer Voices from Japan: First-Person Narratives from Japan's Sexual Minorities,  edited by Mark J. McLelland, Katsuhiko Suganuma, and James Welker, 153-165.   Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2007.

Meyer, Leonard B., Kendall Walton, Albert Hofstadter, Svetlana Alpers, George Kubler, Richard Wolheim, Monroe Beardsley, Seymour Chatman, Ann Banfield, and Hayden White. The Concept of Style . Edited by Berel Lang.  Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1979.  

Electronic Books

Follow the guidelines for print books, above, but include the collection (if there is one), URL and the date you accessed the material.

1 John Rae, Statement of Some New Principles on the Subject of Political Economy (Boston: Hillard, Gray and Company, 1834), in The Making of the Modern World,   http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/MOME?af=RN&ae=U104874605&srchtp=a&ste=14  (accessed June 22, 2009).  

2 Rae, Statement of Some New Principles on the Subject of Political Economy .

Rae, John.  Statement of Some New Principles on the Subject of Political Economy. Boston: Hillard, Gray and Company, 1834. In The Making of the Modern World,   http://galenet.galegroup.com/servlet/MOME?af=RN&ae=U104874605&srchtp=a&ste=14  (accessed June 22, 2009).  

PERIODICAL ARTICLES

For periodical (magazine, journal, newspaper, etc.) articles, include some or all of the following elements in your first footnote or endnote and in your bibliography, in this order:

1. Author; 2. Article title; 3. Periodical title; 4. Volume or Issue number (or both); 5. Publication date; 6. Page numbers.

For online periodicals   , add: 7. URL and date of access; or 8. Database name, URL and date of access. (If available, include database publisher and city of publication.)

For an article available in more than one format (print, online, etc.), cite whichever version you used.

Journal Articles (Print)

1 Lawrence Freedman, "The Changing Roles of Military Conflict," Survival 40, no. 4 (1998): 52.

Here you are citing page 52.  In the bibliography (see below) you would include the full page range: 39-56.

If a journal has continuous pagination within a volume, you do not need to include the issue number:

1 John T. Kirby, "Aristotle on Metaphor," American Journal of Philology 118 (1997): 520.

Subsequent footnotes :

2 Freedman, "The Changing Roles of Military Conflict," 49.   

2 Kirby, "Aristotle on Metaphor," 545.

Freedman, Lawrence. "The Changing Roles of Military Conflict."   Survival 40, no. 4 (1998): 39-56.

Kirby, John T. "Aristotle on Metaphor."  American Journal of Philology 118 (1997): 517-554.  

Journal Articles (Online)

Cite as above, but include the URL and the date of access of the article.

On the Free Web

1 Molly Shea, "Hacking Nostalgia: Super Mario Clouds," Gnovis 9, no. 2 (Spring 2009), http://gnovisjournal.org/journal/hacking-nostalgia-super-mario-clouds  (accessed June 25, 2009).

Through a Subscription Database

1 John T. Kirby, "Aristotle on Metaphor," American Journal of Philology 118, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 524, http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/american_journal_of_philology/v118/118.4.kirby.html  (accessed June 25, 2009).

1 Michael Moon, et al., "Queers in (Single-Family) Space," Assemblage 24 (August 1994): 32, http://www.jstor.org/stable/3171189  (accessed June 25, 2009).

Subsequent Footnotes:

2 Shea, "Hacking Nostalgia."

2 Kirby, "Aristotle on Metaphor," 527. 

2 Moon, "Queers in (Single-Family) Space," 34. 

Shea, Molly. "Hacking Nostalgia: Super Mario Clouds," Gnovis 9, no. 2 (Spring 2009), http://gnovisjournal.org/journal/hacking-nostalgia-super-mario-clouds  (accessed June 25, 2009).

Kirby, John T. "Aristotle on Metaphor," American Journal of Philology 118, no. 4 (Winter 1997): 524, http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/american_journal_of_philology/v118/118.4.kirby.html  (accessed June 25, 2009).

Moon, Michael, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Benjamin Gianni, and Scott Weir. "Queers in (Single-Family) Space." Assemblage 24 (August 1994): 30-7, http://www.jstor.org/stable/3171189  (accessed June 25, 2009).

Magazine Articles (Print)

Monthly or Bimonthly

           1 Paul Goldberger, "Machines for Living: The Architectonic Allure of the Automobile," Architectural Digest, October 1996, 82.

1 Steven Levy and Brad Stone, "Silicon Valley Reboots," Newsweek , March 25, 2002, 45.

          2 Goldberger, "Machines for Living," 82.

          2 Levy and Stone, "Silicon Valley Reboots," 46.

Goldberger, Paul.  "Machines for Living: The Architectonic Allure of the Automobile." Architectural Digest, October 1996.

Levy, Steven, and Brad Stone. "Silicon Valley Reboots." Newsweek , March 25, 2002.

Magazine Articles (Online)

Follow the guidelines for print magazine articles, adding the URL and date accessed.

1 Bill Wyman, "Tony Soprano's Female Trouble," Salon.com, May 19, 2001, http://www.salon.com/2001/05/19/sopranos_final/ (accessed February 13, 2017).

1 Sasha Frere-Jones, "Hip-Hop President." New Yorker , November 24, 2008, http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=35324426&site=ehost-live (accessed June 26, 2009).

Wyman, Bill. "Tony Soprano's Female Trouble." Salon.com, May 19, 2001, http://www.salon.com/2001/05/19/sopranos_final/ (accessed February 13, 2017).

Frere-Jones, Sasha. "Hip-Hop President." New Yorker , November 24, 2008. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=35324426&site=ehost-live (accessed June 26, 2009).

Newspaper Articles

In most cases, you will cite newspaper articles only in notes, not in your bibliography. Follow the general pattern for citing magazine articles, although you may omit page numbers.

        1 Eric Pianin, "Use of Arsenic in Wood Products to End," Washington Post , February 13, 2002, final edition.

        1 Eric Pianin, "Use of Arsenic in Wood Products to End," Washington Post , February 13, 2002, final edition, in LexisNexis Academic (accessed June 27, 2009).

Note: In the example above, there was no stable URL for the article in LexisNexis, so the name of the database was given rather than a URL.

Review Articles

Follow the pattern below for review articles in any kind of periodical.

1 Alanna Nash, "Hit 'Em With a Lizard," review of Basket Case, by Carl Hiassen, New York Times , February 3, 2002, http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=105338185&sid=2&Fmt=6&clientId=5604&RQT=309&VName=PQD (accessed June 26, 2009).  

1 David Denby, "Killing Joke," review of No Country for Old Men , directed by Ethan and Joel Coen,  New Yorker, February 25, 2008, 72-73, http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=fah&AN=30033248&site=ehost-live (accessed June 26, 2009). 

Second footnote:

2 Nash, "Hit 'Em With a Lizard."

2 Denby, "Killing Joke."

In most cases, you will be citing something smaller than an entire website. If you are citing an article from a website, for example, follow the guidelines for articles above. You can usually refer to an entire website in running text without including it in your reference list, e.g.: "According to its website, the Financial Accounting Standards Board requires ...".

If you need to cite an entire website in your bibliography, include some or all of the following elements, in this order:

1. Author or editor of the website (if known) 2. Title of the website 3. URL 4. Date of access

Financial Accounting Standards Board .  http://www.fasb.org  (accessed April 29, 2009).

FOR MORE HELP

Following are links to sites that have additional information and further examples:

Turabian Quick Guide (University of Chicago Press)

Chicago Manual of Style Online

RefWorks Once you have created an account, go to Tools/Preview Output Style to see examples of Turabian style.

Purdue's Online Writing Lab (OWL) Excellent source for research, writing and citation tips.

Citing Sources Duke University's guide to citing sources. The site offers comparison citation tables with examples from APA , Chicago , MLA and Turabian for both print and electronic works.

How to Cite Electronic Sources From the Library of Congress. Provides MLA and Turabian examples of citing formats like films, photographs, maps and recorded sound that are accessed electronically.

Uncle Sam: Brief Guide to Citing Government Publications The examples in this excellent guide from the University of Memphis are based on the Chicago Manual of Style and Kate Turabian's Manual .

Purdue Online Writing Lab Purdue OWL® College of Liberal Arts

Periodicals

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This section contains information on The Chicago Manual of Style method of document formatting and citation. These resources follow the seventeenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style , which was issued in 2017.

Periodicals include print journals, electronic journals, magazines, and newspapers. Citations for these sources should include enough information for the reader to find them   in a library or a database, and as such, publication dates are essential. Magazines and newspapers are typically serialized by day, month, and year; journals include volume, year, month, or season and issue number.

