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How to give a good presentation that captivates any audience

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What are the main difficulties when giving presentations?

How to create an effective presentation, after that, how do i give a memorable presentation, how to connect with the audience when presenting.

If you’ve ever heard someone give a powerful presentation, you probably remember how it made you feel. Much like a composer, a good speaker knows precisely when each note should strike to captivate their audience’s attention and leave them with a lasting impression.

No one becomes a great public speaker or presenter without practice. And almost everyone can recall a time one of their presentations went badly — that’s a painful part of the learning process.

Whether you’re working within a small creative team or a large organization, public speaking and presentation skills are vital to communicating your ideas. Knowing how to present your vision can help you pitch concepts to clients, present ideas to your team, and develop the confidence to participate in team meetings.

If you have an upcoming presentation on the horizon and feel nervous, that’s normal. Around 15-30% of the general population experience a fear of public speaking . And, unfortunately, social anxiety is on the rise, with a 12% increase in adults over the last 20 years . 

Learning how to give a good presentation can dismantle your fears and break down these barriers, ensuring you’re ready to confidently share your point of view. 

It’s the week before your presentation, and you’re already feeling nervous . Maybe there’ll be an important mentor in the room you need to impress, or you’re looking for an opportunity to show your boss your value. Regardless of your countless past presentations, you still feel nervous. 

Sharing your vision and ideas with any sized group is intimidating. You’re likely worrying about how you’ll perform as a presenter and whether the audience will be interested in what you offer. But nerves aren’t inherently negative — you can actually use this feeling to fuel your preparation.

businesswoman-speaking-from-a-podium-to-an-audience-in-a-conference-room-how-to-give-a-good-presentation

It’s helpful to identify where your worries are coming from and address your fears. Here are some common concerns when preparing for an upcoming presentation:

Fear of public speaking: When you share your ideas in front of a group, you’re placing yourself in a vulnerable position to be critiqued on your knowledge and communication skills . Maybe you feel confident in your content, but when you think about standing in front of an audience, you feel anxious and your mind goes blank.

It’s also not uncommon to have physical symptoms when presenting . Some people experience nausea and dizziness as the brain releases adrenaline to cope with the potentially stressful situation . Remember to take deep breaths to recenter yourself and be patient, even if you make a mistake.

Losing the audience’s attention: As a presenter, your main focus is to keep your audience engaged. They should feel like they’re learning valuable information or following a story that will improve them in life or business.

Highlight the most exciting pieces of knowledge and ensure you emphasize those points in your presentation. If you feel passionate about your content, it’s more likely that your audience will experience this excitement for themselves and become invested in what you have to say.

Not knowing what content to place on presentation slides: Overloading presentation slides is a fast way to lose your audience’s attention. Your slides should contain only the main talking points and limited text to ensure your audience focuses on what you have to say rather than becoming distracted by the content on your slides.

Discomfort incorporating nonverbal communication: It’s natural to feel stiff and frozen when you’re nervous. But maintaining effective body language helps your audience stay focused on you as you speak and encourages you to relax.

If you struggle to incorporate body language into your presentations, try starting small by making hand gestures toward your slides. If you’re working with a large audience, use different parts of the stage to ensure everyone feels included. 

Each presenter has their own personal brand and style. Some may use humor to break the ice, while others might appeal to the audience’s emotional side through inspiring storytelling. 

Watching online presentations, such as TED talks, is an excellent way to expose yourself to various presentation styles and develop your own. While observing others, you can note how they carry themselves on stage and learn new ways to keep your audience engaged.

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Once you’ve addressed what’s causing your fears, it’s time to prepare for a great presentation. Use your past experience as inspiration and aim to outshine your former self by learning from your mistakes and employing new techniques. Here are five presentation tips to help you create a strong presentation and wow your audience:

1. Keep it simple

Simple means something different to everyone.

Before creating your presentation, take note of your intended audience and their knowledge level of your subject. You’ll want your content to be easy for your intended audience to follow.

Say you’re giving a presentation on improving your company’s operational structure. Entry-level workers will likely need a more straightforward overview of the content than C-suite leaders, who have significantly more experience. 

Ask yourself what you want your audience to take away from your presentation and emphasize those important points. Doing this ensures they remember the most vital information rather than less important supporting ideas. Try organizing these concepts into bullet points so viewers can quickly identify critical takeaways.

2. Create a compelling structure

Put yourself in your audience member’s shoes and determine the most compelling way to organize your information. Your presentation should be articulate , cohesive, and logical, and you must be sure to include all necessary supporting evidence to strengthen your main points.

If you give away all of your answers too quickly, your audience could lose interest. And if there isn’t enough supporting information, they could hit a roadblock of confusion. Try developing a compelling story that leads your audience through your thought processes so they can experience the ups and downs alongside you. 

By structuring your presentation to lead up to a final conclusion, you’re more likely to keep listeners’ attention. Once you’ve reached that conclusion, you can offer a Q&A period to put any of their questions or concerns to rest. 

3. Use visual aids

Appealing to various learning styles is a great way to keep everyone on the same page and ensure they absorb your content. Visual aids are necessary for visual learners and make it easier for people to picture your ideas.

Aim to incorporate a mixture of photos, videos, and props to engage your audience and convey your key points. For instance, if you’re giving a presentation on anthropology subject matter, you could show your audience an artifact to help them understand how exciting a discovery must have been. 

If your presentation is long, including a video for your audience to watch is an excellent way to give yourself a break and create new jumping-off points for your speech.

4. Be aware of design techniques and trends

Thanks to cutting-edge technology and tools, you have numerous platforms at your disposal to create a good presentation. But keep in mind that although color, images, and graphics liven things up, they can cause distraction when misused.

  Here are a few standard pointers for incorporating visuals on your slides: 

  • Don’t place blocks of small text on a single slide
  • Use a minimalistic background instead of a busy one
  • Ensure text stands out against the background color
  • Only use high-resolution photos
  • Maintain a consistent font style and size throughout the presentation
  • Don’t overuse transitions and effects

5. Try the 10-20-30 rule

Guy Kawasaki, a prominent venture capitalist and one of the original marketing specialists for Apple, said that the best slideshow presentations are less than 10 slides , last at most 20 minutes, and use a font size of 30. Following this strategy can help you condense your information, eliminate unnecessary ideas, and maintain your audience’s focus more efficiently.

Once you’re confident in creating a memorable presentation, it’s time to learn how to give one. Here are some valuable tips for keeping your audience invested during your talk: 

Tip #1: Tell stories

Sharing an anecdote from your life can improve your credibility and increase your relatability. And when an audience relates to you, they’re more likely to feel connected to who you are as a person and encouraged to give you their full attention, as they would want others to do the same.

Gill Hicks utilized this strategy well when she shared her powerful story, “ I survived a terrorist attack. Here’s what I learned .” In her harrowing tale, Hicks highlights the importance of compassion, unconditional love, and helping those in need.

If you feel uncomfortable sharing personal stories, that’s okay. You can use examples from famous individuals or create a fictional account to demonstrate your ideas.

Tip #2: Make eye contact with the audience

Maintaining eye contact is less intimidating than it sounds. In fact, you don’t have to look your audience members directly in their eyes — you can focus on their foreheads or noses if that’s easier.

Try making eye contact with as many people as possible for 3–5 seconds each. This timing ensures you don’t look away too quickly, making the audience member feel unimportant, or linger too long, making them feel uncomfortable.

If you’re presenting to a large group, direct your focus to each part of the room to ensure no section of the audience feels ignored. 

Group-of-a-business-people-having-meeting-in-a-conference-room-how-to-give-a-good-presentation

Tip #3: Work on your stage presence

Although your tone and words are the most impactful part of your presentation, recall that body language keeps your audience engaged. Use these tips to master a professional stage presence:

  • Speak with open arms and avoid crossing them
  • Keep a reasonable pace and try not to stand still
  • Use hand gestures to highlight important information

Tip #4: Start strong

Like watching a movie trailer, the first seconds of your talk are critical for capturing your audience’s attention. How you start your speech sets the tone for the rest of your presentation and tells your audience whether or not they should pay attention. Here are some ways to start your presentation to leave a lasting impression:

  • Use a quote from a well-known and likable influential person 
  • Ask a rhetorical question to create intrigue
  • Start with an anecdote to add context to your talk 
  • Spark your audience’s curiosity by involving them in an interactive problem-solving puzzle or riddle

Tip #5: Show your passion

Don’t be afraid of being too enthusiastic. Everyone appreciates a speaker who’s genuinely excited about their field of expertise. 

In “ Grit: The Power of Passion and Perseverance ,” Angela Lee Duckworth discusses the importance of passion in research and delivery. She delivers her presentation excitedly to show the audience how excitement piques interest. 

Tip #6: Plan your delivery

How you decide to deliver your speech will shape your presentation. Will you be preparing a PowerPoint presentation and using a teleprompter? Or are you working within the constraints of the digital world and presenting over Zoom?

The best presentations are conducted by speakers who know their stuff and memorize their content. However, if you find this challenging, try creating notes to use as a safety net in case you lose track.

If you’re presenting online, you can keep notes beside your computer for each slide, highlighting your key points. This ensures you include all the necessary information and follow a logical order.

Woman-presenting-charts-and-data-to-work-team-how-to-give-a-good-presentation

Tip #7: Practice

Practice doesn’t make perfect — it makes progress. There’s no way of preparing for unforeseen circumstances, but thorough practice means you’ve done everything you can to succeed.

Rehearse your speech in front of a mirror or to a trusted friend or family member. Take any feedback and use it as an opportunity to fine-tune your speech. But remember: who you practice your presentation in front of may differ from your intended audience. Consider their opinions through the lens of them occupying this different position.

Tip #8: Read the room

Whether you’re a keynote speaker at an event or presenting to a small group of clients, knowing how to read the room is vital for keeping your audience happy. Stay flexible and be willing to move on from topics quickly if your listeners are uninterested or displeased with a particular part of your speech.

Tip #9: Breathe

Try taking deep breaths before your presentation to calm your nerves. If you feel rushed, you’re more likely to feel nervous and stumble on your words.

The most important thing to consider when presenting is your audience’s feelings. When you approach your next presentation calmly, you’ll put your audience at ease and encourage them to feel comfortable in your presence.

Tip #10: Provide a call-to-action

When you end your presentation, your audience should feel compelled to take a specific action, whether that’s changing their habits or contacting you for your services.

If you’re presenting to clients, create a handout with key points and contact information so they can get in touch. You should provide your LinkedIn information, email address, and phone number so they have a variety of ways to reach you. 

There’s no one-size-fits-all template for an effective presentation, as your unique audience and subject matter play a role in shaping your speech. As a general rule, though, you should aim to connect with your audience through passion and excitement. Use strong eye contact and body language. Capture their interest through storytelling and their trust through relatability.

Learning how to give a good presentation can feel overwhelming — but remember, practice makes progress. Rehearse your presentation for someone you trust, collect their feedback , and revise. Practicing your presentation skills is helpful for any job, and every challenge is a chance to grow.

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Elizabeth Perry

Content Marketing Manager, ACC

3 stand-out professional bio examples to inspire your own

How to write a speech that your audience remembers, tell a story they can't ignore these 10 tips will teach you how, how to make a presentation interactive and exciting, reading the room gives you an edge — no matter who you're talking to, writing an elevator pitch about yourself: a how-to plus tips, your ultimate guide on how to be a good storyteller, 8 clever hooks for presentations (with tips), 18 effective strategies to improve your communication skills, similar articles, the importance of good speech: 5 tips to be more articulate, the 11 tips that will improve your public speaking skills, 30 presentation feedback examples, how to not be nervous for a presentation — 13 tips that work (really), how the minto pyramid principle can enhance your communication skills, stay connected with betterup, get our newsletter, event invites, plus product insights and research..

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What Are Effective Presentation Skills (and How to Improve Them)

Presentation skills are essential for your personal and professional life. Learn about effective presentations and how to boost your presenting techniques.

[Featured Image]: The marketing manager, wearing a yellow top, is making a PowerPoint presentation.

At least seven out of 10 Americans agree that presentation skills are essential for a successful career [ 1 ]. Although it might be tempting to think that these are skills reserved for people interested in public speaking roles, they're critical in a diverse range of jobs. For example, you might need to brief your supervisor on research results.

Presentation skills are also essential in other scenarios, including working with a team and explaining your thought process, walking clients through project ideas and timelines, and highlighting your strengths and achievements to your manager during performance reviews.

Whatever the scenario, you have very little time to capture your audience’s attention and get your point across when presenting information—about three seconds, according to research [ 2 ]. Effective presentation skills help you get your point across and connect with the people you’re communicating with, which is why nearly every employer requires them.

Understanding what presentation skills are is only half the battle. Honing your presenting techniques is essential for mastering presentations of all kinds and in all settings.

What are presentation skills?

Presentation skills are the abilities and qualities necessary for creating and delivering a compelling presentation that effectively communicates information and ideas. They encompass what you say, how you structure it, and the materials you include to support what you say, such as slides, videos, or images.