One of the major differences between notes and bibliographic entries for periodicals is the way in which major elements are separated. In notes, the major elements are separated by commas. In the bibliography, the major elements are separated by periods.

Notes and bibliographic entries for a journal include the following: full name of the author(s), article title, journal title, and issue information. Issue information refers to volume, issue number, month, year, and page number(s). For online works, retrieval information and the date of access are also included. Author Name:

Notes include the author’s name as listed in the article. Bibliographic entries, however, invert the author’s name (last name, first name). Article Title: Both notes and bibliographies use quotation marks to set off the titles of articles within the journal. Journal Title: Journal titles may omit an initial “The” but should otherwise be given in full, capitalized (headline-style), and italicized. Issue Information: The volume number follows the journal title with no punctuation and is not italicized. The issue number (if it is given) is separated from the volume number with a comma and is preceded by “no.” The year appears in parentheses after the volume number (or issue number if given). The year may be preceded by a specific date, month, or season if given. Page information follows the year. For notes, page number(s) refer only to the cited material; the bibliography includes the first and last pages of the article.

Electronic Journals

Citing electronic journals generally follows the same format for printed periodicals, which is explained in the Journals section. Additionally, entries include the DOI or URL (DOIs are preferred). The date accessed is not required by CMOS for citations of formally published electronic sources. If an access date is required for other reasons (i.e. by discipline, publisher, or instructor), the access date should be included immediately prior to the DOI or URL. If included, access dates should be separated by commas in notes or periods in bibliographical entries.

Even if weekly or monthly magazines are numbered by volume or issue, they are cited by date only. When following the CMOS Note and Bibliography style, the year is presented as shown in the examples below. When following the CMOS Author-Date style, the date is essential to the citation and it is not enclosed in parentheses.

Page Numbers: Citations for journal articles may include a specific page number. Inclusive page numbers for the entire article are often omitted in bibliographical entries, however, because the pages of the article are often separated by many pages of unrelated material. If page numbers are included, they should follow the date and be preceded by a colon.

Notes and bibliographic entries for magazines include the following information: author’s name, article title (enclosed by quotation marks), magazine title (italicized), and date. Page numbers are included in notes but are omitted in bibliographic entries. Regular departments (or regularly occurring subsections) in a magazine are capitalized but not put in quotation marks. For example, National Geographic is the magazine that regularly includes a department called Foods of the Region.  

Online Magazines

Notes and bibliographic entries for online magazines should follow the relevant examples for printed magazines. Additionally, online magazine entries should contain the URL at the end of the citation. If no stable URL exists, the name of the database can be substituted. Note:  In the examples below, Green Room is not placed in quotation marks because it is the department title rather than the article title. Access Date:

Access dates are not required by CMOS in citations of formally published electronic sources. If an access date is required for other reasons (i.e. by discipline, publisher, or instructor), the access date should be included immediately prior to the URL. In notes, access dates are surrounded by commas and in bibliographic entries they are surrounded by periods.

Notes and bibliographic entries for newspapers should include the following: name of the author (if listed), headline or column heading, newspaper name, month (often abbreviated), day, and year. Since issues may include several editions, page numbers are usually omitted. If an online edition of a newspaper is consulted, the URL should be added at the end of the citation. Time stamps may be appropriate to include when stories for unfolding events are modified. Names of Newspapers: If the name of a newspaper begins with “The,” this word is omitted. For American newspapers that are not well-known, a city name should be added along with the newspaper title (see below). Additionally, a state abbreviation may be added in parentheses after the city name. News Services: News services, such as the Associated Press or the United Press International, are capitalized but not italicized and often appear in the author position of the citation. Headlines: Headlines may be capitalized using “headline style,” in which all major words are capitalized. Although many major newspapers prefer sentence style, the CMOS recommends headline style for consistency among various types of cited sources. Headlines presented entirely in full capital letters in the original are usually converted to headline-style upper and lower case in the citation. Regular Columns: If a regular column is cited, the column name may be included with the article title.

Editorials, Letters to the Editor, and Readers’ Comments: Published editorials and letters to the editor should be treated generically, usually without headlines. Instead of a title, use “letter to the editor” [14.196]. Citing in Text: Newspapers are more often cited in notes or parenthetical references than in bibliographies. If newspaper sources are carefully documented in the text, they need not be cited in the bibliography.

University of Portland Clark Library

Thursday, February 23: The Clark Library is closed today.

Chicago Style (17th Edition) Citation Guide: Magazine/Newspaper Articles

  • Introduction
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  • Magazine/Newspaper Articles
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Table of Contents

A note on magazine/newspaper citations, magazine/newspaper article from a website.

Magazine/Newspaper Article from Library Database

Magazine/Newspaper Article In Print

How do i know if it's a newspaper.

Not sure whether your article is from a newspaper? Look for these characteristics:

  • Main purpose is to provide readers with a brief account of current events locally, nationally or internationally.
  • Can be published daily, semiweekly or weekly.
  • Written for the general public, readers don't need any previous subject knowledge.
  • Little, if any, information about other sources is provided.

Articles may also come from  journals  or magazines.

Bibliography:

All citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent.

A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches.

All citations should use first line indent, where the first line of the footnote should be indented by 0.5 inches; all subsequent lines are not indented.

Footnotes should be the same font size and style as the rest of your paper.

See instructions for how to insert footnotes in Microsoft Word.

If there is no known author, start the citation with the title of the article instead.

Access Date

Chicago style does not recommend including access dates in the citation, unless no date of publication for the source may be located.

Cite a newspaper article as you would a magazine article. If the newspaper title starts with  The , omit  The from the title in your citation. 

Since newspapers may have multiple editions, page numbers are usually omitted for newspaper articles.  

If the newspaper is a less well-known or local publication, include the city name and state abbreviation in parentheses after the title of the newspaper. (See Magazine/Newspaper Article In Print example).

Zimmerman, Eilene. "The Many Delicate Issues of Spirituality in the Office."  New York Times , August 15, 2004. https://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/15/jobs/the-many-delicate-issues-of-spirituality-in-the-office.html.

1. Eilene Zimmerman, "The Many Delicate Issues of Spirituality in the Office,"  New York Times , August 15, 2004, https://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/15/jobs/the-many-delicate-issues-of-spirituality-in-the-office.html. 

Magazine/Newspaper Article from Library Database

Banks, Adelle M. "For Black Millennials, a Space to Discuss Spirituality."  Washington Post . August 25, 2018. https://advance.lexis.com/api/document?collection=news&id=urn:contentItem:5T3X-H121-DXXY-3353-00000-00&context=1516831.

1. Adelle M. Banks, "For Black Millennials, a Space to Discuss Spirituality,"  Washington Post,  August 25, 2018, https://advance.lexis.com/api/document?collection=news&id=urn:contentItem:5T3X-H121-DXXY-3353-00000-00&context=1516831.

Heltzel, Ellen Emry.  "The Hype and the Hush Around the Historian."  Oregonian , September 23, 1999.

1. Ellen Emry Heltzel, "The Hype and the Hush Around the Historian,"  Oregonian , September 23, 1999.

If the newspaper is a less well-known or local publication, include the city name and state abbreviation in parentheses after the title of the newspaper.

Behre, Robert. "Presidential Hopefuls Get Final Crack at Core of S.C. Democrats."  Post and Courier  (Charleston, SC), April 29. 2007.

1. Robert Behre, "Presidential Hopefuls Get Final Crack at Core of S.C. Democrats,"  Post and Courier  (Charleston, SC), April 29. 2007.

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Home / Guides / Citation Guides / Chicago Style / How to Cite a Newspaper in Chicago/Turabian

How to Cite a Newspaper in Chicago/Turabian

Newspaper articles are a reliable and widely available source to cite when writing a paper. This guide will show you how to create notes-bibliography style citations for both print and online newspaper articles using the 17th edition of the Chicago Manual of Style .

Guide Overview

  • Citing a newspaper article in print
  • Citing an online newspaper article
  • What you need

Citing a Newspaper Article in Print

Chicago style newspaper citation structure:.

1. First name Last name, “Article Title,” Newspaper Title , Month Date, Year of publication.

Bibliography:

Last name, First name. “Article Title.” Newspaper Title , Month Date, Year of publication.

*Note: According to the Chicago Manual of Style, newspaper articles are usually cited directly in-text or in a footnote and not included in bibliographies . Please see CMoS section 14.198 for further details. If your instructor requires you to cite newspaper articles, please use the  format provided here.

Screen Shot 2014-04-02 at 12.52.43 PM

Chicago Style Newspaper Citation Example:

1. Lee Bowman, “Bills Target Lake Erie Mussels,” The Pittsburgh Press , March 7, 1990.

Bowman, Lee. “Bills Target Lake Erie Mussels.” The Pittsburgh Press , March 7, 1990.