You'll make presentations at various times in your life. Examples include:

Making speeches at a wedding, conference, or another event

Making a toast at a dinner or event

Explaining projects to a team 

Delivering results and findings to management teams

Teaching people specific methods or information

Proposing a vote at community group meetings

Pitching a new idea or business to potential partners or investors

Why are presentation skills important? 

Delivering effective presentations is critical in your professional and personal life. You’ll need to hone your presentation skills in various areas, such as when giving a speech, convincing your partner to make a substantial purchase, and talking to friends and family about an important situation.

No matter if you’re using them in a personal or professional setting, these are the skills that make it easier and more effective to convey your ideas, convince or persuade others, and experience success. A few of the benefits that often accompany improving your presentation skills include:

Enriched written and verbal communication skills

Enhanced confidence and self-image

Boosted critical thinking and problem-solving capabilities

Better motivational techniques

Increased leadership skills

Expanded time management, negotiation, and creativity

The better your presenting techniques, the more engaging your presentations will be. You could also have greater opportunities to make positive impacts in business and other areas of your life.

Effective presentation skills

Imagine yourself in the audience at a TED Talk or sitting with your coworkers at a big meeting held by your employer. What would you be looking for in how they deliver their message? What would make you feel engaged?

These are a few questions to ask yourself as you review this list of some of the most effective presentation skills.

Verbal communication

How you use language and deliver messages play essential roles in how your audience will receive your presentation. Speak clearly and confidently, projecting your voice enough to ensure everyone can hear. Think before you speak, pausing when necessary and tailoring the way you talk to resonate with your particular audience.

Body language

Body language combines various critical elements, including posture, gestures, eye contact, expressions, and position in front of the audience. Body language is one of the elements that can instantly transform a presentation that would otherwise be dull into one that's dynamic and interesting.

Voice projection

The ability to project your voice improves your presentation by allowing your audience to hear what you're saying. It also increases your confidence to help settle any lingering nerves while also making your message more engaging. To project your voice, stand comfortably with your shoulders back. Take deep breaths to power your speaking voice and ensure you enunciate every syllable you speak.

How you present yourself plays a role in your body language and ability to project your voice. It also sets the tone for the presentation. Avoid slouching or looking overly tense. Instead, remain open, upright, and adaptable while taking the formality of the occasion into account.

Storytelling

Incorporating storytelling into a presentation is an effective strategy used by many powerful public speakers. It has the power to bring your subject to life and pique the audience’s curiosity. Don’t be afraid to tell a personal story, slowly building up suspense or adding a dramatic moment. And, of course, be sure to end with a positive takeaway to drive your point home.

Active listening

Active listening is a valuable skill all on its own. When you understand and thoughtfully respond to what you hear—whether it's in a conversation or during a presentation—you’ll likely deepen your personal relationships and actively engage audiences during a presentation. As part of your presentation skill set, it helps catch and maintain the audience’s attention, helping them remain focused while minimizing passive response, ensuring the message is delivered correctly, and encouraging a call to action.

Stage presence

During a presentation, projecting confidence can help keep your audience engaged. Stage presence can help you connect with your audience and encourage them to want to watch you. To improve your presence, try amping up your normal demeanor by infusing it with a bit of enthusiasm. Project confidence and keep your information interesting.

Watch your audience as you’re presenting. If you’re holding their attention, it likely means you’re connecting well with them.

Self-awareness

Monitoring your own emotions and reactions will allow you to react well in various situations. It helps you remain personable throughout your presentation and handle feedback well. Self-awareness can help soothe nervousness during presentations, allowing you to perform more effectively.

Writing skills

Writing is a form of presentation. Sharp writing skills can help you master your presentation’s outline to ensure you stay on message and remain clear about your objectives from the beginning until the end. It’s also helpful to have strong writing abilities for creating compelling slides and other visual aids.

Understanding an audience

When you understand your audience's needs and interests, you can design your presentation around them. In turn, you'll deliver maximum value to them and enhance your ability to make your message easy to understand.

Learn more about presentation skills from industry experts at SAP:

How to improve presentation skills

There’s an art to public speaking. Just like any other type of art, this is one that requires practice. Improving your presentation skills will help reduce miscommunications, enhance your time management capabilities, and boost your leadership skills. Here are some ways you can improve these skills:

Work on self-confidence.

When you’re confident, you naturally speak more clearly and with more authority. Taking the time to prepare your presentation with a strong opening and compelling visual aids can help you feel more confident. Other ways to improve your self-confidence include practicing positive self-talk, surrounding yourself with positive people, and avoiding comparing yourself (or your presentation) to others.

Develop strategies for overcoming fear.

Many people are nervous or fearful before giving a presentation. A bad memory of a past performance or insufficient self-confidence can contribute to fear and anxiety. Having a few go-to strategies like deep breathing, practicing your presentation, and grounding can help you transform that fear into extra energy to put into your stage presence.

Learn grounding techniques.

Grounding is any type of technique that helps you steer your focus away from distressing thoughts and keeps you connected with your present self. To ground yourself, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and imagine you’re a large, mature tree with roots extending deep into the earth—like the tree, you can become unshakable.

Learn how to use presentation tools.

Visual aids and other technical support can transform an otherwise good presentation into a wow-worthy one. A few popular presentation tools include:

Canva: Provides easy-to-design templates you can customize

Powtoon: Animation software that makes video creation fast and easy

PowerPoint: Microsoft's iconic program popular for dynamic marketing and sales presentations

Practice breathing techniques.

Breathing techniques can help quell anxiety, making it easier to shake off pre-presentation jitters and nerves. It also helps relax your muscles and get more oxygen to your brain.  For some pre-presentation calmness, you can take deep breaths, slowly inhaling through your nose and exhaling through your mouth.

While presenting, breathe in through your mouth with the back of your tongue relaxed so your audience doesn't hear a gasping sound. Speak on your exhalation, maintaining a smooth voice.

Gain experience.

The more you practice, the better you’ll become. The more you doanything, the more comfortable you’ll feel engaging in that activity. Presentations are no different. Repeatedly practicing your own presentation also offers the opportunity to get feedback from other people and tweak your style and content as needed.

Tips to help you ace your presentation

Your presentation isn’t about you; it’s about the material you’re presenting. Sometimes, reminding yourself of this ahead of taking center stage can help take you out of your head, allowing you to connect effectively with your audience. The following are some of the many actions you can take on the day of your presentation.

Arrive early.

Since you may have a bit of presentation-related anxiety, it’s important to avoid adding travel stress. Give yourself an abundance of time to arrive at your destination, and take into account heavy traffic and other unforeseen events. By arriving early, you also give yourself time to meet with any on-site technicians, test your equipment, and connect with people ahead of the presentation.

Become familiar with the layout of the room.

Arriving early also gives you time to assess the room and figure out where you want to stand. Experiment with the acoustics to determine how loudly you need to project your voice, and test your equipment to make sure everything connects and appears properly with the available setup. This is an excellent opportunity to work out any last-minute concerns and move around to familiarize yourself with the setting for improved stage presence.

Listen to presenters ahead of you.

When you watch others present, you'll get a feel for the room's acoustics and lighting. You can also listen for any data that’s relevant to your presentation and revisit it during your presentation—this can make the presentation more interactive and engaging.

Use note cards.

Writing yourself a script could provide you with more comfort. To prevent sounding too robotic or disengaged, only include talking points in your note cards in case you get off track. Using note cards can help keep your presentation organized while sounding more authentic to your audience.

Learn to deliver clear and confident presentations with Dynamic Public Speaking from the University of Washington. Build confidence, develop new delivery techniques, and practice strategies for crafting compelling presentations for different purposes, occasions, and audiences.

Article sources

Forbes. “ New Survey: 70% Say Presentation Skills are Critical for Career Success , https://www.forbes.com/sites/carminegallo/2014/09/25/new-survey-70-percent-say-presentation-skills-critical-for-career-success/?sh=619f3ff78890.” Accessed December 7, 2022.

Beautiful.ai. “ 15 Presentation and Public Speaking Stats You Need to Know , https://www.beautiful.ai/blog/15-presentation-and-public-speaking-stats-you-need-to-know. Accessed December 7, 2022.

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How to Structure a Presentation

Choosing the best format for your audience.

By the Mind Tools Content Team

effective presentation format

Have you ever sat through a rambling, disorganized presentation? If so, you probably found it hard to follow what the speaker was saying.

When presentations don't flow well, it's easy for audiences to get lost. This is why it's important to think carefully about the structure and organization of your presentation.

In this article, we'll explore some common structures that you can use next time you speak in front of other people.

The Importance of Structure

Without a defined structure, your audience may not be able to follow your presentation. When this happens, your opportunity is lost, the communication fails, and your reputation takes a hit. For example, if your aim is to persuade people, you'll want to use a different approach from the one you'd use if you wanted to demonstrate how a product works.

Many factors can influence your choice of structure, but the most important consideration is your presentation's purpose or goal. You need to identify what you want to achieve – do you want to inspire, motivate, inform, persuade, or entertain people?

Your audience's needs also affect the structure you choose. For example, those who are new to your topic need more background information than people with more expertise and experience. So, in this case, you'd want to choose an approach that gives you ample time to explain the context of your subject, as well as to reinforce your main points.

Structures to Consider

Below, we outline several structures that you can use to organize your presentation.

1. Open – Body – Conclusion

The Open – Body – Conclusion approach is one of the most practical structures you can use for presentations. (Click here to download a worksheet that helps you use it.)

People often call it the "tell 'em" approach, because you:

  • Tell audience members what you're going to tell them (introduction).
  • Tell them (body).
  • Tell them what you told them (conclusion).

This structure is simple, effective and easy to remember. Its repetitive nature allows you to reinforce your points, which helps others remember them. It is also flexible: you can adjust the introduction and body to persuade, motivate, educate, or entertain them.

One downside, however, is that repetition can quickly bore people. The approach is also "old hat" to many, which can cause them to lose interest. If you choose to use it, balance repetition with plenty of interesting facts, images, anecdotes, or stories to hold your audience's interest.

Let's look at each stage of the Open – Body – Conclusion structure in detail and discuss the elements that you need to include in each. We'll start with the body, rather than the introduction, because the rest of your presentation will be based on that.

The body of your presentation needs to contain your key points. You should present these in a logical order, so that your audience can follow them easily.

Keep in mind that the body should comprise a limited number of ideas: the more you try to include, the fewer people will remember. A good guide is to cover three to five main points, but no more.

When organizing your ideas, use the chunking principle to put the information into specific units. This will make the concepts easier to grasp, and help people remember what you have told them.

Make sure that you back up your main points with facts. Use good information-gathering strategies in your research, and consider citing the sources that you use. To add credibility to your presentation, consider using the following information to support your ideas:

  • Data, facts or statistics.
  • Images or diagrams.
  • Stories and examples.
  • Quotes or testimonials from experts or industry leaders.

Reliable sources will strengthen your credibility , and build trust with your audience.

Your opening, or introduction, has two main purposes: to grab your audience's attention, and to cover the key points that you intend to talk about.

Instead of telling people what you plan to say, you can use a different approach and explain why they are there. What will they learn from your presentation, and how will the content benefit them?

It's also important to get their attention right from the beginning. You can do this in several ways:

  • Tell a story.
  • Ask a rhetorical question.
  • Play a short video.
  • Make a strong or unexpected statement.
  • Challenge your audience.
  • Use a quotation or example.
  • Appeal to people's self-interest.
  • Request a specific action.
  • Use suspense.

If you plan to answer questions at the end of your presentation, it's a good idea to mention this in the introduction, so people don't interrupt you mid-flow.

Many presenters overlook the importance of a conclusion – but the statements you finish with are what many audience members will remember best.

With the "tell 'em" approach, your conclusion summarizes the main points in the body of your presentation. If you want people to take action, be specific about what you want them to do.

Think carefully about how you want them to feel once you've finished; your conclusion is a great opportunity to reinforce this. Why not inspire them with a great story, a quote or a compelling call to action?

2. The Sandwich Approach

The Sandwich Approach is a variation of the Open – Body – Conclusion structure. This three-part structure covers:

  • Advantages and/or benefits of your message or idea.
  • Risks and concerns.
  • How the benefits manage or eliminate those risks.

This approach is effective when you want to persuade audience members, or change their minds.

Having evidence to support your position is critical. However, factual data and reams of spreadsheets and charts are not highly persuasive. What people respond to is "vivid" evidence that brings your concept or argument to life.

To brush up on your persuasion skills, look at The Rhetorical Triangle . This tool asks you to consider your communication from three perspectives: those of the writer, the audience and the context. It's a method that builds credibility, and helps you ensure that your arguments are logical.

3. Monroe's Motivated Sequence

Monroe's Motivated Sequence is another good structure to use when you need to motivate or persuade. This sequence consists of five key steps:

  • Getting your audience's attention – Use an interesting "hook" or opening point, such as a shocking statistic. Be provocative and stimulating, not boring and unemotional.
  • Creating a need – Convince the audience there's a problem, explain how it affects them. Persuade them that things need to change.
  • Defining your solution – Explain what you think needs to be done.
  • Describing a detailed picture of success (or failure) – Give people a vision; something they can see, hear, taste, and touch.
  • Asking the audience to do something straight away – Get them involved right from the start. If you do this, it's then much easier to keep them engaged and active in your cause.

4. Demonstration Structure

Use a simple demonstration structure when you are unveiling a new product or service.

Start by explaining why the product or service is so good. What makes it special? What problem will it solve for people?

Next, demonstrate what it does. How you do this will depend on your product but, whatever you do, make sure it works! Bring any important points to the audience's attention and provide helpful tips, where appropriate. Show them the results, and finish by giving them useful information, a good understanding of your topic, and something to remember.

Don't get too wrapped up in the detail; remember to keep it simple. Your presentation will be more powerful and your audience will remember more if you highlight just a few of the most important features. This will whet their appetite, and leave them wanting to know more.

5. Opportunity, Benefits, Numbers Structure

The Opportunity, Benefits, Number (OBN) structure is useful when you face busy people who want to hear what you have to say in the shortest time possible.

To use this structure, give audience members a quick summary of the opportunity that they need to consider, and outline the benefits that they can expect. Then, show them the numbers that back up your claims. [1]

For example, imagine you are explaining why your company should implement a new performance management system. First, you might give some background on the proposal – for example, you want to drive a high-performance culture. Then, you could explain the benefits, such as improving organizational performance and profits. Finally, you could compare the cost of bringing the system in with the predicted return on investment, based on a similar system at another organization.

Presentations that lack a clear flow are confusing and ineffective. This is why it's important to pay careful attention when choosing the most appropriate structure.

Different structures fulfill different purposes. Before you begin, think about why you are giving your presentation. Do you want to inform, persuade, inspire, or entertain your audience?

The most common structure for presentations is Open – Body – Conclusion. This is often effective because it gives you the opportunity to repeat your key points a number of times. However, other structures can be more appropriate, depending on the circumstances, such as when you're trying to persuade an audience, demonstrate a product, or provide information in the most time-efficient way.

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[1] Martinuzzi, B. (2013). '11 Ways to Structure a Knockout Presentation,' from American Express OPEN Forum [online]. Available here . [Accessed 7 August 2014.]

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8 tips to make the best powerpoint presentations.

Want to make your PowerPoint presentations really shine? Here's how to impress and engage your audience.

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Table of contents, start with a goal, less is more, consider your typeface, make bullet points count, limit the use of transitions, skip text where possible, think in color, take a look from the top down, bonus: start with templates.

Slideshows are an intuitive way to share complex ideas with an audience, although they're dull and frustrating when poorly executed. Here are some tips to make your Microsoft PowerPoint presentations sing while avoiding common pitfalls.

It all starts with identifying what we're trying to achieve with the presentation. Is it informative, a showcase of data in an easy-to-understand medium? Or is it more of a pitch, something meant to persuade and convince an audience and lead them to a particular outcome?

It's here where the majority of these presentations go wrong with the inability to identify the talking points that best support our goal. Always start with a goal in mind: to entertain, to inform, or to share data in a way that's easy to understand. Use facts, figures, and images to support your conclusion while keeping structure in mind (Where are we now and where are we going?).

I've found that it's helpful to start with the ending. Once I know how to end a presentation, I know how best to get to that point. I start by identifying the takeaway---that one nugget that I want to implant before thanking everyone for their time---and I work in reverse to figure out how best to get there.

Your mileage, of course, may vary. But it's always going to be a good idea to put in the time in the beginning stages so that you aren't reworking large portions of the presentation later. And that starts with a defined goal.

A slideshow isn't supposed to include everything. It's an introduction to a topic, one that we can elaborate on with speech. Anything unnecessary is a distraction. It makes the presentation less visually appealing and less interesting, and it makes you look bad as a presenter.

This goes for text as well as images. There's nothing worse, in fact, than a series of slides where the presenter just reads them as they appear. Your audience is capable of reading, and chances are they'll be done with the slide, and browsing Reddit, long before you finish. Avoid putting the literal text on the screen, and your audience will thank you.

Related: How to Burn Your PowerPoint to DVD

Right off the bat, we're just going to come out and say that Papyrus and Comic Sans should be banned from all PowerPoint presentations, permanently. Beyond that, it's worth considering the typeface you're using and what it's saying about you, the presenter, and the presentation itself.

Consider choosing readability over aesthetics, and avoid fancy fonts that could prove to be more of a distraction than anything else. A good presentation needs two fonts: a serif and sans-serif. Use one for the headlines and one for body text, lists, and the like. Keep it simple. Veranda, Helvetica, Arial, and even Times New Roman are safe choices. Stick with the classics and it's hard to botch this one too badly.

There reaches a point where bullet points become less of a visual aid and more of a visual examination.

Bullet points should support the speaker, not overwhelm his audience. The best slides have little or no text at all, in fact. As a presenter, it's our job to talk through complex issues, but that doesn't mean that we need to highlight every talking point.

Instead, think about how you can break up large lists into three or four bullet points. Carefully consider whether you need to use more bullet points, or if you can combine multiple topics into a single point instead. And if you can't, remember that there's no one limiting the number of slides you can have in a presentation. It's always possible to break a list of 12 points down into three pages of four points each.

Animation, when used correctly, is a good idea. It breaks up slow-moving parts of a presentation and adds action to elements that require it. But it should be used judiciously.

Adding a transition that wipes left to right between every slide or that animates each bullet point in a list, for example, starts to grow taxing on those forced to endure the presentation. Viewers get bored quickly, and animations that are meant to highlight specific elements quickly become taxing.

That's not to say that you can't use animations and transitions, just that you need to pick your spots. Aim for no more than a handful of these transitions for each presentation. And use them in spots where they'll add to the demonstration, not detract from it.

Sometimes images tell a better story than text can. And as a presenter, your goal is to describe points in detail without making users do a lot of reading. In these cases, a well-designed visual, like a chart, might better convey the information you're trying to share.

The right image adds visual appeal and serves to break up longer, text-heavy sections of the presentation---but only if you're using the right images. A single high-quality image can make all the difference between a success and a dud when you're driving a specific point home.

When considering text, don't think solely in terms of bullet points and paragraphs. Tables, for example, are often unnecessary. Ask yourself whether you could present the same data in a bar or line chart instead.

Color is interesting. It evokes certain feelings and adds visual appeal to your presentation as a whole. Studies show that color also improves interest, comprehension, and retention. It should be a careful consideration, not an afterthought.

You don't have to be a graphic designer to use color well in a presentation. What I do is look for palettes I like, and then find ways to use them in the presentation. There are a number of tools for this, like Adobe Color , Coolors , and ColorHunt , just to name a few. After finding a palette you enjoy, consider how it works with the presentation you're about to give. Pastels, for example, evoke feelings of freedom and light, so they probably aren't the best choice when you're presenting quarterly earnings that missed the mark.

It's also worth mentioning that you don't need to use every color in the palette. Often, you can get by with just two or three, though you should really think through how they all work together and how readable they'll be when layered. A simple rule of thumb here is that contrast is your friend. Dark colors work well on light backgrounds, and light colors work best on dark backgrounds.

Spend some time in the Slide Sorter before you finish your presentation. By clicking the four squares at the bottom left of the presentation, you can take a look at multiple slides at once and consider how each works together. Alternatively, you can click "View" on the ribbon and select "Slide Sorter."

Are you presenting too much text at once? Move an image in. Could a series of slides benefit from a chart or summary before you move on to another point?

It's here that we have the opportunity to view the presentation from beyond the single-slide viewpoint and think in terms of how each slide fits, or if it fits at all. From this view, you can rearrange slides, add additional ones, or delete them entirely if you find that they don't advance the presentation.

The difference between a good presentation and a bad one is really all about preparation and execution. Those that respect the process and plan carefully---not only the presentation as a whole, but each slide within it---are the ones who will succeed.

This brings me to my last (half) point: When in doubt, just buy a template and use it. You can find these all over the web, though Creative Market and GraphicRiver are probably the two most popular marketplaces for this kind of thing. Not all of us are blessed with the skills needed to design and deliver an effective presentation. And while a pre-made PowerPoint template isn't going to make you a better presenter, it will ease the anxiety of creating a visually appealing slide deck.

How to make a great presentation

Stressed about an upcoming presentation? These talks are full of helpful tips on how to get up in front of an audience and make a lasting impression.

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How can you make a good presentation even more effective?

This page draws on published advice from expert presenters around the world, which will help to take your presentations from merely ‘good’ to ‘great’.

By bringing together advice from a wide range of people, the aim is to cover a whole range of areas.

Whether you are an experienced presenter, or just starting out, there should be ideas here to help you to improve.

1. Show your Passion and Connect with your Audience

It’s hard to be relaxed and be yourself when you’re nervous.

But time and again, the great presenters say that the most important thing is to connect with your audience, and the best way to do that is to let your passion for the subject shine through.

Be honest with the audience about what is important to you and why it matters.

Be enthusiastic and honest, and the audience will respond.

2. Focus on your Audience’s Needs

Your presentation needs to be built around what your audience is going to get out of the presentation.

As you prepare the presentation, you always need to bear in mind what the audience needs and wants to know, not what you can tell them.

While you’re giving the presentation, you also need to remain focused on your audience’s response, and react to that.

You need to make it easy for your audience to understand and respond.

3. Keep it Simple: Concentrate on your Core Message

When planning your presentation, you should always keep in mind the question:

What is the key message (or three key points) for my audience to take away?

You should be able to communicate that key message very briefly.

Some experts recommend a 30-second ‘elevator summary’, others that you can write it on the back of a business card, or say it in no more than 15 words.

Whichever rule you choose, the important thing is to keep your core message focused and brief.

And if what you are planning to say doesn’t contribute to that core message, don’t say it.

4. Smile and Make Eye Contact with your Audience

This sounds very easy, but a surprisingly large number of presenters fail to do it.

If you smile and make eye contact, you are building rapport , which helps the audience to connect with you and your subject. It also helps you to feel less nervous, because you are talking to individuals, not to a great mass of unknown people.

To help you with this, make sure that you don’t turn down all the lights so that only the slide screen is visible. Your audience needs to see you as well as your slides.

5. Start Strongly

The beginning of your presentation is crucial. You need to grab your audience’s attention and hold it.

They will give you a few minutes’ grace in which to entertain them, before they start to switch off if you’re dull. So don’t waste that on explaining who you are. Start by entertaining them.

Try a story (see tip 7 below), or an attention-grabbing (but useful) image on a slide.

6. Remember the 10-20-30 Rule for Slideshows

This is a tip from Guy Kawasaki of Apple. He suggests that slideshows should:

  • Contain no more than 10 slides;
  • Last no more than 20 minutes; and
  • Use a font size of no less than 30 point.

This last is particularly important as it stops you trying to put too much information on any one slide. This whole approach avoids the dreaded ‘Death by PowerPoint’.

As a general rule, slides should be the sideshow to you, the presenter. A good set of slides should be no use without the presenter, and they should definitely contain less, rather than more, information, expressed simply.

If you need to provide more information, create a bespoke handout and give it out after your presentation.

7. Tell Stories

Human beings are programmed to respond to stories.

Stories help us to pay attention, and also to remember things. If you can use stories in your presentation, your audience is more likely to engage and to remember your points afterwards. It is a good idea to start with a story, but there is a wider point too: you need your presentation to act like a story.

Think about what story you are trying to tell your audience, and create your presentation to tell it.

Finding The Story Behind Your Presentation

To effectively tell a story, focus on using at least one of the two most basic storytelling mechanics in your presentation:

Focusing On Characters – People have stories; things, data, and objects do not. So ask yourself “who” is directly involved in your topic that you can use as the focal point of your story.

For example, instead of talking about cars (your company’s products), you could focus on specific characters like:

  • The drivers the car is intended for – people looking for speed and adventure
  • The engineers who went out of their way to design the most cost-effective car imaginable

A Changing Dynamic – A story needs something to change along the way. So ask yourself “What is not as it should be?” and answer with what you are going to do about it (or what you did about it).

For example…

  • Did hazardous road conditions inspire you to build a rugged, all-terrain jeep that any family could afford?
  • Did a complicated and confusing food labelling system lead you to establish a colour-coded nutritional index so that anybody could easily understand it?

To see 15 more actionable storytelling tips, see Nuts & Bolts Speed Training’s post on Storytelling Tips .

8. Use your Voice Effectively

The spoken word is actually a pretty inefficient means of communication, because it uses only one of your audience’s five senses. That’s why presenters tend to use visual aids, too. But you can help to make the spoken word better by using your voice effectively.

Varying the speed at which you talk, and emphasising changes in pitch and tone all help to make your voice more interesting and hold your audience’s attention.