Citing an Online Newspaper Article

Chicago style online newspaper citation structure:.

1. First name Last Name, “Article Title,” Newspaper Title , Month Date, Year of publication, URL.

Last name, First name. “Article Title.” Newspaper Title , Month Date, Year of publication. URL.

Screen Shot 2014-04-02 at 12.55.58 PM

Note that an access date is only needed if no publication date is available for the article.

Chicago Style Online Newspaper Citation Example:

1. Karen Kaplan, “Flu Shots May Reduce Risk of Heart Attacks, Strokes and Even Death,” Los Angeles Times , October 22, 2013,  https://articles.latimes.com/2013/oct/22/science/la-sci-sn-flu-shot-heart-attack-stroke-death-20131022.

Kaplan, Karen. “Flu Shots May Reduce Risk of Heart Attacks, Strokes and Even Death.” Los Angeles Times , October 22, 2013.  https://articles.latimes.com/2013/oct/22/science/la-sci-sn-flu-shot-heart-attack-stroke-death-20131022.

What You Need

A citation for a newspaper article usually includes the following:

  • Author name
  • Article title
  • Name of the publication/newspaper
  • Publication date
  • URL (if accessed online)

The name of the article should be in headline case and enclosed in quotation marks, and the name of the publication should be italicized. Most newspaper articles will have a publication date, but if none is available, you should include the date you accessed the article instead.

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Chicago Citation Guide (17th Edition): Newspaper Articles

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Newspaper article from a library database, newspaper article from a website, newspaper article in print.

  • Citing Sources with Multiple Authors

How Can I Tell if it's a Newspaper?

Photo from Flickr, created by user NS Newsflash. Available under a Creative Commons license.

Not sure whether your article is from a newspaper? Look for these characteristics:

  • Main purpose is to provide readers with a brief account of current events locally, nationally or internationally.
  • Can be published daily, semiweekly or weekly.
  • Articles are usually written by journalists who may or may not have subject expertise.
  • Written for the general public, readers don't need any previous subject knowledge.
  • Little, if any, information about other sources is provided.

Articles may also come from journals or magazines .

1. Author's First Name Last Name, "Title of Article," Name of Newspaper (City and Province/State of Publication, if not Included in Name), Date of Publication, https://doi.org/DOI Number or Name of Database.

Bibliography Entry:

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article."  Name of Newspaper (City and Province/State of Publication, if not Included in Name) ,  Date of Publication. https://doi.org/DOI Number or Name of Database.

 If no author name is provided, begin the citation with the title of the article.

 Omit page numbers.

1. Author's First Name Last Name, "Title of Article," Name of Newspaper (City and Province/State of Publication, if not Included in Name), Date of Publication, URL.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article."  Name of Newspaper (City and Province/State of Publication, if not Included in Name) ,  Date of Publication. URL.                                                                   

1. Author's First Name Last Name, "Title of Article," Name of Newspaper (City and Province/State of Publication, if not Included in Name), Date of Publication.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article."  Name of Newspaper (City and Province/State of Publication, if not Included in Name) ,  Date of Publication.    

Citing Source with Multiple Authors

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Chicago/Turabian Citation Guide (17th Edition): Newspaper Articles

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About These Examples

The following examples are for the  Notes-Bibliography  system of Chicago/Turabian. This means that you are citing your courses using either footnotes or endnotes. If your teacher has asked you to cite your sources using in-text citations in brackets, visit this page to find out how to format these citations in the Author-Date system of Chicago/Turabian.

On This Page: Newspapers

Newspaper article from a library database, newspaper article from a library database - newspapers with volumes and issues, newspaper article from a website, newspaper article in print, citing two authors, citing three or more authors, abbreviating months.

In your works cited list, abbreviate months as follows: 

January = Jan. February = Feb. March = Mar. April = Apr. May = May June = June July = July August = Aug. September = Sept. October = Oct. November = Nov. December = Dec.

Spell out months fully in the body of your paper. 

How Can I Tell if it's a Newspaper?

Photo from Flickr, created by user NS Newsflash. Available under a Creative Commons license.

Not sure whether your article is from a newspaper? Look for these characteristics:

  • Main purpose is to provide readers with a brief account of current events locally, nationally or internationally.
  • Can be published daily, semiweekly or weekly.
  • Articles are usually written by journalists who may or may not have subject expertise.
  • Written for the general public, readers don't need any previous subject knowledge.
  • Little, if any, information about other sources is provided.

Articles may also come from journals or magazines .

Note : For your Works Cited list, all citations should be double spaced and have a hanging indent.

A "hanging indent" means that each subsequent line after the first line of your citation should be indented by 0.5 inches.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper [city of newspaper if local paper with city name not in name], Date of Publication, p. Page Number if given. Name of Database.  

 Note: If the author's name is not listed, begin the citation with the title of the article.

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper [City of newspaper if local paper with city name not in name of newspaper], vol. Volume Number, no. Issues Number, Date of Publication, p. Page Number if given. Name of Database.  

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Title of Website,  Date of Publication, URL. Accessed Day Month Year site was visited .

Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article: Subtitle if Any." Name of Newspaper, Date of Publication, p. Page Number. 

If there are two authors, cite the the authors as follows (list authors in the order they are given on the page, not alphabetically):

Last Name, First Name of First Author, and First Name Last Name of Second Author.

Example: Smith, James, and Sarah Johnston.

If there are three or more authors, cite only the name of the first author listed with their Last Name, First Name Middle Name followed by a comma et al.

Example: Smith, James, et al.

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Chicago Style Guide, for 17th Edition

  • Paper Formatting
  • Style Handbooks
  • Footnotes vs. Endnotes
  • Books / E-books
  • Interviews / Personal Communications
  • Audiovisual Materials
  • Shortened Citations
  • Author-Date References
  • Books / E-Books
  • Journal Articles
  • Magazine Articles
  • Newspaper Articles
  • Interviews / Personal Communication
  • Website / Webpage

Introduction

            Newspaper footnotes/endnotes share much of the same structure as journals and magazines. The author, headline, publisher, and especially the day/year are all central elements to a proper newspaper note-style citation. If the online edition of a paper was consulted as the reference, a URL should be included at the end of the citation.

Note-style citations of newspaper should include most or all of the following elements

  • Authors: Full name(s) of authors (Firstname Middlename Lastname).
  • Title: and subtitle of article with all major words capitalized (article name surrounded by quotation marks).
  • Newspaper column:  with all major words capitalized (if article is part of regular column) ( e.g. citation 2)
  • Newspaper Title:  with all major words capitalized (in italicized characters).
  • Publication date: (Month, Day and Year).
  • URL: (for online publications).

Basic Layout

[indented tab] 1. Author Firstname Lastname, “Article Title: Subtitle,” Column Name, Title of Magazine , publication Month/Day/Year, URL.

Physical Newspaper Article

           1. Marguerite Fields, “Want to Be My Boyfriend? Please Define,” Modern Love,  New York Times , May 4, 2008.

           2. Denis Judd, "Hanging on to the Jewel in the Crown,"  History Today,  November 2009, 34.

Online Newspaper Article

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How to Cite a Newspaper in Oxford Referencing

How to Cite a Newspaper in Oxford Referencing

3-minute read

  • 15th December 2019

Amid the celebrity gossip and angry opinion pieces, newspapers sometimes report on important things. Things one might write an academic paper about, for example. You might even need to cite a newspaper article at times.

But how do you do this in Oxford referencing? Check out our guide below to make sure you get footnote citations and the bibliography entry right.

How to Cite a Newspaper Article in Footnotes

The exact rules for citing a newspaper article may vary between universities, so make sure to check your style guide. However, most versions of Oxford referencing use a format like this:

n. Initial(s). Surname, “Title of article,” Title of Newspaper , Section of Newspaper (if applicable), date of publication, page number(s).

The first footnote citation of a newspaper article would thus look like this:

1. C. Cummins, “Lecturer fires up on LinkedIn after being faced with empty classroom,” The Sydney Morning Herald , July 12, 2017, p. 42.

If you have accessed a newspaper article online, give a URL and date of access instead of a page number in the footnote. For instance:

2. P. Hawker, “Teen movies: familiar tropes of school, detention, love and growing up,” The Australian , July 8, 2017, http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/review/teen-movies-familiar-tropes-of-school-detention-love-and-growing-up/news-story/23ad53ec8d84b34de4d1d46c5af232f9, accessed August 3, 2019.

And, as with any source in Oxford referencing, you can use a shortened footnote format for repeat citations (usually, just the author’s surname and a page number). This will save you from repeating the full source information every time you cite the same article.

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Newspaper Articles in an Oxford Bibliography

As well as citing newspaper articles in footnotes, you need to list them in a bibliography at the end of your document. This should include every source you cite, with full publication information.

The format here is similar to the first footnote. The only differences are that:

  • You should give the author’s surname before their initial.
  • You should include a full page range for print articles, not just a pinpoint citation (for online articles, give a URL and date of access instead).

As such, the standard bibliography format for a newspaper article is:

Surname, Initial(s)., “Title of article,” Title of Newspaper , Section of Newspaper (if applicable), date of publication, page range.

In practice, then, you would list the articles we cited above as follows:

Cummins, C., “Lecturer fires up on LinkedIn after being faced with empty classroom,” The Sydney Morning Herald , July 12, 2017, pp. 42-43.

Hawker, P., “Teen movies: familiar tropes of school, detention, love and growing up,” The Australian , July 8, 2017, http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/review/teen-movies-familiar-tropes-of-school-detention-love-and-growing-up/news-story/23ad53ec8d84b34de4d1d46c5af232f9, accessed August 3, 2019.

If you come across a newspaper article without a named author, you can use the article title in the first position in footnotes and the bibliography instead. However, this may depend on the version of Oxford referencing you’re using, so make sure to check your style guide. And if you’d like an expert to check your writing, we have proofreaders ready to help.

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Chicago Citation Style (17th Edition): Newspaper Article from an Online Newspaper

  • General Guidelines
  • One Author or Editor
  • Two or Three Authors or Editors
  • More Than Three Authors or Editors
  • Chapter or Article in a Multi-Author Book
  • Chapter or Article in a Multi-Volume Work
  • Organization as Author
  • Reference Book
  • Edition Other than the First
  • Basic Journal Article
  • Journal Article from an Online Periodical
  • Journal Article from Database
  • Magazine Article
  • Magazine Article from an Online Magazine
  • Newspaper Article
  • Newspaper Article from an Online Newspaper
  • Basic Web Page
  • Government Publication
  • Motion Picture (Video Recording)
  • Online Multimedia
  • Image from an Electronic Source
  • Published Photograph
  • Interviews & Personal Communications
  • Pamphlets, Brochures, and Reports
  • Scriptural References
  • Secondary Sources
  • Government Publications
  • Ask for Help

Newspaper Article from an Online Newspaper (pp. 739-740)

General Format 

1. Author First Name/Initial Surname, "Article Title,"  Newspaper Title ,       Month Day, Year, URL.

Concise Note:  

2. Author Surname, "Article Title." 

Bibliography:

Author Surname, First Name or Initial. "Article Title."  Newspaper Title ,             Month Day, Year. URL.

1. Andrew Chung, "Duceppe Resigns as Bloc Quebecois Drowns       in an Orange Tsunami,"  Toronto Sta r, April 10, 2000, https://www.thestar.com

Concise Note:

2. Chung, "Duceppe Resigns."

Andrew Chung. "Duceppe Resigns as Bloc Quebecois Drowns             in an Orange Tsunami."  Toronto Star . April 10, 2000.              https://www.thestar.com .

Formatting of papers in Chicago Style:

Purdue Online Writing Lab

Citations and bibliographies in Chicago Style:

University of Alberta

About Citing Articles

This guide is intended to cover only the Notes and Bibliography system for citing articles.

For each type of source in this guide, both the general form and a specific example will be provided.

The following format will be used:

Full Note  - use the first time that you cite a source. Concise Note  - use after the first time you cite a source. Bibliography  - use when you are compiling the Bibliography that appears at the end of your paper.

Information on citing and several of the examples were drawn from  The Chicago Manual of Style (17th ed.).  

Numbers in parentheses refer to specific pages in the manual.

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  • Last Updated: Jul 10, 2023 12:20 PM
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Generate accurate Chicago citations for free

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  • Chicago Style
  • Chicago Style Footnotes | Citation Format & Examples

Chicago Style Footnotes | Citation Format & Examples

Published on September 18, 2019 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on December 5, 2022.

The notes and bibliography style is one of two citation options provided by the Chicago Manual of Style . Each time a source is quoted or paraphrased , a superscript number is placed in the text, which corresponds to a footnote or endnote containing details of the source .

Footnotes appear at the bottom of the page, while endnotes appear on a separate page at the end of the text.

Chicago-style-footnote-citation

Pay attention to the punctuation (e.g., commas , quotation marks ) in your footnotes.

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Table of contents

Full notes and short notes, placement of footnotes, content of chicago footnotes, footnote examples for different source types, footnotes vs endnotes, frequently asked questions about chicago style footnotes.

There are two types of footnote in Chicago style: full notes and short notes.

Full notes contain the full publication details of the source. The first citation of each source should be a full note.

Full note example

1. Virginia Woolf, “Modern Fiction,” in Selected Essays , ed. David Bradshaw (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008), 11.

Short notes contain only the author’s last name, the title (shortened if longer than four words), and the page number (if relevant). They are used for all subsequent citations of the same source. It’s also acceptable to use “ ibid. ” instead to refer to the immediately preceding source.

Short note example

2. Woolf, “Modern Fiction,” 11.

The guidelines for use of short and full notes can vary across different fields and institutions. Sometimes you might be required to use a full note for every citation, or to use a short note every time as long as all sources appear in the Chicago style bibliography . Check with your instructor if you’re unsure.

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Footnotes should be used whenever a source is quoted or paraphrased in the text. They appear at the bottom of the relevant page, corresponding to reference numbers in the text. You can easily insert footnotes in Microsoft Word .

The reference number appears in superscript at the end of the clause or sentence it refers to. It is placed after any punctuation except a dash :

Johnson argues that “the data is unconvincing.” 1

Johnson argues that “the data is unconvincing” 1 —but Smith contends that …

Notes should be numbered consecutively, starting from 1, across the whole text. Your first citation is marked with a 1, your second with a 2, and so on. The numbering does not restart with a new page or section (although in a book-length text it may restart with each new chapter).

The footnote contains the number of the citation followed by a period and then the citation itself. The citation always includes the author’s name and the title of the text, and it always ends with a period. Full notes also include all the relevant publication information in parentheses (which varies by source type ).

If you quote a source or refer to a specific passage, include a page number or range. However, if the source doesn’t have page numbers, or if you’re referring to the text as a whole, you can omit the page number.

In short notes, titles of more than four words are shortened. Shorten them in a way that retains the keyword(s) so that the text is still easily recognizable for the reader:

1. Mary Shelley, Frankenstein; or, the Modern Prometheus , ed. M.K. Joseph (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998), 91. 2. Shelley, Frankenstein , 91.

Combining multiple citations

Do not place multiple footnotes at the same point in your text (e.g. 1, 2, 3 ). If you need to cite multiple sources in one sentence, you can combine the citations into one footnote, separated by semicolons :

1. Hulme, “Romanticism and Classicism”; Eliot, The Waste Land ; Woolf, “Modern Fiction,” 11.

Sources with multiple authors

Footnotes for sources with two or three authors should include all the authors’ names. When there are four or more authors, add “ et al. ” (Latin for “and others”) after the first author’s name.

Missing information

You sometimes won’t have all the information required for your citation. You might be missing page numbers, the author’s name, or the publication date.

If one of your sources (e.g., a website ) has no page numbers, but you still think it’s important to cite a specific part of the text, other locators like headings , chapters or paragraphs can be used. Abbreviate words like “paragraph” to “par.” and “chapter” to “chap.”, and put headings in quotation marks :

1. Johnson, “Literature Review,” chap. 2.1 . 2. Smith, “Thematic Analysis,” under “Methodology.”

If the source lacks a stated publication date, the abbreviation “n.d.” (no date) should replace the year in a full note:

1. Smith, Data Analysis (New York: Norton, n.d. ), 293.

If a text doesn’t list its author’s name, the organization that published it can be treated as the author in your citation:

1. Scribbr , “Chicago Style Citation.”

If you use a website name as an author, you may end up repeating the same information twice in one citation. Omit the website name from its usual place if you’ve already listed it in place of the author.

Short notes usually look similar regardless of source type—author, title, page number. However, the information included in full notes varies according to the source you’re citing. Below are examples for several common source types, showing how the footnote should look in Chicago format .

Chicago book citation

Italicize the book title. If the book states an edition (other than the first), include this and abbreviate it (e.g., 2nd ed., rev. ed.). Add the URL if you consulted the book online instead of in a physical copy.

Chicago book citation format

Chicago book chapter citation

Sometimes you’ll cite from one chapter in a book containing texts by multiple authors—for example, a compilation of essays. In this case, you’ll want to cite the relevant chapter rather than the whole book.

The chapter title should be enclosed in quotation marks , while the book title should be italicized. The short note only contains the chapter title.