For more about this, see our page on Effective Speaking .

9. Use your Body Too

It has been estimated that more than three quarters of communication is non-verbal.

That means that as well as your tone of voice, your body language is crucial to getting your message across. Make sure that you are giving the right messages: body language to avoid includes crossed arms, hands held behind your back or in your pockets, and pacing the stage.

Make your gestures open and confident, and move naturally around the stage, and among the audience too, if possible.

10. Relax, Breathe and Enjoy

If you find presenting difficult, it can be hard to be calm and relaxed about doing it.

One option is to start by concentrating on your breathing. Slow it down, and make sure that you’re breathing fully. Make sure that you continue to pause for breath occasionally during your presentation too.

For more ideas, see our page on Coping with Presentation Nerves .

If you can bring yourself to relax, you will almost certainly present better. If you can actually start to enjoy yourself, your audience will respond to that, and engage better. Your presentations will improve exponentially, and so will your confidence. It’s well worth a try.

Improve your Presentation Skills

Follow our guide to boost your presentation skills learning about preparation, delivery, questions and all other aspects of giving effective presentations.

Start with: What is a Presentation?

Continue to: How to Give a Speech Self Presentation

See also: Five Ways You Can Do Visual Marketing on a Budget Can Presentation Science Improve Your Presentation? Typography – It’s All About the Message in Your Slides

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How to Give a Killer Presentation

  • Chris Anderson

effective presentation format

For more than 30 years, the TED conference series has presented enlightening talks that people enjoy watching. In this article, Anderson, TED’s curator, shares five keys to great presentations:

  • Frame your story (figure out where to start and where to end).
  • Plan your delivery (decide whether to memorize your speech word for word or develop bullet points and then rehearse it—over and over).
  • Work on stage presence (but remember that your story matters more than how you stand or whether you’re visibly nervous).
  • Plan the multimedia (whatever you do, don’t read from PowerPoint slides).
  • Put it together (play to your strengths and be authentic).

According to Anderson, presentations rise or fall on the quality of the idea, the narrative, and the passion of the speaker. It’s about substance—not style. In fact, it’s fairly easy to “coach out” the problems in a talk, but there’s no way to “coach in” the basic story—the presenter has to have the raw material. So if your thinking is not there yet, he advises, decline that invitation to speak. Instead, keep working until you have an idea that’s worth sharing.

Lessons from TED

A little more than a year ago, on a trip to Nairobi, Kenya, some colleagues and I met a 12-year-old Masai boy named Richard Turere, who told us a fascinating story. His family raises livestock on the edge of a vast national park, and one of the biggest challenges is protecting the animals from lions—especially at night. Richard had noticed that placing lamps in a field didn’t deter lion attacks, but when he walked the field with a torch, the lions stayed away. From a young age, he’d been interested in electronics, teaching himself by, for example, taking apart his parents’ radio. He used that experience to devise a system of lights that would turn on and off in sequence—using solar panels, a car battery, and a motorcycle indicator box—and thereby create a sense of movement that he hoped would scare off the lions. He installed the lights, and the lions stopped attacking. Soon villages elsewhere in Kenya began installing Richard’s “lion lights.”

  • CA Chris Anderson is the curator of TED.

effective presentation format

Partner Center

Presentation Format: How To Make An Outstanding Presentation (With Tips + Examples)

Jane Ng • 30 May 2023 • 7 min read

Are you ready to captivate your audience and leave a lasting impact with your presentations? The first and most important step toward that goal is to design a well-structured presentation. In other words, your chosen presentation format plays a vital role in setting the stage for success, as it guides your audience through a journey of information and ideas.

In this blog, we’ll unlock the power of a presentation format, explore three different format types with examples, and share valuable tips to transform your presentations into engaging and unforgettable experiences.

Get ready to capture your audience’s attention like never before!

Table of Contents

What is presentation format, why is presentation format important, 3 types of presentation formats + examples, tips to make an outstanding presentation.

  • Key Takeaways 

A presentation format is the structure and organization of a presentation. It includes the way information is arranged, as well as the overall style and delivery of the presentation. 

effective presentation format

A great presentation format can significantly enhance audience engagement. It helps capture the audience’s attention, maintain interest, and ensure they stay focused throughout the presentation. 

In addition, it helps the presenter to convey ideas in a logical sequence, making it easier for the audience to understand and retain the information. A well-organized format allows smooth transitions between topics, preventing confusion and ensuring a cohesive flow of ideas.

Finally, the presentation format reflects the presenter’s professionalism and attention to detail. A well-executed one shows that the presenter has put effort into crafting a polished and thoughtful presentation, which can positively influence the audience’s perception and receptiveness.

effective presentation format

1/ The linear format 

The linear format is one of the most common and straightforward presentation formats. In this format, the presenter follows a sequential progression, presenting the content in a logical order that is easy for the audience to follow. The information is typically divided into sections, including the introduction, body, and conclusion, and presented accordingly.

Introduction: 

Introduce the topic and provide an overview of what will be covered in the presentation. 

Body: 

The body of the presentation comprises the main points or key ideas that the presenter wants to convey. 

  • Each point is presented in a clear and structured manner, often accompanied by visual aids such as slides or cue cards. 
  • Use sub-points, examples, or supporting evidence to reinforce the main ideas and enhance understanding.

Wrap up the presentation by summarizing the main points, reinforcing the key takeaways, and providing a sense of closure. 

The conclusion may also include a call to action, encouraging the audience to apply the information presented or further explore the topic.

Example of a linear presentation format: 

Topic: The benefits of regular exercise. 

2/ The problem-solution format

The problem-solution format is an effective presentation format commonly used when addressing a specific problem or challenge. 

It follows a structured approach where the presenter first identifies and highlights the problem or challenge, and then gives potential solutions or strategies to overcome it.

Here’s a breakdown of the problem-solution format:

Problem Identification: 

  • Clearly define and explain the problem or challenge at hand.
  • Provide relevant context, statistics, or examples to emphasize the significance of the issue to help the audience understand the problem and its implications.

Problem Analysis: 

  • Delve deeper into the problem, analyzing its root causes and factors contributing to its existence. 
  • Discuss the challenges and barriers associated with addressing the problem effectively. 

This analysis helps the audience gain a comprehensive understanding of the problem’s complexities.

Solution Presentation: 

  • Introduce potential solutions or strategies to tackle the identified problem. 
  • Explain each solution in detail, including its benefits, feasibility, and potential impact. 
  • Use visuals, case studies, or examples to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed solutions.

Solution Evaluation:

  • Evaluate and compare the proposed solutions, weighing their pros and cons.
  • Discuss the potential challenges or limitations associated with each solution. 

Conclusion: 

  • Summarize the problem and the potential solutions presented.  
  • Provide a call to action or recommendations for further action.

Example of this presentation format: 

Topic: The increasing pollution levels in a city

3/ The storytelling format 

The storytelling format is a powerful presentation format that leverages the art of storytelling to engage the audience and convey information in a memorable and impactful way. It involves structuring the presentation as a narrative, incorporating elements of storytelling such as a compelling opening, a series of related events, and a resolution or conclusion.

Compelling Opening: 

Begin with an attention-grabbing opening that hooks the audience and sets the stage for the story. This can be a captivating anecdote, a thought-provoking question, or a vivid description that piques the audience’s curiosity.

Introduction to the Story:

Introduce the main characters, the setting, and the central theme of the story. This helps the audience connect with the narrative and establishes the context for the presentation.

Series of Related Events:

  • Takes the audience through a series of interconnected events, illustrating key points or lessons within the narrative. 
  • Each event builds upon the previous one, creating a sense of progression and building tension or anticipation.

Climax and Resolution: 

  • The story reaches a climax, a pivotal moment where the protagonist faces a critical challenge or makes a significant decision. 
  • The presenter builds suspense and engages the audience emotionally. 
  • Eventually, the story reaches a resolution or conclusion, where the protagonist overcomes obstacles or achieves their goal.

Key Takeaways: 

  • Draw connections between the narrative and the main message or key takeaways they want the audience to remember. 
  • Highlight the insights, lessons, or principles embedded within the story and relate them to the broader context or topic of the presentation.
  • Wrap up the presentation by summarizing the story and its key points, reiterating the main message, and providing a sense of closure.  
  • Encourage the audience to reflect on the story and apply the lessons learned in their own lives or work.

Here is an example of a TED Talk that effectively utilizes the storytelling format:

  • Title: “The Power of Vulnerability” 
  • Speaker: Brené Brown
  • Keep it Simple: Avoid cluttered slides with excessive text or graphics. Keep the design clean and uncluttered to ensure your audience can quickly grasp the key points. 
  • Use Visuals: Incorporate relevant visuals such as images, charts, and graphs to enhance understanding and engagement. Visuals can help break up the text and make your presentation more seemingly appealing. Ensure the visuals are high-quality, easy to read, and support your message. 
  • Limit Text: Minimize the amount of text on each slide. You can apply the 7×7 rule , and use keywords or short phrases instead of long sentences. Keep the text concise and easy to read. 

effective presentation format

  • Consistent Design: Use a consistent design theme throughout your presentation to maintain a professional and cohesive look. Choose complementary colors, fonts, and layouts that align with your topic and audience. Consistency in design helps create visual harmony and keeps the audience focused on your content. 
  • Practice, Practice, Practice: Rehearse your presentation multiple times to become familiar with the flow, timing, and transitions. Practice helps you deliver the content confidently and smoothly. It also allows you to identify any areas that need improvement or adjustment.
  • Engage with the Audience: Remember to maintain eye contact with your audience and use the interactive features of AhaSlides Polls as PowerPoint adds in. With features like live polls , you can easily interact with your audience and get more insight and feedback for your presentation. 

>> You may need: AhaSlides 2023 – Extension For PowerPoint

Key Takeaways 

The key to a successful presentation is choosing a format that aligns with your content, audience, and goals. Combine a well-structured format with engaging visuals, concise text, and effective delivery techniques to create a memorable and impactful presentation.

And don’t forget that AhaSlides is a robust platform that allows presenters to create interactive and dynamic presentations. Our pre-made templates and features like live polls, quizzes, and interactive Q&A sessions will help you actively involve the audience and gather valuable insights.

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Complete Guide for Effective Presentations, with Examples

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Complete Guide for Effective Presentations, with Examples

July 09, 2018 - dom barnard.

During a presentation you aim to look confident, enthusiastic and natural. You'll need more than good words and content to achieve this - your delivery plays a significant part. In this article, we discuss various techniques that can be used to deliver an effective presentation.

Effective presentations

Think about if you were in the audience, what would:

  • Get you to focus and listen
  • Make you understand
  • Activate your imagination
  • Persuade you

Providing the audience with interesting information is not enough to achieve these aims - you need to ensure that the way you present is stimulating and engaging. If it's not, you'll lose the audience's interest and they'll stop listening.

Tips for an Effective Presentation

Professional public speakers spend hours creating and practicing presentations. These are the delivery techniques they consider:

Keep it simple

You shouldn't overwhelm your audience with information - ensure that you're clear, concise and that you get to the point so they can understand your message.

Have a maximum of three main points and state them at the beginning, before you explain them in more depth, and then state them at the end so the audience will at least remember these points.

If some of your content doesn't contribute to your key message then cut it out. Also avoid using too many statistics and technical terminology.

Connect with your audience

One of the greatest difficulties when delivering a presentation is connecting with the audience. If you don't connect with them it will seem as though you're talking to an empty room.

Trying to make contact with the audience makes them feel like they're part of the presentation which encourages them to listen and it shows that you want to speak to them.

Asking the audience questions during a presentation

Eye contact and smile

Avoiding eye contact is uncomfortable because it make you look insecure. When you maintain eye contact the audience feels like you're speaking to them personally. If this is something you struggle with, try looking at people's foreheads as it gives the impression of making eye contact.

Try to cover all sections of the audience and don't move on to the next person too quickly as you will look nervous.

Smiling also helps with rapport and it reduces your nerves because you'll feel less like you're talking to group of faceless people. Make sure you don't turn the lights down too much before your presentation so you can all clearly see each other.

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Body language

Be aware of your body language and use it to connect:

  • Keep your arms uncrossed so your body language is more open .
  • Match your facial expressions with what you're saying.
  • Avoid fidgeting and displaying nervous habits, such as, rocking on your feet.
  • You may need to glance at the computer slide or a visual aid but make sure you predominantly face the audience.
  • Emphasise points by using hand gestures but use them sparingly - too little and they'll awkwardly sit at your side, too much and you'll be distracting and look nervous.
  • Vary your gestures so you don't look robotic.
  • Maintain a straight posture.
  • Be aware of cultural differences .

Move around

Avoid standing behind the lectern or computer because you need to reduce the distance and barriers between yourself and the audience. Use movement to increase the audience's interest and make it easier to follow your presentation.