The author is the one who wrote the specific chapter you’re citing. The editor of the whole book is listed toward the end of the footnote (with the abbreviation “ed.”), and left out of the short note.

Chicago book chapter citation format

Chicago journal article citation

The article title should be enclosed in quotation marks, while the journal name should be italicized. Volume and issue numbers identify which edition of the journal the source appears in.

A DOI is a digital object identifier. This is generally more reliable than the URL when linking to online journal content.

Chicago journal article citation format

Chicago website citation

The page title should be enclosed in quotation marks. Italicization is not used for website names.

If the publication date is unknown, you can instead list the date when you accessed the page at the end of the citation (e.g., accessed on September 10, 2019).

Chicago website citation format

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All of the above information also applies to endnotes. Endnotes are less commonly used than footnotes, but they’re a perfectly valid option.

Footnotes appear at the bottom of the page they refer to.

  • Footnotes allow the reader to immediately check your citations as they read …
  • … but if you have a lot of footnotes, they can be distracting and take up space on the page.

Endnotes appear in their own section at the end of the text, before the bibliography.

  • Endnotes take up less space in the body of your text and reduce distraction …
  • … but they are less accessible, as the reader has to flip to the end to check each note.

Endnote citations look exactly the same as those in footnotes. Unless you’ve been told which one to use, choose whichever you prefer. Just use one or the other consistently.

Footnotes appear at the bottom of the relevant page.  Endnotes appear in a list at the end of the text, just before the reference list or bibliography. Don’t mix footnotes and endnotes in the same document: choose one or the other and use them consistently.

In Chicago notes and bibliography style , you can use either footnotes or endnotes, and citations follow the same format in either case.

In APA and MLA style , footnotes or endnotes are not used for citations, but they can be used to provide additional information.

In Chicago notes and bibliography style , the usual standard is to use a full note for the first citation of each source, and short notes for any subsequent citations of the same source.

However, your institution’s guidelines may differ from the standard rule. In some fields, you’re required to use a full note every time, whereas in some other fields you can use short notes every time, as long as all sources are listed in your bibliography . If you’re not sure, check with your instructor.

In Chicago author-date style , your text must include a reference list . It appears at the end of your paper and gives full details of every source you cited.

In notes and bibliography style, you use Chicago style footnotes to cite sources; a bibliography is optional but recommended. If you don’t include one, be sure to use a full note for the first citation of each source.

Page numbers should be included in your Chicago in-text citations when:

  • You’re quoting from the text.
  • You’re paraphrasing a particular passage.
  • You’re referring to information from a specific section.

When you’re referring to the overall argument or general content of a source, it’s unnecessary to include page numbers.

In a Chicago style footnote , list up to three authors. If there are more than three, name only the first author, followed by “ et al. “

In the bibliography , list up to 10 authors. If there are more than 10, list the first seven followed by “et al.”

The same rules apply in Chicago author-date style .

To automatically generate accurate Chicago references, you can use Scribbr’s free Chicago reference generator .

Cite this Scribbr article

If you want to cite this source, you can copy and paste the citation or click the “Cite this Scribbr article” button to automatically add the citation to our free Citation Generator.

Caulfield, J. (2022, December 05). Chicago Style Footnotes | Citation Format & Examples. Scribbr. Retrieved February 12, 2024, from https://www.scribbr.com/chicago-style/footnotes/

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Note-Bibliography

Footnote #. First Name Last-name, “Title of Article,” Title of Newspaper , Month Day, Year. url.

     27. Sandra Blakeslee, “A Pregnant Mother’s Diet May Turn the Genes Around,” New York Times , October 7, 2003. http://web.lexis-nexis.com/.

Short Note:

Footnote #. Last-name, “Shortened Title.”

28. Blakeslee, “A Pregnant Mother’s.”

Bibliography Entry:

Last-name, First Name. “Title of Article.” Title of Newspaper. Month Day, Year. url.

Blakeslee, Sandra. “A Pregnant Mother’s Diet May Turn the Genes Around.” New York Times. October 7, 2003.      http://web.lexis-nexis.com/.

Author-Date

Text Citation:

(Last-name Day Month. Year, Page)

  • If the author is named, cite in the normal way with the author and date
  • If no author is given, cite the newspaper title in italics
  • Include the specific date as well as year and page or section numbers if appropriate

(Blakeslee 7 Oct. 2005, D7)

Reference Entry:

Last-name, First Name. Year. “Title of Article.”  Title of Newspaper . Month Day. url.

Blakeslee, Sandra. 2003. “A Pregnant Mother’s Diet May Turn the Genes Around.”  New York Times . October 7.       http://web.lexis-nexis.com/.

Footnote #. First Name Last-name, “Title of Article,” Title of Newspaper , Month Day, Year.

15. Frank Kafka, “Great Restaurants in Morgantown,” The Dominion Post , July 14, 2003.

Footnote #. Last-name, “Shortened Title,” Page #.

16. Kafka, “Great Restaurants,” B6.

Last-name, First Name. “Title of Article.” Title of Newspaper. Month Day, Year, Pages.

Kafka, Frank. “Great Restaurants in Morgantown.” The Dominion Post. July 14, 2003, B6-8.

Author-Date See:  "Newspapers From Online Sources"

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Chicago Referencing – Citing a Newspaper (Footnote Style)

Chicago Referencing – Citing a Newspaper (Footnote Style)

3-minute read

  • 31st August 2017

News flash! You need to cite your sources when writing an academic paper . Perhaps you already knew that, but do you know how to cite a newspaper article using Chicago referencing?

We looked at how to do this using Chicago author-date citations here . Today, though, we’re going to set out how to cite a newspaper using the Chicago footnote and bibliography system .

When to Cite a Newspaper Article

In Chicago referencing, it isn’t always necessary to give full citations for newspaper or magazine articles. Instead, you can simply provide details of the article in the main text of your essay:

In a satirical piece by Mark Steel in the Independent (dated Thursday 6 July 2017)…

Here, we give the reader enough information to identify the article, so there is no need to give full publication details in a footnote or in the bibliography.

However, when writing a university essay, it’s usually better to give a formal citation. This shows that you understand the rules of academic writing and that you’ve engaged fully with the source.

Footnote Citations

If you’re giving a full citation, the format to use for the first footnote is:

n. Author Name(s), ‘Title of Article’, Title of Newspaper , date of publication, page number.

The page number here is the specific page you’re citing or quoting, not the complete page range for the article. If citing an online newspaper article, you do not need to give a page number. However, you should provide a URL and, if your university requires it, a date of access.

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In practice, then, the first footnote for a newspaper article would look something like this:

1. Mark Steel, ‘Why can’t these selfish nurses and firefighters try raising their salaries through crowdfunding?’, The Independent , 6 July, 2017, accessed 24 July 2017, http://www.independent.co.uk/Voices/public-sector-pay-cap-nurses-firemen-crowd-fund-wages-a7827591.html.

Subsequent footnote citations of the same source can then be shortened to just the author’s surname, an abbreviated version of the article title, and a page number (if applicable).

Bibliography

In a Chicago bibliography , the entry for a newspaper article is similar to the first footnote. However, there are a few differences in how source details are presented. The basic format is:

Surname, First Name(s). ‘Title of Article’. Title of Newspaper , date of publication.

For an online article, you would also include a URL and, if required by your university, a date of access. Consequently, the article cited above would appear in a bibliography as:

Steel, Mark. ‘Why can’t these selfish nurses and firefighters try raising their salaries through crowdfunding?’. The Independent , 6 July, 2017. Accessed 24 July 2017. http://www.independent.co.uk/Voices/public-sector-pay-cap-nurses-firemen-crowd-fund-wages-a7827591.html.

Finally, if no author is named for an article, you can use the title in place of the author’s name in both footnote citations and the bibliography.

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Chicago Footnote Referencing - Theology students: Newspaper/Magazines

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Page numbers for newspapers and magazines

Page numbers may usually be omitted from newspaper references. When citing articles from weekend supplements and other special sections, specific page references may be beneficial.

How to reference newspaper articles

  • Print article
  • Online article
  • Article with no author

1st citation 

First name Surname, "Title of Newspaper Article: Subtitle,"  Title of newspaper, Month Date, Year,  page number(s). 

Jim Yardley and Simon Romero, “Liberation Theology gets Second Look in Pope Francis' focus on Poor,” Sydney Morning Herald, May 30, 2015, 54.

Subsequent citations

Surname, "Shortened Title of Newspaper Article," page number(s).

Yardley and Romero, “Liberation Theology gets Second Look,” 54.

Bibliography

Surname,  First name. "Title of Newspaper Article: Subtitle."  Title of newspaper, Month Date, Year.   

Yardley Jim, and Simon Romero. “Liberation Theology gets Second Look in Pope Francis' focus on Poor.” Sydney Morning Herald, May 30, 2015.

First name Surname, "Title of Newspaper Article: Subtitle,"  Title of newspaper, Month Date, Year, URL . 

Zach Hope, “'A New Energy': Back to Church for the Tiny Flock Made Whole by Refugees,” The Sydney Morning Herald, June 6, 2020,  https://www.smh.com.au/national/victoria/a-new-energy-back-to-church-for-the-tiny-flock-made-whole-by-refugees-20200604-p54zq8.html .

Surname, "Shortened Title of Newspaper Article." 

Hope, “A New Energy.”

Surname,  First name. "Title of Newspaper Article: Subtitle."  Title of newspaper, Month Date, Year.  URL

Hope,  Zach.  “ 'A New Energy': Back to Church for the Tiny Flock Made Whole by Refugees . ”  The Sydney Morning Herald.  June 6, 2020.   https://www.smh.com.au/national/victoria/a-new-energy-back-to-church-for-the-tiny-flock-made-whole-by-refugees-20200604-p54zq8.html .

NB: If no author is identified begin the citation with the article title

"Title of Newspaper Article: Subtitle,"  Title of newspaper, Month Date, Year, URL if applicable . 

“David Simmons to Focus on Theology Following NRL Retirement,” Daily Telegraph, September 3, 2015, http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/nrl/david-simmons-to-focus-on-theology-following-nrl-retirement/story-fni3gfvk-1227510512966 .

"Shortened Title of Newspaper Article." 

“ David Simmons to Focus on Theology Following NRL Retirement .”

Title of newspaper.  "Title of Newspaper Article: Subtitle."  Month Date, Year.  URL if applicable.

Daily Telegraph.  “ David Simmons to Focus on Theology Following NRL Retirement .” September 3, 2015. http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/nrl/david-simmons-to-focus-on-theology-following-nrl-retirement/story-fni3gfvk-1227510512966 .

Journals vs Magazines

Chicago Manual of Style makes a distinction between journals and magazines:

  • A journal refers to a scholarly or professional periodical available normally by subscription (either print or online)
  • A magazine refers to a weekly or monthly periodical that is more accessible to general readers such as through bookstore or newsagent.

How to reference magazines

First name Surname, "Title of Magazine Article: Subtitle,"  Title of magazine, Month Year,  page number(s). 

Tim Beardsley, “Where Science and Religion Meet,” Scientific American, February 1998, 18.

Surname, "Shortened Title of Magazine Article ," page number(s).

Beardsley, “Where Science and Religion Meet,” 19.

Surname,  First name. " Title of Magazine Article : Subtitle."  Title of magazine, Month Year.   

Beardsley, Tim. “Where Science and Religion Meet.” Scientific American, February 1998.

First name Surname, " Title of Magazine Article : Subtitle,"  Title of magazine, Month Year,  URL.

Brian Handwerk, “Gospel of Judas Pages Endured Long, Strange Journey,” National Geographic, April 2006, https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2006/04/gospel-judas-pages-long-strange-journey/ .

Surname, "Shortened Title of Magazine Article ." 

Handwerk, “Gospel of Judas Pages.”

Surname,  First name. " Title of Magazine Article : Subtitle."  Title of magazine, Month Year, URL.

Handwerk,  Brian.  “ Gospel of Judas Pages Endured Long, Strange Journey .”  National Geographic.  April 2006.  https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2006/04/gospel-judas-pages-long-strange-journey/ .

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Footnote - Referencing Guide

  • Part 3: Internet Documents to Newspaper Articles
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  • Part 1: Assignments to Books
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To see more information about the formats below, either click on the format headings in this list of examples or hover your cursor over the Bibliography Entries menu and select the format you want.

All Examples

Part 1 :    Assignments - A-V Materials - Book Chapters - Books 

Part 2 :     Conference Papers - Datasets

Part 3 :     Internet Documents - Journal Articles - Newspaper Articles

Part 4 :    Podcasts - Readers - Secondary Sources - Theses

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  • Last Updated: Dec 13, 2023 12:55 PM
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Advertisement

Defending Troops, Haley Says Golf Course Is Closest Trump Has Come to Combat

After months of treading lightly about the former president’s legal travails and increasing authoritarian rhetoric, Nikki Haley came out swinging in South Carolina over a personal attack.

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Nikki Haley stands and gestures beside an American flag in a Harley-Davidson dealership. There are microphones in front of her and at least three TV cameras pointed at her.

By Anjali Huynh

Reporting from Elgin, S.C.

  • Feb. 12, 2024

Nikki Haley, in the final stretch before the South Carolina primary, is going all in on attacking former President Donald J. Trump, her former boss and chief rival, whom she trails by a huge margin in her home state.

Ms. Haley, the former governor of South Carolina, has used Mr. Trump’s comments over the weekend, about foreign policy and her family, to question his fitness for office, after months of treading lightly on his legal travails and increasing authoritarian rhetoric .

In Elgin, S.C., on Monday, she cast Mr. Trump as disrespectful to military personnel, a threat to national security, and too addled by old age to effectively serve. The harsher approach is central to her argument that the country does not want a rematch between President Biden and Mr. Trump and that she is more electable than the former president in a general election, even as polls show her behind Mr. Trump by over 30 points in South Carolina.

Ms. Haley has used a special counsel report that suggested Mr. Biden struggles with memory problems to argue that the same is true of Mr. Trump, pointing to his conflation of her with Representative Nancy Pelosi of California and his seemingly off-script remarks.

“The special counsel comes out and says he’s mentally diminished,” Ms. Haley said of Mr. Biden, before adding: “That’s not far from Donald Trump.”

She criticized the former president’s comments over the weekend insinuating that her husband , who is deployed to Africa with the National Guard, left the country to escape her. Those remarks, Ms. Haley said on Monday, were insulting to all military personnel, adding, “With that kind of disrespect for the military, he’s not qualified to be the president of the United States, because I don’t trust him to protect them.”

Speaking to reporters afterward, she got more personal.

“The most harm he’s ever come across is whether a golf ball hits him on a golf cart, and you’re going to go and mock our men and women in the military?” she said. “I don’t care what party you’re in, that’s not OK.”

Ms. Haley also hit Mr. Trump for suggesting he would encourage Russian aggression against U.S. allies behind on payments to the military alliance. She said the remarks put service members and “all of our allies in harm’s way.”

“Donald Trump is taking the side of a thug,” she said, noting Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and its detainment of Evan Gershkovich , a reporter at The Wall Street Journal.

And she said Mr. Trump had his “fingerprints on” a slew of other examples of what she called Mr. Trump’s chaotic influence over the party, like the collapse of a bipartisan border deal in Congress and reports of turnover at the Republican National Committee. Ms. Haley has also, in recent weeks, criticized Mr. Trump for spending $50 million in campaign funds on court appearances.

Karoline Leavitt, a spokeswoman for Mr. Trump, pointed to his record in office in saying “there has been no greater advocate for our brave military men and women than President Trump.”

“Nikki Haley advocates for greater foreign intervention and supports endless wars that would leave more American heroes dead,” Ms. Leavitt said in a statement. “It’s a good thing she will never be commander in chief.”

Before the first Republican nominating contest in Iowa in January, Ms. Haley’s stump speech, which she rarely deviated from, often played up her record in South Carolina, foreign policy experience as Mr. Trump’s United Nations ambassador and her vision for the future. But since the Iowa caucuses, where she finished third, she has gradually ramped up her attacks on Mr. Trump, progressing from offhand jabs about his administration’s raising the national debt to centering his weaknesses in speeches.

Asked about her harsher approach, and why she didn’t strike that tone sooner, Ms. Haley said she had avoided such attacks because she wanted to focus on a vision for the future.

“If I make it about me, that’s no different than what Donald Trump does every single day because all he does is make everything about himself,” she said.

Ms. Haley’s biggest challenge, however, was perhaps best exhibited by her events themselves: At the Harley-Davidson dealership where she spoke on a rainy afternoon on Monday, she addressed around 50 people, where some chairs that were set up went unfilled.

And some who attended were not necessarily voters she needs to cut into Mr. Trump’s lead. John Schuller, a 76-year-old Democrat, said he believed it was “arrogant and selfish” for Mr. Biden “not to step off the stage and let someone new come on.” Ms. Haley, whom he plans to back in the primary, seemed like a “reasonable voice” — though he acknowledged that her path forward would be tough.

“Miracles happen,” Mr. Schuller said. “I hope South Carolina can make a miracle happen.”