A common technique for incorporating movement into your presentation is to:

  • Start your introduction by standing in the centre of the stage.
  • For your first point you stand on the left side of the stage.
  • You discuss your second point from the centre again.
  • You stand on the right side of the stage for your third point.
  • The conclusion occurs in the centre.

Watch 3 examples of good and bad movement while presenting

Example: Movement while presenting

Your movement at the front of the class and amongst the listeners can help with engagement. Think about which of these three speakers maintains the attention of their audience for longer, and what they are doing differently to each other.

Speak with the audience

You can conduct polls using your audience or ask questions to make them think and feel invested in your presentation. There are three different types of questions:

Direct questions require an answer: "What would you do in this situation?" These are mentally stimulating for the audience. You can pass a microphone around and let the audience come to your desired solution.

Rhetorical questions do not require answers, they are often used to emphasises an idea or point: "Is the Pope catholic?

Loaded questions contain an unjustified assumption made to prompt the audience into providing a particular answer which you can then correct to support your point: You may ask "Why does your wonderful company have such a low incidence of mental health problems?" The audience will generally answer that they're happy.

After receiving the answers you could then say "Actually it's because people are still unwilling and too embarrassed to seek help for mental health issues at work etc."

Delivering a presentation in Asia

Be specific with your language

Make the audience feel as though you are speaking to each member individually by using "you" and "your."

For example: asking "Do you want to lose weight without feeling hungry?" would be more effective than asking "Does anyone here want to lost weight without feeling hungry?" when delivering your presentation. You can also increase solidarity by using "we", "us" etc - it makes the audience think "we're in this together".

Be flexible

Be prepared to adapt to the situation at the time, for example, if the audience seems bored you can omit details and go through the material faster, if they are confused then you will need to come up with more examples on the spot for clarification. This doesn't mean that you weren't prepared because you can't predict everything.

Vocal variety

How you say something is just as is important as the content of your speech - arguably, more so.

For example, if an individual presented on a topic very enthusiastically the audience would probably enjoy this compared to someone who covered more points but mumbled into their notes.

  • Adapt your voice depending on what are you're saying - if you want to highlight something then raise your voice or lower it for intensity. Communicate emotion by using your voice.
  • Avoid speaking in monotone as you will look uninterested and the audience will lose interest.
  • Take time to pronounce every word carefully.
  • Raise your pitch when asking questions and lower it when you want to sound severe.
  • Sound enthusiastic - the more you sound like you care about the topic, the more the audience will listen. Smiling and pace can help with this.
  • Speak loudly and clearly - think about projecting your voice to the back of the room.
  • Speak at a pace that's easy to follow . If you're too fast or too slow it will be difficult for the audience to understand what you're saying and it's also frustrating. Subtly fasten the pace to show enthusiasm and slow down for emphasis, thoughtfulness or caution.

Prior to the presentation, ensure that you prepare your vocal chords :

  • You could read aloud a book that requires vocal variety, such as, a children's book.
  • Avoid dairy and eating or drinking anything too sugary beforehand as mucus can build-up leading to frequent throat clearing.
  • Don't drink anything too cold before you present as this can constrict your throat which affects vocal quality.
  • Some people suggest a warm cup of tea beforehand to relax the throat.

Practice Presentation Skills

Improve your public speaking and presentation skills by practicing them in realistic environments, with automated feedback on performance.

Pause to breathe

When you're anxious your breathing will become quick and shallow which will affect the control you have on your voice. This can consequently make you feel more nervous. You want to breathe steadily and deeply so before you start speaking take some deep breaths or implement controlled breathing.

Controlled breathing is a common technique that helps slow down your breathing to normal thus reducing your anxiety. If you think this may be useful practice with these steps:

  • Sit down in an upright position as it easier for your lungs to fill with air
  • Breathe in through your nose and into your abdomen for four seconds
  • Hold this breathe for two seconds
  • Breathe out through your nose for six seconds
  • Wait a few seconds before inhaling and repeating the cycle

It takes practice to master this technique but once you get used to it you may want to implement it directly before your presentation.

Take a deep breath when delivering a presentation

Completely filling your lungs during a pause will ensure you reach a greater vocal range.

During the presentation delivery, if you notice that you're speaking too quickly then pause and breathe. This won't look strange - it will appear as though you're giving thought to what you're saying. You can also strategically plan some of your pauses, such as after questions and at the end of sections, because this will give you a chance to calm down and it will also give the audience an opportunity to think and reflect.

Pausing will also help you avoid filler words , such as, "um" as well which can make you sound unsure.

  • 10 Effective Ways to use Pauses in your Speech

Strong opening

The first five minutes are vital to engage the audience and get them listening to you. You could start with a story to highlight why your topic is significant.

For example, if the topic is on the benefits of pets on physical and psychological health, you could present a story or a study about an individual whose quality of life significantly improved after being given a dog. The audience is more likely to respond better to this and remember this story than a list of facts.

Example: Which presentation intro keeps you engaged?

Watch 5 different presentation introductions, from both virtual and in-person events. Notice how it can only take a few seconds to decide if you want to keep listening or switch off. For the good introductions, what about them keeps you engaged?

More experienced and confident public speakers use humour in their presentations. The audience will be incredibly engaged if you make them laugh but caution must be exercised when using humour because a joke can be misinterpreted and even offend the audience.

Only use jokes if you're confident with this technique, it has been successful in the past and it's suitable for the situation.

Stories and anecdotes

Use stories whenever you can and judge whether you can tell a story about yourself because the audience are even more interested in seeing the human side of you.

Consider telling a story about a mistake you made, for example, perhaps you froze up during an important presentation when you were 25, or maybe life wasn't going well for you in the past - if relevant to your presentation's aim. People will relate to this as we have all experienced mistakes and failures. The more the audience relates to you, the more likely they will remain engaged.

These stories can also be told in a humorous way if it makes you feel more comfortable and because you're disclosing a personal story there is less chance of misinterpretation compared to telling a joke.

Anecdotes are especially valuable for your introduction and between different sections of the presentation because they engage the audience. Ensure that you plan the stories thoroughly beforehand and that they are not too long.

Focus on the audience's needs

Even though your aim is to persuade the audience, they must also get something helpful from the presentation. Provide the audience with value by giving them useful information, tactics, tips etc. They're more likely to warm to you and trust you if you're sharing valuable information with them.

You could also highlight their pain point. For example, you might ask "Have you found it difficult to stick to a healthy diet?" The audience will now want to remain engaged because they want to know the solution and the opportunities that you're offering.

Use visual aids

Visual aids are items of a visual manner, such as graphs, photographs, video clips etc used in addition to spoken information. Visual aids are chosen depending on their purpose, for example, you may want to:

  • Summarise information.
  • Reduce the amount of spoken words, for example, you may show a graph of your results rather than reading them out.
  • Clarify and show examples.
  • Create more of an impact. You must consider what type of impact you want to make beforehand - do you want the audience to be sad, happy, angry etc?
  • Emphasise what you're saying.
  • Make a point memorable.
  • Enhance your credibility.
  • Engage the audience and maintain their interest.
  • Make something easier for the audience to understand.

Visual aids being used during a presentation

Some general tips for using visual aids :

  • Think about how can a visual aid can support your message. What do you want the audience to do?
  • Ensure that your visual aid follows what you're saying or this will confuse the audience.
  • Avoid cluttering the image as it may look messy and unclear.
  • Visual aids must be clear, concise and of a high quality.
  • Keep the style consistent, such as, the same font, colours, positions etc
  • Use graphs and charts to present data.
  • The audience should not be trying to read and listen at the same time - use visual aids to highlight your points.
  • One message per visual aid, for example, on a slide there should only be one key point.
  • Use visual aids in moderation - they are additions meant to emphasise and support main points.
  • Ensure that your presentation still works without your visual aids in case of technical problems.

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10-20-30 slideshow rule

Slideshows are widely used for presentations because it's easy to create attractive and professional presentations using them. Guy Kawasaki, an entrepreneur and author, suggests that slideshows should follow a 10-20-30 rule :

  • There should be a maximum of 10 slides - people rarely remember more than one concept afterwards so there's no point overwhelming them with unnecessary information.
  • The presentation should last no longer than 20 minutes as this will leave time for questions and discussion.
  • The font size should be a minimum of 30pt because the audience reads faster than you talk so less information on the slides means that there is less chance of the audience being distracted.

If you want to give the audience more information you can provide them with partially completed handouts or give them the handouts after you’ve delivered the presentation.

Keep a drink nearby

Have something to drink when you're on stage, preferably water at room temperature. This will help maintain your vocal quality and having a sip is a subtle way of introducing pauses.

Practice, practice, practice

If you are very familiar with the content of your presentation, your audience will perceive you as confident and you'll be more persuasive.

  • Don't just read the presentation through - practice everything, including your transitions and using your visual aids.
  • Stand up and speak it aloud, in an engaging manner, as though you were presenting to an audience.
  • Ensure that you practice your body language and gesturing.
  • Use VR to practice in a realistic environment .
  • Practice in front of others and get their feedback.
  • Freely improvise so you'll sound more natural on the day. Don't learn your presentation verbatim because you will sound uninterested and if you lose focus then you may forget everything.
  • Create cards to use as cues - one card should be used for one key idea. Write down brief notes or key words and ensure that the cards are physically connected so the order cannot be lost. Visual prompts can also be used as cues.

This video shows how you can practice presentations in virtual reality. See our VR training courses .

Two courses where you can practice your presentations in interactive exercises:

  • Essential Public Speaking
  • How to Present over Video

Try these different presentation delivery methods to see which ones you prefer and which need to be improved. The most important factor is to feel comfortable during the presentation as the delivery is likely to be better.

Remember that the audience are generally on your side - they want you to do well so present with confidence.

Storydoc

52 Perfect Presentation Examples to Set You Apart (2023)

Browse effective professional business presentation samples & templates . Get great simple presentation examples with perfect design & content beyond PowerPoint .

effective presentation format

Dominika Krukowska

7 minute read

Presentation examples

Short answer

What makes a good presentation.

A good presentation tells an engaging story, establishes credibility, and allows audience interaction. It should pose an intriguing question and guide the audience to its resolution. A good presentation hooks and holds attention with interactive elements like animations, videos, live infographics, and quizzes.

Let’s face it - most slides are not interesting - are yours?

We've all been there—trapped in a never-ending session of mind-numbing slides, with no hope in sight. It's called "Death by PowerPoint," and it's the silent killer of enthusiasm and engagement. But fear not! You're a short way from escaping this bleak fate.

We've curated perfect presentation examples, crafted to captivate and inspire., They will transform your slides from yawn-inducing to jaw-dropping. And they’re all instantly usable as templates.

Prepare to wow your audience, command the room, and leave them begging for more!

What makes a bad presentation?

We've all sat through them, the cringe-worthy presentations that make us want to reach for our phones or run for the hills. But what exactly pushes a presentation from mediocre to downright unbearable? Let's break it down:

Lack of clarity: When the presenter's message is buried in a heap of confusing jargon or irrelevant details, it's hard to stay focused.

Poor visuals: Low-quality or irrelevant images can be distracting and fail to support the main points.

Overloaded slides: Too much text or clutter on a slide is overwhelming and makes it difficult to grasp the key ideas.

Monotonous delivery: A presenter who drones on without variation in tone or pace can quickly put their audience to sleep.

No connection: Failing to engage with the audience or tailor the presentation to their needs creates a disconnect that stifles interest.

What makes an exceptional presentation?

A clear structure set within a story or narrative: Humans think in stories. We relate to stories and we remember stories, it’s in our genes. A message without a story is like a cart full of goods with no wheels.

Priority and hierarchy of information: Attention is limited, you won’t have your audience forever, 32% of readers bounce in the first 15 seconds and most don’t make it past the 3rd slide. Make your first words count. They will determine whether your audience sticks around to hear the rest.

Interactive content: Like 99% of us, you’ve learned that presentation = PowerPoint. But that’s the past, my friend. PowerPoint is inherently static, and while static slides can be really beautiful, they are all too often really boring. Interactive slides get the readers involved in the presentation which makes it much more enjoyable.

Wanna see the actual difference between static and interactive slides? Here’s an example. Which one would you lean into?

effective presentation format

Perfect presentation examples to inspire you

Feeling ready to unleash your presentation skills? Hold on to your socks, because we've got a lineup of battle-tasted presentation samples that'll knock ’em right off!

From cutting-edge design to irresistible storytelling, these effective business presentations exemplify best practices and are primed to drive results.

Types of presentations

Report presentations.

Unveil the story behind the data with a report presentation that makes complex insights accessible and captivating.

Meta - Interactive corporate report

Meta - Interactive corporate report

Insights and trends from Israel's thriving consumer-facing industry. A comprehensive review of the B2C ecosystem's performance and future prospects.

SNC desert-tech - Long-form report

SNC desert-tech - Long-form report

A desert-tech report with live graphs & beautiful design - easily shareable at scale for easy reading on any device.