Anjali Huynh , a member of the 2023-24 Times Fellowship class based in New York, covers national politics, the 2024 presidential campaign and other elections. More about Anjali Huynh

Our Coverage of the 2024 Presidential Election

News and Analysis

Tom Suozzi’s victory in a special House election in New York  gave Democrats a dose of optimism  and a model for how to navigate one of the biggest political liabilities for President Biden and the party: the migrant influx overwhelming the southern border .

Nikki Haley’s bus tour through South Carolina , where she is trailing Trump in the polls , was intended to evoke a candidate on the upswing. But it has served more as a reminder of how much the state has changed since she was governor .

Our Revolution, the political organization that Senator Bernie Sanders launched in 2016, is joining the effort to vote Uncommitted in Michigan’s Democratic primary , seeking to pressure Biden into changing his approach to the war in Gaza.

Can Democrats Win Back Latino Men?: A friendship forged in a Las Vegas barbershop offers clues to one of the biggest questions of the presidential election .

Disparate Economic Pictures: Democrats say Nevada’s economy is getting better, while Republicans argue it’s getting worse. Which message resonates more could help make a difference in the pivotal battleground state in November .

Behaving Like an Incumbent: As he rolls toward the Republican nomination, Trump is using the imagery of his presidency  to twist the race in his favor in ways big and small.

Watching From a Distance: Maj. Michael Haley, Nikki Haley’s husband, has missed the highs and lows of his wife’s pursuit of the White House while deployed to Djibouti. He is still a big presence in her campaign .

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Trump appeals immunity ruling to the Supreme Court

Carrie Johnson 2016 square

Carrie Johnson

footnote citation newspaper article

Former President Trump appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court a federal appeals court ruling that he did not enjoy immunity from prosecution. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

Former President Trump appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court a federal appeals court ruling that he did not enjoy immunity from prosecution.

Former President Donald Trump is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to hit pause on his federal criminal prosecution for allegedly conspiring to obstruct the electoral certification three years ago.

Lawyers for Trump made the request Monday, writing the justices that they are preparing a petition for certiorari, or a full application for the high court to take the case. They said they want the court to indefinitely delay the trial at a federal courthouse in Washington D.C. At issue is a dispute over whether Trump should enjoy absolute immunity from criminal charges over acts he allegedly committed while in the White House.

Last week, three judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit flatly rejected Trump's bid for blanket immunity .

"Former President Trump has become citizen Trump, with all of the defenses of any other criminal defendant," the ideologically diverse judges wrote in an unsigned, unanimous opinion.

"We cannot accept that the office of the Presidency places its former occupants above the law for all time thereafter," the D.C. Circuit judges wrote. Doing so, they said, "would collapse our system of separated powers by placing the President beyond the reach of all three branches."

The three-judge panel gave Trump until Monday to take his case to the Supreme Court. What the justices do, and how quickly, could determine whether Trump faces trial before the November election in a case that accuses him of breaking federal conspiracy laws to cling to power after he lost the 2020 race to Joe Biden.

Lawyers working for Special Counsel Jack Smith said in court papers that those conspiracies culminated in violence at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, that injured more than 140 law enforcement officers and shook the foundations of American democracy.

Trump has pleaded not guilty and has argued in and outside of court that the case amounts to "election interference" against the Republican frontrunner to return to the White House. Attorney General Merrick Garland, who named a special counsel to lead the inquiry, has denied under oath any meddling by Biden and others currently in the White House.

The question of presidential immunity in criminal cases has never before arisen, because Trump is the first former president to face such charges.

He's fighting 91 felony counts, across four different jurisdictions, for allegations related to the 2020 election, his refusal to return highly classified documents to the FBI, and for paperwork violations over hush-money payments to an adult film star.

At the Supreme Court, meanwhile, the justices seemed skeptical of Colorado's bid to disqualify Trump from a state primary ballot for allegedly engaging in an insurrection. A decision in that case could come within weeks.

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Why tens of thousands of Indian farmers are marching toward the capital in protest

Indian police fired tear gas and detained some farmers who tried to break barricades blocking their way to New Delhi in a protest march. (Feb. 13)

Farmers marching to New Delhi gather near the Punjab-Haryana border at Shambhu, India, Tuesday, Feb.13, 2024. Farmers are marching to the Indian capital asking for a guaranteed minimum support price for all farm produce. (AP Photo/Rajesh Sachar)

Farmers marching to New Delhi gather near the Punjab-Haryana border at Shambhu, India, Tuesday, Feb.13, 2024. Farmers are marching to the Indian capital asking for a guaranteed minimum support price for all farm produce. (AP Photo/Rajesh Sachar)

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Farmers on tractors march to New Delhi near the Punjab-Haryana border at Shambhu, India, Tuesday, Feb.13, 2024. Farmers are marching to the Indian capital asking for a guaranteed minimum support price for all farm produce. (AP Photo/Rajesh Sachar)

Farmers run for cover after police fired tear gas to disperse protesting farmers who were marching to New Delhi near the Punjab-Haryana border at Shambhu, India, Tuesday, Feb.13, 2024. Farmers are marching to the Indian capital asking for a guaranteed minimum support price for all farm produce. (AP Photo/Rajesh Sachar)

Rapid Action Force personnel guard a major highway at Singhu near New Delhi to stop thousands of protesting farmers from entering the capital, India, Tuesday, Feb.13, 2024. Farmers, who began their march from northern Haryana and Punjab states, are asking for a guaranteed minimum support price for all farm produce. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Police guard a major highway at Singhu near New Delhi to stop thousands of protesting farmers from entering the capital, India, Tuesday, Feb.13, 2024. Farmers, who began their march from northern Haryana and Punjab states, are asking for a guaranteed minimum support price for all farm produce. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

footnote citation newspaper article

NEW DELHI (AP) — Tens of thousands of Indian farmers are marching toward the capital to demand guaranteed crop prices, renewing a movement from two years ago that succeeded in getting the government to repeal contentious new agricultural laws.

On Tuesday, police used tear gas , detained a number of farmers and heavily barricaded border points to block the protesters from entering New Delhi.

Authorities are determined to control the new demonstrations to avoid a repeat of the 2021 protests, in which tens of thousands of farmers camped outside the capital for over a year, enduring a harsh winter and a devastating COVID-19 surge.

WHY ARE FARMERS PROTESTING AGAIN?

Farmers run for cover after police fired tear gas to disperse protesting farmers who were marching to New Delhi near the Punjab-Haryana border at Shambhu, India, Tuesday, Feb.13, 2024. Farmers are marching to the Indian capital asking for a guaranteed minimum support price for all farm produce. (AP Photo/Rajesh Sachar)

Farmers run for cover after police fired tear gas to disperse protesting farmers who were marching to New Delhi near the Punjab-Haryana border at Shambhu, India, Tuesday, Feb.13, 2024. (AP Photo/Rajesh Sachar)

The farmers, who rode on tractors and trucks from neighboring Haryana and Punjab states, say the government has failed to meet some of their key demands from the previous protests.

In 2021, Prime Minister Narendra Modi repealed a set of agricultural laws that had triggered the first round of protests from farmers, who said the legislation would hurt their incomes.

But farmer groups that are leading the current march say that since then, the government hasn’t made progress on other important demands such as guaranteed crop prices, a doubling of farmers’ income and loan waivers.

The demand for legislation that will guarantee minimum support prices is at the heart of their protests.

Currently, the government protects agricultural producers against any sharp fall in farm prices by setting a minimum purchase price for certain essential crops, a system that was introduced in the 1960s to help shore up food reserves and prevent shortages. But the farmers are demanding that this be extended to all farm produce, and not just essential crops.

WHAT HAPPENED LAST TIME?

In November 2021, Modi’s announcement that his government would quash the controversial laws was widely seen as a win for the farmers and a rare retreat by the populist leader.

FILE - In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021, file photo, farmers participate in a tractor protest rally towards the capital during India's Republic Day in New Delhi, India. A sea of tens of thousands of farmers riding tractors and horses stormed India’s historic Red Fort on Jan. 26, a dramatic escalation of their protests, which are posing a major challenge to Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government. They are demanding the repeal of laws passed by Parliament in September that they say will favor large corporate farms, devastate the earnings of many farmers and leave those who hold small plots behind as big corporations win out. (AP Photo/Dinesh Joshi, File)

The government had defended the laws as necessary reforms to modernize Indian farming, but farmers feared the government’s move to introduce market reforms in agriculture would leave them poorer.

The protests, which began in northern India, triggered nationwide demonstrations and drew international support. Dozens of farmers died due to suicides, bad weather conditions and the pandemic.

Political commentators said the protest movement was the biggest challenge until that time for the Modi government, which then tried to paint its decision to scrap the laws as a move that prioritized farmers.