HealthTech SNC - Simplified data-heavy report

HealthTech SNC - Simplified data-heavy report

An extensive data report from a non-profit organization made easy to digest thanks to interactive, engaging design.

Annual report example

Annual Report template

A template designed with longer pieces of business content in mind. Let's create a wonderful annual report.

NGO report example

NGO Report template

Put all the relevant information about your organization together. Let the world know about all the good things your organization have done.

Pitch deck presentations

A pitch deck presentation is your chance to sell your idea in a concise, compelling way that leaves investors hungry for more.

Cannasoft - Investment pitch deck

Cannasoft - Investment pitch deck

A hard-hitting investment deck of a publicly traded tech company dedicated to medical cannabis manufacturers.

Start-up pitch deck example

Start-up pitch deck

Our top-performing pitch deck design helping you cut through the noise and really grab the attention of investors and VCs.

Tech deck example

Designed primarily for technological companies. Slide designs offer plenty of data visualization options to illustrate all important business metrics and KPIs.

Basic pitch deck example

Basic pitch deck

With slide designs for all "typical" of pitch deck components —company intro, solutions, timelines, competitors, and SWOT analyses—you can use this template to create your master deck to later build from.

Creative pitch deck example

Creative pitch deck

This fun template for a pitch deck will work best for those of you working in creative industries: think advertising, digital marketing or PR. It features fun, bright colors and a fully interactive layout.

Make an instant impact with a concise one-pager that distills your key message into a powerful and easily digestible format.

Octopai - Outbound sales one-pager

Octopai - Outbound sales one-pager

An outbound one-pager identifying a problem in modern-day analytics and offering an easy-to-grasp solution.

nSure - Interactive cyber one-pager

nSure - Interactive cyber one-pager

An interactive cyber one-pager making a highly-complex AI fraud protection solution feel simple and accessible.

Yotpo - SaaS product one-pager

Yotpo - SaaS product one-pager

A SaaS product one-pager delivered as an interactive story with immersive visuals, animation, and live data.

Sales one-pager example

Sales one-pager

With this sales one-pager, you'll easily convey your features, benefits and, most importantly, your unique value proposition. A go-to template for B2B sales teams.

Company intro brochure example

Company intro one-pager

A very simple, yet very effective one-pager template for general "About us" company deck. The colors are eye-catching while not too aggressive, the layout and modern fonts add up to a very contemporary look.

Sales deck presentations

Win over your prospects with a persuasive sales deck that highlights your product's unique selling points and irresistible value.

Deliveright - Logistics sales deck

Deliveright - Logistics sales deck

Engaging logistics sales deck using storytelling to showcase white glove delivery and process optimization.

Orbiit - Visually narrated sales deck

Orbiit - Visually narrated sales deck

Visually narrated sales deck of a virtual networking platform telling AND showing readers what's in it for them.

Sales pitch deck example

Sales pitch deck

With this one, you'll easily convey your product features, benefits and, most importantly, your unique value proposition. A go-to template for sales teams.

Short pitch deck example

Short sales pitch deck

Simple and super easy to fill out, this template will work like a charm for a short pitch deck. Slide layouts guide the approach to content so you'll easily squeeze in more value in fewer slides.

Real estate deck example

Real estate sales deck

A highly visual template to make your real estate business shine. Strategically-placed image placeholders will help you tell a beautiful story.

Product marketing presentations

Ignite excitement around your new product or feature with a presentation that showcases its benefits and makes it irresistible.

Mayku - Physical product deck

Mayku - Physical product deck

A welcoming physical product deck for immersive introduction to a revolutionary vacuum-forming solution.

Matics - Digital product brochure

Matics - Digital product brochure

A product brochure showing smart manufacturing execution systems on a mission to digitalize production floors.

Galor - Personalized product sales deck

Galor - Personalized product sales deck

A highly-converting product sales deck with a modern design, interactive narrated content, and an integrated chatbot.

Physical product sales deck example

Physical product sales deck

Use this template to talk about your product and finally do it justice! Use visuals to easily present all the features and use cases for your product. Show how it can solve your prospects' problems.

SaaS product deck example

SaaS product sales deck

Use this presentation template to make even the most complex SaaS solutions exciting and easy to grasp.

Education and academic presentations

Enlighten minds and spark curiosity with an engaging educational presentation that simplifies complex concepts and fosters deep understanding.

Interactive CV example

Interactive CV

The perfect template for creating a modern, stylish and professional resume that will help you stand out from the competition. Your information, education, and experiences can be easily added using the editor.

Interactive cover letter example

Interactive cover letter

Introducing an interactive cover letter template designed to highlight your unique strengths and experiences. With an easy-to-use editor, you can personalize your introduction, showcase your relevant skills, and narrate your career journey. Engage potential employers with a dynamic, polished presentation that elevates you above the crowd.

Research proposal example

Research proposal

This school research presentation template is perfect for students who need to present their findings from a research project. The template includes space for a title, introduction, main body, conclusion, and bibliography.

Academic case study example

Academic case study

Want to tell the story of your educational institution, a specific curriculum, or a research project? Use this clean and minimalist academic case study template to make sure your message sticks.

Business proposal presentations

A business proposal presentation is like a romantic proposal - it's all about convincing your prospect that you're the right choice for them and getting them to seal the deal.

RFKeeper - Retail proposal deck

RFKeeper - Retail proposal deck

A dynamic, highly visual proposal deck for a retail software provider, designed to grab and keep attention.

Wisestamp - Personalized proposal deck

Wisestamp - Personalized proposal deck

Proposal deck automatically personalized at scale helped boost win rates for a leading email signature manager.

General business proposal example

General business proposal template

An all-purpose proposal template, guaranteed to make an immediate impact. Easy to tweak to match your specific needs.

Consulting proposal example

Consulting proposal template

Visually highlight the pain point and quickly show that your skills and experience make you the best fit for the project.

Sales proposal example

Sales proposal template

A template designed to grab and keep attention. Use it to convince your client's boss that you're worth the splurge.

Sports sponsorship proposals

A sports sponsorship proposal is your chance to show potential sponsors how they can be a part of your team's winning journey and create a mutually beneficial partnership.

Football sponsorship proposal example

Football sponsorship proposal

This bright and energetic template reflects the dynamic nature of sports. With a combination of text-based and interactive slides, you'll easily convey the history of your organization, as well as the team's main drivers and objectives, to make sponsors instantly realize the value for their money.

Racing sponsorship proposal example

Racing sponsorship proposal

With this powerful template, you'll instantly become the frontrunner in the fundraising race. Equipped with a combination of text-based and interactive slides, it has all it takes to present your team and convince sponsors why they should get in on the action.

Athlete sponsorship proposal example

Athlete sponsorship proposal

This dynamic template will give you a finishing kick to get ahead of your competition. A variety of interactive slides will allow you to tell a compelling story that will convince potential sponsors to pick up the pace and invest in you.

Boxing sponsorship proposal example

Boxing sponsorship proposal

Are you ready to rumble? With this high-performance template, you'll knock out your competitors and become a fundraising champion. You can use a variety of image and video placeholders to tell your story in a captivating way and get sponsors in your corner.

Hockey sponsorship proposal example

Hockey sponsorship proposal

Packed with numerous image and video placeholders and optimized for storytelling, this template will work like an extra member of your team to convince sponsors about the value you bring to the rink.

White papers

White papers give you a chance to establish your expertise and thought leadership by delving deep into a problem and presenting a well-researched, innovative solution.

Drive - Automotive research white-paper

Drive - Automotive research white-paper

A white-paper showing high-level research on electric vehicle charging wrapped in a stunning interactive experience.

Corporate report example

Corporate Report template

Create an easy-to-follow corporate report.

Impact report example

Impact Report template

A template designed with longer pieces of business content in mind. Show your company's impact.

Case studies

Showcase your success stories with a case study presentation that highlights your customers' transformation and the impact of your product or service.

Boom25 - Interactive case study deck

Boom25 - Interactive case study deck

Fun, engaging, and interactive case study of a UK cashback service: mixing business with entertainment.

UX case study example

UX Case study

This template for case studies in UX and UI comes with tons of space for text and many visual elements such as charts, timelines, or graphs. This one is perfect for those case studies in which you need to explain the process in greater detail.

Public relations case study example

Public relations case study

Show the scope of work done for your client to boost their reputation and raise brand awareness. PR is all about telling stories so you get text placeholders with this template. Not to worry though, there's a slide for quantitative summary, too!

Case study simple example

Case study simple

White glove delivery with a focus on process optimization explained by a compelling story.

Marketing case study example

Marketing case study

Business plan presentations.

Chart the course to success with a business plan presentation that clearly outlines your company's strategy, goals, and roadmap for the future.

Fashion Business Plan example

Fashion Business Plan

In trend-led, highly competitive industries such as fashion, innovative solutions are key to stay ahead of the competition. With a wide variety of interactive visual slides, you'll be able to add another outstanding design to your latest collection.

General business plan example

General Business Plan

This template has everything you need to create a visual summary of your business idea. Thanks to a range of interactive slides, you'll be able to convey your vision in a way that impresses investors and gets you the necessary buy-in.

Startup business plan example

Startup Business Plan

This fresh, youthful template will act as a launchpad for your newest business venture. With a variety of interactive elements available in a mix of toned-down and vibrant colors, it will set you apart in the eyes of potential investors.

Business plan one-pager example

Business Plan One-pager

Simple and easy to customize, this template will help you present your business idea in a clear and concise way. With several data visualization elements to choose from, you can display all the key numbers to make investors instantly understand your vision.

Strategic business plan example

Strategic Business Plan

This classic template is perfect for guiding your audience through your main objectives as well as the action plan of how you are going to get there. Optimized for engagement, it will help ensure that everyone is on the same page regarding the strategic direction of your company.

Best presentation content examples

The secret sauce for a presentation that leaves a lasting impression lies in delivering your content within a story framework.

3 presentation content examples that captivate and inspire the audience:

1. Inspirational story:

An emotional, relatable story can move hearts and change minds. Share a personal anecdote, a customer success story, or an account of overcoming adversity to create a deep connection with your audience.

Remember, vulnerability and authenticity can be your greatest assets.

2. Mystery - Gap theory:

Keep your audience on the edge of their seats by building suspense through the gap theory. Start by presenting a problem, a puzzle, or a question that leaves them craving the answer. Gradually reveal the solution, creating anticipation and excitement as you guide them through the resolution.

3. The Hero's Journey:

Transform your presentation into an epic adventure by incorporating the classic hero's journey narrative.

Introduce a "hero" (your audience), and introduce yourself or your company as a “guide” that will take them on a transformative journey filled with challenges, lessons, and triumphs.

This powerful storytelling structure helps your audience relate to your message and stay engaged from start to finish.

Here’s a great video on how to structure an effective sales story:

How to structure a

Best presentation document formats

Selecting the right format for your presentation plays a huge part in getting or losing engagement. Let's explore popular presentation document formats, each with its own unique advantages and disadvantages.

PowerPoint : Microsoft's PowerPoint is a tried-and-true classic, offering a wide array of design options and features for crafting visually appealing static presentations.

Google Slides : For seamless collaboration and real-time editing, Google Slides is the go-to choice. This cloud-based platform allows you to create static presentations that are accessible from anywhere.

Keynote : Apple's Keynote offers a sleek, user-friendly interface and stunning design templates, making it a popular choice for crafting polished static presentations on Mac devices.

PDF: PDF is ideal for sharing static presentations that preserve their original layout, design, and fonts across different devices and operating systems.

Prezi : Break free from traditional slide-based presentations with Prezi's dynamic, zoomable canvas. Prezi allows you to create interactive decks, but it follows a non-chronological presentation format, so it may take some time to get the hang of it.

Storydoc : Elevate your presentations with Storydoc's interactive, web-based format. Transform your static content into immersive, visually rich experiences that captivate and inspire your audience.

Best tool to create a perfect presentation

There are countless presentation software options. From legacy tools like PowerPoint or Google Slides to more modern design tools such as Pitch or Canva.

If you want to create pretty presentations any of these tools would do just fine. But if you want to create unforgettable, interactive experiences , you may want to consider using an interactive presentation maker instead.

One in particular - Storydoc :). Use it to effortlessly transform your static content into immersive, visually rich presentations that will captivate and inspire your audience .

Plus, we specialize in storytelling. In Storydoc you can find special storytelling slides built to help you weave your content into a compelling narrative.

You can do better than “pretty” - you can make a presentation that involves your audience and leaves a lasting impression.

Storydoc presentation make

Grab a template to create your best presentation to date

Crafting an effective presentation can feel like climbing a mountain, but it doesn't have to. With interactive presentation templates , you can fast-track your way to success and leave your audience in awe.

Grab a template and create the best presentation of your career in a fraction of the time.

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Hi, I'm Dominika, Content Specialist at Storydoc. As a creative professional with experience in fashion, I'm here to show you how to amplify your brand message through the power of storytelling and eye-catching visuals.

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Blog Graphic Design

15 Effective Visual Presentation Tips To Wow Your Audience

By Krystle Wong , Sep 28, 2023

Visual Presentation Tips

So, you’re gearing up for that big presentation and you want it to be more than just another snooze-fest with slides. You want it to be engaging, memorable and downright impressive. 

Well, you’ve come to the right place — I’ve got some slick tips on how to create a visual presentation that’ll take your presentation game up a notch. 

Packed with presentation templates that are easily customizable, keep reading this blog post to learn the secret sauce behind crafting presentations that captivate, inform and remain etched in the memory of your audience.

Click to jump ahead:

What is a visual presentation & why is it important?

15 effective tips to make your visual presentations more engaging, 6 major types of visual presentation you should know , what are some common mistakes to avoid in visual presentations, visual presentation faqs, 5 steps to create a visual presentation with venngage.

A visual presentation is a communication method that utilizes visual elements such as images, graphics, charts, slides and other visual aids to convey information, ideas or messages to an audience. 

Visual presentations aim to enhance comprehension engagement and the overall impact of the message through the strategic use of visuals. People remember what they see, making your point last longer in their heads. 

Without further ado, let’s jump right into some great visual presentation examples that would do a great job in keeping your audience interested and getting your point across.

In today’s fast-paced world, where information is constantly bombarding our senses, creating engaging visual presentations has never been more crucial. To help you design a presentation that’ll leave a lasting impression, I’ve compiled these examples of visual presentations that will elevate your game.

1. Use the rule of thirds for layout

Ever heard of the rule of thirds? It’s a presentation layout trick that can instantly up your slide game. Imagine dividing your slide into a 3×3 grid and then placing your text and visuals at the intersection points or along the lines. This simple tweak creates a balanced and seriously pleasing layout that’ll draw everyone’s eyes.

2. Get creative with visual metaphors

Got a complex idea to explain? Skip the jargon and use visual metaphors. Throw in images that symbolize your point – for example, using a road map to show your journey towards a goal or using metaphors to represent answer choices or progress indicators in an interactive quiz or poll.

3. Visualize your data with charts and graphs

The right data visualization tools not only make content more appealing but also aid comprehension and retention. Choosing the right visual presentation for your data is all about finding a good match. 

For ordinal data, where things have a clear order, consider using ordered bar charts or dot plots. When it comes to nominal data, where categories are on an equal footing, stick with the classics like bar charts, pie charts or simple frequency tables. And for interval-ratio data, where there’s a meaningful order, go for histograms, line graphs, scatterplots or box plots to help your data shine.

In an increasingly visual world, effective visual communication is a valuable skill for conveying messages. Here’s a guide on how to use visual communication to engage your audience while avoiding information overload.

effective presentation format

4. Employ the power of contrast

Want your important stuff to pop? That’s where contrast comes in. Mix things up with contrasting colors, fonts or shapes. It’s like highlighting your key points with a neon marker – an instant attention grabber.

5. Tell a visual story

Structure your slides like a storybook and create a visual narrative by arranging your slides in a way that tells a story. Each slide should flow into the next, creating a visual narrative that keeps your audience hooked till the very end.

Icons and images are essential for adding visual appeal and clarity to your presentation. Venngage provides a vast library of icons and images, allowing you to choose visuals that resonate with your audience and complement your message. 

effective presentation format

6. Show the “before and after” magic

Want to drive home the impact of your message or solution? Whip out the “before and after” technique. Show the current state (before) and the desired state (after) in a visual way. It’s like showing a makeover transformation, but for your ideas.

7. Add fun with visual quizzes and polls

To break the monotony and see if your audience is still with you, throw in some quick quizzes or polls. It’s like a mini-game break in your presentation — your audience gets involved and it makes your presentation way more dynamic and memorable.

8. End with a powerful visual punch

Your presentation closing should be a showstopper. Think a stunning clip art that wraps up your message with a visual bow, a killer quote that lingers in minds or a call to action that gets hearts racing.

effective presentation format

9. Engage with storytelling through data

Use storytelling magic to bring your data to life. Don’t just throw numbers at your audience—explain what they mean, why they matter and add a bit of human touch. Turn those stats into relatable tales and watch your audience’s eyes light up with understanding.

effective presentation format

10. Use visuals wisely

Your visuals are the secret sauce of a great presentation. Cherry-pick high-quality images, graphics, charts and videos that not only look good but also align with your message’s vibe. Each visual should have a purpose – they’re not just there for decoration. 

11. Utilize visual hierarchy

Employ design principles like contrast, alignment and proximity to make your key info stand out. Play around with fonts, colors and placement to make sure your audience can’t miss the important stuff.

12. Engage with multimedia

Static slides are so last year. Give your presentation some sizzle by tossing in multimedia elements. Think short video clips, animations or a touch of sound when it makes sense. But remember, these are sidekicks, not the main act, so use them smartly.

13. Interact with your audience

Turn your presentation into a two-way street. Start your presentation by encouraging your audience to join in with thought-provoking questions, quick polls or using interactive tools. Get them chatting and watch your presentation come alive.

effective presentation format

When it comes to delivering a group presentation, it’s important to have everyone on the team on the same page. Venngage’s real-time collaboration tools enable you and your team to work together seamlessly, regardless of geographical locations. Collaborators can provide input, make edits and offer suggestions in real time. 

14. Incorporate stories and examples

Weave in relatable stories, personal anecdotes or real-life examples to illustrate your points. It’s like adding a dash of spice to your content – it becomes more memorable and relatable.

15. Nail that delivery

Don’t just stand there and recite facts like a robot — be a confident and engaging presenter. Lock eyes with your audience, mix up your tone and pace and use some gestures to drive your points home. Practice and brush up your presentation skills until you’ve got it down pat for a persuasive presentation that flows like a pro.

Venngage offers a wide selection of professionally designed presentation templates, each tailored for different purposes and styles. By choosing a template that aligns with your content and goals, you can create a visually cohesive and polished presentation that captivates your audience.

Looking for more presentation ideas ? Why not try using a presentation software that will take your presentations to the next level with a combination of user-friendly interfaces, stunning visuals, collaboration features and innovative functionalities that will take your presentations to the next level. 

Visual presentations come in various formats, each uniquely suited to convey information and engage audiences effectively. Here are six major types of visual presentations that you should be familiar with:

1. Slideshows or PowerPoint presentations

Slideshows are one of the most common forms of visual presentations. They typically consist of a series of slides containing text, images, charts, graphs and other visual elements. Slideshows are used for various purposes, including business presentations, educational lectures and conference talks.

effective presentation format

2. Infographics

Infographics are visual representations of information, data or knowledge. They combine text, images and graphics to convey complex concepts or data in a concise and visually appealing manner. Infographics are often used in marketing, reporting and educational materials.

Don’t worry, they are also super easy to create thanks to Venngage’s fully customizable infographics templates that are professionally designed to bring your information to life. Be sure to try it out for your next visual presentation!

effective presentation format

3. Video presentation

Videos are your dynamic storytellers. Whether it’s pre-recorded or happening in real-time, videos are the showstoppers. You can have interviews, demos, animations or even your own mini-documentary. Video presentations are highly engaging and can be shared in both in-person and virtual presentations .

4. Charts and graphs

Charts and graphs are visual representations of data that make it easier to understand and analyze numerical information. Common types include bar charts, line graphs, pie charts and scatterplots. They are commonly used in scientific research, business reports and academic presentations.

Effective data visualizations are crucial for simplifying complex information and Venngage has got you covered. Venngage’s tools enable you to create engaging charts, graphs,and infographics that enhance audience understanding and retention, leaving a lasting impression in your presentation.

effective presentation format

5. Interactive presentations

Interactive presentations involve audience participation and engagement. These can include interactive polls, quizzes, games and multimedia elements that allow the audience to actively participate in the presentation. Interactive presentations are often used in workshops, training sessions and webinars.

Venngage’s interactive presentation tools enable you to create immersive experiences that leave a lasting impact and enhance audience retention. By incorporating features like clickable elements, quizzes and embedded multimedia, you can captivate your audience’s attention and encourage active participation.

6. Poster presentations

Poster presentations are the stars of the academic and research scene. They consist of a large poster that includes text, images and graphics to communicate research findings or project details and are usually used at conferences and exhibitions. For more poster ideas, browse through Venngage’s gallery of poster templates to inspire your next presentation.

effective presentation format

Different visual presentations aside, different presentation methods also serve a unique purpose, tailored to specific objectives and audiences. Find out which type of presentation works best for the message you are sending across to better capture attention, maintain interest and leave a lasting impression. 

To make a good presentation , it’s crucial to be aware of common mistakes and how to avoid them. Without further ado, let’s explore some of these pitfalls along with valuable insights on how to sidestep them.

Overloading slides with text

Text heavy slides can be like trying to swallow a whole sandwich in one bite – overwhelming and unappetizing. Instead, opt for concise sentences and bullet points to keep your slides simple. Visuals can help convey your message in a more engaging way.

Using low-quality visuals

Grainy images and pixelated charts are the equivalent of a scratchy vinyl record at a DJ party. High-resolution visuals are your ticket to professionalism. Ensure that the images, charts and graphics you use are clear, relevant and sharp.

Choosing the right visuals for presentations is important. To find great visuals for your visual presentation, Browse Venngage’s extensive library of high-quality stock photos. These images can help you convey your message effectively, evoke emotions and create a visually pleasing narrative. 

Ignoring design consistency

Imagine a book with every chapter in a different font and color – it’s a visual mess. Consistency in fonts, colors and formatting throughout your presentation is key to a polished and professional look.

Reading directly from slides

Reading your slides word-for-word is like inviting your audience to a one-person audiobook session. Slides should complement your speech, not replace it. Use them as visual aids, offering key points and visuals to support your narrative.

Lack of visual hierarchy

Neglecting visual hierarchy is like trying to find Waldo in a crowd of clones. Use size, color and positioning to emphasize what’s most important. Guide your audience’s attention to key points so they don’t miss the forest for the trees.

Ignoring accessibility

Accessibility isn’t an option these days; it’s a must. Forgetting alt text for images, color contrast and closed captions for videos can exclude individuals with disabilities from understanding your presentation. 

Relying too heavily on animation

While animations can add pizzazz and draw attention, overdoing it can overshadow your message. Use animations sparingly and with purpose to enhance, not detract from your content.

Using jargon and complex language

Keep it simple. Use plain language and explain terms when needed. You want your message to resonate, not leave people scratching their heads.

Not testing interactive elements

Interactive elements can be the life of your whole presentation, but not testing them beforehand is like jumping into a pool without checking if there’s water. Ensure that all interactive features, from live polls to multimedia content, work seamlessly. A smooth experience keeps your audience engaged and avoids those awkward technical hiccups.

Presenting complex data and information in a clear and visually appealing way has never been easier with Venngage. Build professional-looking designs with our free visual chart slide templates for your next presentation.

What software or tools can I use to create visual presentations?

You can use various software and tools to create visual presentations, including Microsoft PowerPoint, Google Slides, Adobe Illustrator, Canva, Prezi and Venngage, among others.

What is the difference between a visual presentation and a written report?

The main difference between a visual presentation and a written report is the medium of communication. Visual presentations rely on visuals, such as slides, charts and images to convey information quickly, while written reports use text to provide detailed information in a linear format.

How do I effectively communicate data through visual presentations?

To effectively communicate data through visual presentations, simplify complex data into easily digestible charts and graphs, use clear labels and titles and ensure that your visuals support the key messages you want to convey.

Are there any accessibility considerations for visual presentations?

Accessibility considerations for visual presentations include providing alt text for images, ensuring good color contrast, using readable fonts and providing transcripts or captions for multimedia content to make the presentation inclusive.

Most design tools today make accessibility hard but Venngage’s Accessibility Design Tool comes with accessibility features baked in, including accessible-friendly and inclusive icons.

How do I choose the right visuals for my presentation?

Choose visuals that align with your content and message. Use charts for data, images for illustrating concepts, icons for emphasis and color to evoke emotions or convey themes.

What is the role of storytelling in visual presentations?

Storytelling plays a crucial role in visual presentations by providing a narrative structure that engages the audience, helps them relate to the content and makes the information more memorable.

How can I adapt my visual presentations for online or virtual audiences?

To adapt visual presentations for online or virtual audiences, focus on concise content, use engaging visuals, ensure clear audio, encourage audience interaction through chat or polls and rehearse for a smooth online delivery.

What is the role of data visualization in visual presentations?

Data visualization in visual presentations simplifies complex data by using charts, graphs and diagrams, making it easier for the audience to understand and interpret information.

How do I choose the right color scheme and fonts for my visual presentation?

Choose a color scheme that aligns with your content and brand and select fonts that are readable and appropriate for the message you want to convey.

How can I measure the effectiveness of my visual presentation?

Measure the effectiveness of your visual presentation by collecting feedback from the audience, tracking engagement metrics (e.g., click-through rates for online presentations) and evaluating whether the presentation achieved its intended objectives.