Rapid Action Force personnel guard a major highway at Singhu near New Delhi to stop thousands of protesting farmers from entering the capital, India, Tuesday, Feb.13, 2024. Farmers, who began their march from northern Haryana and Punjab states, are asking for a guaranteed minimum support price for all farm produce. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Rapid Action Force personnel guard a major highway at Singhu near New Delhi to stop thousands of protesting farmers from entering the capital, India, Tuesday, Feb.13, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR MODI’S GOVERNMENT?

The protests come at a crucial time for the governing party and Modi, who is widely expected to sweep upcoming national polls and secure a third successive term.

In 2021, Modi’s decision to do away with the laws was seen as a move to appease farmers ahead of crucial state polls.

Farmers form the most influential voting bloc in India and are often romanticized as the heart and soul of the nation.

India's Bharatiya Janata Party supporters celebrate after Uttarakhand state lawmakers passed a uniform marriage law for all religions in Dehradun, India, Wednesday, Feb.7, 2024. The northern Indian state on Wednesday approved an unprecedented uniform code for marriage, divorce, adoption and inheritance for Hindus, Muslims and other religious communities under a new law that also requires couples that live together to register with the government or face punishment. (AP Photo)

Politicians have long considered it unwise to alienate them, and farmers are also particularly important to Modi’s base. Northern Haryana and a few other states with substantial farmer populations are ruled by his party.

If the protests were to gain the same kind of momentum as last time, it could pose a new test for Modi and his government just a few months before the general election.

KRUTIKA PATHI

IMAGES

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  3. How to Cite a Newspaper Article in MLA With Examples

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Cite a Newspaper Article

    To cite an article from a newspaper, you need an in-text citation and a reference listing the author, the publication date, the article's title, the name of the newspaper, and a URL if it was accessed online. Different citation styles present this information differently. The main styles are APA, MLA, and Chicago style.

  2. Chicago Referencing

    The first time you cite a newspaper article, give full publication information in the footnote. The format for doing this is: n. Author Name, "Title of Article," Title of Newspaper, date of publication, page number. In practice, then, the first citation of a newspaper article would look like this: 1.

  3. Citing a Newspaper Article in Chicago Style

    In Chicago notes and bibliography style, it's recommended to just cite newspaper articles in footnotes and omit them from the bibliography. Only list an article in the bibliography if it's essential to your argument, if you cite it frequently, or if your university requires you to.

  4. Turabian Footnote/Endnote Style

    Newspaper Articles Review Articles Websites For More Help The examples in this guide are meant to introduce you to the basics of citing sources using Kate Turabian's A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations (seventh edition) .

  5. Newspaper article references

    Provide the comment title or up to the first 20 words of the comment; then write "Comment on the article" and the title of the article on which the comment appeared (in quotation marks and sentence case, enclosed within square brackets). Link to the comment itself if possible. Either the full URL or a short URL is acceptable.

  6. Periodicals

    Article Title: Both notes and bibliographies use quotation marks to set off the titles of articles within the journal. Journal Title: Journal titles may omit an initial "The" but should otherwise be given in full, capitalized (headline-style), and italicized. Issue Information:

  7. Magazine/Newspaper Articles

    Cite a newspaper article as you would a magazine article. If the newspaper title starts with The, omit The from the title in your citation. Since newspapers may have multiple editions, page numbers are usually omitted for newspaper articles.

  8. How to Cite a Newspaper in Chicago/Turabian

    *Note: According to the Chicago Manual of Style, newspaper articles are usually cited directly in-text or in a footnote and not included in bibliographies. Please see CMoS section 14.198 for further details. If your instructor requires you to cite newspaper articles, please use the format provided here. Chicago Style Newspaper Citation Example:

  9. PDF Chicago Citation Style: Footnotes and Bibliography

    General Guidelines: Your footnotes should be numbered consecutively throughout the paper. Use your word processing program to insert footnotes and it will number them for you automatically. The footnote number should always be inserted after the punctuation.1 The first time you cite a source, you will include a full citation.

  10. Chicago Citation Guide (17th Edition): Newspaper Articles

    Footnote: 1. Author's First Name Last Name, "Title of Article," Name of Newspaper (City and Province/State of Publication, if not Included in Name), Date of Publication, https://doi.org/DOI Number or Name of Database. Bibliography Entry: Author's Last Name, First Name. "Title of Article."

  11. Newspaper Articles

    Footnote - Referencing Guide Information • Include section name if given. • Include the specific date as well as year. • Include internet address if viewed online. Format Standard format for citation Article Author, A. A. "Title of Article." Title of Newspaper, Month Date, Year, Section. Examples Newspaper articles in print Buchanan, Rachel.

  12. How to Cite Newspapers and Other Articles in Chicago Style

    The format for citing a newspaper article in a reference list using the author-date system looks like this: Last name, First name of author. Year. "Article title.". Newspaper name, Month Day, Year, #-#. Note that in Chicago style, you don't need to write "p." or "pp." before the page or page ranges you are referencing.

  13. Newspaper Articles

    The following examples are for the Notes-Bibliography system of Chicago/Turabian.This means that you are citing your courses using either footnotes or endnotes. If your teacher has asked you to cite your sources using in-text citations in brackets, visit this page to find out how to format these citations in the Author-Date system of Chicago/Turabian.

  14. LibGuides: Chicago Style Guide, for 17th Edition: Newspapers

    Newspaper footnotes/endnotes share much of the same structure as journals and magazines. The author, headline, publisher, and especially the day/year are all central elements to a proper newspaper note-style citation. If the online edition of a paper was consulted as the reference, a URL should be included at the end of the citation.

  15. Chicago Referencing

    In the reference list, newspaper articles should be listed using the following format: Surname, First Name. Year. "Title.". Newspaper Name, Month Day. Chicago referencing doesn't include page numbers in the reference list, even for print articles. This is because pagination can differ in different editions of the same newspaper.

  16. How to Cite a Newspaper in Oxford Referencing

    How to Cite a Newspaper Article in Footnotes The exact rules for citing a newspaper article may vary between universities, so make sure to check your style guide. However, most versions of Oxford referencing use a format like this: n. Initial (s).

  17. Newspaper Article from an Online Newspaper

    A sample paper using the Chicago Style, with footnotes, page numbers, section headings, and bibliography, (NOTE: Footnote 13 uses Ibid. to denote that it is from the same source as Footnote 12. Chicago Style 17th edition discourages the use of Ibid. and requires writers to use shortened notes instead.) Presented by Montana State University ...

  18. Chicago Style Footnotes

    1. Virginia Woolf, "Modern Fiction," in Selected Essays, ed. David Bradshaw (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008), 11. Short notes contain only the author's last name, the title (shortened if longer than four words), and the page number (if relevant). They are used for all subsequent citations of the same source.

  19. Citing Newspaper Articles

    If the author is named, cite in the normal way with the author and date; If no author is given, cite the newspaper title in italics; Include the specific date as well as year and page or section numbers if appropriate; Example: (Blakeslee 7 Oct. 2005, D7) Reference Entry: Last-name, First Name. Year. "Title of Article." Title of Newspaper ...

  20. Chicago Referencing

    Subsequent footnote citations of the same source can then be shortened to just the author's surname, an abbreviated version of the article title, and a page number (if applicable). Bibliography. In a Chicago bibliography, the entry for a newspaper article is similar to the first footnote. However, there are a few differences in how source ...

  21. Newspaper/Magazines

    Footnote 1st citation First name Surname, "Title of Newspaper Article: Subtitle," Title of newspaper, Month Date, Year, page number (s). Jim Yardley and Simon Romero, "Liberation Theology gets Second Look in Pope Francis' focus on Poor," Sydney Morning Herald, May 30, 2015, 54. Subsequent citations

  22. Part 3: Internet Documents to Newspaper Articles

    Footnote Style; In Text Citation Toggle Dropdown. Citing in the Text ; Citation Examples ; ... In Text Citation: Note: Subsequent Note: Bibliography: ... Newspaper Article from a Full Text Database: 37: 37. Cameron Stewart, "Man of War Who Helped Create Anzac Legend."

  23. Register for Free Citation Management Workshops Next Week

    How to install the program and configure a web browser to collect and manage citations. How to use Zotero with Microsoft Word to insert and format in-text references, endnotes and footnotes . This one-hour session will be offered at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20; 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21; 2 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21; and 12:30 p.m. Thursday ...

  24. Here's the missing context from Putin's interview with Tucker Carlson

    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. Updated 12:02 PM PST, February 9, 2024. Russian President Vladimir Putin sat down in the Kremlin for a two-hour interview with former Fox News host Tucker Carlson, pushing his views on the justification for the nearly 2-year-old war in Ukraine, the prospects of peace talks, and other issues.

  25. Haley Blasts Trump's Insinuations About Her Husband's Service

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