Ultimately, creating a memorable visual presentation isn’t just about throwing together pretty slides. It’s about mastering the art of making your message stick, captivating your audience and leaving a mark.

Lucky for you, Venngage simplifies the process of creating great presentations, empowering you to concentrate on delivering a compelling message. Follow the 5 simple steps below to make your entire presentation visually appealing and impactful:

1. Sign up and log In: Log in to your Venngage account or sign up for free and gain access to Venngage’s templates and design tools.

2. Choose a template: Browse through Venngage’s presentation template library and select one that best suits your presentation’s purpose and style. Venngage offers a variety of pre-designed templates for different types of visual presentations, including infographics, reports, posters and more.

3. Edit and customize your template: Replace the placeholder text, image and graphics with your own content and customize the colors, fonts and visual elements to align with your presentation’s theme or your organization’s branding.

4. Add visual elements: Venngage offers a wide range of visual elements, such as icons, illustrations, charts, graphs and images, that you can easily add to your presentation with the user-friendly drag-and-drop editor.

5. Save and export your presentation: Export your presentation in a format that suits your needs and then share it with your audience via email, social media or by embedding it on your website or blog.

So, as you gear up for your next presentation, whether it’s for business, education or pure creative expression, don’t forget to keep these visual presentation ideas in your back pocket.

Feel free to experiment and fine-tune your approach and let your passion and expertise shine through in your presentation. With practice, you’ll not only build presentations but also leave a lasting impact on your audience – one slide at a time.

effective presentation format

Create a template

If you frequently create a certain type of document, such as a monthly report, a sales forecast, or a presentation with a company logo, save it as a template so you can use that as your starting point instead of recreating the file from scratch each time you need it. Start with a document that you already created, a document you downloaded, or a new Microsoft template you customized. 

Save a template

To save a file as a template, click File > Save As .

Double-click Computer or, in Office 2016 programs, double-click This PC .

The Save As window, showing the list of places where you can save a document

Type a name for your template in the File name box.

For a basic template, click the template item in the Save as type list. In Word for example, click Word Template .

Save document as a template

If your document contains macros, click Word Macro-Enabled Template .

Office automatically goes to the Custom Office Templates folder.

Click Save .

Tip:  To change where your application automatically saves your templates, click File > Options > Save and type the folder and path you want to use in the Default personal templates location box. Any new templates you save will be stored in that folder, and when you click File > New > Personal , you'll see the templates in that folder.

Edit your template

To update your template, open the file, make the changes you want, and then save the template.

Click File > Open .

Double-click Computer or This PC .

Browse to the Custom Office Templates folder that’s under My Documents .

Click your template, and click Open .

Make the changes you want, then save and close the template.

Use your template to make a new document

To start a new file based on your template, click File > New > Custom , and click your template.

Link to personal templates

Note:  If you're using Office 2013, this button may say Personal instead of Custom .

Use your templates from earlier versions of Office

If you made templates in an earlier version of Office, you can still use them in Office 2013 and 2016. The first step is to move them into the Custom Office Templates folder so your application can find them. To move your templates quickly, use the Fix it tool .

Save a document as a template

Open the Word document that you want to save as a template.

On the File menu, click Save as Template .

In the Save As box, type the name that you want to use for the new template.

(Optional) In the Where box, choose a location where the template will be saved.

Next to File Format , click Microsoft Word template (.dotx) , or, if your document contains macros, click Microsoft Word Macro-Enabled template (.dotm) .

Unless you select a different location, the template is saved in /Users/ username /Library/Group Containers/UBF8T346G9.Office/User Content/Templates.

To change where Word automatically saves your templates, on the Word menu, click Preferences , and then under Personal Settings , click File Locations . Under File Locations , select User templates from the list, and then click Modify . Type the new folder and path you want to use, and Word will save any new templates in that folder.

Create a new template based on another template

You can customize an existing template to make it even more useful. Add static information to the existing template, and then save the file again (as a template).

On the File menu, click New from Template .

Click a template that is similar to the one you want to create, and then click Create .

Note:  If you can't find a template, you can search for it based on keywords in the Search All Templates box.

Add, delete, or change any text, graphics, or formatting, and make any other changes that you want to appear in all new documents that you base on the template.

Next to File Format , click Microsoft Word template (.dotx) , or, if your template contains macros, click Microsoft Word Macro-Enabled template .

Use your template to create a new document

To start a new document based on your template, on the File menu, click New from Template , and then select the template you want to use.

Delete a template

In the Finder , open /Users/ username /Library/Group Containers/UBF8T346G9.Office/User Content/Templates.

Drag the templates that you want to delete to the Trash.

Create a PowerPoint template

Open a blank presentation, and then on the View tab, click Slide Master .

The slide master is the largest slide image at the top of the slide thumbnail list. Associated layouts are positioned beneath it.

effective presentation format

To make changes to the slide master or layouts, on the Slide Master tab, do any of these:

PowerPoint for Mac Slide Master

To add a colorful theme with special fonts, and effects, click Themes , and pick a theme.

To change the background, click Background Styles , and pick a background.

To add a placeholder for text, picture, chart, and other objects, in the thumbnail pane, click the slide layout that you want to hold the placeholder. From Insert Placeholder , pick the type of placeholder you want to add, and drag to draw the placeholder size.

PowerPoint for Mac Insert Placeholder

Save your presentation as a PowerPoint template

Open the presentation that you want to save as a template.

On the File tab, click Save as Template .

Next to File Format , click PowerPoint Template (.potx) , or, if your presentation contains macros, click PowerPoint Macro-Enabled Template (.potm) .

Add, delete, or change any text, graphics, or formatting, and make any other changes that you want to appear in all new presentations that you base on the template.

Next to File Format , click PowerPoint Template (.potx) , or, if your template contains macros, click PowerPoint Macro-Enabled Template (.potm) .

Use your template to create a new presentation

To start a new presentation based on a template, on the File menu, click New from Template , and then select the template you want to use.

Save a workbook or sheet as a template

Open the workbook that you want to save as a template.

Next to File Format , click Excel Template (.xltx) , or, if your workbook contains macros, click Excel Macro-Enabled Template (.xltm) .

Add, delete, or change any content, graphics, or formatting, and make any other changes that you want to appear in all new workbooks that you base on the template.

Next to File Format , click Excel Template (.xltx) , or, if your template contains macros, click Excel Macro-Enabled Template (.xltm) .

In the Save As box, Word template is highlighted

Use your template to create a new workbook

To start a new workbook based on a template, on the File menu, click New from Template , and then select the template you want to use.

Differences between templates, themes, and Word styles

Open the document.

On the File menu, click Save As .

On the Format pop-up menu, click Word Template (.dotx) .

In the Save As box, type the name that you want to use for the new template, and then click Save .

Unless you select a different location, the template is saved in /Users/ username /Library/Application Support/Microsoft/Office/User Templates/My Templates.

On the File menu, click Close.

To organize templates, use the Finder to create a new folder in /Users/ username /Library/Application Support/Microsoft/Office/User Templates/My Templates, and then save your template in the new folder. 

Note:  If you are using Mac OS X 7 (Lion), the Library folder is hidden by default. To show the Library folder, in the Finder, click the Go menu, and then hold down OPTION.

In the left navigation pane, under TEMPLATES , click All .

Note:  If you can't find a template, you can search for it based on keywords in the Search box.

Click a template that is similar to the one that you want to create, and then click Choose .

Use a template to create a new document

In the left navigation pane, under TEMPLATES , click My Templates .

Note:  If you created folders to organize your templates, the folders are displayed under My Templates . You need to click the folder to see the templates.

Click the template that you created, and then click Choose .

Delete a template from My Templates

In the Finder , open /Users/ username /Library/Application Support/Microsoft/Office/User Templates/My Templates.

Note:  If you are using Mac OS X 7 (Lion), the Library folder is hidden by default. To show the Library folder, in the Finder, click the Go menu, and then hold down OPTION .

Save a presentation as a template

Open the presentation that you want to create the new template from.

On the Format pop-up menu, click PowerPoint Template (.potx) .

Note:  If you can't find a template, you can search for a template based on keywords in the Search box.

If you want to make one change to replicate it in several slide layouts, rather than changing each layout or slide individually, you can edit slide masters.

Use a template to create a new presentation

In the right navigation pane, you can select the colors, font, and slide size for the template.

Open the workbook that you want to create the new template from.

On the Format pop-up menu, click Excel Template (.xltx) .

Use a template to create a new workbook

Modify a slide master

Customize how Excel starts in Excel for Mac

If you think of your current document as a template, you can save it with a different name to create a new document that's based on the current one. Whenever you want to create a document like that, you'll open your document in Word for the web, go to File > Save As , and create a document that's a copy of the one you started with.

effective presentation format

On the other hand, if you're thinking of the kind of templates you see by going to File > New , then no: you can't create those in Word for the web.

Instead, do this:

If you have the Word desktop application, use the Open in Word command in Word for the web to open the document in Word on your desktop.

Image of the Open in Desktop App command

From there, create a template. When you go to File > New in the Word desktop application, you'll be able to use your template for new documents. And if you store the documents online, you can edit them in Word for the web.

Microsoft Templates and Themes

Download free, pre-built templates

Free background templates for PowerPoint

Edit templates

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    Overview Overview of presentation writing. What Is A Presentation? Presentations are all about connecting with your audience. Presenting is a fantastic way to share information, ideas, or arguments with your audience. Think of it as a structured approach to effectively convey your message.

  12. How To Give an Effective Presentation

    1. Understand your audience The first rule for delivering an effective presentation is to know the audience you'll be speaking to and to keep them in mind throughout the entire duration of your presentation. Consider your topic from their perspective and think through what information they would need to know for you to achieve the desired result.

  13. How to Make Effective Impactful Presentations (Tips & Tools)

    Start with a surprising statement, a bold promise, or a mystery. Provide context with a bit of background information. Structure your presentation within a story framework. Make every word count, and use as few as possible. Use visuals only to support your presentation text. Use interactive design to make your audience active participants.

  14. Top Tips for Effective Presentations

    1. Show your Passion and Connect with your Audience It's hard to be relaxed and be yourself when you're nervous. But time and again, the great presenters say that the most important thing is to connect with your audience, and the best way to do that is to let your passion for the subject shine through.

  15. How to Give a Killer Presentation

    Frame your story (figure out where to start and where to end). Plan your delivery (decide whether to memorize your speech word for word or develop bullet points and then rehearse it—over and ...

  16. Presentation Format: How To Make An Outstanding ...

    1/ The linear format The linear format is one of the most common and straightforward presentation formats. In this format, the presenter follows a sequential progression, presenting the content in a logical order that is easy for the audience to follow.

  17. 25 PowerPoint Presentation Tips For Good PPT Slides in 2022

    The Neo PowerPoint template features a modern and bold design and includes five color variations to get you started. Along with this, you'll also get 10 master slides and 30 individual slides for all your presentation needs. 2. Vexana PowerPoint Template. The Vexana template is a great choice for brands that need a touch of elegance.

  18. How to Structure your Presentation, with Examples

    What setting you are in Your ability to use any kinds of visual assistance Before choosing the presentation's structure answer these questions first: What is your presentation's aim? Who are the audience? What are the main points your audience should remember afterwards?

  19. How To Create an Effective Presentation Outline

    Follow these steps when creating an outline for your presentation: 1. Consider the purpose of your presentation. When creating a presentation outline, determine your goal. To find this, think about what you want your audience to obtain or support after your discussion. For example, a nonprofit that builds wells for impoverished communities may ...

  20. 10+ Types of Effective Presentation Styles (Top Methods for 2022)

    Koba PowerPoint Presentation template comes with over 100 unique slides. Icons, infographics and mockup devices are included with this template package. The Koba PowerPoint Presentation is a flexible template. Use it for many different presentation purposes. Now, let's dive into our look at effective presentation styles.

  21. Complete Guide for Effective Presentations, with Examples

    Tips for an Effective Presentation. Professional public speakers spend hours creating and practicing presentations. These are the delivery techniques they consider: Keep it simple. You shouldn't overwhelm your audience with information - ensure that you're clear, concise and that you get to the point so they can understand your message.

  22. 52 Perfect Presentation Examples to Set You Apart (2023)

    Short answer What makes a good presentation? A good presentation tells an engaging story, establishes credibility, and allows audience interaction. It should pose an intriguing question and guide the audience to its resolution.

  23. 15 Effective Visual Presentation Tips To Wow Your Audience

    7. Add fun with visual quizzes and polls. To break the monotony and see if your audience is still with you, throw in some quick quizzes or polls. It's like a mini-game break in your presentation — your audience gets involved and it makes your presentation way more dynamic and memorable. 8.

  24. Create a template

    Double-click Computer or, in Office 2016 programs, double-click This PC. Type a name for your template in the File name box. For a basic template, click the template item in the Save as type list. In Word for example, click Word Template. If your document contains macros, click Word Macro-Enabled Template.